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The Ubyssey Apr 11, 2011

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Array Prime minsters can touch boobies SINCE 1918
RAISE YOU
STUDENTS BRING THE YEAR TO A TRIUMPHANT CLOSE
WITH UBC LIPDUB AND BLOCK PARTY. PAGE 3-4
GLASS 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2011.04.11
APRIL 11,2011
VOLUME XCII,  N°L
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Arshy Mann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR NEWS WRITER
Micki Cowan: mcowan@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Ginny Monaco: gmonaco@ubyssey ca
CULTURE ILLUSTRATOR
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Marie Vondracek: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
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BUSINESS
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print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
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Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
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ACCOUNTS
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CONTRIBUTORS
Karina Palmitesta
Will Mackenzie
Kait Bolongaro
Joyce Wan
Elise Grieg
Rob Fougere
LEGAL
Urooba Jamal
Iqra Azhar
Irene Lo
Jenny Tsundu
Noah Burshtein
Richard Lam
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
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and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
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Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
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will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
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pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
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EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect
to be fed. • Every Sunday and
Wednesday, 2pm.
RESOURCE GROUPS • Are you
working on a progressive
project, but need funding? Do
you have an idea, but can't get
it off the ground? Apply to the
Resource Groups for funding!
Come in, pitch your idea to us
and we will consider fully or
partially funding your project.
• Every Monday, 11 am in SUB
245 (second floor, north-east
corner). For more info email
resourcegroups.ams@gmail.
com.
NOON YOGA $1 • Led by the UBC
Yoga Club—all skill levels are
welcome. Bring your own mat and
enjoy this invigorating session.
RSVP on the Facebook events
page. • Tuesdays, 12-lpm, UBC
Bookstore, $1.
POTTERY SALE AT SPROUTS •
The UBC Pottery Club is now
selling their work at Sprouts
and have donated some pieces
in return for space. It brings a
new addition to the Sprouts
atmosphere and allows potters
space to showcase their
pieces. • Mon-Fri, 9:30am-
4pm, Sprouts, SUB basement.
TUESDAY, APR. 12
QUARTET IN FOUR COURSES: AN
EVENING OF MUSICAL DRAMA
AND CONVERSATION • This
experimental evening will
explore connections between
a string quartet, a theatrical
performance and a social
event (a dinner party). The
celebrated Borealis Quartet
will play Joseph Haydn's String
Quartet in G Major, Op. 76,
No. 1, with a staged reading
of a short play by Jonathan
Wisenthal as a companion
piece. • 8-9:30pm, Coach
House, Green College, go to
greencollege.ubc.ca for more
information.
THURSDAY, APR. 14
CO. ERASGA/COMPLOT: EXPOSE • A
powerful new full-length duet
exploring sexuality, gender
and identity, EXpose brings
together two exceptional male
solo artists: Vancouver's own
Alvin Erasga Tolentino, artistic
director of Co. ERASGA,
whose sophisticated works
have toured around the world;
and Martin Inthamoussu, a
driving force in Uruguay's
contemporary dance scene.
These two charismatic
performers seek to expose
the complexity of the personal
and public territories within
the gay psyche, creating a
spellbinding theatrical and
physical dialogue. • Apr. 14-
16, 8pm, Scotiabank Dance
Centre, $28, $20 students/
seniors, buy tickets at
ticketstonight.ca.
SATURDAY, APR. 16
FILM   SCREENING:  AAKIDEH •
Aakideh' is an Ojibwe word
meaning brave or brave-hearted.
Artist Carl Beam earned a
reputation for being fearless,
visionary and ultimately,
unforgettable. From his early
years growing up on Manitoulin
Island to his turbulent years
spent at a residential school,
this documentary explores
how these early experiences
not only impacted Beam's life
but also his art. Screening time:
65 minutes. • 7pm, Museum of
Anthropology, $14/$12 + HST.
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©2011 HSR Block Canada, Inc. *$2Q;.q5 valid for regular student tax preparation only. Casn back service included. To qualify for student pricing, student must present either (j) a "2202a documenting 4 or
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any interest or penalties on additional taxes due, although we do not assume the liability for the addttional taxes, we will reimburse you foi the interest and penalties. 2011.04.11/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/3
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER GINNY MONACO »gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
ILLUSTRATOR INDIANA JOEL»ijoel@ubyssey.ca
UBC LIPDUB VIEWED 300K TIMES IN TWO DAYS
Some 200 people turned out to the launch party Friday. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
Less than three days after its release, UBC's LipDub video seems primed to go big.
"I could never have envisioned it would turn
out this way/' said Andrew Cohen, the BFA Acting student who directed and co-produced the
video. "I had visions of grandeur six months
ago, but I never thought it would look this cool."
The video was shot on campus on March 26,
featuring close to 1000 UBC students and community members lip syncing, dancing and celebrating to the sound of Pink and
Marianas Trench. It was uploaded Friday afternoon, and
had around 300,000 views
as of press time.
Cohen and co-producer Bijan Ahmadian officially unveiled the video at a launch party at
Robson Square Friday evening. Around 200
people attended the event, many of whom participated in the video.
"I thought [the LipDub] was pretty good," said
Nick Hamm, a second-year Science student. "It
getspeople to meet...people from other faculties
and people who don't even go to this school. I
saw a lot of younger kids who were attracted
by the fact that Marianas Trench was there."
"I heard about [the LipDub] because the guy
from Marianas Trench was talking about it and
I thought it looked like fun," said Samatha Pinter-Thompson, a local high school student. "I'd
love to go to UBC."
Many YouTube commenters echoed Pinter-
Thompson's thoughts. The thousands of comments on the video speak to its power as a
"The LipDub is fearless.
BRIAN SULLIVAN, FORMER VP STUDENTS
potential recruitment tool. "There was...this guy
who said 'Yo, I'm on the East Coast but I know
where I'm going to university'" said Ahmadian.
While the university supported the video-
donating spaces and the film license, and closing East Mall—it had no creative control over
the final product or branding. "The benefit of
something like this is...it's grass roots," said
Cohen. "As soon as it has that corporate-y feel
it loses its value."
"The LipDub is fearless," said former VP Students Brian Sullivan, who attended Friday's
opening. "It's fun and it does
everybody proud and I think
it's going to take the whole
thing to the next level."
Cohen and Ahmadian
hope the video will hit ten
million views. They are collecting donations
based on view counts for the Make a Wish
Foundation.
Cohen admitted that the success of the Lip-
dub is an anomaly for a disconnected campus
like UBC. "I've been a commuter student this entire time, and that's one of the reasons I wanted to do this, because I figured it would give me
some kind of affiliation to a campus that I otherwise had no real connection to," he said. Ahmadian, however, said the eventbuilds off of the
success of other campus-wide events like Imagine Day and the Student Leadership Conference.
"We showcased some ofthe things that I think
students from this generation will remember
about UBC," said Ahmadian. "I think ifyou talk
to this generation of students they'll tell you they
remember their Translink bus passes, they remember Ike Barber, they'll remember the Knoll
and Storm the Wall...And this video." va
Most-watched campus
lipdubs:
Universite du Quebec a Montreal
Posted: September 11,2009
Views: 8,441,908
Shorewood High School (WA)
Posted: December 17,2009
Views: 1,583,318
Universitat de Vic (Spain)
Posted: May 24,2010
Views: 1,308,136
Boston University
Posted: December 14,2009
Views: 556,393
Warsaw School of Economics
Posted: December 16,2009
Views: 460,103
University of Victoria
Posted: October 22,2010
Views: 216,325
UBC
Posted: April 8,2011
Views: 300,000+
YouTube honours as of press
time
2nd most viewed video in
Canada (of videos uploaded
same day)
4th top rated video in Canada
this week
6th most viewed video in
Entertainment
FOOD WITH KAIT
B0L0NGAR0
URBAN HONEY: VANCOUVER'S
SWEET COTTAGE INDUSTRY
While wildflow-
ers are found in
nooks and crannies throughout
Vancouver, fewpeo-
ple would think of
them as a potential
source of income.
However, flowers—
whether urban or
rural—need to be
pollinated. The primary movers in
this act are bees, which turn nectar
into honey to be harvested and sold.
This small-scale honey industry is
growing, as consumer demand for
local and organic products climbs.
UrbanSweet Honey is a Vancouver
company capitalizing on the market
for quality local honey. Russell Godwin, its owner, comes from a line
of beekeepers. He decided to transplant his family's trade into an urban setting.
"I just thought that it would be
neat to have a hobby," said Godwin.
"The city of Vancouver made it legal
[to harvest urban nectar]. I extended that thought: it would be nice to
have urban honey as an alternative
to commercial honey. It was a way
of cutting myself out from the herd."
One of the biggest issues in the
commercial honey industry is how
heavily filtered and processed products are. Honey sold in supermarket chains is usually clear like liquid gold, while honey in its natural
state is cloudy.
"Retailers don't want it because
the customers think that the honey
is bad," said Godwin,
All of UrbanSweet's honey is collected from beehives in the Greater
Vancouver Area."The process is the
same," said Godwin. "The irony of it
is that GVRD is cleaner than the countryside because [Vancouver] doesn't
use a lot of pesticides. With all the
bees, people are able to eat product
that comes from Vancouver."
What about the ethical implications of harvesting honey? According
to Godwin, UrbanSweet only takes a
portion of the product at the end of
the summer, leaving the bees enough
to survive the winter. However, more
large-scale producers can push bees
beyond their limits.
"We have physiologically pushed
dairy cattle very far. To some extent,
that's true of bees [too]," said Dr Murray Isman, Dean of Land and Food
Systems faculty.
"There's been a recent crisis [called]
colony collapse disorder, in part because companies push bees to their
limits of their abilities. However, the
[main cause] is a virus [that] bees are
more susceptible to because bee colonies are transported by humans to
pollinate agricultural crops which
have a high amount of pesticides."
And harvesting honey doesn't jeopardize a bee colony's survival. "We
domesticate a lot of plants and animals to feed humans," said Isman.
"We want to do that in as sustainable a manner possible. The history of humans and bees domesticated goes back a long way and it's firmly established you can harvest honey without harming the beehive." va
And that's all Ubysseyers! Thanks for
reading my column thisyear. From Ethiopian cuisine to honey, we have gone
around the world in food. Ifyou're interested, check out my food blog at
roamingepicurian.wordpress.com. 4/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2011.04.11
POETRY
Kicking it with kid Koyczan"
Vancouver spoken word artist revisits youth in latest work
GINNY MONACO
gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
"Think of your childhood as
a neighbourhood and it's just
finished raining," said poet
Shane Koyczan. "You've got
all those rain puddles which
represent all those dark spots,
but there are those few in-between dry patches where you
can safely jump from dry
patch to dry patch."
Koyczan has spent the better part of a year meditating
on his unconventional childhood in preparation for an upcoming series of shows at The
Cultch. When I was a Kid deals
with youthful "silliness" and
"wonder," qualities Koyczan
considers "important aspects
of ourselves that should never be thrown away."
Koyczan never really knew
his mother or father, and was
raised by his grandparents in
Yellowknife before moving to
Penticton at age 14. His childhood had more than a few dark
spots and he never spent much
time looking back on it. "The
biggest thing was sort of believing for the longest time
that I didn't really have a
childhood because I was bullied so much and there was
so much tragedy," he said. "I
felt like maybe I'd been cheated because I had to grow up
so quickly."
It was only recently, when
Koyczan's grandmother discovered his early journals, thathe
began to reevaluate his experiences growing up. "[The writing] was really horrible stuff
but what's funny is that I was so
genuine at the time. I meant everything I'd written down.
"It's so bad!" Koyczan laughed
and offered an example. "I think
it was meant to be an insult
about this kid who had started dating my soul mate, kind
of a 'fuck you.' The insult was
'Oh, his mother probably cuts
his apples!' Like, what the hell
does that even mean?
"That's when it occurred to
me, as awful as the majority of
my childhood was, I did still
have a childhood."
Koyczan is perhaps best
known for the piece "We Are
More," which he performed
at the 2010 Olympic Opening
Ceremonies, but he was an
established and well-respected artist long before that. His
poems, often accompanied by
his band The Short Story Long,
are at once heart-wrenching,
funny and always surprising.
Koyczan calls writing a "mechanism to deal with the moment," and his candid poems
call upon specific events to
communicate some more universal ideas.
"Not everyone's had the
same experience that I've had,
but people have felt the same
way. I talk a lot about the way
that I feel and I think it's that
level of emotional nudity that
people identify with."
On top of creating When I Was
a Kid, Koyczan has been working with George Miller on the
next installment of the Mad
Max franchise, as well as preparing to release the next Short
Story Long album this summer. Koyczan has found a way to
make a living as a writer, something he never really expected.
"I thought for sure I'd be a
wrestler. I had it all worked
out. My name was going to be
'The Garbage Man' and my saying would be 'I'm taking out
the trash!' My finishing move
would be the Trash Compactor.
"I guess things worked out
for the best," he laughed, tl
INDIANA JOEL ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
AMS Block Party's moment in the sun
CAMPUS
Beers and bass shook Maclnnes Field on Thursday
In the press. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
BRYCE WARNES
culture@ubyssey.ca
The sun showed up for Block
Party on Thursday and brought
3055 students in its wake. By
four o'clock in the afternoon,
a throbbing gang of dancers
had gathered in front of the
stage, bouncing along to mash-
ups by Team Canada DJs and
turning Maclnnes Field into a
stew of mud and discarded plastic cups. Rye Rye was next on
stage. Flanked by a pair of backup
dancers and spitting her brand
of art rap over an electrified hip-
hop beat, her performance was
well-received by an increasingly boisterous audience.
Spirits were high, and so
were students, as cups of Molson were raised up and joints
were ignited on the down low.
Security was benevolent, for the
most part, their work mainly
consisting of telling smokers to
put out their cigarettes. (A designated smoking section would
have benefited the event, as anybody stepping out for a puff was
barred from re-entry.) On several separate occasions, flailing
participants who had clearly
gone over their limits were
strong-armed out of Block Party by guards. But for the most
part, the atmosphere was festive and non-threatening.
By nine o'clock, 50 kegs had
been emptied and it was time
to clear out. Besides the sunny afternoon, the choice of performers likely helped to draw
the large crowd. Block Party's
music had the baseline (and
bassline, ha ha ha ha) popular
appeal that can get students of
whatever tastes dancing after a
few drinks. Its performers may
not have been as high-profile
as the Barenaked Ladies, but
Block Party got students dancing and singing. And that lead
to a warm and fuzzy last day of
classes, tl
^
ONLINE EXCLUSIVE
For more pictures from Block Party, visit ubyssey.ca/culture. 2011.04.11/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/5
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT EDITOR KALYEENA MAKORTOFF»kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
Fate of Gage South still under review
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
Will the bus loop be turned into
market housing?
That's what the UBC Board
of Governors (BoG) is slated to
decide over the next year. The
area known as Gage South became a point of contention after
the university proposed building market housing in its place
in the UBC Land Use Plan (LUP)
amendments lastyear.
However, after receiving negative feedback from the university community, the BoG decided to designate Gage South as an
"Area Under Review," creating a
separate consultation process to
determine its future. Last Tuesday, BoG passed a resolution beginning the process that will
eventually culminate in a public hearing next year.
"Gage South is unfinished
business from the land use
plan," said Nassif Ghoussoub,
a faculty representative on BoG,
and the head of the Property
and Planning Committee. "This
is [going to be] a long process."
Since the passage of Bill 20,
which transfered responsibility
for the University Endowment
Lands (UEL) from Metro Vancouver to the Province, UBC is required to adhere to a strict set
of guidelines any time it wishes to change area zoning.
According to Associate VP
Planning Nancy Knight, although Gage South only covers
the area where the current die-
sel bus loop stands, any changes will have to account for bordering areas.
Gage South, the area previously planned for market housing. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
This area is currently in a
state of flux due to the building
of a new Student Union Building,
alumni centre, a possible relocation of the aquatic centre and
changes to the transit hubs. War
Memorial Gym and Maclnnes
Field will also be part of the study.
"The program is intended to
be highly collaborative," said
Knight. "We've alreadyputtogeth-
er a working group for consultation, which includes students, of
course."
AMS VP Academic and University Affairs Matt Parson will be
one ofthe members ofthe group.
They will be consulting with the
Alma Mater Society (AMS), Graduate Student Society, University Neighbourhoods Association,
UEL and Translink regarding the
changes.
During last year's consultations, the AMS expressed
its strong opposition against
building market housing on Gage
South, arguing that it would not
be compatible with the bustling
atmosphere ofthe area.
In the past, fraternities and other campus groups have come up
against market housing residents
over noise complaints.
The market housing that the
university had planned for Gage
South was heldover from housing that was originally set to be
built on UBC Farm.
Butwhen the university made a
commitment in 2008 to save the
Farm, it did so under the condition that the housing be transferred to another part of campus,
some of which was integrated
into plans for Gage South.
The university is now making
similar demands in the face of
a possible transfer of housing
from Gage South.
"The housing units will
be transferred elsewhere on
campus if they're not built
there," said Knight at last Tuesday's BoG meeting. Units to support around 400 people were
planned for the area.
At the December 1 public
hearing about the LUP lastyear,
then chair ofthe AMS's University and External Relations Committee and current VP External Katherine Tyson, criticized
UBC's demands to transfer these
units.
"We don't understand why
Campus and Community Planning keeps saying that we need
to transfer [the density] out."
She went on to say that UBC was
speaking of these density transfers as if they were absolutely
necessary, as opposed to a choice
the university was making.
After the public hearing is
held, amendments will go to
the Minister of Agriculture and
Lands for approval, tl
Bob Rae: Liberals more progressive than ever
ARSHY MANN & KALYEENA
MAKORTOFF
news@ubyssey.ca
On the eve ofthe leaders' debate
this Tuesday, Deputy Liberal Leader Bob Rae took some time to speak
to The Ubyssey about what issues
will be affecting students in this
election, and why young people
should consider voting Liberal.
UBYSSEY: More than the rest ofthe
population, students and young
people tend to be fairly-left-of-
center. Why should students who
might be considering voting for
the NDP or the Greens in this
election give their vote to the
Liberals?
BOB RAE: I think the strongest
argument that we can make for
the Liberals is a combination of
two things: one is that we've got
a platform and a leader that are
clearly thinking a lot about the
future, that they're focusing a
lot on issues that matter to the
whole country and we've got a
very progressive and thoughtful
platform. The second is that we've
actually got a chance of forming
a government.
U: What are the ways in which
that can be improved, that you
can get the youth to be engaged
in the political process?
Bob Rae PHOTO C0URTESYTHE LIBERAL PARTY OF CANADA
RAE: We've talked about the
learning passport which is a
really progressive and thoughtful way to try and encourage
more participation in college
and university. Another thing,
obviously is really focusing on
how people communicate, so
we spend a lot of time on social media.
U: One criticism about the learning passport is that it requires
you to open up an RESP, which
lower income families are generally less likely to do.
RAE: One ofthe reasons thatpeo-
ple are less likely to have an account is because they don't have
any money, and the fact of the
matter is that this proposal from
Mr. Ignatieff doesn't require any
people to put money into their
account, it just requires thatpeo-
ple open an account.
U: Three UBC students have been
recruited by Liberals to run in
what appear to be unwinnable
ridings in BC, or at least ridings
thathave done historically poorly for the Liberals. What role do
you think thatyounger, unexperienced candidates should have
in an election, and what advice
would you give them?
RAE: I think it's great if young
people are coming forward and
running for us in ridings, that's
terrific, in ridings which don't
appear to be winnable at the beginning may be in fact winnable at the end, so we wish people the very best, I've run in ten
elections...andIcanassureyou
there will be many surprises on
election night.
U: On a closing note, what is
the one message young people
should be left with during this
election?
RAE: My clear message to young
people would be you've got a
real choice in this election, and
I can't think of an election in
which the choices were more
stark or more clear between a
party that's talking about the
future in an open and progressive way and a party that is doing the exact opposite, that has
a very narrow ideological vision, and I hope that students
are active in helping to change
its government, vl
To read the whole interview, go
to ubyssey.ca.
NEWS BRIEFS
EMERGENCY AMS COUNCIL
MEETING TONIGHT
KALYEENA MAKORTOFF
kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
AMS Council will be holding
an emergency meeting at 7pm
tonight to discuss pay raises
for AMS staff and executives.
Last Wednesday, council received a presentation from the
Business and Facilities Committee (BAFCOM) about provincial plans to raise minimum
wage beginning May 1, along
with a strategy they believe
the AMS should take to best
implement incremental raises
for their own staff.
AMS staff wages under discussion did not include food
and beverage workers.
"When the premier announced that she's raising minimum wage, I thought that we
could take this opportunity to
look at the entire wage structure of the AMS and also how
can we make it so that the AMS
can pay our student employees
fairly, equitably and also systematically," explained Allen
Chen, a member of the BAFCOM working group.
A three-tier wage system
was proposed by BAFCOM.
While minimum wage earners
would see their pay increase in
order to match new provincial
levels, AMS executives would
see their salary increase from
$25,000/year to approximately
$28,000 this year, and $31,000
for the 2012-2013 executives.
The change would also eliminate the meal voucher program, an executive benef it valued at $500-$1000 per executive yearly.
"We knew this was something that wasn't going to be
popular at all," explained Chen,
"[but] if the executive salary
was not increased at all, a lot
of the staff that would be reporting to them would essentially be compensated almost
at their level, at hourly wage, if
that base goes up but your top
does not move, a lot of people
will generally feel, in a professional environment, there's pay
inequity."
"Whether council agrees or
not that's something that we'll
see, but also the timing is another question to be considered."
"Raising the salaries of the
AMS employees—particularly executives—so soon after
passing a major fee referendum which was sold around the
need for more program funding
is about the worst thing you
could possibly do for optics,"
said former AUS President Brian Piatt on his blog UBC Vanguard. "It looks absolutely terrible. It makes you look like liars."
Executive members recused
themselves from discussion,
as their own salaries were being debated.
Chen said that there will be
an AMS compensation review
forum hosted by the BAFCOM
working group before the council meeting, in SUB 206. Chen
hopes this will be a chance to
dispel potential misunderstandings and have an open and informal question and answer
period. 6/UBYSSEY.CA/INVESTIGATIVE/2011.04.11
A Ubyssey investigation into on-campus employers
Living as a student in Vancouver is expensive. Scholarships don't always provide sufficient financial coverage for
post-secondary education, forcing even
full-time students to seek employment.
For those looking for jobs, working on
campus is convenient, not only for those
living in residence. Commuting students
may also find it more desirable to work
shifts close to their classes, and international students have to apply for an off-
campus work permit if they choose to
seek employment outside UBC.
"Given the nature of international students at UBC, they're only allowed to work
on campus," said AMS President Jeremy
McElroy. "Unless, of course, they apply for
an off campus work permit, which takes
a while to process, costs $ 150 and doesn't
guarantee you a job, so a lot of students
sort of stay away from that."
With the need for financial support in
mind, The Ubyssey's investigative team
set out to find out how many jobs are
available for students at UBC.
ON-CAMPUS EMPLOYERS
"UBC does do a great job hiring students
and there are a ton of positions available," said McElroy. "The AMS also employs over 400 students and we're actually one ofthe largest student employers
in Canada, in terms of student unions...
we all do a lot but there are just so many
students on campus."
For students looking for career-related work opportunities, UBC offers the
Work Study and Work Learn programs.
Opportunities in these programs can include research/lab assistant and TA positions for both undergraduate and graduate students, among others. Available
to domestic and international students,
the programs provided over a thousand
jobs lastyear.
"Last [academic] year...we had about
1750 students working through Work
Study and the average wage was about
15.5 dollars an hour," said Career Services Director Howie Outerbridge.
However, participants can only work a
maximum of ten hours per week in the
programs. According to Outerbridge, this
limit was created to help ensure that students maintain a balanced lifestyle while
going to school.
"One ofthe reasons why we have a cap
is that really we want to give students a
chance to focus on their studies...by limiting it to ten hours we're figuring that
a lot of students will volunteer, or be engaged in leadership. They may also be
living in Richmond, and have an hour
or two-hour commute every day, so that's
one of the reasons why we've limited it
to ten hours a week."
He cited research from the UK, which
showed that "anybody that works more
than 15 hours [and goes to school
INVESTIGATIVE TEAM LEAD: JENNY TSUNDU INVESTIGATIVE@UBYSSEY.CA
FEATURES EDITOR: TREVOR RECORD FEATURES@UBYSSEY.CA
ill WORK
for school
WRITTEN BY JOYCE WAN. UROOB JAMAL. IQRA AZHAR, IRENE LO. JENNY TSUNDU AND ELISE GRIEG
full-time] is at risk of seriously affecting their physical health, their mental health, their ability to cope and do
well in school."
While he realizes that the Work Study
and Work Learn programs don't give students the ability to be completely financially self-sufficient, the cap allows for
more positions to be available.
"It allows us to spread the resources
out a bit further. If we...had 20 hours a
week then half as many students could
be involved with the program."
WHERE THE JOBS ARE(N'T)
The Work Study and Work Learn program provide many jobs at reasonable
pay, but with few weekly hours. To get a
better idea ofthe extent of other student
employment opportunities on campus,
The Ubyssey contacted a number of UBC
ancillaries for the number of students
they employ. Many, such as UBC Food
Services, UBC Bookstore and UBC Parking and Access Control, employ limited
numbers of students.
After Work Study and Work Learn, the
biggest student employer on campus was
UBC Athletics. Around 90 per cent of their
total work force are students.
Athletics typically posts details about
the application process on its website in
August, and the positions available range
from promotions to security to media
relations. UBC REC currently hires 200
student employees in roles ranging from
game management to human resources, and also runs a leadership development program.
The AMS is the next largest student
employer, with 400 student employees.
THE COST OF BEING A STUDENT
UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies posts
an estimation of the minimum annual
living costs for a single person in Vancouver on their Campus & Community
web page. Their estimate accounts for
books, student fees, health plans, personal/household expenses and a small
entertainment stipend. The total minimum estimated cost of living in Vancouver as a single person on your own (on
or off campus) isabout$17,027 peryear
Room and board (including food costs)
makes up a conservative $12,000 of this
total, so costs are considerably lower if
you're living with family.
According to UBC's "You@UBC" guide
to undergraduate programs and admission, tuition for most undergraduate programs at UBC costs between $4000 and
$6000 for domestic students, and ranges from $21,000 to just over $25,000
for international students. That makes
the cost of attending UBC and living in
Vancouvera minimum of $21,000 for domestic students and $38,000 for international students.
"You're using the standard of a student who is receiving no support from
their parents, which is actually the majority of students out there," said AMS
President Jeremy McElroy. "Not living at
home.. .and working part-time while going to school full-time, it's actually almost
impossible to pay UBC's tuition in addition to the cost of living in Vancouver."
Riddell said that being financially self-
sufficient in Vancouver is indeed difficult.
"Tuition is still low in Canada, compared to some countries like the US,"
said UBC Economics Professor Dr Craig
Riddell. "But when you add in [the cost
of living].. .you either need support from
your family or you need to try to earn
enough money in the summer... or you
need loans or some other [form of financial aid]."
McElroy said that an AMS report on the
affordability of education over the last 70
years at UBC showed that, even when adjusted for inflation, going to UBC has never been more expensive.
" Really what it came down to was tuition at UBC, all other fees notwithstanding, just tuition for 30 credits for an Arts
student, is twice as much in real dollars...
as any other time in UBC's history," said
McElroy. "The cost of living in Vancouver has been creeping steadily up above
the national average... it's harder than it's
ever been to be a student." tl
After this, UBC service ancillaries have
less than half of their positions available
to students. UBC Food Services, a potential source of on-campus employment,
allocates less than half of their available
positions for students. Out of 300 positions, only 120-130 are designated for
students. UBC Housing and Hospitality
Services allocates approximately 330 of
1000 positions for students.
Other UBC ancillaries employ even
fewer students. The UBC Bookstore, Parking and Access Control, Properties Trust,
and Public Affairs are subsidiaries that
employ 25, 19, one and zero student employees, respectively. These numbers can
fluctuate depending on the time of year-
while the UBC Bookstore allots 25 out of
100 positions for students, an additional 60 students are usually hired during
term rush seasons.
However, all ancillaries have hired
UBC students in the past and expressed
interest in hiring students where feasible.
A representative from Properties Trust
said they often promote interns after
they graduate from UBC, and expressed
a special preference for hiring Sauder
students. At the time this information
was collected, UBC Public Affairs had
no student employees, though they had
hired journalism students in the past.
WHY NOT MORE STUDENT JOBS?
Dr Craig Riddell, a UBC econom
ics professor specializing in labour economics, guessed these
ancillary groups can't hire
more students because of
the unique scheduling
needs students have.
Students tend to work less during terms
when they are taking classes, and instead seek more hours in the summer,
when many of these groups need fewer
employees.
"Ifyou had students who' d want to work
year-round, then the only obstacle might
be that they only want to work a few hours
a week during the terms when they want
to take classes, and work more hours in
the summer. That may not fit with the employers' desire for the number of hours
they have their employees work."
McElroy pointed out that parameters
set by unions as to how many hours
should be worked each week often did
not fit with a student's need for part-time
work and flexible hours. Riddell suggested that students are more likely to find
jobs on campus in the service sector.
"I think a lot of part-time work is in the
service sector, like working in a coffee
shop, bar or restaurant," Riddell noted.
"Those are the most plentiful jobs, they
often have pretty flexible hours, which
fits what students need... [and they're] often available close to where people live...
At the same time, they're not exactly career paths.. .though they might be useful
in enhancing some skills."
The part-time job that both provides a
living wage and career experience is especially elusive. Riddell explained that
career-related job opportunities are harder for students to attain because employers are "often looking for more permanent employees. Typically there's a fair
amount of training and learning on the
job required...they're not just looking for
people who are there temporarily. The
employer is making a big investment."
Co-op and Work Study/Learn programs
can help convince employers to hire students, using wage subsidies as an incentive—UBC pays part ofyour wage, so that
the employer gets a lower rate for your
work. In addition, certain government programs offer the same kind of agreements
for employers. But for the majority of students, who will likely accrue some financial debt as a result of their post-secondary education, Riddell said that it's best to
look at things in the long-term.
"The good news is, on average, you...
get paid off quite handsomely; [education is] a good investment," said Riddell. "It may be a situation where students are a bit uncomfortable, having
accumulated a substantial amount of
debt, but from an investment point of
view, it's a good debt to take on for the
average person." tl
$21,000
MINIMUM TUITION,
FIVE COURSES,
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENT
MINIMUM
TUITION, FIVE COURSES,
DOMESTIC STUDENT 2011.04.11/UBYSSEY.CA/NATIONAL/7
NATIONAL
VIU enters second month of faculty strike
CHRISTINA M. WINDLE
The Navigator (Vancouver
siand University]
NANAIMO, BC (CUP) - Holding
bright handmade signs, culinary
arts students at Vancouver Island
University protested the faculty
strike that has already lasted a
month and could cause irreparable time-loss damage to their
education.
"Unlike most students, we're
not able to make up the work at
home. We have to be in school
to make it up," said Martin Mac-
nutt, a participant of the March
29 protest. "The strike affects us
more than most students."
Aheavy portion of VIU's trades
programs are based on physical-
skills training and exams that require equipment accessible only
on campus. Each day these students, whose skills-based courses
and exams need to be completed
to graduate and begin summer
work placements, lose valuable
in-class time and facility access
that they may notbe able to make
up by June 20, when planned coop placements begin.
The cost for students to complete an extended semester may
also cause repercussions for the
2011-12 school year.
"If I can't finish my semester,
I don't know how I'll afford to
come back in September," Mac-
nutt said. "I drive from Port Al-
berni every day and I don't have
the extra $500 a month it costs
me in gas, plus time away from
my child to be here."
Like an increasing number of
students, none of the culinary
SHERRY WOTA PHOTO/COURTESY THE NEXUS
arts protesters were in support
of VIU's faculty association, who
have been on strike since March
10.
"We justwantto see ourselves
back in school," Macnutt said.
"Their job security is not my problem. I've paid to come to school.
I've signed up for this course
and they're choosing to protest,
to put up their picket line before
the semester's over, affecting as
many students as they possibly
can. I feel like they're using us
as pawns."
"If anyone is using the students as pawns, frankly, it's the
employer," said Dominique Ro-
elants, faculty association chief
steward.
"If negotiations had started
last May, we would have settled
this long ago and there wouldn't
have been a strike."
The delays in negotiations are
causing mounting frustration
on the picket line.
"Students have the right to
express themselves," said Toni
O'Keeffe, communications director for the university."
Education is about critical
thinking, and understanding
and appreciating different
points of view....We are not surprised to see students out there
in support of their beliefs."
O'Keeffe added that other factors played a role in negotiation delays.
"[The delays] were the result
of some significant administrative transition," he said. "VIU's
vice-president of academics
stepped down last spring and
it took until August to get the
[position] replaced. So yes, this
did impact VIU's ability to move
forward. It was not a delay tactic, it was not part of any plan-
it just was."
Although all sides involved in
the strike have been feeling student-based tension from the beginning, something that could
also be taking an extra toll on
the faculty association is pressure from within the union
itself.
"We also feel the pressure
of the long-term impact on the
university if we don't solve it in
the right way," Roelants said.
"We need to get a solution that
means that VIU will become a
great university as opposed to
whatever it might become if we
don't win this.
"Spirits are pretty high on
the line because, you know what
we're actually fighting about is
for ensuring that the priority
for spending at VIU is on educational services for students,"
Roelants added.
"If we were out there trying
to get a salary increase, I have
to tell you, the line would have
fallen apart long ago." tl
iss;sssssBsss=s:yssssssssssssss:sBSSSBSSS8;s:sssssssssss5sss
INVENT THE
CI ITI IDC
FUTURE
CONTEST 2010 J
	
CONGRATULATIONS GRACE!
YOU'VE RAISED THE BAR IN RAISING AWARENESS
ABOUT ENERGY CONSERVATION
"IH
GRACE WONG
ESSAY: THE TABLES HAVE TURNED:
PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY ON PRODUCT DISPOSAL
AGE GROUP: 20-24
UBC student Grace Wong is a grand prize winner in BC Hydro Power Smart's
Invent the Future Contest — an online contest created to raise awareness
about the importance of energy conservation. Her winning essay describes an
idea that proposes manufacturers be responsible for the full life-cycle of their
product. Read her winning entry at www.inventthefuture.ca.
BC hydros
WWW.INVENTTHEFUTURE.CA POWEfSfTlBrt
Your campus radio station
with online streaming
and podcasts
CiTR
101.9fm/CITR.ca
OWN YOUR FREQUENCY
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Have some free time after exams?
Start writing for The Ubysseyl
We will be publishing throughout the summer, online
and in print. Shoot us an email at news@ubyssey.ca
to get on our pitchlist.
arshy mann | news@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc 8/UBYSSEY.CA/S PORTS/2 011.04.11
SPORTS
EDITOR MARIE VONDRACEK»sports@ubyssey.ca
Sailing to compete at collegiate level
NOAH BURSHTEIN
nburshtei n@ubyssey.ca
Most people on campus haven't
heard of UBC's new competitive
sailing team. Of course, most
people on campus also haven't
raced across the ocean at speeds
of up to 30 miles an hour either.
Newly founded, the UBC sailing
team has become officially competitive at the collegiate level
thanks to a passionate group of
racers led by team manager and
sailor Elisha Allen.
Allen is passionate, to say the
least. Clearly in love with her
sport, she was thrust into sailing at an early age. She grew
up in Calgary, where her father
taught her to race 50 foot boats,
and instilled in her a love of sailing that she still wears proudly on her sleeve. Taking lessons
in Calgary, she learned how to
race boats and began to meet
other racers.
Coming to UBC, Allen had one
goal in mind: she wanted to sail.
She claims she came here "both
for school and sailing," but her
true love was out on the water.
She joined with some sailing
friends who she had met before
coming to UBC and together they
joined the Royal Vancouver Yacht
Club. Given occasional time to
practice, they decided to propose
the idea of a competitive collegiate racing team, only the second of its kind on the West coast
of Canada. After having their
proposal pass, a process Allen
admits was "surprisingly painless." The University of Alberta's
coach came out to Vancouver to
help them get set up. Allen sat on
the executive board of the yacht
club and helped gain funding
and support for her team.
Collegiate sail racing is quite
popular in the Eastern US and
Canada, with major programs
at Harvard, Yale and Princeton.
These American schools offer
full scholarships for their teams,
allowing them to be quite competitive in the racing world. UBC,
armed with a brand new squad,
is obviously not as competitive as
these older programs, but they
do have a few secret weapons
that allow them to beat many
schools. UBC has always been
a breeding ground for Olympic
athletes, and when racing at non-
NCAA tournaments where non-
amateur athletes are allowed to
compete, the Thunderbirds really have an opportunity to shine.
UBC has been quite competitive at the many different sailing
regattas they've been to already,
competing mostly in the southwestern United States. Thanks to
their two volunteer coaches, the
Thunderbirds are beginning to
attract more and more talent to
the Vancouver campus. Moving
forward, Allen admits there are
still a few roadblocks left to tackle.
She explains that "we don't have
the use of the yacht club's boats
for summer training, as they are
in use for lessons and such," detailing the Thunderbirds' biggest
issue thus far. Teams at the highest level of this sport train year-
round, and Allen's squad is still
unable to find boats that are available for use during the summer.
The key is, of course, funding,
and so far it has been an uphill
battle for the T-Bird racers to find
enough. It costs roughly $20,000
to be able to fund boats for the
team, and Allen plans to approach
both the AMS and corporate sponsors to attempt to raise the funds.
"Corporate sponsorships are
something we're really planning
on investigating," Allen says, noting that the Canadian Yacht Club
has been "more than supportive,"
and that she plans to approach
Setting out on a new era of UBC sailing. ROB FOUGERE PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
sailing equipment companies for
additional support.
Already armed with 20 willing
and able racers, the team has been
contacted by coaches in Brazil and
the US who'd like to work with
them in the future. Nextyear, the
squad will be headed to Hawaii
and Stanford to compete in some
of the most competitive sailing
tournaments available on the collegiate scene.
The future is bright for Allen
and her racers, who are managing to popularize their sport while
racing to the finish line. ^J
ams Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
11.04.11
The AMS Student Food
Bank provides
emergency food relief to
current UBC students.
We offer a seven-day
emergency supply of
food to help students
during a time of crisis.
Visit the SUB Room 58
during operation hours
and staff members wilt
'le to assist yoi i
www.ams. ubc caf
services/ams-food-bank
ams
&19J
Batik
Speak
^easy
Speakeasy provides information, peer
support, and crisis services to the UBC students
and community.
AMS Speakeasy - SUB North Concourse
604.822.3777 | speak@ams.ubc.ca
A+'
Helping students
achieve their
academic goals
AMS Tutoring still offers appointment tutoring for a
variety of subjects at $30.00 per hour (groups are
welcome) during the exam period!
Check out http://tutoring.ams.ubc.ca/
for more information
AMS SERVICES
siici *
EVERVDM
quaredis located m the Main Concourse ofthe SUB
STAY UP TO DATE WITH THE AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
Q
Twitter:
AMSExecutive 2011.04.11/UBYSSEY.CA/S PORTS/9
Big Block Banquet honours athletes
Cam Thompson soaking up the magic. RICHARD LAM PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
MARIE VONDRACEK
sports@ubyssey.ca
Uniforms were exchanged for
tuxedos and dresses last Wednesday as over 850 guests attended
the 90th annual UBC Big Block
Club Awards and Sports Hall of
Fame Banquet. Eleven different
teams were represented among
the winners, with volleyball and
track and field sweeping the major individual awards.
The event celebrates excellence and commitment to Varsity athletics, with a parade ofthe
Big Block Inductees and graduating athletes in addition to
the individual awards. Inductees are awarded a 'Big Block
sweater,' upon completion of
their second varsity season,
while graduating players are
presented with a silver, Native
art-engraved ring to be worn on
the ring finger ofthe right hand.
The winner of the Bus Phillips award, which honours the
top male athlete of the year,
was Inaki Gomez of track and
field, while on the women's side,
Shanice Marcelle won the Marilyn Pomfret Award.
"It's pretty incredible, I never thought that in the short
time that I've been here so
far that I'd be getting this
award," said Marcelle. "Just
being up on stage, surrounded
by all these athletes, it was
incredible."
Three athletes shared the
Thunderbird Rookie of the
Year award for their first season at UBC. Gagan Dosanjh from men's soccer was the
lone male recipient while Kylie
Barros (women's golf) and Savannah King (women's swimming) shared the female award.
The Du Vivier Team of the Year
award was also split between
two national championship-
winning squads, women's golf
and women's volleyball.
The most prestigious award
ofthe evening was awarded to
one track and field athlete and
a pair of volleyball players, as
the top graduating athletes of
the year awards were earned
by Blair Bann, Jen Hinze and
Liz Gleadle.
"It's an honour to win it and
to leave UBC with this prestigious award is a great feeling,"
said Bann, who won the Bobby
Gaul Memorial Trophy in his
final year on the men's volleyball team.
The May Brown Trophy for
the top female graduating athlete was split between Hinze of
women's volleyball and Gleadle of track and field.
"I was incredibly anxious and
nervous the entire day and it
was really exciting to hear my
name called," Gleadle said afterward, calling the award a
great honour.
Hinze held similar sentiments. "There were just so
many athletes and competitors at the banquet that in it,
"really an honour to be selected
amongst such an elite group." tl
BIRD DROPPINGS
UBC SOFTBALL PICKING IT UP
The UBC Thunderbird soft-
ball team has moved over .500
during a six-game win streak
last weekend in Oakland, CA.
Senior Tanya McLean led her
team on Friday with two home
runs and seven RBIs in the 7-0
and 15-6 wins, both over Patten
University. The second match of
the day was a slugfest, with UBC
out hitting Patten with 16 hits to
9, and four home runs to three.
UBC defeated the Holy Names
University (HNU) in two tight
rendezvous 3-0 and 3-2. Freshman pitcher Leigh Delia Siega
threw all seven innings ceding
only three hits and four walks,
and striking out five batters.
On Sunday, the 'Birds earned
another 5-3 win over HNU and a
dominating 10-4 victory over Patten. The victories moved UBC to
23-18 on the season.
UBC BASEBALL SLACKING
The UBC Thunderbirds settled
for a split with the Concordia Cav-
aliers to start their series at Nat
Bailey Stadium, as the T-Birds
edged the visitors 3-1 in game
one but fell 6-2 in the evening.
"This is a team supposed to
be getting ready to make a big
push for the World Series and
we aren't playing anywhere near
that," said UBC head coach Terry
McKaig after the series. "These
guys at some point have to make
the decision to elevate our game
because we're just making too
many mistakes and not bringing the proper mental approach
to the plate, little defensive and
base running mistakes, and you
just can't do that to be a championship team so we have to
keep pushing in the right direction here." *"'
m^
ttCCCS
|/|VU'
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Start here.
marie vondracek | sports@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc 10/U BYSSEY. CA/G AMES/2011.04.11
GAMES & COMICS
CROSSWORD
SUSC0MIC.COM, BY MIKE BROUND
COMICMASTER, BY MARIA CIRSTEA
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BLUNDERGRADS, BY PHIL FLICKINGER [BLUNDERGRADS.COM]
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5. Copycat
9. Wreath of flowers
12. Car bar
13. Roofing items
15. Mouth bones
16. Milk source
17. Shout of exultation
18. Airline since 1948
19. Writer
21. Headset
23. Apply powder to oneself
25. Combining form meaning
"dry"
26. Convened
29. Enclose
31. Gambling state
35. Israeli submachine gun
36. Muzzle
38. Mum's mate
39. Feminist Lucretia
41. Chairman's hammer
43. Suspend
44. A Musketeer
46. Nairobi's nation
48. Baton Rouge sch.
49. Winged child
51. Singer Amos
52. Bruce was a famous kung-
fu movie star
Public Open House
You arc invited to attend an Open House to view and comment on two residential proposals:
(T) EC Lot 4: A new 14-storey, rental residential building in East Campus
(2) Modern Green: A new 6-storey, mixed-use residential building in Wesbrook Place
The design team and Campus + Community Planning staff will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about these two projects.
The public is also welcome to attend the Development Permit Board meeting shown below.
More information on these projects is available on the C+CP website: www.planning.ubc.ca
Acadia Park
Residence
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Public Open House Development Permit Board
Wed. April 20, 2011 4:30 - 6:30 PM Wed. May 11, 2011   5 - 7 PM
Commons Room, MBA House Maple Room, Ponderosa Centre
3385 Wesbrook Mall 2071 West Mall
Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services, C+CP
email: karen.russell@ubc.ca.
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
• Complete 30-Hour Seminars
• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Strategics
• Experienced Course Instructors
• Comprehensive Study Materials
• Simulated Practice Exams
• Limited Class Size
• Free Repeat Policy
• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www .oxfordseminars.r.i
There's only one issue
left after this one.
Don't forget to get
involved next year!
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
tlT lEUBYSSEYc
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55. Frees (of)
57. In fact
61. It spreads aromatic smoke
65. Fleshy fruit
66. Garlic sauce
68. In a bad way
69. Actress McClurg
70. Merchandise
71. Physical suffering
72. Part of RSVP
73. Chair
74. Blunted blade
DOWN
1. Panama and bowler
2. Corp. VIP, briefly
3. Banned apple spray
4. Minor, in law
5. Man of royal blood
6. Actress Zadora
7. Fashion mag
8. Make less tense
9. Composer Schifrin
10. Actor McGregor
11. Archipelago part
14. Philosopher Kierkegaard
15. God
20. Sacks
22. Get ready
24. Frog sound
26. Shrub of the cashew family
27. Alchemist's mercury
28. One tenth, usually
30. Down-filled quilt
32. In the least
33. Compact
34. Dispute
37. Domingo, for one
40. Agonize
42. Lyric poet
45. Chapter of the Koran
47. Adjutant
50. Clause
54. AKA
56. Long-billed sandpiper
57. Gorillas, chimpanzees and
orangutans
58. Basic monetary unit of
Ghana
59. Follow
60. Long ago
62. Hit with an open hand
63. Night author WieseI
64. Baseball's Sandberg
67. Meadow
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OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
MENTAL HEALTH MORE THAN A SERVICE
Queen's University made unfortunate headlines
this week after two students died on campus—
the fifth and sixth in the past year. At least two
of these deaths were suicides. This tragedy has
left the university reeling and looking for answers. It's also the latest development in a national conversation about the mental health of
university students.
We've known for several years that students
tend to display higher rates of depressive symptoms than the general population. It's a stressful time. We're often living away from home for
the first time, disconnected from social networks
and forced to cope with the stresses of work and
study. Whatever the cause, many report feeling
hopeless, lonely and overwhelmed, according to
the National College Health Assessment.
Universities are starting to realize they need
to do more to help students. In 2009, the UBC VP
Students office made mental health "a priority,"
and launched a number of programs aimed at
getting help to students in distress. UBC is working on an early alert system to get help to students thinking about suicide. And most counselling appointments are now available same-day
We're doing better than other schools our size:
at UW in Seattle, it can take up to four weeks to
see a counsellor.
While safety nets like these are vital, we may be
overlooking important structural concerns that
are making university an unreasonably stressful time of life. Cornell University experienced
six suicides in five months, and some started referring to it as a "suicide school." The university
began to look seriously at how their curriculum
was affecting mental health. In light of this, the
Cornell senate made a number of changes to its
academic policies. Assignments during breaks
are "strongly discouraged," breaks have been extended and the university is facilitating discussions between students and faculty on academic pressures. Queen's administrators are promising to similarly alter their academic calendar.
It's distressing that these steps only are seriously considered in the wake of tragedies. Preventative measures like those UBC are considering
are a step in the right direction. But they may not
go far enough. There maybe something embedded in the bones of the university that make it a
harder place to be. It's a large university with rigorous academic standards, where most students
commute and feel no real sense of community.
UBC students score higher than average on rates
of depressive symptoms. The university should
take proactive steps towards addressing student
mental health that go beyond tweaks to services.
THOUGHTS ON THE UBC LIPDUB VIDEO
A small note, because as the YouTube counter ticks ever-higher from the tens of thousands
into the hundreds of thousands, across Canada hopeful and prospective students alike begin
to imagine UBC as a Utopia in which helicopter
rides and pole-dance party buses featuring Brian Sullivan abound, and you and your 999 best
friends might spontaneously break into choreography in a display of overwhelming school spirit; a place where the Greek system is a part of a
larger community of service and students hobnob with stars on their way to classes in gleaming buildings filled with the fruits of higher education; a place where every sporting event is attended by mobs of screaming Thunderbird fans,
student elections engage their constituencies to
create high turnout and the phrase 'degree factory' is a dusty dream of the past; in short, the kind
of dream university in which unicorns are plentiful and flash mobs are a daily occurrence; where
learning and intellect are melded with charming
absurdity into one single spandex-studded display of the depth of feeling this campus community inspires—yes, this, they think, might be
the place for me!
It isn't. This is a fine school, but fully lacking in
this sort of campus-wide spirit 99 per cent of the
time. You want crazy funtimes, go to St FX. Or
Western. Or Queen's.
But this was quite nice for what it was. Raise
your glass to those involved, tl
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BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
OPINIONS
Time for South Asian LGBTQ support
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
Vancouverites could be forgiven for
thinking it's impossible to be both
South Asian and queer.
The media tends to frame the two
groups as antagonists, with South
Asian men full of machismo and Eastern prejudices terrorizing Vancouver's
vibrant queer community.
When Peter Regier and David
Holtzman were savagely beaten outside
of their Chinatown home by two South
Asian brothers in July 2010, the media immediately began asking if South
Asians had a problem with homophobia.
The Province asked if "gay bashings
were a culture clash."
Same story with Michael Kandola's
attack against Jordan Smith in Vancouver in 2008.
After a Sikh religious leader made
homophobic remarks in December
2007, gay rights activist Kevin Dale
McKeown said that the comments were
"a wake-up call to the queer community to recognize that other marginalized minorities are not automatically
our friends and allies."
He went on to say that "minorities
[that] hold devoutly and literally to just
about any religious creed, the odds are
that they are not only not our friends,
but are in fact a very real threat to our
own rights and freedoms."
The discussion was very different
when Shawn Woodward, a white man,
punched Ritch Dowrey in the face at a
gay bar, giving him permanent brain
damage. No one asked if the white
community had a homophobia problem. People saw it for what it was; the
repulsive and hateful actions of an
individual.
Of course, we can't apologize for the
hatred that some people in Vancouver's South Asian community—especially older generations—have towards
people with differing sexualities.
But putting the focus on one ethnic community and making them the
scapegoat for homophobia in Vancouver means that the rest of our city
doesn't have to examine their own
prejudices.
And even more importantly, these
pernicious media stereotypes find
their way into the LGBTQ community, making South Asians who are
struggling with their sexuality another reason to stay in the closet.
At a recent conference about immigration, Brian O'Neill, a professor
of social work at UBC, said that he
thinks "the mainstream gay community at large has a tendency to blame
the South Asian community [for gay-
bashings] and say 'send them back.'"
"[Queer South Asians] felt rejected
by the mainstream community and
the mainstream Anglo white gay community," he went on to say. "You face
double discrimination."
Groups such as Sher Vancouver have
sprouted up to help queer South Asian
youth and give them a place to fit in,
but it's not enough.
With South Asia one of the primary sources for new arrivals in Canada, we need to create the infrastructure and support networks to help
both immigrants and their children
who are queer.
Just as many new immigrants are
being asked to question their own prejudices about sexuality, Vancouver's
LGBTQ community must ask whether
they're letting members in both communities down, va
LETTERS
REGULAR AMS WORKERS DESERVE
WAGE INCREASE
Members of AMS council have an important debate looming, and it's a debate that will end up affecting many
students on campus. I'm referring,
of course, to the emergency council
debate on wages and compensation
for employees ofthe AMS. Hundreds
of students rely on the AMS as an employer through their school years; it's
a crucial aspect of how many students
pay their tuition each year.
The starting wage for many AMS
employees, especially those who are
in the food services, is well below the
proposed minimum wage. Even with
wage increases each semester, it would
still take a full year for many employees to reach the new minimum wage.
This isn't acceptable. It isn't acceptable as a stand-alone policy, and
it's certainly not acceptable to leave
AMS employee wages where they are
when we plan to give large raises
to our AMS Executives. The debate
about whether the Executives require
a raise is not one I wish to discuss;
my concern is solely with those students who put in time at our food establishments in order to keep themselves in schools.
Many of these students, including
myself, work few hours in order to ensure that all student employees have
a chance to earn money. This makes it
all the more important that we raise
the wages they earn, to compensate
for the reduced number of working
hours these students work in comparison to our executives.
On Monday, our AMS Council members will have a choice before them.
They can choose to find a way to help
students in need, or they can choose
to wait for the government to impose
it upon them. I sincerely hope that the
AMS Council chooses to find a way to
smoothly integrate a wage increase
for low wage employees and to do it
in as expedient a manner as possible.
—Trevor Ritchie
President of the
UBC New Democratic Party 8/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2011.04.11
Like it and WIN it
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