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The Ubyssey Mar 3, 2009

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March 3,2009 \ www.ubyssey.ca
losing bits of our thumbs since 1918 | volume xc, number 41
UBC's official student newspaper is published Tuesdays and Fridays
CALORIES
INSIDE THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
MARCH 3, 2009
Events
If you have an event, e-mail us at events@ubyssey.ca
The Ubyssey
Action—Camera: Beijing Performance Photography • Examines
the trajectory from the discreet
underground performance art
community centered in Beijing's
"East Village" in the early 1990s,
to a current internationally
recognized practice. • January
16, 2009 10:00am-Monday,
April 20, 2009 11:00am. For
further information please contact Naomi Sawada at naomi.
sawada@ubc.ca, tel: (604) 822-
3640, or fax: (604) 822-6689, or
take a look at belkinartgallery.
com/_email/_main_belkin/Ac-
tion_Camera •
UBC Greek Week • The Panhel-
enic Council and the Inter-
Fraternity Council are putting
on a week long event for Greeks
and UBC students alike. Events
nclude, Delta Gamma Anchor
Splash, Greek Letter Check &
Guest Speaker, Staff Appreciation & Greek Jepoardy, Greek
BBQ Fundraiser, Greek Olympics,
Can-Struction & Greek Olympic
Finals, Awards Presentation Ceremony will take place at Pride of
Order of Omega. If you've ever
wondering what the Greeks are
all about come out and check
out this events. • March 1-7,
events all over campus. For more
information check out the "UBC
GREEK WEEK 2009!" Facebook
group •
March 3
The Annual TEC Young Entrepreneurs Dinner • This is a networking and informational event
where students, entrepreneurs,
nvestors and top company
executives share insights and
exchange thoughts on current
and existing ventures. • Tuesday
March 3, 2009, 5:30pm-9pm,
Renaissance Vancouver Hotel
Free Meditation
Workshop
A series of 4
weekly classes,
beginning
Tuesday March
10th at 7:30pm
Rm. 604, Asian Centre
1871 West Mall UBC
To Register, Call:
604-732-8997
Teach English
Overseas
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
• Intensive 60-Hour Program
• Classroom Management Techniques
• Detailed Lesson Planning
• ESL Skills Development
• Comprehensive Teaching Materials
• Interactive Teaching Practicum
• Internationally Recognized Certificate
• Teacher Placement Service
• Money Bach Guarantee Included
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfoidseminars.ca
Harbourside, cost $20 (includes
a full meal), Attire: Business Formal, for more information visit
www.tecubc.com •
March 4
Milk • Check out Sean Penn's
academy-award winning portrayal of gay rights activist and politician Harvey Milk. By winning a
seat in the San Franciso Board of
Supervisors in 1977 Harvey Milk
became the first openly gay man
to be elected to public office
in the USA. This biopic traces
Harvey Milk's career from his 40th
birthday until his death. • March
4pm-8pm, 9:3Opm-11:00pm,
Location: Norm Theatre, Cost: $4
general admission, $2 members •
Fair Trade Panel Discussion •
What are the on-the-ground
results of buying Fair Trade
products? What might be the
long-term effects of an increas-
ng Fair Trade market? Sales of
Fair Trade Certified products have
been increasingly dramatically in
recent years. This trend prom-
ses to ensure a fair and stable
standard of living for producers,
while also holding potential for
cooperatives and corporations
getting involved in the Fair Trade
movement. The panel will explore the results of Fair Trade for
all those involved, and where the
movement might go in the future.   • March 4 at 4pm in Norm
Theatre, Hosted by Engineers
without Borders, free •
Happy-Go-Lucky • This British
comedy film tells the story of
Pauline Cross, a cheerful and optimistic teacher living and work-
ng in North London. Pauline, or
"Poppy" as she is nicknamed,
catches the attention of two
different men, a social worker
and a driving instructor, and
complications ensue • Wednesday March 4, 6-8, 7pm-9pm.
Location: Norm Theatre. Cost: $4
general admission, $2 members •
March 5
"Faith Without Fear" • Cel
ebrate International Women's
Day with a screening of "Faith
Without Fear" a documentary by
the Canadian journalist and human rights activist Irshad Manji
The film will be introduced by
the former Lieutenant-Governor
of British Columbia, lona Cam-
pagnolo. • March 5 at 7pm.
Vancouver Planetarium Theatre.
Admission for students is $8.
Please RSVP by leaving a voice-
mail at 604-781-3151. •
Fair Trade Breakfast • It's back
You know the drill - Fair Trade
Banana-Chocolate Chip pancakes, 3 for $2. Bring your own
plate and cutlery. • March 5 at
8am in Kaiser Foyer, Hosted by
Engineers without Borders •
Winners ofthe 2009 Ubyssey
Literary Competition
1ST PLACE winning a prize of $75 is "The Way Back" by Jill Von
Sprecken. This story was not in the print version of our paper,
but you can read it online at a later date.
2ND PLACE winning a prize of $50 is "Overtures" by Taylor Basso.
3RD PLACE winning a prize of $2 5 is "Twenty-seven years, Thirty-
six Days" by Arielle Indiana Furneaux.
HONOURABLE MENTION goes to Naflza Azad for "Paranthas and
Promenades."
Please contact Celestian Rince at copy@ubyssey.ca to claim your
prize.
The judges ofthe 2009 Ubyssey Literary Competition:
GISELE BAXTER Originally from Nova Scotia, Gisele Baxter did her
BA at Mount Saint Vincent and her MA and PhD at Dalhousie.
She did postdoctoral research at East Anglia (UK) and McGill,
and has taught sessionally at UBC since 1997. Her areas of interest include popular culture, the gothic influence, children's
literature, and near-future dystopias. She writes fiction in her
spare time.
MICHELLE MILLER Born and raised in Ontario, Michelle is trying
to get used to life on the west coast, which is easy in the sun and
impossible in the rain. Michelle Miller is a queer-feminist writer
of fiction, non-fiction and poetry. Michelle attends the MFA program in Creative Writing at UBC and is currently the fiction editor for PRISM international.
J
Imagine Your Arts Major: What
Can I Do with My Major? *
Wondering what you are going
to do with your BA? Come to
this workshop and learn about
the career possibilities open
to you and the influence your
choice of major has on your
career prospects. Explore insider
nformation for different career
choices, from the day-to-day
tasks of a certain job to advice
on getting entry level positions,
and what associations or organizations you should join. • March
5 at 12-lpm, location: Irving K
Barber, Lillooet Room, register
online at secure.students.ubc.ca/
workshops/careers.cfm •
Imagine Your Arts Major Go
Global: Taking Your Major
Global • Imagine waking up for
class in Australia or Denmark, or
going on a volunteer placement
to Africa a co-op placement in
Singapore. Come to this session to learn about Go Globa
opportunities and how you can
participate. • March 5, 5pm-
6pm. Location: Irving K. Barber,
Lillooet Room, register online
at secure.students.ubc.ca/work-
shops/careers.cfm •
Verdi: Falstaff • The UBC School
of Music presents Verdi: Falstaff.
Featuring the UBC Opera Ensemble and the UBC Symphony
Orchestra. In Italian with English
subtitles. • Wed, March 5-Sat,
March 7, 8pm-11pm, Sun,
March 8, 3pm-6pm, Location:
Chan Centre. Cost: $15 for
students, $25 for adults. Tickets
available at the Chan Centre and
through Ticketmaster •
Movie Night • Screening of fair
trade film "Black Gold" at 7pm
in Wood 5. Drinks and discussion to follow at Mahoney and
Sons. • March 5, 7pm in Wood
5, Hosted by Engineers Without
Borders •
March 6
Imagine Your Arts Major Go
Global: Taking Your Major
Global • Imagine waking up for
class in Australia or Denmark, or
going on a volunteer placement
to Africa or a co-op placement in
Singapore. Come to this session
to learn about Go Global opportunities and how you can participate. • March 6, 12pm-1pm.
Location: Irving K Barber, Lillooet
Room, register online at secure,
students.ubc.ca/workshops/
careers.cfm •
Classifieds
We Want You!
Guys, want to
win $100
by telling us
your opinion
on dating?
That's how much we want to
know what you think!
Take our University Dating
survey and win $ 100 or an infield dating coaching session,
worth $225.
Survey at
www.campussocialstatus.com
-  MAN MEETS
^ WOMAN1
Powered by Man Meets Woman
coach@manmeetswoman.com
778.999.5094
*Girls, we haven't forgotten about you, go to www.happysexyyou.com
**Drawwill be held on March 20th. Tell your friends. Enter today.
Are you a UBC distance student
with a learning disability?
Wantto be partofa research study?
Contact PhD candidate Nancy E.
Black to receive an information
package:
ruby77@interchange.ubc.ca
Free Meditation Workshop!
A series of 4 weekly classes beginning Tuesday March 10,7:30pm
Rm. 604ofthe Asian Centre:
1871 West Mall UBC
To Register Call #604.732.8997
Interested in learning about international health initiatives? Attend
Exploring Global Outreach - a FREE
speakers evening hosted by Global
Outreach Students' Association,
March 16th 5-7:30pm, Room 182 in
the Ike Barber Learning Centre.
Contact ubc.gosa@gmail.com
Self-Discovery and Peace:
A FREE 8-Week Course
Starts: March 15,2-3 pm
Location: Kitsilano Neighbourhood
House ,2305 West 7th Ave
To register:
1-877-GNOSIS-1
vancouver@gnosticmovement.
com
Know yourself and discover profound peace.
March 3rd, 2009
volume xc, n"41
Editorial Board
COORDINATING EDITOR
Kellan Higgins: coordinating@uhyssey.ca
NEWS EDITORS
Stephanie Findlay & Justin McElroy :
news@uhyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Trevor Melanson : culture@uhyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Shun Endo : sports@uhyssey.ca
FEATURES & PERSPECTIVES EDITOR
Joe Rayment: features@uhyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Goh Iromoto :photos@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Paul Bucci:production@uhyssey.ca
COPY EDITOR
Celestian Rince: copy@uhysseyca
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: volunteers @uhyssey.ca
WEBMASTER
Adam Leggett: webmaster@uhyssey ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : multimedia@uhyssey.ca
Editorial Office
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604-822-2301
fax: 604-822-9279
web: www.uhyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @uhyssey.ca
Business Office
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604-822-6681
fax: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@uhyssey.ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Gerald Deo
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of British Columbia. It is published every Tuesday
and Friday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an
autonomous, democratically run student organization, and
all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe Ubyssey staff.
They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not
necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey Publications
Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial
content appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adherestoCUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words. Please
include your phone number, student number and signature
(not for publication) as well as your year and faculty with
all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off atthe editorial officeofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and are run
according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written
by Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to letters
and perspectives over freestyles unless the latter is time
sensitive. Opinion pieces will not be run until the identity of
the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissionsfor length and clarity. All letters must be
received by 12 noon the day before intended publication.
Letters received after this point will be published in the
following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or
other matter deemed relevant bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified
advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to
publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad occurs the
liability of the UPS will not be greaterthan the price pa id for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes
or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or the
impact ofthe ad.
Contributors
Kellan Higgins realized the Ubyssey's office was causing him
to be Vitamin D deprived regardless of how much Vitamin
Water he drinks because of the lack of sunlight in the office. He convinced Samantha Jung, Ian Turner, and Shawn
Li to round up a mass mob of squirrels to build a new Ubyssey greenhouse on the grassy knoll. Zoe Siegel and Alicia
Woodside scrounged around for scrap building materials
(to keep costs low) whileTrevor Melanson and Goh Iromoto
cleared the landforTrevor Record to lay thefoundation with
the help of Keegan Bursawand Sulman U mar. To keep the
protesting students from disrupting the construction, Hereward Langley, Crystal Tai, Jorge Amigo, Teegan (please tell
us your last name), and Henry Lebard used their super ninja
skills and tazers to guard the site. Belinda Li consulted on
the project to make sure the building was as sustainable
as possible. While shopping for plants for the office, she
ran into Kathy Yan Li and Katarina Grgic, who were looking
for a present for Justin McElroy. Just then, Stephanie Findlay passed by and broke the news that Gerald Deo made
fabulous brownies and Paul Bucci ate all of them. Back at
the construction site, Celestian Rince and Shun Endo supervised puppies as they installed the final glass panes while
Kalyeena Makortoff and Adam Leggett recruited kittens to
pack up the old office. Llamas ssssfollowed Tara Martellaro's
commands to move everything to the new greenhouse.
Kyrstin Bain then organized a sweet greenhouse warming
party with Bengal tigers as honourary guests.
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100%
University     'recycledpaper
Press \Z_\Q MARCH 3, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
Hollywood North on campus
UBC trusted home of Wolverine, Battlestar Galactica, Smallville
by Sophie Raider
News Writer
We may have appeared ostensibly to bristle at the encroachment of our campus by (presumably) snobbish Hollywood production crews—geez, they are so
in the way. Totally made me late
to class.
But really, whenever possible, we exploited the event. We
boasted to our friends at other
universities, crowded the barricades hoping to catch glimpses
of Hugh Jackman, snapped pictures to post on Facebook and
perhaps even showed up outside
Buchanan Tower at 2 am, stirred
by vague rumors that they would
be filming an explosion scene.
The affairs of the X-Men
Origins: Wolverine shoot on East
Mall late last month were certainly something to talk about.
Then again, at UBC we are not
unaccustomed to seeing film
crews and sets around campus.
Last year there were 46 separate
productions shot on university
grounds.
Considering that British
Columbia typically hosts over
200 major film and television
productions (excluding commercials) in a year, UBC commands
nearly 15 per cent of film shoots.
Our campus is a hot venue.
"UBC has always been a very
valuable asset," affirmed Susan Croome, British Columbia
film commissioner. The Film
Commission, which in 2008
celebrated its 30th year showcasing our province as a motion
picture production destination,
often recommends UBC to international filmmakers. Croome
praised the campus as unique
and cited a history of valuable
experiences that drives foreign
producers to return.
In regards to Wolverine she
crooned, "We felt very happy to
have Hugh Jackman back here."
Every other X-Men movie featuring Jackman has filmed scenes
in BC; and all but the first have
shot at UBC.
Producers keen to film on
our campus inquire with UBC
Business Development, which
charges location fees of $2500
per shoot day and $1250 per
prep or wrap day, as well as various operating fees.
In 2008 commercial film production at UBC brought in more
than $200,000 in location fees
alone.
A portion of these revenues
serves to sustain UBC's own film
program. The departments of
Film Studies and Film Production divide the funds to purchase
films to screen, projectors, equipment, supplies, and services.
"The majority of the funding
for our equipment comes from
these location rental revenues,"
said Sharon McGowan, associate
head of Film Production. "Without them we would not be able
to do many of the things we do."
American films comprise
roughly three-quarters of
BC production.
As ofyet, the languishing
economy has not seen a
decline in the business.
McGowan stressed that while
a UBC student pays the same
tuition for a philosophy lecture
course as for a film production
class, the costs to provide the
film course are significandy
higher. The livelihood of UBC's
film program depends on campus commercial production. As
bonus, it is blessed by the networking opportunities that these
productions beget.
"The producer of The Matrix,
Erwin Stoff, was here last year
with The Day the Earth Stood Still,
she explained. "He came into a
class to speak to Creative Writing
and Film students—he contacted
me to offer to do this—and he
talked about how nice it was to
meet the students and get to
know people from the campus."
Once or twice per term, granting schedules and conditions coincide, film students are allowed
to visit a set. McGowan claimed
that these firsthand observations
have been great successes.
In addition to The Day the
Earth Stood Still, productions
shot on-campus last year included the upcoming comedy, The
Tooth Fairy, featuring Dwayne
(the Rock) Johnson and Ashley
Judd, as well as Harper's Island,
the new CBS horror series airing
April 9.
Arlene Chan, marketing manager of UBC Business Development, processes all campus
production requests. They range
from the scandy-budgeted student feature to the multi-billion
dollar blockbuster hopeful
(student films have their fees
waived).
Chan approves those that are
deemed to be without adverse effect to the university or its reputation and minimally disruptive
to university life. Her office
notifies departments affected,
which also receive a slice of the
revenues.
Those curious about upcoming productions can look to the
Business Development website
which, Chan insisted, will soon
be up-to-date.
And what of the economic
crisis? American films and television comprise roughly three-
quarters of BC production. As
of yet, the languishing economy
has not seen a decline in the
business.
"We're very fortunate,"
Croome said. "We're actually
seeing a lot of interest for film
production in 2009."
Vancouver's production industry ranks third-largest in
North America and has expanded rapidly to meet pre- and post-
production needs.
As with the choice of UBC for
the Wolverine re-shoot, Croome
reasoned, "During uncertain
times producers want to go to a
tried and true location."
Chan alluded to other major
productions scheduled to film at
UBC this spring. However, she
declined to offer specifics, citing
years past when the paparazzi
have materialized on campus,
disturbing the peace of producers and students alike.
For now, we can be grateful
that Wolverine does not premiere
until after final exams, that is,
May 1. Afterward we can indulge
in that action-thriller-fantasy that
only Hollywood (and the cold,
dark cement fagade of Buchanan
Tower) can produce. *2I
A SELECTION OF FILMS AT UBC:
1987
The Stepfather
Terry O'Quinn
2001
Antitrust
Ryan Phillippe,
Rachael Leigh Cook
2004
The Butterfly Effect
Ashton Kutcher, Amy Smart
TELEVISION SHOWS:
Battlestar Galactica (2004
to 2008)
2007
88 Minutes
Al Pacino
2008
Passengers
Anne Hathaway, Patrick
Wilson
UPCOMING MOVIES ON CAMPUS:
MARCH 4-5
7am-10pm Chan Centre for the Performing Arts
MARCH 6
7am-10pm Chan Centre for the Performing Arts
7am-10pm Liu Institute for Global Issues
Production will prepare the Chan Centre from 7am-7pm, March 2-3, with
wrap Mar 9-10.
WHO DO I CONTACT?
Contact the Film Industry Liaison Officer, at 604-837-1951 or the
Marketing Manager, UBC Business Development at 604-822-6555.
2009 (IN POST
PRODUCTION, TO BE
RELEASED IN MAY)
X-Men Origins: Wolverine
Hugh Jackman, Ryan
Reynolds
GOH IROHMOTO PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY 4 | NEWS
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
MARCH 3, 2009
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Program (DAP) at the University of British Columbia.
DAP prepares university graduates with limited or no training in
accounting for entry into a professional accounting designation.
DAP's curriculum is recognized by the Chartered Accountants
School of Business (CASB) and satisfies most of the CMA and
CGA program requirements.
APPLICATION DEADLINES:
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August 1st - Canadian Applicants
Find out how DAP can accelerate your future:
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Fi
SAUDER
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Opening Worlds
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Go to www.ubyssey.ca to get all of your campus news.
A Speakeasy representative providing information in their office in the SUB basement, shawn li photo/the ubyssey
AMS service fights counselling stigma
Students are not taking advantage of Speakeasy counselling
by Ian Turner
News Staff
Speakeasy, an AMS service that provides information, peer counselling
and crisis support to the UBC students and community is not being
taken advantage of by UBC students,
despite the service being free. The
heads of the organization believe it
is indicative of a stigma against
counselling existing on campus.
Nick Nagy, one of the two co-
heads of Speakeasy is on the frontline fighting the stigma. He offered
two reasons for why this stigma
exists/It's more a stigma against
not being able to control one's emotions by themselves. In Western
society specifically we view having
emotions as a weak thing," he said.
No one wants
to seem weak or
need help.
—Nick Nagy, Speakeasy co-head
"The stigma is not against counsellors, it's against the people who actually have to go there or syaing they
need to go. No one wants to seem
weak or need help."
Additionally, Nagy said, "There
still is a large stigma against the
concept of someone having a mental illness."
Fatou Wurie, the other Speakeasy
co-head, spoke about the service's
initiatives. Currently they are taking the traditional route of posters, classroom talks, and word of
mouth. She added that breaking
this barrier is difficult because
the "stigma depends on your
background, on your religious beliefs—it depends on how you just
perceive life."
"We try to make sure our volunteers are exposed to issues of
diversity, types of sexuality, religions and cultures so that they are
not coming in blinded and think
all have the same mentality or approach towards counseling."
Speakeasy is composed of approximately 80 volunteers, and
the two co-heads on a salary. The
organization previously operated
an information booth in the SUB's
main concourse.
Wurie noted that the service
was not clear to people to associate the information desk that exists downstairs in the SUB with
the one in the main concourse.
"That is a problem at Speakeasy
we are constantly running into,"
she admitted. Efforts are underway to fink the information booth
more tightly with Speakeasy's
goal: providing peer-support
services.
Peer-support service, as volunteer Mark McLean put it, is to
"listen to what the student's problems are," and that "we try and
help them figure out what they
should do" without offering any
advice.
"I think if more people were
aware of peer-support there
would not be as much of a stigma
because frankly it is just people
coming into talk," he said.
Nagy added that "As more people become aware of the importance of maintaining good mental
health the stigma will slowly wear
away." Xj
EUS campaigns to raise fair trade awareness
Attempt to change student behavior during week-long event
by Zoe Siegel
News Staff
How much coffee do you drink?
To most university students a
cup of Java is part of the usual
morning routine. Less thought
about are the impacts their coffee habit has on developing
countries. Engineers Without
Borders (EWB) is hosting the
week-long event Coffee To End
Poverty to raise awareness of fair
trade and to encourage students
to be more aware ofthe products
they buy.
"There are lots of myths about
fair trade out there and we are
trying to break down the stereotypes," said Sara Mohammad
Pour, EWB director of outreach.
Fair trade products guarantee
fair prices and safe working conditions for the farmers. Coffee is
a well known fair trade product,
but there is also cocoa, sugar,
tea, flowers and many others.
Certified Fair Trade Products are
marked with the black-and-white
Transfair Canada Logo. Products
with this logo have been purchased under completely fair
trade conditions.
"It's about choice, we want to
make students aware of their
choices," stated AnneliesTjebbes,
director of communications.
The week began with outreach events at coffee shops on
campus, including Salt Spring
Coffee, the Boulevard, AMS
food service restaurants and at
Place Vanier and Totem Park
residences.
According to Tjebbes, "there
is attitude and behavior change.
UBC has assisted with the behavior change of the students
by selling all fair trade coffee,
but many students are unaware
that that is what they are drinking. It's about taking ownership over actions because they
realize fair trade is making a
difference."
On Wednesday there will be
a fair trade panel in the Norm
Theatre and many experts
who have first hand experience working with fair  trade
organizations will present their
views and opinions about fair
trade. Thursday there will be a
pancake breakfast where fair
trade chocolate chip banana
pancakes and coffee will be
served. During the evening they
will show Black Gold, a film
about impoverished Ethiopian
coffee, focusing on one man's
fight for a fair price.
This is the third year that
EWB has run Coffee To End Poverty, but the first year they have
put on events like the speaker
panel and the film.
The week will conclude with
EWB Day on Saturday where
EWB members will go out to
local grocery stores including
Safeway, Stongs and IGA Marketplace and hand out flyers
promoting fair trade. EWB Day
is a nationwide event so all other EWB chapters will be doing
the same thing across Canada.
"This year there will be something for everyone," said Justine
Clift, EWB Fair Trade Project
organizer. \a MARCH 3, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
NEWS I ;
Online identity destroys job opportunities
Once upon a time you could leave your past behind, not anymore
by Ian Turner
News Staff
Digital Tattoo, a UBC awareness
campaign, is striving to educate
students about their online identity and the impact it will have
on future careers.
"People have often done
youthful indiscretions that they
have had to live down and the
Internet is just a new place that
these could be recorded," said
Sheryl Adams, an administrator
at Digital Tattoo. "Your youthful indiscretion can be emailed
around the world in a nanosecond. In the olden days you could
leave your past behind, not so
much any more."
"Students' online identity can
impact a student's job search
both positively and negatively.
And we feel that a lot of students
do not understand how employers can use social networking in
the hiring process," said Carol
Naylor, manager at UBC Career
Education. At career conferences
Naylor has learned that many recruiters are actively looking online for applicant information.
She defined an online identity
We feel that a lot
of students do not
understand how
employers can use
social networking in
the hiring process.
—Carol Naylor, manager at UBC
Career Education
as what your online activity says
about you as a person. "People
will make assumptions about
you based on the impressions
you leave," she said later.
Digital Tattoo routinely holds
booths at on-campus events that
have high attendance rates, Imagine Day being an example. Career
Services does not have an official
stance regarding students' online
activity. Both Adams and Naylor
stated that students are largely
unaware of their own ability to
control their public image on
the web, an example being Face-
book's privacy settings. Naylor
expanded upon this point saying many students did not know
that their own photos could be
accessed by employers through
others' Facebook accounts.
Liana Popa, Digital Tattoo's
coordinator, said that Facebook
is but one way to excavate an
individual's online identity. She
cited Xobni, an ouflook application, that locates the sender's online social networking accounts
and shows the account's display
photo(s) alongside the email,
which may include a resume.
Coupled with students' ignorance about their online identities is a belief that damaging online information can be removed
from the web. Naylor dismissed
that notion, saying that once anything has been posted on the web
it is likely to be etched on the Internet. Adams seconded this saying it would be "a wise person"
who let that general rule guide
their actions.
When asked what students
should post online, Adams said,
"Is it something you want you
mom to see? Because your mom
will probably be able to see it
soon." *2l
GOH IROMOTO PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
Surviving
the recession
Columnist Alicia Woodside gives you the downlow on how to job-search during hard economic times
Recession-proof job-search strategies
by Alicia Woodside
News Writer
Uneasy about the economy
and how it may affect your job
prospects? The following article
serves as a useful compass, outlining advice in how to find the
best job in today's economy
from the viewpoint of a successful job-seeking student, and
that of experienced director of
UBC Career Services, Howie
Outerbridge.
Top five job-search strategies:
1. Stay on top of trends:
Clearly, some sectors are affected more severely than others.
Howie advises to really look into
the larger trends to determine
the best areas for future work
opportunities. It's as straightforward as reading the newspaper
on a regular basis. He advises
the Working section of The Vancouver Sun, which "is basically a
snapshot of everything going on
in BC and Canada." It is readily
available online. While students
may find fewer opportunities
this year in oil and gas, investment banking, or working with
the big auto producers, they can
direct their sights to numerous
emerging opportunities. Simply
glancing at the proposed federal
budget gives students ideas for
opportunities in several areas,
such as construction and infrastructure, or home renovations
businesses. Students can also
anticipate many opportunities in
BC's service industry during the
lead-up to the Olympic Games.
In other trends, Howie predicts Obama's lead in developing green energies to provide
a future surge in opportunities
worth exploring for students.
The large aging population
translates to opportunities in
the health care sector, as well
as in the provision of medical
and health-related products and
services. In addition, it means
unprecedented levels of attrition
for the government as the aging
workforce begins to accelerate.
Branches such as the Public Service Commission and Canadian
Security Intelligence Service are
expecting huge staffing needs.
Government related postings
on Career Services' job board experienced a jump of 28 per cent
between November 2007 and November 2008, while all other sectors experienced little change, or
a decline. Howie advises reading
the 'Working' section of the Saturday Vancouver Sun for a great
place to start generating ideas
2. Self Initiate! It's often repeated that over 80 per cent of
jobs aren't even advertised. As a
result, job search attempts that
consist only of applying to postings can severely limit success. It
can be difficult, even impossible,
to convey your skills and personality on paper alone. The best jobs
are found by networking. When
an employer meets a potential
hire in-person and outside of a
typical hiring environment, they
will be able to assess things that
cannot come across on paper,
such as enthusiasm, attitude, and
interpersonal skills. Great ways
to create these opportunities are
through cold-calling companies
you'd like to work for and setting
up informational meetings. Don't
be shy, the worst they can say is,
"No thank-you."
Other great tactics are to use
well-connected faculty and UBC
staff. Pay a visit to a professor from
your field, or to a staff member
from Career Services, as employers are frequently contacting UBC
in search of a qualified candidate
they can recommend. In addition,
these knowledgeable sources can
direct you to the best places to
seek opportunities. If job boards
do see a decrease in postings this
year, the increased competition is
reason enough to seek more creative job search strategies.
3. Create a network team: If
you were to agree to share contacts with a few of your trusted
friends   and   classmates,   you
would far sooner come across
the ideal work opportunity, or
the contact to make that job a
reality. As a result of sharing
networks and actively communicating opportunities to one another, these trusted contacts act
as teammates in your job search,
always on the lookout for something or someone that may be
helpful to you. The beauty of this
strategy is that your teammates
know you well and care for your
success, so they can pass on
ideal opportunities. Build your
aggregate network attending
events and building relationships with people you feel you
can learn from.
4. Use those resources: Did
you know that there are six career fairs happening in term
two, or that UBC Career Services
has a fantastic, loaded job board
online? What about the Work
Study program, or the one-on-
one peer support program that
is being introduced by Career
Services to help students more
personally in their career preparation? In the event of fewer jobs
being available this spring, your
chances of success come down to
the number of opportunities you
apply to, as well as the quality of
your cover letter, resume, and
interviewing skills. The peer career support will provide much-
needed one-on-one guidance on
all aspects of the career search.
Career Services will also be expanding its Work Study opportunities to the summer, which
offer part-time work for students
at rates of $15-$20 per hour in
their field of interest. Sign up for
a bi-weekly update about all Career Services resources on their
Facebook group.
5. Be flexible! It's evident that
some areas are adversely affected by the economy, and it may
be that your dream job is one of
those areas. A common message
from career experts is to be more
flexible in times of economic uncertainty. If the job you land this
spring isn't the ideal one you
envisioned, ensure your future
success by getting the most you
possibly can from the job. There
are always transferable skills to
be developed that can aid you in
your ideal career down the road.
Linda Gully, director of the
Business Career Centre at the
Sauder School of Business, states
that "students can normally
choose their industry, their position, or the company." Her message is to be thankful for an opportunity that satisfies goals in
one of these three dimensions,
and not to expect to land a job
right away with all three perfect
circumstances. *2l c
CuJ
tui
Editor: Trevor Melanson | E-mail: culture@ubyssey.ca
March 3,2009 | Page 6
Vitamin Water: The hipper, sexier broccoli
VITAMINWATER
»120 CALORIES
»39 GRAMS OF SUGAR
COCA COLA
»140 CALORIES
»39 GRAMS OF SUGAR
by Arielle Indiana Furneaux
Culture Writer
Playing the time machine game
can be an instructive exercise.
Pick one object from our society,
and predict what archaeologists
from the future would conclude
about our culture based on that
artifact. The future archaeologist would have good reason to
conclude that UBC students,
circa 2009, were terribly malnourished. Maybe food had lost
its nutritional value after some
agricultural disaster. Perhaps
the digestive tract had warped
to prohibit digestion of solids.
In any case, the prevalence of
VitaminWater would suggest
that something big had happened to upset our relationship
with food.
VitaminWater dispensers
have sprung up far and wide on
UBC's campus, beckoning the
uninitiated with candy-coloured
botfles and the beguiling suggestion: "Try it." Flavours are
tailored to meet specific bodily
needs, bearing succinct names
like "Defense" and "Revive."
VitaminWater's cachet has been
cemented by a nod on Gossip
Girl, where an anxious teen requests a botde of "Focus" to help
get her through a party. Clever.
UBC students are embracing
the trend. Law student Xiaodi
Jin told me he gravitated to
the drink "because it looked
healthy, efficient and clean."
Coca-Cola is obviously doing
something right, having bought
VitaminWater-creator Glaceau
in 2007.
It's no secret that advertisers capitalize on inventing new
problems for us to treat. My
eyelashes aren't thick enough,
so I should buy some volumiz-
ing mascara. Your manhood
isn't big enough, so you should
order yourself a  bigger   one.
These branded deficiencies are
particularly insidious when they
pertain to our health. We can
usually talk ourselves out of the
idea that un-enhanced eyelashes
are the end of the world. Claims
about health can be harder to
shake off. For one, they seem
more serious. Also, we may not
have the scientific know-how to
assess them critically.
Michael Pollan, author of
In Defense of Food, bemoans
the growing trend of treating
food as combinations of nutrients as opposed to nourishing
meals. Instead of buying a tub
of yogurt, consumers buy health
products like Yoplait Source,
whose cartons trill about "8 essentials" like bacterial cultures
and vitamin A. Yogurt of the
bygone era was certainly nutritious, but wasn't presented as a
health elixir.
Consumers now scoop up cereals, orange juice and milk fortified with vitamins. The same
trend has permeated the most
basic sustenance we can give our
bodies: water. Instead of relying
on water as an intuitive form of
hydration, we have boosted the
meager liquid's prestige with
the addition of minerals, vitamins and flavours.
VitaminWater does contain its
fair share of vitamins. My botde
of "Defense" (bought for research
purposes, I assure you) contains
vitamin B3, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin C, zinc and vitamin B12. These vitamins and
minerals are tellingly referred
to as "medicinal ingredients,"
reinforcing Michael Pollan's
"food-as-nutrients" lament. And
the amount of vitamins isn't
negligible, either. "Defense" contains 1.5 micrograms of vitamin
B12. For comparison: one large
fast food taco contains 1.6 micrograms. The daily recommended
intake is 6.0 micrograms.
Although the drink contains a
substantial amount of vitamins,
its high sugar content may overwhelm any health benefits. Each
botde contains 39 grams of
sugar (roughly two tablespoons),
and 125 calories—just shy of
the 140 in a can of Coca Cola.
Of course, each botde officially
contains three servings. But really, who drinks just a third of a
botde of water?
You might suggest that the
presence of vitamins outweighs
the sugar content of VitaminWater. Certainly, a vitamin-
deficient third world denizen
would benefit from the infusion
of vitamins in a bottle of VitaminWater. But North Americans
generally aren't suffering from
scurvy or beriberi. According to
Scienceline, the only vitamin of
which Americans consume less
than half their recommended
daily amount is Vitamin E,
which happens to be fat-soluble.
In other words, in order to
properly absorb the Vitamin E
in a botde of VitaminWater, you
would have to time your drink
to coincide with a meal. Furthermore, Vitamin E is only found in
four of VitaminWater's thirteen
varieties.
After their discovery in 1919
by biochemist Casimir Funk,
vitamins became a big hit with
the middle class. Amusingly,
these were the very people
who didn't need them. The upper crust could afford enough
nutrition to avoid deficiency
diseases like scurvy. Little has
changed in nearly a century.
VitaminWater plays right to the
Kitsilano mindset. Here is a
group of wealthy, trendy people
eager to jump on the latest
health bandwagon. If you can
afford a $2.25 botde of cunning
marketing and sugar, you probably don't need those incidental
vitamins. \a
Hot Hot Heat for a drunk drunk Pit
by Trevor Record
Culture Staff
I thought that Hot Hot Heat was
pretty popular at some point,
but I guess things have gone
downhill for them. Last Thursday they played a free concert
at the Pit. They were promoting
Corona beer, which was still
not the cheapest beverage available at the bar, but all it takes is
a few people deciding to buy
that stuff for the rest of their
lives for it to be worthwhile to
the company's marketing team.
The Pit, which had been
painted up like a tropical trollop, had reasonably high attendance, but considering there
was a free concert going on you
mighthave expected a moderate
lineup. Once the doors opened
at 8pm, everyone that wanted
to get in did, which places the
show behind Pit Night for attendance. All this seems to contradict their MySpace page, which
claims two sold-out shows at
the Commodore in April (ah,
but there they are opening for
Bloc Party).
Maybe   it  was   a   carefully
calculated move on the part of
the Corona marketing team to
make sure we were all getting
sort of sauced, but the show
didn't start until a few hours
after doors had opened.
The openers were Vancouver's Bend Sinister; I questioned if they named themselves after the Fall album
or the Nabokov novel it took
its name from. Despite their
namesake, they didn't do
anything too musically crazy,
playing basically solid rock
music (with a few exceptions).
They started things off with a
terrible cover of "A Day in the
Life," and finished with a passable cover of Journey's "Don't
Stop Believing," which many of
the partially-inebriated crowd
were disposed to scream along
with. In between they sounded
sort of prog-rockish, and at moments like Queen.
Hot Hot Heat got started even
later, but the crowd's reaction
was explosive. Although I hate
to admit it, things did indeed
get fairly hot. About half of the
dance floor was either dancing
or trying desperately not to get
Hot Hot Heat had nearly everyone on the dance floor dancing—or falling over, hereward longley photo/the ubyssey
knocked onto their asses. For
a while, we were getting into
punk concert territory. Hot Hot
Heat played an hour set, consisting of many of their earlier
songs. They followed up with a
single encore. Then Pit security
kicked all of our sorry asses
out.
Maybe it was just the beer,
but the show was good. The last
time I saw Hot Hot Heat play
(at the Croatian Cultural Centre
back in 2003), the Walkmen and
the Organ opened for them, both
of whom played a better set. I
guess they've gone from being a
sort of crummy breakout band,
to being a competent, established band whose popularity is
waning. Damn, I feel old. vi MARCH 3, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
CULTURE I 7
To some, it seems it's always white guys with Asian girls rather than otherwise, shawn li photo illustration/the ubyssey
Angry Asian man
Dealing with persecution
and acquiring confidence
by Crystal Tai
Culture Writer
A week ago, I sat down with self-
described "former Angry Asian
Man" Mark Lee. For those of
you non-angry Asians and non-
Asians alike, "angry Asian man"
is a term that's been coined for
Asian men who feel subjugated
and invisible within Western
society. Feelings of neglect may
arise from their perceived lack
of political visibility, media exposure and Asian role models.
There are also the stereotypes
that have accompanied Asians
in North America.
Mark Lee is a fourth-generation Chinese-Canadian, speaks
English at home with his mom
and dad, and grew up in the
Vancouver suburbs where he
watched hockey and G.I. Joe.
For Mark, the bulk of his angst
started when he realized society
looked upon Asian men as sexless computer programmers,
possessing little machismo
and zero social skills. Mark's
reality didn't help his outlook
They harbour
misogyny,
blaming Asian
women for leaving 'us' for white
men, but really,
it's just the anger of getting
no women!
—Mark Lee
on Asian men either: "I had
low self-esteem, I was chubby
and I always put women on a
pedestal."
Dating always seemed very
one sided for Mark. It was always a white guy and an Asian
girl, he said. But rarely would
one see a white girl with an
Asian guy. Mark became curious and started poking around
online to see if there were any
correlations or theories behind
his observations.
"Itwas winter break, I was 17,
reading stuff online," he said.
He found Asian-American social awareness websites such as
Asian Nation and Angry Asian
Man. "That's when it all started
to make sense. I wouldn't have
attributed [all the setbacks I
felt that Asian men had] to race
before," he said. "I didn't realize other people had the same
theories."
Ultimately, it was anti-Asian
racism that "really got to" Mark.
"I read about some incidents on
the campus at Stanford University," he said. There had been
racist graffiti on the Ivy League
campus, "racist graffiti that was
very misogynistic about Asian
women," he said. "I'm not sure
if these ideas might have been
acted upon, but they were combined with [notions] of raping
Asian women." Such racism existing in a so-called "PC" cream-
of-the-crop intellectual facility
enraged Mark.
Online was also where Mark
learned about the origins of
the stereotype of the sexless
Asian man. Some of these notions are based from historical
misconceptions he said. "In a
frontier country, such as Canada, there were few women,"
he said. "Chinese workers were
presented with very little opportunity to do regular work.
A few that were lucky became
merchants, others did what
they could," Mark said, referring  to  the  domestic labour
that Chinese-Canadians took
on. "They didn't have a lot of
options," so many of them did
domestic labour, while others
opened shop within the industry such as laundromats, Chinese restaurants, tailor shops
and the like.
"I think racial dynamics
[are indicative] of the different threats different groups
represent to the [mainstream]
society," Mark said. "Different
people are blamed for different
issues." Historically, Asian-
Canadians have presented an
economic threat. "Do they fear
that we're smarter? That we'll
take over?" All in all, Mark attributes the stereotypes to historical fact, as well as many of
the misconceptions that have
perpetually plagued Asians in
the West.
But the worst part of it, according to Mark, is the role of
the Angry Asian Man himself.
Despite the fact that they are affected by Western stereotypes,
these angry Asian men also tend
to bring it upon themselves.
"They harbour misogyny, blaming Asian women for leaving
'us' for white men," said Mark.
"But really, it's just the anger of
getting no women!"
He plans to put the spotlight
on the Asian male community in his upcoming workshop,
"Asian Man, Take a Stand! Re-
framing the Angry Asian Man
Experience." He says it will be a
group experience where Asians
and non-Asians alike can chat
together about social stigmas surrounding Asian men.
Mark's workshop happens on
March 5, l-2:30pm in room
214, SUB building. ^
The workshop is one of many,
which will take place at the
Asian Canadian Cultural Organization's annual Unconfer-
ence, March 5 and 6. For more
information check out www.
ubcacco.com or look up ACCO
on Facebook.
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O
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WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
DON'T JUST
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CHANGE.
ENGINEER IT.
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Now is the time to act.
Visit bcit.ca, search 'engineering'
TECHNOLOGY
CHANGES
EVERYTHING  10    SPORTS
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
MARCH 3, 2009
Agenda : Wednesday, March 4
1. Women's Supplement
2. Colours Supplement
3. Staff restructuring vote
4. Kate's fundraiser
5. Motivational staff meeting date
6. Mary Lynn seminar
7. Discuss where 6 went
8. Mary Lynn seminar
9. Ubyssey board election update
• Note: The meeting will start precisely at 12:05. Be there
Back 2 Back!
The women's volleyball team competed in the CIS championships
this past weekend and won their second consecutive crown in
Fredericton, New Brunswick. Although finishing third in the Canada
West regular season, the Birds bounced back to claim the Canada
West championship and went on to beat Calgary at the CIS Championship finals.
With pressure on their back and playing far away from home, the
Birds were initially not the top favourite in the tournament as they
were seeded second after Montreal. The Calgary Dinos had the momentum going into the final by beating Montreal in the semifinals,
but fell short in front of the defending champions. The final was
a hard fought match with a score of 25-20, 22-25, 29-27, 20-25,
15-9. The Birds have now established their position after suffering a
30-year drought prior to the crown they achieved last year.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS BURGLAND
Canada dominant
in sledge hockey
The Sledge Hockey Cup was held from Feburary 24-March 1 in the
Thunderbird Arena at UBC. Team Canada prevailed 2-1 in a shootout against the US in the finals, jon horn photos/the ubyssey march 3, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
ADVERTISEMENT     II
UBC'S    CELEBRATE    RESEARCH    WEEK
YOU ARE HERE
NAVIGATING AN UNCERTAIN WORLD
Each year in March, UBC faculties, departments, schools, research hospitals and
partner institutions are invited to host discussion forums, lectures, seminars, open houses
and symposia on topical and timely issues related to their research
From Fine Arts to Chemistry everyone is invited to participate in this week-long event.
Almost all of these events are FREE and open to the public, students, faculty, staff and
schools. For updates and a complete listing of these events visit:
WWW.CEtEBRATERESEARCH.UBC.CA
7 ARCH
TURDAY
Faculty of Medicine Research Day
KALEIDOSCOPE OF POPULATION & PUBLIC
HEALTH
10:00AM-12:00PM ">S
How can we improve the health of our most
vulnerable and disadvantaged citizens? Join faculty
members of UBC's new School of Population and
Public Health talk about their research into a variety
of topics, including emerging health threats and
rapid responses to combat them; understanding
how to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases;
how to maintain a healthy society; how to protect
and enhance our health care system; and the latest
issues in occupational and environmental health.
Contact: Brian Kladko, brian.kladko@ubc.ca
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
Faculty of Medicine Research Day
EMERGING RESEARCH THEMES IN PSYCHIATRY
2:00PM - 4:00PM ">S
A discussion ofthe problems being tackled - and
the breakthroughs achieved - by some of Canada's
most promising young psychiatric researchers,
including: Jun-Feng Wang, John Ogrodniczuk,
Christian G. Schiitz and David Bond. All welcome.
Contact: Brian Kladko, brian.kladko@ubc.ca
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
^^MARCH
■dnday
BRIDGING THE GAP:
Bringing Medicines to the Poor of the World ^^
7:00PM-8:30PM
A symposium to discuss how UBC is addressing
the obstacles to researching diseases of, and
delivering medical technologies to, the developing
world. Featuring Drs. Brett Finlay, Robert Hancock
and Kishor Wasan, with Ian Bell and Michael
Gretes. Contact: Jennifer Choi, jenniferchoi@gmail
com.
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street - room 0150
UBC's Centre for International Health & Global
Health
INTEGRATING RESEARCH, SERVICE & LEARNING
IN GLOBAL HEALTH ^S *^S
5:00PM-7:00PM
Join us for an evening of global health project
presentations, student posters and stimulating
discussions on the future of global health. Free.
Contact: Sozan Savehilagh, sozans@interchange,
ubc.ca.
Please rsvp at: ghealth@interchange.ubc.ca.
Multipurpose room, 6476 NW Marine Drive
UBC School of Nursing
IS STIGMA HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH?
Stigma, Trauma and Resilience and Their Influence
on Your Health "^^
1:00PM-5:00PM
In this session, some of the latest research on
stigma, trauma and resilience will explore how
protective factors can help reduce health inequities
among youth. Free,
Contact: Jennifer.Matthews@nursing.ubc.ca.
Robson Square 800 Robson Street
^^   High School students welcome
^^   Public welcome
Women's Health Research Institute
NAVIGATING THE UNCERTAIN WORLD OF
WOMEN'S HEALTH "*K ">^
6:00PM - 8:00PM
Given all ofthe media hype around the new cancer
prevention vaccine - the HPV vaccine - this
session will address the basic research behind the
virus, the diseases it causes and the current HPV
vaccine. Contact: Christina Schmidt, cschmidt®
cw.bc.ca, www.whri.org.
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
^MARCH
■ SDAY
Michael Smith Laboratories
2nd ANNUAL MOST EXCEPTIONAL ESCAPADES IN
SCIENCE - High School Conference "^^
9:00AM - 4:00PM
This event, designed for high school students
(Grades 8 to 12), showcases various scientific
pursuits, including the opportunity to engage in
hands-on activities, as well as interact with some
ofthe most prominent scientists in the world. Free.
Contact: Joanne Fox, joanne@msl.ubc.ca. FULL
2185 East Mall
UBC School of Nursing
SEXUAL HEALTH IN A SOCIAL WORLD: How do
Social Contexts Shape the Wellbeing of Sexual
Minority Youth        "^^
2:30PM-4:30PM
Together, we will examine the latest research
about sexual minority youth health inequities,
and introduce an innovative health, social and
educational intervention to promote their health.
Free. Contact: Stephanie Coen, Stephanie.coen®
nursing.ubc.ca
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
Sauder School of Business
SUSTAINABILITY AND SOCIAL INNOVATION "^
Reception: 5:00PM - 6:00PM
Presentation: 6:00PM - 7:30PM
Professor James Tansey and research associates
will discuss the projects that have marked the
beginnings of the Centre for Sustainability and
Social Innovation (CSSI). Contact: Jessie Lam,
Jessie.Iam@sauder.ubc.ca
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
nIARCH
EDNESDAY
Pharmaceutical Sciences
FROM OUTCOMES RESEARCH TO PATIENT CARE:
Knocking Down the Ivory Tower ^^
1:00PM-4:00PM
Drs. Andreas Laupacis and Sean Sullivan will
highlight the impact of outcomes research, from
both an epidemiology and health economics
perspective, on patient care and global health
policy. Contact: Suzana Topic scindric®
interchange.ubc.ca.
Social Lounge, St. John's College, 2111 Lower
Mall
Gairdner Foundation 50lh Anniversary Symposium
SCIENCE AND THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE "^S
9:00AM - 5:00PM
An academic symposium featuring eight esteemed
presenters, including four Nobel Laureates (Drs,
Carl Wieman, Harold Varmus, Sydney Brenner and
Roger Tsien). This all-day event is intended for life
sciences researchers and interested members of
the public. Tickets to this FREE event are available
to the public and must be picked up in advance
from the Chan Centre Ticket Office (Mon-Sat, 12-
5:00 p.m.) The morning and afternoon sessions
are ticketed separately; For more information
(604)875-3535.
The Chan Centre, 6265 Crescent Road
2009 Michael Smith Memorial Nobel Forum
PERSONAL GENOMICS: HOPE OR HYPE? ">^
7:30PM-9:00PM
A free public forum discussing the science and
issues of personal genetic testing. Panel of
renowned medical geneticists (Cynthia Kenyon,
Muin Khoury & Harold Varmus) will be moderated
by award-winning former NBC correspondent,
Charles Sabine. Hosted by Dr. Michael Hayden.
Visit www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca for up-to-date
details. Contact: Seetha Kumaran, skumaran®
cmmt.ubc.ca. Tickets are free and must be picked
up in advance from The Chan Centre Ticket Office
(www.chancentre.ubc.ca)
The Chan Centre, 6265 Crescent Road
Faculty of Applied Science
LEARNING FROM EARTHQUAKES TO PREPARE
FOR EARTHQUAKES 1^ ">K
3:30 PM -
Join Professor Carlos E. Ventura and learn the
causes and types of earthquakes and their effects
on buildings, bridges and other structures. Don't
miss the shake tests after the talk! Contact:
ErinRose Handy, Ehnrose.handy@ubc.ca. Free.
2332 Main Mall, 2020/2030
Faculty of Applied Science
NANOTECHNOLOGY: From Fiction to Science ">S
1:00 PM-
Professor Alireza Nojeh explores the futuristic
visions behind nanotechnology, as well as some of
its popular applications and implications. Contact:
ErinRose Handy, Erinrose.handy@ubc.ca. Free.
Everyone welcome!
Kaiser Building - 2332 Main Mall, 2020/2030
Faculty of Applied Science
TO THE MOON AND BACK: Thunderbird Robotics
10:00AM-2:00PM (talks)
11:30AM - 1:30PM (demonstration)
Attend the talks and come see UBC students show-
off their robots at the lunch-time mini-race.
Contact: ErinRose Handy,
Erinrose.handy@ubc.ca. Free.
2332 Main Mall, 2020/2030
Land & Food Systems
VISIT THE UBC WINE LIBRARY 1^
11:00AM - 12:00PM, 1:00PM - 2:00PM &
2:00PM-3:00PM
The Wine Library in the Wine Research Centre is
one of the most beautiful, modem and well-
equipped wine libraries in the world. The library
can house 22,000 bottles of wine. Contact
Samantha Turner to register at wine@interchange,
ubc.ca or 604.822.0005. Free!
Wine Research Centre, 2205 East Mall
UBC School of Audiology & Speech Sciences
CELEBRATE SPEECH AND HEARING RESEARCH:
Talk to Me, Listen to Me ^      "^^
9:00AM-12:00PM
Learn about our current research, explore
possible careers, and experience the energy in
our new facility - where insights into the nature of
human communication are being translated into
therapeutic action. Contact: ssmall@audiospeech.
ubc.ca.
3rd Floor, 2177 Wesbrook Mall
TAG ISOTL NETWORKING EVENT
2:00PM-3:15PM
UBC's new course management system (Vista')
collects and compiles detailed data on student
online activity. Join us to hear results of a research
study and help identify future directions. Contact:
Alice Cassidy, alice.cassidy@ubc.ca. To register
visit www.tag.ubc.ca and link to ISoTL Networking
Events,
Fraser River Room (Room 2.27), 1961 East Mall
Green College
TIME AS SPIRIT: Common Law Thought and
the Historical Imagination in the Early American
Republic
5:00PM-6:30PM
The talk is drawn from Dr. Kunal Parker's
forthcoming book, Custom and History: Common
Law Thought and the Historical Imagination in
Nineteenth Century America.
Green College Coach House, 6201 Cecil Green
PkRd
^ MARCH
FRIDAY
College For Interdisciplinary Studies
BEYOND BINARIES & BORDERS ">S
9:00AM - 5:00PM (see also March 14)
We will be looking at the ways in which
intercultural and interdisciplinary approaches
intersect using the case study of food with an
emphasis on fish. Please rsvp to Lindsay to reserve
seating at lindsay.funk@ubc.ca.
Liu Institute, Multipurpose Room, 6476 NW Marine
Dr
UBC School of Nursing
MEN'S HEALTH:
Minds, Bodies & Masculine Ideals        ^^
5:30PM-7:00PM
This panel presents research on men's depression,
fathers' smoking, South Asian Canadian men's
heart health, and young men's sexual health to
explore relationships between masculinity and
men's health experiences. Everyone welcome.
Contact: Stephanie Coen at nexus@nursing.ubc.ca,
www.nexus.ubc.ca.
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
MvRCH
JRDAY
^Imarch
■jrsday
V^-r
Centre for Health and Environment Research
AIR POLLUTION AND HEART DISEASE - Making
the Connections "^^
7:00PM-9:00PM
Air pollution has been identified as a direct cause
of cardiovascular disease. Find out from B.C.'s
leading experts what this means for our health
and what is being done about it here in the Lower
Mainland. Contact: Christie Hurrell, hurrell®
interchange.ubc.ca.
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
Ike Barber Cell Transplant Program
ANNUAL UBC DIABETES RESEARCH FORUM ">S
12:00PM-5:00PM
This forum is an event where the public, students,
scientists and physicians gather to exchange ideas
and learn about the latest breakthroughs in all
areas of diabetes research. Contact: Crystal
Robertson, isletlab@interchange.ubc.ca. For up-to-
date details visit, www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca.
LSI 3 2350 Health Sciences Mall
The Vancouver Institute Presents
SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION: How B.C. Can
Be a Showcase For the New "Electricity Economy"
8:15PM-
Guest speaker Professor Robert Evans is also the
author of Fueling Our Future: An Introduction to
Sustainable Energy.
Lecture Hall No. 20, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre
WWW.CELEBRATERESEARCH.UBC.CA lnion
If you 'd like to submit a letter, please contact feedback@ubyssey.ca
March 3,20091 Page 12
Letters
IN RESPONSE TO SPHR'S'ISRAEL APARTHEID WEEK':
One has to wonder what is going
through the minds of the UBC
Solidarity for Palestinian Human Rights' (SPHR) executives
as they prepare to unveil another
inflammatory "Israel Apartheid
Week" from Mar. 2-6 2009 on
our beautiful campus.
Is the sole goal of SPHR to
blatandy offend and infuriate Israel's supporters at UBC, Jewish
and non-Jewish alike, by using
cheap propaganda tactics in an
attempt to equate democratic
Israel with a formerly repressive and outdated South African
system? One need only ask one
of Israel's estimated 127,000 citizens of Ethiopian extraction such
as my friend and former Israel
Defence Forces comrade-in-arms
Mekonen Gevermadhin to dispel
this vicious lie of discrimination
existing in Israel any more than
in other democratic countries.
I am puzzled as to why SPHR
would dedicate a week of their
time to Israel-bashing, when they
could gain so much more support
for their cause (yes, even among
members of UBC's Israel Awareness Club) by portraying a moderate, peace-focused, message. It
certainly would not hurt SPHR's
image if they were to attempt to
transmit more positive aspects of
Arab culture to the larger campus
community instead of constandy
railing against Israel.
I understand that many UBC
students find it challenging to accept the representation of Arabs
as peace-loving people when images of PLO hijackings, Hamas
suicide bombings, Hezbollah
rocket attacks, and above all the
9/11 Saudi terrorist attacks that
brought down the twin towers in
New York, remain fresh in their
minds. But, why not give it a try?
Why continue to stoke the flames
of the fire?
I believe strongly that a week
hosted by SPHR dedicated to
Jewish-Arab co-existence in the
Middle East would have a far
greater effect on this campus
than the continued vilification
and demonization of the Jewish-
Zionist homeland which I wholeheartedly support. *2I
—Freeman Poritz
History Honours 4
UBC Israel Awareness Club
Treasurer 2008-2009
Freeman Poritz served as an
infantry soldier and in the foreign
relations bureau of the Israel Defence Forces from 2004-2007
If you wish to to submit a letter
it must be no longer than 350
words. Your identity will be confirmed by phone or by ID from
the office. People may email us at
feedback ©ubyssey. ca
Perspectives
You...write...letter.
— last words of former letters editor
write a letter feedback@ubyssey.ca
Africa Awareness
unites diverse cultures
Editor: Joe Rayment
THE AFRICA AWARENESS
INITIATIVE'S RESPONSE TO
"CANADIAN LIFESTYLE IS NOT
FOR EVERYONE"
Canada is a multicultural country
that has embraced the peoples of
many nations. The diversity of
cultures within most Canadian
cities is one ofthe most colourful
in the world.
However, when many cultures
come together the hardest part
is finding the balance between
embracing their newfound
global solidarity and remaining
in-tune with their customs. The
Africa Awareness Initiative (AAI)
at UBC is one of the many clubs
that focus on bridging the gap
between two unique ways of life.
Students at UBC have found in
the Africa Awareness Initiative a
place that facilitates intelligent
discussion and understanding of
the relationship between African
culture and their own cultures.
The continued dedication of
AAI to increasing the positive
perception of Africa's cultural,
economic and political state
among other things has largely
led to  the implementation of
the African studies minor and
will hopefully be a key factor in
the establishment of tie African
studies major.
It was on this basis that the
executive members of the Africa
Awareness initiative agreed to
an interview by a Ubyssey writer
in the hopes of highlighting their
goals and the plight of the African student at UBC. However,
upon release, the article did not
convey what was meant during
the interview and consequendy a
lot of misconceptions have been
formed about the focus ofthe Africa Awareness Initiative, its members and the continent as a whole.
We hope to dispel those now.
The AAI team and its members
respect the position of The Ubyssey and have faith in the integrity
of the writer. We, however, dispute the idea that the club believes
that "Canadian lifestyle is not for
everyone." One of the main aims
ofthe club is to bring together peoples of many distinctive cultures
and allow them to find common
ground in their passion for Africa.
There are differences between the "Canadian lifestyle"
and that of Africans, but these
"There are differences between the
'Canadian lifestyle and that of Africans,
but these differences are what make
each culture uniaue and none can be
undermined in favour of another"
differences are what make each
culture unique and none can be
undermined in favour of another. Many African students can
attest to the warmth that they
have received within UBC and
the impact it has had on their
lives. The promotion of global
citizenship by UBC is fully embraced by the Africa Awareness
Initiative team and its members, and has inspired them to
push for equal representation
of the African continent.
The continued dedication of
the AAI team to increasing the
knowledge of African economic
affairs, among other things,
has resulted in the African
Dream Launch, which was
held on February 26 at the Liu
Institute. The guest speaker
during the launch was Dzingai
Mutumbuka, who is the chair
of the Association of Development of Education in Africa
and the former sector manager
of human development at the
World Bank. This was a wonderful opportunity for all who
are interested in learning more
about African education policies based on African leadership and developmental issues
in Africa.
The dream of the Africa
Awareness Initiative is to promote inquiring, knowledgeable and open-minded global
citizens, and we hope that The
Ubyssey will embrace our hope
for the future. *2I
the journey's just begun
Day one. It's what you've been waiting for. When your career starts to take shape with award-winning
training and support. When your skills are developed through experiences tailored to your needs
And when your success is driven by individual coaching, mentoring and counseling. From your very
first day, we're committed to helping you achieve your potential. So, whether your career lies in
assurance, tax, transaction or advisory services, shouldn't your day one be at Ernst & Young?
What's next for your future?
Visit ey.com/ca/careers and our Facebook page.
=U Ernst &Young
Quality In Everything We Do MARCH 3, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
ADVERTISEMENT | I 3
am.S Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
03.03.09
MORE
BUSES!
MORE
OFTEN!
SAVE
THE
UBC
FARM
JOIN      THE     TREK
tmmffnttffn
Tfifftffiifftfif!
tffftffftfTftftfT
TftiifffifTftfiii1
We want to hear from you,
tell us your transit story at
www.passups.ca
An initiative from your
AMS External Office
Authorized by the AMS,
registered sponsor under the Elections Act, 604 822 2050.
GREAT FARM TREK09
APRIL 7th
The Trek will depart from the
Student Union Building at 3:30 p.m.
and trekkers will walk to the
UBC Farm on south campus.
Please join us at this family-friendly event to support
the farm remaining in its current size and location.
For more information:
www.amsubc.ca and on facebook: Great Farm Trek 2009
I9B09
March 10th-11th
10:00 am-4:00 p.m.
Main Concourse, SUB
AMs       ..-.•.•.•••....
scores :^&:v
big*    :
io©' zpp>
Thanks to AMS lobbying efforts on
the behalf of students, many athlectic
fees have been reduced!
For more information:
www.ams.ubc.ca
athletics@ams.ubc.ca
amseventsubc.com
O ROGERS
Plants & Animals
with DRMHLLR
March 18th, Biltmore Cabaret
Tickets: Ticketweb, Zulu,
Scratch, Red Cat
Great Lake
Swimmers
with Kate Maki
March 29th, St James Hall
March 30th, Norm Theatre
Tickets: Ticketweb, Zulu, Outpost
$15.00 advance
m~^ THE AMS IS NOW ON FACEBOOK
U UBC Alma Mater Society Editorial
If you'd like to submit a letter, please contact feedback@ubyssey.ca
March 3,2009 \ Page 14
Bye-bye Wendland
We have come to the following conclusion: pants are overrated.
At least, that's what many of us were thinking following the
highly successful and PDAtastic No Pants Party held in the SUB
on Friday. It was spearheaded by the fun-loving Radical Beer
Faction, who have done a bang-up job in holding the occasional
party that helps to make this campus a fun place to be on a
Friday night. What they haven't had as much success with is
changing the culture on campus that allows a hyperbolic slogan
like "War on Fun" to have some merit.
Changes could be coming though. For a number of years, the
officer who developed the worst rapport with students on campus was Constable Rob Worsley, who never met an exuberant
party he didn't want to end. But last semester, he was granted
a requested transfer out of UBC. We've been told the reason
was that he felt he had lost the trust of students on campus to
effectively do his job. His replacement, Charlotte Peters, has,
by all accounts, been a significant improvement.
But a far greater, and potentially far more important development is currently underway. Staff Sgt. Dan Wendland
is set to be transferred out of UBC later this year. Who's that
99.8 per cent of you ask? Well, he was the first officer of his
rank to come to UBC in 2005. He revamped the rules around
granting special occasion licenses on campus (ie: passes to
serve liquor), and has strictly, and we mean strictly, enforced
them. Many in the know point to his Javertesque devotion to
the law as the reason that scores of faculty and club events
have been cancelled or significantly curtailed in recent years.
In an interview with The Tyee, he disparaged the events held to
raise culture and raise funds for clubs as "weekly beer gardens,
daily beer gardens, drunkfests, whatever [students] want to call
them," and have said students "don't own this place out here."
So yeah, he's sort of a big deal. And his departure creates a giant opportunity to re-open fundamental debates about the role
of the RCMP, with the RCMP.
Now obviously, a new staff sergeant does not make a resolution to the War on Fun. It doesn't change the simple fact that
there are way too few officers policing this campus, and that
the Vancouver Police Force is much better suited than the
RCMP to deal with this area. But it's a start. So, while we'd like
to wish Sgt. Wendland the best in his future endeavours, we'd
also hope that the AMS and the UBC administration take steps
to work with his replacement in ensuring that the RCMP aren't,
in Stephen Toope's words, "purveyors of prohibition." And
even if you waited until you were out of the SUB and in your
bed before you took your pants off Friday, isn't that something
we can all agree on? tU
Rules are meant to be questioned
Do you know why laws and rules exist? They exist for us. They
exist to make our lives better. They exist so I can't go outside
and start fights in the street, because we have decided that
we'd rather not have to fight someone just to get to work. They
exist so that companies can't dump toxic waste into the water
supply to preserve their bottom line (Hi Erin Brockovich!),
because we've decided that it's more important for us to have
water that isn't poisonous than for a company to save a few
bucks. They exist so you can cross the street without getting
run over by an oncoming semi, because we've decided that we
want to cross the street without being hit by traffic. Laws protect society as we know it where morality falls short.
Rules start to lose their value when people follow them blindly simply because they are the rules. They are meant to serve
a greater good. The minute they no longer fulfill that function,
it is justified and proper to freely ignore that rule. Rules serve
the people, people do not serve the rules. In other words, let's
say we want to break a rule. Ask the question: would breaking this rule cause any harm (harm defined as negative or
unwanted consequences)? If the answer is no, then feel free to
throw that rule out the window.
A good example for this is that jaywalking (i.e. crossing the
street anywhere other than a crosswalk) is against the rules.
Why is it against the rules? Because we decided that pedestrian
safety is a good thing. And we at The Ubyssey agree that a rule
against jaywalking is a good rule. However, if there is no traffic, then it is perfectly fine to ignore that rule and cross the
street.
In fact, if we blindly follow the rules, more harm may come
than good, as we will not be evaluating our actions. We live in a
democratic society where debate on laws is technically public-
constant thought about the effectiveness of a law is necessary.
This applies on campus as well. It is your right to question
whether a rule works anymore, and, more importantly, respectfully disobey it. tU
This day in Ubyssey history
March 3,1992
AMS orders EUS to pay $15,000 because
of a racist, sexist, and homophobic EUS-
lettre published in 1990.
mmi~~~ mjm mmm- mom ^mm
euxmof ufb &m>m mmmm am
by Trevor Melanson
Letters
Dear fellow Koreans,
Shut the fuck up.
I don't want to hear
how you'd love to tap
that white chick's ass,
ride her on her all fours,
make a white horse
out of her.
Nor do I want to see how
you revel in the fact
she is ordering her
fried rice and veggies
unaware of foreign
degradation,
standing just a meter away
from you—hardly
far enough.
—Minwook Bae
English 3
If you wish to to submit a letter
it must be no longer than 350
words. Your identity will be confirmed by phone or by ID from
the office. People may email us at
feedback ©ubyssey. ca
Streeters
THE UBYSSEY PRESENTS:
INTERNET WOES
For those of you that have not
noticed, there has been no new
content put on our website for
quite some time now. This is
due to issues that we are having
while switching servers. Now,
we know that we have been
promising new web content every day, and it's been made—but
not posted. Our webmaster tells
us that it's because the tubes are
broken and leaking somewhere
in the dry Texas desert. We've
been keeping in contact with
him through satellite phone as
he traverses that rugged terrain
with a very super-duper leak
detection device made especially
for finding excess Internet deposits in typically dry areas, such
as Texas.
The device doesn't work so
well in wet climates, as the Internet will dissociate in water, leaving porn and LOLcat deposits in
the soil. These will confuse the
detector, giving constant false
positives. This was the initial
reason for switching over our
servers, at least according to
our webmaster, who knows a
lot more about this sort of thing
then the rest of us. Hell, as far as
we know, it's magic.
So, hopefully we will find the
source of the leak soon and stop
it up with large amounts of silicone and excess internet comments. Then the natural flow will
be restored and you can read
great Ubyssey content with only
minor interruptions, usually
from our own pipe trolls. We're
looking at you, Clayton Burns.
Love,
The Ubyssey
Do you use vitamin supplements?
Alek Hrycailco
BASC 1
"I take calcium, a
couple forms of
vitamin D—other
than that I don't
generally take
them personally.
I do think they
are a good idea
though for the
average person."
Alex Stevens
Science 3
"Nope, not really. I don't take
them at all...
They're expensive, and so far
I'm doing good
without them."
Ammar Bakhurj
Engineering 1
Brian Wong
Science 2
"We need
vitamins every
day in our lives,
and sometimes
we don't get
vitamins due
to our studies.
We don't have
time to cook, we
don't have time
to eat."
"Yes, definitely
supplements for
sure...I take lots
of supplements:
vitamin pills, fish
oil pills, anti-inflammatory, liver
pills...vitamin
supplements are
key because you
can't get all the
nutrients from
regular food."
Coordinated by Tara Martellaro
Caitlin MacDonell
Commerce 3
"No...I probably should
take calcium...I
haven't really
looked into it,
but I feel like my
diet is sufficient
for my vitamin
needs."
Alicia Woodside MARCH 3, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
GAMES & A POEM | I ;
A POEM FOR A CHANGE: AE CONSUMMATION
Seldom do I finish what I start,
Books, literature, associations, and Eros, all in part,
Fortitude, astuteness, and forbearance I lack,
All that and desire, passion, and regret, courtesy of you, now I pack
That inveigling smile which shall remain ensconced forever,
Spouting a perennial fountain of tranquility, prurience, and pleasure,
Relying on the incandescence of that beam when a journey I embark,
Thy will steer me through intricacies when outlook is dark,
Your eyes, mammaries, and glowing beauty all mesmerize;
That initial rainy night shall remain a life-long gratifying surprise
Hand in hand we strolled momentarily,
Brimming with lust, frolicked boisterously,
He clutched onto you with his firm embrace;
Nourishing his soul, you absorbed him with grace,
Barring that, he is abyssal in his approbation and regard for she,
For the inspiration and ingenuity bequeathed on the anarchist he
With ardor and resolve, I will pledge to commit this:
Compose much more of such for you, beauteous bliss,
0 Heather, don't be unsettled by my fervor and expansive hold,
Cherish, stay firm, and deliberate, for your name implies bold.
Crossword
by Kyrstin Bain
For once, I will finish what I start,
Books, literature, associations, and Eros, all part by part
-Sulman Umar
9
5  6
4
1
8
3
2
8
4
7
1
6
7
2
1
5
9
6
3
1
9
7
2
1
8
3
6
MEDIUM #24
solution, tips and computer
programs at www.sudoku.com
ACROSS
1. The "Australian drop-bear"
6. Type of tea
10. (Herring-like fish
14. A venomous snake
1 5. Surrealist Salvador
16. Designer Chane
17. Alias
19. Still mooing
20. High school subject, similar to
Chem or Econ
21. Underwater shocker
22. One who gets a goa
24. Consult
26. Sheet of paper
27. Provoke
29. Furniture that lines the wall
33. Perfect score on a scale of attractiveness
34. "Do you see what I'm trying to	
 7"
36. Part of the animal or fruit that is
eaten
37. Jason's ship
39. The 1852 publisher of the Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases
41. Not here
42. A small island
44. An eaglefs nest
46. American icon, with 66a
47. Captain Malcolm , of Firefly
49. Sultan's abode
51. "Well, I guess..."
52. A wooden prop
53. Tumbler
56. Opposite of WSW
57. Examine
60. Margarine
61. Conclusive argument
64. Highly excited
65. White-tailed Eagle
66. American icon, with 46a
67. A lot
68. Raise
69. Lacy potholder
DOWN
1. German philosopher of the Critique
of Pure Reason
2. Smell
3. Appreciatively
4. Account book
5. I am, we	
6. Time waster
7. To be "born in the "
8. Tree from certain Plath poem
9. Type of vehicle that burns heavy oi
10. "King's Evil" disease
11. Dramatic frost
12. Winnie's wood had a hundred of
■
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■ 1 s
i
17                                                     18
H"
■ 21
■ 22
■ 24                                            ■                                  ^JjVllJ^Hl^H
^M
29                                                         30        31        32
33                                      ■ 34                    35
■H36
37                              38             ■ 39
40              ■
42                                            43              ■
45              ■ 46
47                                                         48
■ 49
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13. Perhaps the opposite of 6d
18. Eye slang
23. Baby elephant
25. Stale air, slang
26. By and by
27. Step
28. Laconic
"The of sin"
Journalism wire service
Abraham's son, of Genesis
Homonymic herb
Lackey
56. Sicilian volcano
58. Buy and	
59. Basketball three-pointer
62. Shakespeare's before
63. To slander, or throw	
FRIDAY'S ANSWERS
29
30
31
32
35
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40   "
43
45
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"Puff the dragon"
Piece of corn
48. Pantry
50. Someone from South or Centra
American, maybe
52. Scornful smile
53. Soapy froth
54. One , two algae
55. Philosopher Trotsky
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© Puzzles by Pappocom
Looking to scare yourself this Friday the 13th? Come to the Black Box Theatre, party
with The Ubyssey and be frightened at how much our editors can drink...
Einstein was actually a genius who knew
squat about auto insurance. Sure he could
have figured it out by himself, but who has
the time to understand RoadsidePlus when
you have to get E to equal that mc thingy?
We won't have the answers to your physics
questions, but we will have the relative facts
about the eight RoadsidePlus coverages.
Protection like Loss of Use and Lock Re-Keying.
Don't wait for your policy to expire. See your
on-campus ICBC Autoplan broker today.
University
Insurance Brokers
autoplan | tenants | condo | travel | medical
From UBC to Yaletown for your ICBC Autoplan and more, visit
University Insurance Brokers orYaletown Insurance Services.
University Insurance Brokers
5727 Dalhousie Road
Vancouver (University Village)
604-221-7080
Yaletown Insurance Services
1283 Pacific Blvd (corner of Drake)
Vancouver
604-899-0511 $OfT/M0.
25
$
24995  $29
$
0
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0
Bell
er

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