UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 3, 2014

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126224.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126224.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126224-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126224-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126224-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126224-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126224-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126224-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126224-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126224.ris

Full Text

Array STROKING SINCE 1918
After many months of
delay, the Compass
Card is finally coming to
a wallet near you in 2015
FOOTBALL
"ON FINISHED
rds end season not
_ but with a whimper,
issing playoffs
CONSTRUCTION
New rec facilities include the
soccerfield house built in
partnership with the Whitecaps
HALLOWEEN
HORROR
A UBC student argues t'
don't nee "
Eve as // Page 2
EVENTS        V THISWEEK, CHECK!
WEDNESDAY ' 5
UBC FEE INCREASE TOWN HALL
4:00 P.M. @ NORM THEATRE IN THE SUB
UBC is hosting the third (and final planned) Town Hall on the proposed
tuition and housing fee increases. Get educated on the proposed changes
and present your feedback to university decision-makers. Free
THURSDAY '6
WHAT DRIVES US TO DRINK?
THURSDAY 12:30 P.M. @ LSK200
This Integrated Sciences talk by Andrew Haack explores the neurological
reasons for why we are driven to drink alcohol. Free
TUES-FRI    ' 4-7
FLU SHOTS
NOVEMBER 4-7,8:30 A.M. 4:00 PM. @ VARIOUS LOCATIONS AT UBC
As part of their Influenza Immunization Program, UBC is offering influenza
vaccinations to U BC staff, students and faculty. Help protect yourself and
others against end-of-term illness. More dates online. Free; register online
ON
THE
COVER
As tough as it was to make it
stay still, we managed to get a
good shot.
-Photo Cherihan Hassun
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*<-
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
\JOVEMBER3,2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXX
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Copy Editor
Matalie Scadden. a Pentland.
Business Manager
Editorial Office: SUB 24
Will McDonald
Ciaran Dougherty
FerniePereira
604.822.2301
coord i n ati n g @ u byss eyes
Design Editor
:opy@ubyssey.cs
Distribution Coordinator
Soren Elsay, Olamide Olaniyan.
_awrenceNeal Garcia,Taric
Vira, Kelley Lin, Jenny Tang,
_eoSoh, Mateo Ospina, Li
fpe reira@ubyssey.es
Ad Sales
Business Office: SUB 23
ADVERTISING 604.822.1654
Nick Adams
Lily Cai
Geoff Lister
NQUIRIES604.S22.66S1
pri nted i tor@ ubys sey.cs
cai@ubyssey.cs
Zhang, Brock Newman, Koby
advertising@ubyssey.es
Student Union Building
Web Developer
Illustrator
Vlichaels
Accounts
613S SUB Boulevard
Peter Siemens
Julian Yu
Thea Simpson
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
web@ubyssey.cs
julianyu@ubyssey.c=
a ccou nts@ u byss ey.es
Online: ubyssey.ca
News Editors
Twitter: ©ubyssey
JovanaVranic +
Veronika Bondarenko
LEGAL
news@ubyssey.cs
The Ubyssey is the officia
cannot be reproduced without
and clarity. All letters must be
student newspaper of theUni ver
the expressed, written permis
•ecelved by 12 neon the day be
Culture Editor
sify of British Columbia. It is pub-
sion of The Ubyssey Publica
fore Intended publication. Let
Jenica Montgomery
idled every Monday and Thurs
tions Society
ters received after this point
culture@ubyssey.cs
day by The U by ssey Publications
The Ubyssey is a founding
Jill te published In the follow
Society. We aie an autonomous.
member of Canadl;
ing Issueunlesstherelsan ur
Sports* Rec Editor
derrcciatlcally run student crga
ty Press(CUP)andadherestc
gent time restriction or other
JackHauen
nlzatlon.andallstudentsapeen-
CUFsguiding principles
matter deemed relevant by
spoits@ubyssey.cs
cou raged to participate
_etters to the editor must
the Ubyssey staff.
Editorials are chosen anc
oe under 300 words. Please
t Isagreed byall persons
Video Producer
iwltten by theUbysse/staff They
nclude your phone number.
■lacing display or dasslf led ad-
TimHoggan
areth -   ■■    -
ertlslrgthatlftheUbyssayPub-
video@ubyssey.cs
staff;-        ■ :■-:-   .v     -
:at Ions Society falls to publish
fleet the views ot 1 he Ubyssey
vvell as your year and faculty
anadvertlsernentcnfanerronn
Photo Editor
Publications Scciety or the Uni
with all submissions. ID will be
the ad occursthe liability ofthe
Cherihan Hassun
versity of British Columbia. AI
checked when submissions are
JPS wil not begreater than the
photo® ubyssey.c;
Editorial content appearing ir
drepped effatt heed Iter el office
once paid for the ad. The UPS
The Ubyssey is the property of
of The Ubyssey other wise ver-
shall rot te responsible for dlght
Opinions + Blog Editor
The U b/ssey Rj b! cation sSCoety
f leaf Ion will be done by phone
changes or ty peg ra phlca 1 er lors
Stories, opinions, photographs
The Ubyssey reservesthe right
that do not lessen the value or
and artwork contained herelr
to edit submissions for length
the Impact of the ad.
aerhardt@ubyssey.ca
OUR CAMPUS//
ONEONONE^
_EANDBUILDINGSTHAT
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Julio Montaner is a world-famous HIV/AIDS researcher, UBC prof and physician at St. Paul's Hospital.
HIV/AIDS researcher Julio Montaner is a real-life superhero
Leo Soh
Staff writer
If the number of lives one saved
determined your membership
in the Justice League, Dr. Julio
Montaner would be the real-life equivalent of Superman.
Regarded as one ofthe foremost
researchers in HIV/AIDS, Montaner will surely be regarded as
a Canadian hero by future generations. His recent nomination
to the Canadian Medical Hall of
Fame bears witness to his legacy.
Now a renowned expert in the
field of HIV/AIDS and a celebrity in medical circles, Montaner
feels his connection to the field
of medicine was present from
birth. Both of his parents were
prominent academics, his father
a pulmonary expert and his
mother a botanist.
"There was never a discussion
that we [all seven siblings] would
pursue some sort of academic careers, but all seven of us
did — seven out of seven — a
pretty good rounding average,"
Montaner said.
Montaner knew from an early
age that he wanted to pursue
medicine, and would accompany his father on door-to-door
visits and Saturday rounds at the
hospital. Although not an exceptional student throughout grade
school and even his undergraduate degree, Montaner had a clear
goal: medical school.
"I did the minimum I had to
do to get by, but the truth was
I didn't like half the stuff I had
to do," Montaner said. "The
moment I walked into medical
school, it was perfectly clear
to me that I was doing what I
wanted."
Shortly after graduating, Montaner realized that his potential
for making change was limited
in Argentina's "complicated"
medical system, and that he
would have to move elsewhere to
make the greatest impact.
Montaner attended a conference in Uruguay where he first
met James Hogg, then a professor of medicine at UBC. Hogg's
prompt invitation to work with
him caught Montaner off guard,
but on the next day, upon the
advice of his father's colleagues,
Montaner approached Hogg and
expressed his desire to work
with him.
Before long, Montaner was
working at St. Paul's Hospital
in Vancouver. Hogg became his
mentor and convinced him, year
after year, to stay in Vancouver. Eventually, he joined the
residency program, led by UBC
prof (now emeritus) John Ruedy,
and in time was appointed head
resident. At this time, AIDS was
emerging as an epidemic.
Montaner was behind much of
the early work for the treatment
and prevention of pneumonia,
the main symptom of HIV/AIDS.
Ruedy came into his office one
Friday and told Montaner that
three ofthe lead AIDS researchers had decided to retire. Three
days later, Montaner was the
head of AIDS research at St.
Paul's Hospital.
We used to have 700
to 800 cases of AIDS
per year diagnosed in
our hospital... now,
we only see a case per
month."
Julio Montaner
HIV/AIDS researcher and UBC
clinical professor of medicine
"[It was] the shortest job interview I ever had," Montaner said.
After considerable research,
Montaner and his team developed a miraculous treatment
for the disease: highly active
antiretroviral therapy (HAART).
This treatment improved the
immune system ofthe patient
while also nullifying the spread
ofthe disease.
The 1996 International AIDS
Conference was held in Vancouver and as the Chair, Montaner was, in his own words, "in
a unique position to use the
conference to educate the world
about this new triple-therapy
approach (HAART)".
12,000 attendees were present
at the conference, and a medley of research manifested new
guidelines, and a new standard
for the treatment of HIV/AIDS.
"Within six months, death
rates from AIDS went from
being huge (11 per 100) to
being down by 60 percent,"
said Montaner.
The challenge then became
reaching those in need, which
Montaner's team did by educating and treating people involved
with commercial sex work and
gay communities.
Montaner's strategy, "Treatment as key to Prevention"
(TasP) could lead to the elimination of AIDS. After a face-to-face
meeting with premier Gordon
Campbell, this was implemented
into the BC health care system.
The success ofthe TasP program
was recognized by the United
Nations and the National Institute of Health (Washington D.C.)
and in 2013, TasP was incorporated into the WHO Consolidated
Antiretroviral Guidelines. It has
been successfully implemented
in various countries around the
world, including China, France,
Panama, Brazil, Spain, Sierra
Leone and Australia.
"We opened an AIDS ward
in the 1990s ... we used to have
700 to 800 cases of AIDS per
year diagnosed in our hospital
... now, we only see a case per
month. When I came up with the
idea for closing the AIDS ward,
it wasn't meant to be that people
with HIV would have nowhere
to go," Montaner said.
"If you are now an HIV-infected person, AIDS should not
be a problem for you ... Since my
patients are now going to lead
a normal life, we can have the
ward address the needs of people
with HIV from a general medical
sense — but it's no longer AIDS!
So I'm out ofthe job."
Though he spends much of
his time away from UBC, this
real-life superhero is a member
of our campus.
"I am a professor at UBC, and
St. Paul's is a university hospital
— clinical work can't be done on
campus, so we do it [here] closer
to the patients. The majority of
my staff here are UBC-affiliated
— we're all professors, and all
my students are actually UBC
students."
It's inspiring that a man of
such stature is a part ofthe UBC
community. His life is a testament to the rewards of hard
work, and serves as an example
for every student: pursue your
dreams, and they could take you
further than you ever imagined
was possible." tJ // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
MONDAY, NC
HEALTH »
Sounding off on the best health and fitness tips
Karolina Kapusta
Contributor
Maintaining one's health can be
a tricky concept for the average
stressed, tired and generally
bogged down student, but there
are some easy steps that can help
you prevent getting sick with the
cold or flu during school.
Joanne Ricci, the senior
instructor at UBC's School of Nursing, said that students often have
a higher risk of getting sick due
to "close studying quarters, high
amounts of time on transit, not eating as well and getting less sleep."
As germs can last anywhere
from 24 to 48 hours on hard
surfaces, Ricci recommends
practicing good hygiene in order
to protect yourself and those
around you.
"Use the cough and cover technique, wash hands frequently and
get vaccinated," said Ricci.
As part of their influenza
awareness campaign, Medicine,
Pharmacy and Nursing students
will be joining together to perform
free flu vaccinations on students,
faculty and staff across the UBC
campus from November 4 to 27.
Ricci also said that making
healthy food choices is an important part of maintaining one's
overall health.
Stress and poor eating habits make students more vulnerable to the flu.
Adam Osuchowski, a third-
year Kinesiology student, said
that opting for nutrient-dense
and unprocessed food as much as
possible has helped him maintain his health while focusing on
his studies.
That said, it can still be tempting to overindulge with junk food
during the winter months.
"To keep from overeating,
try to listen to your body and
ask yourself if you are actually
hungry or if a food craving was
PHOTOTINAFRANKLIN/FLICKR
' said
triggered by something,'
Osuchowski.
Osuchowski recommends
structuring your diet on the
80/20 concept, where you eat
healthy food 80 per cent ofthe
time and indulge in the occa
sional treat. An easy way to start
would be by investing in a simple
juicer or blender and drinking a
green smoothie a couple of times
a week.
"Smoothies are a very efficient
way to get in massive amounts of
nutrients," said Osuchowski.
Fourth-year Sauder student
Konrad Kobielewski said that
while it is often difficult to find
the time to work out, it is also
vital to maintaining one's health
and energy levels during long
study sessions.
"Keeping fit keeps the mind
well lit," said Kobielewski. "It is
difficult to find energy and willpower to exercise every day."
Kobielewski, who recently
finished a 40-day workout challenge, said that physical exercise
is now an essential part of his
daily routine.
"Now that [the challenge] is
over, daily activity has become
a habit, something I need, just
like I used to need fries," said
Kobielewski.
Ricci also said that performing
some type of physical activity
four to five times a week, like
Kobielewski, and regularly
taking the time to relax are good
ways to stay healthy and fight off
infections over time when paired
with a healthy diet. Xi
PROTESTS»
Second Town Hall meets silent demonstration
PHOTO WILLMCDONALDfTHE UBYSSEY
Six student protesters came to silently demonstrate their disapproval of the fee increases at Friday's Town Hall.
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
On Friday, October 31, the UBC
administration held their second
public consultation on the proposed international tuition and
residence fee increases.
Vice Provost and Associate VP
Enrolment and Academic Facilities
Angela Redish, and VP Students
Louise Cowin went over a presentation from the last Town Hall,
held just before the AMS's Annual
General Meeting on October 28.
Halfway through the presentation, six students made their way
to the front ofthe Norm Theatre
to stand in silent demonstration
against the fee increase proposals.
Redish and Cowin ignored the
protesters and carried on with
the presentation.
This was the students' statement on the demonstration:
'Our action today stood in solidarity with students who are already struggling to get by. Those of
us that are already in debt-working, studying, struggling to find
the time to make it to a Town Hall
only to have our voice tokenized by
a university administration who
long ago decided to start treating
students as commodities.
Our next call to action is happening at the final Town Hall. Join
us as we stand in silence, refusing
to participate in an already unequal and unjust system.'
Following the presentation,
the protesters left the room. At
this point, Redish and Cowin
opened the floor to questions
and comments from students
in attendance.
Students who took to the microphone expressed dissatisfaction
about the consultation process, the
lack of detailed information being
made public, and about the fee
increase proposals in general.
AMS President Tanner Bokor, in
particular, made two requests: that
President Arvind Gupta be present
at the next Town Hall consultation, and that the proposals be
pushed back for February's Board
of Governors meeting, with consultations continuing until then.
The next Town Hall will be
held at 4 p.m. on Wednesday,
November 5. tB
Want to write for news?
WE ARE
GAME	
CHANGERS
WORK YOUR DEGREE
WITH A POSTGRAD
EMAIL NEWS@UBYSSEY.CA OR
COME BY OUR EDITORIAL OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS NEWS    I    MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2014
CONSTRUCTION »
New aquatic centre, soccer training facility coming soon
David Nixon
Senior Staff Writer
UBC is moving forward with a new
$40 million Aquatic Centre and a
$22 million soccer training facility
project, in partnership with the
Vancouver Whitecaps.
The current Aquatic Centre
has reached the end of its useful
life, which was the main driver
ofthe new project according to
Kavie Toor, director of facilities
and business development for UBC
Athletics and Recreation.
"We're dealing with an old
infrastructure problem," said Toor,
"but also looking at an opportunity
that existed to vastly improve the
aquatic experience for students and
for the community."
Those improvements include
separate pools, so that the whole
centre won't be shut down when
teams are practicing.
"With this new configuration,
we can have the high performance
team have their own practice and
there will always be a pool open
for students and the community,"
said Toor.
The centre will include three
indoor pools at different temperatures, a 50 metre tank for both
high performance and student use,
a 25 metre recreation-focused tank,
and a 400 square metre warm-
water pool. While set-up ofthe site
is already taking place, construction on the building itself is slated
to begin in early August 2015, and
it is expected to take two years.
There will be a five to 10 per cent
increase on rental rates, but student
drop-in rates will remain free.
The other project that is currently underway is the new $22 million
soccer facility in partnership with
the Vancouver Whitecaps. The
central project in the partnership is
the 35,000 square foot Fieldhouse,
which will include washrooms,
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUWHE UBYSSEY
The new UBC Aquatic Centre is currently in the early stages of its construction at Maclnnes field.
changing rooms, classrooms, multipurpose space, concessions and
kitchens. There are also four fields
that will be built.
"There's a lot of our programs
on our fields at capacity, so with
this we're able to increase the
capacity of fields for all our user
groups, whether they're a minor
soccer league or student inter-
mural leagues," said Toor.
Another key upgrade is
the quality of turf on the
fields, which they've been
able to improve as a result of
the partnership.
Alongside the two projects,
UBC Athletics is conducting surveys to contribute to their master
plan for the next 20 years. The
survey will ask students to allocate
fake money to various recreational
programs in the hopes of assessing
which areas are priorities for students. The surveys will be sent out
near the end of November to 6,000
students, and further information
on getting involved will be posted
on UBC's Athletics website around
the same time.
"One ofthe things we're looking for is what's a good number
of fitness centres' square footage
relevant to student population
base," said Toor. "UBC is way
behind relative to other schools,
and we're hoping through part of
this process to address that."
UBC has also hired a consultant for the master plan on a
fee-per-service basis at a cost of
$7,000 to date.
The master plan draft is expected to be completed by early
January 2015, and go through another month of revisions before
the final copy is approved and
construction can begin. Xi
ELECTIONS »
UBC student liana Shecter running for School Board trustee
Milica Palinic
Contributor
liana Shecter, a fifth-year UBC
student, is running for trustee
ofthe Vancouver School Board
with Vancouver's left-wing political party COPE (Coalition of
Progress Electors) in this year's
municipal elections.
Shecter is an interdisciplinary
studies major who has been at
the forefront of campus activism
at UBC. Last year, shecter ran for
UBC's Board of Governors where
she brought forward issues such
as Divest UBC and environmental responsibility. She has also
been active in trying to create a
safer and more inclusive space
for students in light of last year's
sexual assaults on campus.
Shecter's main platform points
include creating a Students'
Environmental Bill of Rights
that would help the Vancouver
School Board achieve their goal
of making the Board the greenest
in North America. The bill would
be co-created with students,
parents, community members
and people who are interested
in sustainability to bring climate
change, education, mitigation
and adaptability to the K to 12
public education system.
"I think that through a Student's Environmental Bill of
Rights we could talk about things
like reconciliation with First Nations," said Shecter. "We can talk
about consumerism. We can talk
about our resource extraction
economy. We can have a lot of
conversations that are difficult to
have with [young] people in the
public education system."
In addition, Shecter also wants
to be part of COPE's legacy of
standing up for public education by
making sure that the public school
system gets adequate funding from
the provincial government.
Shecter also hopes mobilize
students and parents in order to
help them have a say in the way
their education is framed.
"I think that the Vancouver
School Board is only as powerful
as the parents who really put their
voice behind it," said Shecter.
Through running with COPE,
Shecter is trying to do her part to
bring more social justice to the
city by being part of a team that
believes in grassroots organizing
and people power.
"I think to be part of that
legacy on the Vancouver School
Board, a lot of positive change
can happen," said Shecter.
Though choosing whether or
not to run in the elections was a
tough decision, Shecter said that
the more she learned about COPE
and their platform, the more it
seemed like something she really
wanted to contribute to.
While managing school and
running in the elections is a
balancing act, Shecter said that
taking three courses and having
supportive professors has helped
her go after something that she
feels truly passionate about.
"It's good to keep my eye on
the prize and realize that some
things are bigger than a grade,"
said Shecter. tJ
=ILE PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGEfTHE UBYSSEY
liana Shecter is running for trustee of the Vancouver School Board with (COPE).
Shecter's platform can "be found at cope.bc.ca/ilana.
U-PASS»
Compass Card
slated to replace
U-Pass in Term 2
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
Translink will be releasing some Compass
Cards to post-secondary students in
February 2015.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
Some students will be able to trade
in their U-Pass for the Compass
Card by February 2015.
After a series of delays and
technical glitches, TransLink has
announced that they will finally
start rolling out the Compass
Card program for students in
January 2015.
Accordingto TransLink, the
first 2,000 are set to receive their
Compass Card on February 1 and
the next 2,000 to follow shortly
after that. The rest ofthe 141,000
post-secondary students in B.C
will be transitioned into the program by the end ofthe summer.
AMS President Tanner Bokor
said that, after discussions with
TransLink and several UBC representatives, he can confirm that
UBC students will be receiving
the Compass Card in Term 2.
"We've gotten all the assurance that we need at this stage
that we're comfortable with a
launch date, so I can confirm
it will be Winter Term 2," said
Bokor. "We're just working out
all the distribution options at
the moment and discussing with
both UBC and TransLink in
which way we can do that for
students."
Bokor said that he was not yet
able to comment on the specifics ofthe distribution and exact
launch date, as that is something
that is still being worked out.
"There are conversations
occurring around exactly what
month, how distribution will
work and what types of communications students can expect
to see, but we will continue these
conversations with TransLink
and UBC as we go," said Bokor.
Bokor also said that students
will receive official confirmation
from both UBC and the AMS as
soon as TransLink is ready to
begin rolling out Compass Cards
at UBC. a
Write
Shoot
Edit
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS II Opinions
LAST WORDS »
ADVICE»
Ask Natalie: trouble with TAs and
weekend procrastination
3TRATIO N J U LIAN YU/TH E U BYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
FOILING THE FLU
Although the night of candy,
chills and costumery may be behind us, we have plenty of other
scary things to look forward to:
namely, the 10-page paper that
is due at the end of term and flu
season. Yes, flu season is once
again making its not-so-wanted
rounds.
Nobody likes getting sick,
but it is especially unpleasant
when you're at your busiest point
in your classes. Given this, it
wouldn't hurt to take some old
fashioned advice as the weather
turns cooler and people start
sniffling: put on an extra sweater, wash your hands and always,
ALWAYS cough into your sleeve.
Seriously.
As tough as it may be, sometimes it really is best to stay
home when you're sick. You'll
get better faster if you take some
time to rest, and you won't get
everyone else sick.
COMPASS CARD CONCERN
TransLink has announced that
the Compass Card will be coming
to post-secondary students with a
U-Pass early next year, and UBC by
mid-2015 (if not earlier).
In some ways, we're excited. The
notion of not having to pick up a
pass at a terminal every month —
and deal with empty machines — is
one that is pretty endearing. But the
program has some downsides, too.
The program, which has cost
around $200 million to develop
and implement, will be bringing
transit travel into the modern age
— tapping in and out with a plastic
card instead of carrying around
change or paper tickets. It sounds
good in theory, but in practice it's
proven problematic. In addition to
the standard delay between a card
being tapped and approved by the
machine, many beta testers have
found themselves unable to tap
out successfully, causing the mass
of people attempting to get off of
busier busses (like the 99) to be held
up. These problems have been seen
with a handful of early adopters
— what will happen when all of
the city's university students are
trying to use transit? The already
molasses-like masses will be slowed
even further.
On top of this, the necessity of
getting a new pass every month
hasn't been eliminated — it's just
been migrated to the internet. Every
month, you'll have to load your
U-Pass onto your Compass Card —
after all, you might have dropped
out of UBC between January and
February, and of course computers
can't be used for automation.
Really, though, who knows what
will happen? Maybe TransLink will
be able to resolve their technical
problems by the time we've all
arrived in the future of transit.
Either way, with the U-Pass gone, at
the very least we'll be able to check
off one of our monthly to-do list
items from the comfort of our own
homes. Xi
Without protests, the AMS has no seat at the table
ALEX MIERKE-ZATWARNICKI
GABRIEL D'ASTOUS
Letter
Should the AMS organize protests?
This seems to be the question of
the moment on campus, and it was
certainly a contentious topic at the
AGM on Tuesday. The "no" side
argues that protests limit the ability
ofthe AMS to negotiate with the
university. In an opinion piece, Viet
Vu cited the AMS' recent successes
negotiating down tuition increases as examples ofthe great gains
that can come from sitting at the
administration's table and playing
nice. And we're not going to say that
these weren't victories in their own
right. On the contrary, it is actually
quite an achievement that the AMS
was able to negotiate any reductions
without student mobilization to
back them up.
Vu argues that playing nice isn't a
defeatist position, but rather a strategy to create the most favourable
conditions for negotiations with the
university. However, the "play nice"
argument is based on an innately
defeatist logic. It is defeatist because
it assumes that the hikes will pass,
that the increases to international
tuition and residence fees are
inevitable. It is defeatist because it's
focused on "meeting halfway," on
finding compromises like negotiating a seven per cent increase rather
than a 10 per cent one. It is defeatist
because it assumes that students
are in a position where they need
to compromise at all. Despite what
Vu and others in his stead imagine,
the "play nice" strategy isn't about
going into battle for students — its
about negotiating the terms of
our surrender.
Organizing protests will not hurt
the AMS' bargaining power with
the university administration, it will
strengthen it. AMS negotiations
without student mobilization rely
largely on the university's goodwill:
they are discussions between a
powerless body and an actor that's
calling all the shots.
From the actions ofthe university
administration to date, it is pretty
clear that they aren't willing to play
ball with the student body at all. The
university didn't bother to send a
broadcast e-mail about the proposals until three weeks after the
information had been leaked by student leaders and several days after
the first "consultation" had already
been held. They also didn't bother to
announce it when they changed the
dates and locations ofthe "consultations", besides silently switching the
text on the website. Most jarring of
all, they seem to have scheduled the
"consultations" deliberately at times
when students won't be able to
attend. Why are consultations being
held when most students have class?
And, seriously, who the fuck holds
consultations on Halloween?
From the callous way that UBC
is treating the negotiations, it's
obvious that the AMS is going to the
table with little to bargain with. To
date, the university administration
has shown no interest in negotiating. And if the AMS had staggering
"political capital" with the university, students wouldn't be facing
these outrageous proposals in the
first place.
Mass mobilization is what gives
organizers strength at a negotiating
table. For proof, take a look back
at the entire history ofthe labour
movement. Or, remember the more
recent history ofthe 2005 Quebec
General Student Strike. The government proposed to cut $103 million
from government student grants.
Student unions mobilized their student bodies and after three weeks of
strike the government backed down.
Why? Because students have power
when we act together. If students
are organizing on a large scale and
refuse to back down, the university
administration will have no choice
but to start sitting down at the bargaining table in good faith.
And for those of you who will
counter that those protests should
be organized on an exclusively
grassroots level, consider this:
if student mobilization is being
orchestrated by a body independent ofthe AMS, why would the
university negotiate with the AMS?
If the AMS has no ability to stop
the protests, how would they have
any legitimacy in those discussions? And most importantly, if the
AMS isn't on the front lines with
students fighting for accessible
education, how can they claim
to represent us at all? A student
association that isn't fighting with
us can't fight for us; and a student
association that can't fight for us
isn't one worth having.
Alex Mierke-Zatwamicki is a
fourth-year political science honours
student, and Gabriel D'Astous is in
hisfinalyear of a political science
and history degree. Both are involved
in the #IAmAStudent movement. Xi
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"I've tried to get past it, but I
can't stand my prof and I think
my TA hates me. What should I
do?"
Short answer: Nothing.
Long answer: There is nothing
you can really do. If you have an
actual problem with the way the
course is being taught, you can
email your department expressing
your formal displeasure with the
professor, TA or course. Of course,
there is no guarantee that this will
change anything, especially if you
are the first (or only) one expressing frustration.
There is something you can
do that is more likely to have an
effect, though. When the course
evaluations come around (and they
will) make sure you answer them
honestly. This could be a good way
to express how much you hated
the course/the prof/the TA. As a
side note, make sure you fill them
out your profs and TAs that you
did like; it can really help them.
If your professor (or TA) is new
or just seasonal, these actions may
actually help the department decide if they want to re-hire them.
You can also check out Rate My
Prof to see what their rating is. If
you disagree with the comments,
submit your opinion. People
actually check that out. Next time
you are planning your classes, you
should too and read all of them.
Just because the first five liked the
prof, doesn't mean the sixth won't
tell you everything you should
know.
Next term, if you realize you
and a TA don't mesh well together,
see if you can switch your lab or
discussion with another. Your new
TA might not be better than your
old one.
However, for this term, you're
flat out of luck. It's too late to
switch or drop the course, but
really we only have five more
weeks left in the term. You can
push through it. I believe in you.
Keep a list going of what profs you
liked and which you didn't so in
the years to come you know which
ones to avoid.
Also keep in mind that everyone
gets profs they don't like and TAs
that don't like them. Just like how
you're going to get bosses you don't
like and co-workers that don't like
you. You're not alone and you're
definitely not the first.
"Next weekend is a weekend
without homework, how do I
spend it?"
To be honest, you should use this
time to write an essay. Or finish
an assignment. Or write that final
lab report due at the end of term.
I mean, all schoolwork you get out
ofthe way now is schoolwork you
don't have you later. Every essay
you at least start now is an essay
you don't have to start later.
But, when are you going to have
another weekend without homework? After exams? Take a night,
let loose, watch all the shows
you've been ignoring, go out with
your friends. Just be aware of
your timeline for the next week
or so.
Need advice? Write to Natalie at
asknatalie@ubyssey.ca and have
your questions answered. Xi
Why I didn't go out on Halloween
KOBY MICHAELS
Letter
I'm not hungover. My stomach
doesn't hurt from eating piles of
candy. I'm not frostbitten from
wearing a ridiculous costume.
It's November 1 and all this is
true because I refused to partake
in Halloween.
It wasn't because I have no
friends (I have one, I promise), it
was because Halloween is stupid.
That's right, I called Halloween
stupid. Now you're thinking,
"what a loser! He's just upset he
wasn't invited to a rager." No, not
true. Let me explain.
For weeks now, campus has
been littered with "Halloween
Club Crawl" signs, Calendar
Halloween flyers and posters for
a bajillion other parties. Isn't the
conspiracy obvious? They want
our already non-existent money,
and they're using Halloween as
an excuse. Wake up, people!
Every time I bump into a
friend on the way to class the
first thing they say is, "what are
you dressing up as? What party
are you going to?" It's like the
fifth grade and the only things
people have to look forward to
are Christmas, school breaks and
Halloween.
Do you even know what
Halloween is? Its roots lie in the
Gaelic holiday of Samhain, during which these pagans believed
the worlds ofthe living and dead
overlapped and the dead came
back, bringing disease and destroying crops. Then, always original, the Christians came along,
declaring November 2 "All Souls
Day." The two holidays blended and Trick-or-Treating was
born. Peasants would beg the
rich for soul cakes, promising, in
exchange, to pray for the rich's
dead. Yup, how does that KitKat
taste now, knowing its original
purpose was for peasants, who
had to sell their prayers to feed
their children? Does it taste like
privilege and gluttony? It should.
And your great "sexy pirate" or
"sexy firefighter" costume? They
are meant to appease evil spirits
so you don't starve to death or
contract tuberculosis over the bitter winter. Hardly a concern with
heating and 100" TVs to keep us
warm. Not to mention how offensive costumes have become. The
wall in the Marketplace dollar
store took it's inspiration from a
porn star's closet.
If you want to party, pseudo-naked, stuffing your face with
chocolate skulls and pumpkin
spiced vodka, go for it! I'm
not judging. We're students,
what else are we supposed to
do, study? But you don't need
Halloween as an excuse, we do it
every weekend anyways.
Koby Michaels is a first-year
Science student and a staff member
of'The Ubyssey "& SEASONAL    I    MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3,2014
Fall, autumn or whatever you call it — it's
clear to see that campus is at its best in these
few months. These are some ofthe best
autumnal photos from October that highlight
how beautiful our campus is right now. It
really makes you want to capture the moment,
you know? Enjoy! BCIT
50
bcit.ca/insurance
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS II Culture
JENICA MONTGOMERY
BOOKS »
Capitalism vs. climate change:
What's really to blame?
WARNING
CLIMATE
CHALLENGES
AHEAD
connect the dots
PHOTO COURTESYCHRISTSE/FLICKR
Naomi Klein visited UBC on October 26 to talk about climate change and her new book.
Braedon Atkinson Pauze
Contributor
Climate change is not a new
issue, what is new are the radical
ideas that are required to stop
it. Stopping climate change isn't
going to be easy, it's going to take
full-scale effort from everyone.
But we've all heard that before,
sometimes ad nauseam. In fact,
since 2006 when Al Gore confronted us with An Inconvenient
Truth, it's been hard not to hear
about climate change and what
we can do to stop it.
And the news seems to be
getting worse by the day. Recently
the public has been bombarded
with news concerning climate
change, especially about how
coastal cities, such as Vancouver,
will soon be underwater thanks
to the rising sea levels caused by
carbon emissions. The public has
heard all about climate change,
but for whatever reason, they're
not listening.
In her latest book, This Changes
Everything: Capitalism Vs. the Climate, Naomi Klein explains why
she thinks they aren't listening.
"We engage in this odd form of
on-again-off-again ecological
amnesia for perfectly rational
reasons. We deny because we fear
that letting in the full reality of
this crisis will change everything.
And we're right," she said.
When it was made easy and
accessible enough for the public,
they began using more efficient
lightbulbs or driving hybrid
cars. There used to be a time
when things like that would have
actually been a large part of the
solution; however that time has
come and passed.
The only way we can stop
climate change, says Klein, is
to change everything about our
lifestyle. These changes have to
combat society's mentality regarding capitalism and materialism. "When I first started writing
the book my friends would ask,
'wasn't writing about climate
change enough? Why did you have
to write about capitalism?" Klein
said, in front ofthe audience in
the Chan Centre on October 26.
Klein would go on to explain
that capitalism as we know it is
the main reason for our ever increasing carbon emissions. After
all, the North American economy
has basically been founded on the
use of fossil fuels.
This solution to climate
change, switching our economic
values away from our current materialistic ideals, has many more
benefits than just the obvious
one. As Klein explained, a mass
movement against capitalism and
climate change would be able to
take issues such as reviving local
economies, liberating democracies from corporate influence and
the lack of affordable housing and
transit to subsequently "weave all
these seemingly disparate issues
into a coherent narrative about
how to protect humanity from the
ravages of both a savagely unjust
economic system and a destabilized climate system." These are
just a few ofthe issues that would
be positively affected through a
new global mindset against climate change.
Waging war against climate
change seems like a lofty goal
considering that society has become dependent on materialistic
lust. To save the world, not only
does society need to change, but it
needs to change quickly. Climate
change can no longer be a secondary issue or an afterthought. It's
going to take a full-scale effort
from everyone.
But we've heard that before.
The only difference is this time
the stakes are much larger. Xi
FILM»
UBC Film Soc mixes the old with the new
Cult classics and new releases are some ofthe Norm's offerings
The UBC Film Society's last pre-screening was of Joss Whedon's The Cabin in the Woods.
Lawrence Neal Garcia
Senior Staff Writer
"To capture the spirit of what we
air, think of our newscast as a
screaming woman running down
the street with her throat cut,"
said one character early on in
Nightcrawler — an exhilarating
thriller that has nothing to do
with X-Men — which screened
at the Norm Theatre on October
29, two days ahead of its wide
release.
It's probably a good thing
that UBC's Film Society doesn't
approach their programming
the way the character described
theirs, although given their recent and upcoming films there's
more than enough nightmare
fodder to go around.
While it isn't a horror film,
Nightcrawler certainly has
horrific elements, due largely to
the enterprising, yet sociopathic
main character: Lou Bloom (Jake
Gyllenhaal, in his best role yet),
who dives into the seedy underworld of L.A. crime reporting.
It's an electrifying ride that
channels the cynicism of Ace
in the Hole (1951) and Network
(1976) to deliver a pitch-black
satire of media reporting.
Pre-screenings — like the
October 29 screening of Nightcrawler — are unusual, but not
unheard of for the Film Society.
The last pre-screening that the
Film Society held was in 2012,
with Joss Whedon's genre-bending meta-horror, The Cabin in the
Woods.
In the case of Nightcrawler,
the distribution company first
contacted the Frederic Wood
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
Theatre, who are unable to play
the film for technical reasons.
They then approached the UBC
Film Society to set up a showing.
"Basically, every once in a
while the distribution companies put together these promo
screenings where they don't
actually sell any tickets ... just
to see who would be interested
in seeing the film," said Mike
Johnston, the Film Society's
operations manager.
Given the large turnout and
positive post-film chatter, people
were evidently interested in
Nightcrawler.
Although the event was a
success for both the Film Society
and the distribution company,
future ones are ultimately up to
the latter. "[Pre-screenings are]
something we definitely want
to pursue in the future," said
Johnston.
Their regular programming,
for the past few years, has
consisted mostly of second runs
— films that have been out ofthe
multiplex for a month or two.
Recently however, the Film
Society has shifted their focus
away from second runs to a more
curated selection of films.
"[Playing second runs] hadn't
been doing terribly for us, but
it hadn't been doing great for
us either. So we thought about
getting out of that area ... and
running a more classical selection of films," said Johnston, who
emphasized that they would still
show second runs. "We're just
trying to diversify the programming a little bit more."
So while upcoming features
include Only Lovers Left Alive
and The Lego Movie — both excellent 2014 releases, cult classics
like DonnieDarko (which played
after Nightcrawler, also starring
Jake Gyllenhaal) and a David
Lynch retrospective (Mulholland
Drive and Blue Velvet) are also in
the mix.
For good measure, the Film
Society is also mixing up its
regular events, adding live music
and a battle of the bands, in partnership with CiTR, to a School
of Rock beverage garden on
November 7, while still keeping
the annual BigLebowski tradition
two weeks later.
So even {{Nightcrawler proves
to be the last pre-screening for
a while, it certainly won't be the
last new thing for the UBC Film
Society. tJ
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 20
Arts and
culture on a
budget
The Museum of Anthropology
is one of UBC's shiniest gems.
Not only do their exhibits highlight
current and historical peoples, but
their programs aim to encourage
dialogue with the general public.
And for UBC students it's free.
Learn more at moa. ubc.ca
Did you know that UBC has their
own movie theatre? Located in
theSUB and run by the UBC Film
Society, the Norm theatre runs
cult classics, popularfilms, and
second runs. They also have
events that feature cult classics
such as their annual Big Lebowski
showing.
Tickets: $5.00 regular, $2.50
FilmSoc members and children
aged 3-13.
Checkout the UBC Film Society's
website ubcfilmsociety.com to
learn more about upcoming
screenings.
The Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra (VSO) offers their
All-Access pass for full time
students or anyone aged 30 and
under. You have to sign up for a
free membership, but it's worth it.
With an all access membership,
tickets for VSO concerts are $15.
Checkout vancouversymphony.
ca/concerts/all-access-pass to
learn more and purchase tickets.
(continued on p. 9) (continued from p. 8)
UBC Theatre and Opera s
season is in full swing. Theatre
and Opera productions are
discounted for students. Both
productions are held on campus
and guarantee a night of class and
culture.
Head over to theatrefilm.ubc.ca/
events/main-stage-season to
learn more about UBC Theatre
and Opera's 2014/2015 season.
■ WHATEVER YOUR PASSION, THE PATH TO ■
TURNING IT INTO A PROFESSION STARTS HERE.
If watching a second showing of
the lego movies doesn't interest
you, but you want to see the latest
blockbuster hit.
Head over to your local Cineplex
on a Tuesday for a mid-week
treat.
The UBC Bachelor + Master of Management Dual Degree
Ifyou'd rather support yourfellow
students, heading overto a UBC
School of Music performance
is a great way to do so. The UBC
School of Music offers free and
low cost tickets throughout the
year.
Learn more at chancentre.ca/
students
UBC
m
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITYOF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
I    SAUDER
School of Business
ROBERT H. LEE
GRADUATE SCHOOL // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
MONDAY, NOVEMBER:
FOOTBALL»
Thunderbird football season over
38-18 loss to Saskatchewan closes the book on UBC's slim playoff hopes
UBC head coach Shawn Olson called his team's performance "embarrassing" during his halftime locker room speech.
C J Pentland
Senior Staff Writer
Disappointment and despair,
followed by excitement and hope,
then eventual downfall and defeat.
In many ways, UBC's final game
resembled the trajectory of their
entire regular season.
Despite their 2-5 record
coming into Saturday's game,
the Thunderbirds still maintained a slim chance of making
the Canada West playoffs for the
second straight year. First off,
they needed to beat the Saskatchewan Huskies, and then receive
some help from the University of
Regina in the form of a win over
the University of Alberta. Regina
held up their end of the bargain,
taking down U of A 35-31, but UBC
couldn't capitalize — they fell
38 -18 to the Huskies and saw their
season come to a close.
The disappointment started
from the get-go, with the Huskies
going up 10-0 after their first two
possessions. They kept rolling in
the second quarter, adding three
touchdowns while forcing a fumble, picking off a pass and not allowing the T-Birds past their own
54-yard line to make it 31-0 at the
half. Saskatchewan quarterback
Drew Burko had his way with
the UBC defence and had just
three incompletions in the first
half, while the T-Birds' Carson
Williams had just one completion
in the first quarter.
Yet the 'Birds came out ofthe
locker room and played like a team
that knew their season was on
the line. Marcus Davis, undoubtedly the team's MVP this year
despite being a rookie, began the
half with a 47-yard kickoff return
which led to a Quinn van Gylswyk
field goal. Five minutes later, the
UBC defence came up big on a
third-and-one to get the ball back,
and Williams capitalized with a
touchdown strike to Niko Jakobs.
Then after a quick Saskatchewan
two-and-out, Davis went back to
work with an 81-yard punt return
to the house to make it 31-17.
A rouge made it 31-18, but that
was as close as the T-Birds would
get — though they had plenty of
opportunities to close the gap. A
forced fumble by Bryan Rideout
couldn't be turned into any points,
a muffed punt started a fourth
quarter drive on the Saskatchewan 27-yard line, the T-Birds
couldn't respond after a fumble
and penalty pushed them backwards. Early in the fourth quarter,
the Huskies added insurance
points on a Tyler Chow touchdown run to gain their insurmountable 20-point lead.
Saturday's game mirrored a
season plagued by consistency
issues and little mistakes. UBC
played around 15 minutes of consistent football, and a fumble and
interception in the first half resulted in 14 Saskatchewan points.
In the second half, All-Canadian
tackle Alec Pennell was ejected
for a play that occurred during an
extra point — a huge loss on the
offensive line. Overall, the 'Birds
just couldn't stay consistent.
"It's a good group of kids here
with some talent but it just did not
come together this year," said UBC
head coach Shawn Olson after the
game to UBC Athletics. "In the
second half today we challenged
their pride and challenged them
as men a bit, and they did come
out and compete, but if you look
throughout the four quarters how
we measure up, it was not good
enough in all three phases and not
enough plays made when there was
any challenging situation. That's
the difference between a playoff
team and a non-playoff team."
The loss brings an end to a
season that started with opti
mism back in the summer. A new
varsity status that brought added
resources, blue-chip recruits
and 19 returning starters led to a
number seven ranking in the CIS
preseason poll, but after a week
one loss, that was the only time
they'd be ranked. Some optimism returned after UBC played
a strong game in week four to
improve to 1-3, but a close loss
to Saskatchewan the following
week sent them backwards again.
A win over Regina kept their slim
playoff hopes alive, but in the end
their goal of "Two Cups" — the
Hardy and Vanier — couldn't
be met.
"There are a lot of really young
talented guys on this team but
talent and potential has to manifest itself into production at some
point," said Olson. "Disappointing
year on the whole, especially for
our veteran guys who put a lot of
blood, sweat and tears into this.
We had expectations this year and
we didn't meet them."
With all eight regular season
games in the books, UBC sat last
in many key categories: average
yards per game at 365.4, points
per game at 21.9 and red zone
efficiency in that they scored
a touchdown just half ofthe
=HOTOWILLMCDONALDfTHE UBYSSEY
times they were in the red zone
(9 of 18). On defence, the 'Birds
showed flashes of brilliance, but
overall they still allowed an average of 36.6 points per game and
511 yards per game.
Yet there was one consistent
bright spot all season long, and
that was Marcus Davis. With
every passing week, the rookie
from Victoria found a new way
to step up his game, helping him
average a conference-leading 161.6
all-purpose yards per game. On
Saturday it was the 81-yard punt
return; there's also been a 107-
yard kickoff return, a 98-yard punt
return, two receiving touchdowns
and two rushing touchdowns. Few
players have shown more electricity on the football field, and the
T-Birds are extremely lucky to
have him for four more years.
Bright spots like Davis provided
reason for optimism throughout
the year, and despite the early
season struggles, that optimism
stuck around until the final day of
the season. But even after being
handed the rare opportunity to
make the playoffs with three wins
— something that hasn't happened
since 2010 - UBC still couldn't
capitalize, ending this season's
trajectory in defeat. 31
FIELD HOCKEY »
UBC wins fourth straight women's field hockey championship
=HOTOJENNIFERSUfTHEVARSIPF
The Thunderbirds have done it
again. Taking on the unbeaten
(17-0-0) OUA champion Toronto
Varsity Blues on their home turf is
nowhere close to an easy task, but
UBC rose to the occasion, scoring
two goals and allowing none to take
their CIS record-setting fourth
straight McCrae Cup. The Blues
had previously allowed just one
goal in their past six games.
Senior UBC midfielder Poonam
Sandhu finally broke the tie after 47
minutes to give her team the lead.
That marker was the only offence
UBC would need, but second year
midfielder Sarah Keglowitsch
popped in the second goal nearly 10
minutes later from a penalty corner
opportunity for good measure.
With the victory, the Thunderbirds improve to 16-6 in the
championship game, and 5-2 over
Toronto over the seven times
they've met during the gold medal
game. UBC goaltender Lauren
Logush was named CIS Rookie of
the Year, and teammates Hannah
Haughn and Sandhu were named
to the All-Canadian team. Fourth-
year Blues midfielder Amanda
Woodcroft received the honours of
2014 CIS player ofthe year, as well
as tournament MVP. Xi MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3,2014    I    SPORTS    I   11
VOLLEYBALL »
Perfect weekend for UBC volleyball
Men's and women's teams both complete sweeps of UBC-O Heat
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Milan Nikic (5) led the team in assists over the weekend.
Olamide Olaniyan
Staff Writer
On Friday and Saturday nights, the
UBC Thunderbirds swept the rival
UBC-O Heat in four and three
sets, respectively.
On Friday the first two sets
seemed like deciders for the
entire game with 25-23 in the first
and 25-15 in the second, but after
losing the third set to the Heat
19-25 due to aces on consecutive
serves from Heat player Kristof
Schlagintweit, the 'Birds had to
fight it out in the fourth to win
25-21.
The following night, however,
the Thunderbirds upped their
performance and finished off the
Heat in three sets, improving on
where they had failed the previous night. Despite some terrific
plays and close calls at the hands
ofthe Heat — especially from
middle Jim Bell, who had 10 kills
in the game — the T-Birds managed to dispatch them effectively.
"UBC Okanagan played very
well. They blocked well, attacked
well, and they were right in the
game. It's nice to see us make some
plays down the stretch when it
counted and when the scores got
close," said Matt Lebourdais, who
is in his fourth season as UBC's
assistant coach. "I thought our
outsides did a good job of putting a
lot of trouble balls away with some
really tough swings."
The first set ended 25-23 with
Irvan Brar, Jarrid Ireland and
Mac McNicol holding three kills
each. Second-year Irvan Brar then
became a integral player in the
second set, making numerous kills
and putting the Thunderbirds on
top 26-24 at set point. In the third
set, Brar went on a killing spree
scoring three in a row, repeatedly
pulverizing the opposition with
strong attacks and wide swings.
"It was really nice to see those
outsides step up like Irvan and
Jarrid, guys that haven't played
as consistently as they have in
the past. It's nice to see them play
well," said Lebourdais.
Joint UBC efforts in the final
moments ofthe game managed to
stay the Heat's progress, and won
them the match point at 25-20.
"I thought [the turning point]
was a couple swings from Irvan
Brar in really tough situations,
when the pass wasn't great
and there was a big block out
there," said Lebourdais, a former
Thunderbird himself. "He just
swung high and hard and was
really aggressive all night."
A noticeable absence on the
court during the weekend games
was Ben Chow, one ofthe team's
top attackers this season. He was
out due to a lower body injury, and
while Lebourdias was unsure about
his recovery, he was certain that
there would be players to step up
in his absence. True to Lebourdais'
words, many players not normally
in the spotlight put in tremendous
effort over the weekend.
One of these players was rookie
Byron Keturakis, who made
three vital digs during the game,
even though he only came in as a
double substitute with Mat Guidi.
Middles like fourth year Alex
Russell and fifth-year Chris Howe
defended well with four blocks
each, while also scoring six and
three kills, respectively.
The players seem to be finding
their groove, probably as a result
of getting into the rhythm of the
regular season. The Thunderbirds
are now second in the Canada
West conference, mainly due
to their current five-game win
streak. The team seems to be
growing more confident about
their ability to compete in the National Championships. With only
one loss in the regular season, they
might just do it.
"Our record is 7-1 so we're feeling good about that. We just don't
want to worry too much about the
wins and losses right now, we want
to focus on getting better, point by
point, game by game, continually
try to improve."
UBC's next home games will be
November 14 and IS against the
University of Alberta at the War
Memorial Gym. Xi
Olamide Olaniyan
Staff Writer
This Halloween weekend, the UBC
Thunderbirds battled hard to clinch
back-to-back wins against sister
school UBC Okanagan, 3-1 on Friday
and 3-2 on Saturday.
The victories came at a great
price for the home team, as they
lost two key players to injuries.
Fifth-year Rosie Schlagintweit was
injured in the opening set on Friday
night, and key attacker Lisa Barclay
sprained her ankle in the fifth set
on Saturday. While head coach
Doug Reimer is saddened by the
drawbacks, he was impressed by the
team effort.
"The most important thing in a
match is to compete hard and play
right to the bitter end, and we did
just that," said Reimer, who has
been the Thunderbird coach for the
past 18 years.
The opening set on Saturday
started out well for the Thunderbirds but slowed as the capable Heat
held back their charge and continuously stopped them from gaining a
substantial lead. UBC-O defended
effectively against the Thunderbirds' attacks and even fought back
the set point at 24-23. Eventually,
the T-Birds won the first set 25-23.
Throughout the game, key
attacks from Heat players like
Brianna Beamish, Megan Festival
and Katy Wuttunee managed to
stop the T-Birds in their tracks, with
Beamish scoring a whopping total of
18 kills in the game. The Heat then
continued to win the second and
fourth sets, pushing the game to a
decisive final round.
Accordingto Reimer, the 'Birds
faltered in their attack. "We didn't
put enough pressure on them and
they gained confidence. They
played better and they started the
=HOTO SOFYTSAIfTHE UBYSSEY
Abbey Keeping (1) had 12 kills over the course of UBC's back-to-back wins.
fifth great. And then we hung in
there," he said.
Reimer had many good things to
say about second year Alessandra
Gentile, the team's setter, and was
really impressed with her weekend
play. Throughout, she had the most
assists of players on both teams,
with 4 6 in total.
The two teams battled hard, and
eventually went to the fifth decisive
set. However, due to successive
serving efforts from fifth-year
Abbey Keeping, the Thunderbirds
managed to finish off the Heat at
match point with a final score of
15-11.
Although injured in the crucial
final set, Lisa Barclay still led the
UBC attack with 15 total kills and 34
total attacks in the game. Danielle
Brisebois followed closely with 12
kills due to her contributions in the
second and third set. Veterans Alissa
Coulter and Abbey Keeping made
nine and seven kills, respectively.
According to Reimer, it was a
great weekend, but the team needs
to focus on their next few games.
The T-Birds face off against the defending national champions Manitoba Bisons next week. The Bisons
are the only team to beat the 'Birds
at the CIS national championships
in the last eight years, and the very
team that brought UBC's six-year
championship streak to an end.
In short, the Thunderbirds have
a score to settle.
"They've had some changes,
we've had some changes so we'll
have to see," said Reimer. "If you
look at the standings, its impossible to predict right now. Right
now it can go so many ways. It's
going to be the most interesting
season for sure."
UBC's next home games will be
November 14 and IS against the
University of Alberta at the War
Memorial Gym. Xi 1
2
3
'
1
'
S
7
8
'
1
-
11
12
13
14
'S
"
17
IS
"
20
■ 21
22
■ 23
24
25
2E
27
28
■
3D
■ 31
32
33
34
35
■ 3G
■ 37
38
33
■ ill
41
■ 42
■ '
44
■ 45
■ 4G
■ 47
4S
49
50
SI
52
53
■ 54
55
5E
57
58
1
.
EO
El
E2
E3
"
1
"
EG
„
ES
6
8
8
6
7
7
3
5
1
3
8
5
9
2
6
8
6
4
4
8
3
2
1
7
4
2
5
's
T
A
*B
S
lc
u
*B
E 1'-'
0
N
"e
T
O
R
A
H
A
p
E
s Ia
S
A
N
I
P
A
N
A
S
G
T
s lu
1
T
T
R
E
M
E
M
'k 1 e
R
A
!3P 1 p
E
A
R
I'll
R | S
A
Y
E | A
R
L
Y
0
D
E
2s | S
a Id |'e 1 s
K 1
s
I
L
0 Ii    'i< | E I A 1*0 M
L
E
R
T
A
L
L    "l   | N | N I'C    H | E | M
1
S
T
E
S
S
E 1 N |*A \~C \ H | E III
0
S
E
|*A
4i. 1 p 1 o |a
ST | 0
N
E
S
V
I
S
H    N
u
M
A
D
E |
A
s
L
r 1 r
p
P
L
A
C | A
B
L
E
S
T
A
R
i
s
A
A
C H"6
R
1
C
E
L
K
0
N
0
R
T
h In
A
S
A
S
E
E
D
E
s
T
E
E H'f.
N
1
D
1
7
8
9
6
3
5
2
4
5
2
4
7
8
1
9
3
6
9
3
6
5
2
4
7
1
8
7
5
3
6
1
9
8
4
2
2
8
1
4
7
5
6
9
3
6
4
9
8
3
2
1
7
5
4
1
7
3
5
8
2
6
9
8
9
2
1
4
6
3
5
7
3
6
5
2
9
7
4
8
1

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126224/manifest

Comment

Related Items