UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 8, 2015

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126205.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126205.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126205-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126205-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126205-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126205-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126205-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126205-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126205-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126205.ris

Full Text

Array  // Page 2
l*MWAWKlflllKI*i»afcwH
EVENTS       V THISWEEK,CHECK!
THURSDAY ' 8
TOM BURROWS EXHIBITION
OPENING RECEPTION 8:00 P.M. @ BELKIN ART GALLERY
The Belkin Art Gallery will be featuring B.C. artist Tom Burrows'works from
January 9 through April 12. Known for his unconventional artistic style,
Belkin will be giving a talk at the gallery on Saturday. Free
SATURDAY   /   10
YULE BALL
8:00 P.M. -2:00 A.M.@SUBPARTY ROOM
Live your Harry Potter fantasies at this UBC Quidditch event — Dress in your
best and bring your wand to this magical atmosphere. $10; 19+
SATURDAY   '   10
BACK TO SCHOOL BASH
8:00 P.M. @ KOERNER'S PUB
The Calendar is hosting a back-to-school party. Meet up with friends, enjoy
some beers and warm yourself against the cold winter nights of Vancouver.
$5 early bird, $10 regular; 19+
ON
THE
COVER
Kickstarting my little brother's
career as a hand model.
-Photo Cherihan Hassun
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
*s-
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
JANUARY8,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXX
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Copy Editor
Matalie Scadden. a Pentland,
Business Manager
Editorial Office: SUB 24
Will McDonald
Ciaran Dougherty
FerniePereira
604.822.2301
coord i n ati n g @ u byss eyes
Design Editor
copy® ubyss eyes
Distribution Coordinator
Soren Elsay, Olamide Olaniyan
_awrenceNeal Garcia,Taric
Vira, Kelley Lin, Jenny Tang,
_eoSoh, Mateo Ospina, Koby
fpe reira@ubyssey.es
Ad Sales
Business Office: SUB 23
ADVERTISING 604.822.1654
NickAdams
Lily Cai
Geoff Lister
nquiries604.S22.66S1
pri nted i tor@ ubys sey.cs
cai@ubyssey.cs
Michaels, Jasmine Cheng,
advertising@ubyssey.es
Student Union Building
Web Developer
Illustrator
Vliguel Santa Maria, Natalie
Accounts
613S SUB Boulevard
Peter Siemens
Julian Yu
Thea Simpson
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
web@ubyssey.cs
julianyu@ubyssey.cs
accounts@ubyssey.es
Online: ubyssey.ca
News Editors
Twitter: ©ubyssey
JovanaVranic +
Veronika Bondarenko
LEGAL
news@ubyssey.cs
The Ubyssey is the officia
cannot be reproduced without
and clarity. All letters must be
student newspaper of theUni ver
the expressed, written permis
•eceived by 12 neon the day be
Culture Editor
sify of British Columbia. It is pub-
sion of The Ubyssey Publica
fore intended publication. Let
Jenica Montgomery
ished every Morday and Thurs
tions Society
ters received after this point
culture@ubyssey.cs
day by The U byssey Publications
The Ubyssey is a rounding
Jill be published in the follow
Society. We aie an autonomous.
member of Canadi;
ing issueunlessthereisan ur
Sports* Rec Editor
democratically run student crga-
ty Press(CUP)andadherestc
gent time restriction or other
JackHauen
nization.andallstudentsaieen-
CUPsguiding principles
matter deemed relevant by
sport s@ubyssey.cs
couraged to participate
_etters to the editor must
the Ubyssey staff.
Editorials are chosen anc
ce under 300 words. Please
t isagreed byall persons
Video Producer
iwitten by theUbysse/staff They
nclude your phone number.
■lacing display or dassif ied ad-
TimHoggan
areth -   ■■    -
ertisirgthatiftheUbysseyPub-
video@ubyssey.cs
staff;--        ■ :■-:-   -v     -
oat ions Scciety fails to publish
fleet the views of 1 he Ubyssey
vvell as your year and faculty
anadvertisementcrifanerrorin
Photo Editor
Publications Scciety or the Uni
with all submissions. ID will be
the ad cccurs the liability ofthe
Cherihan Hassun
versity of British Columbia. AI
checked when submissions are
JPS wil not begreater than the
photo® ubyssey.c;
Editorial content appearing ir
drepped off at t heed iter el effice
crice paid for the ad. The UPS
The Ubyssey is the property of
of The Ubyssey otherwise ver-
shall rot be responsible for slight
Opinions + Blog Editor
The U by ssey Pu b! cation sSCciety
fication will be done by phone
changes or ty peg ra phica 1 er lors
Stories, opinions, photographs
The Ubyssey reservesthe right
that do not lessen the value or
and artwork contained herein
to edit submissions for length
the impact of the ad.
:@ ubyssey.ca
OUR CAMPUS //
ONEONONE1
PHOTOCOURTESF UBC ROWING
Jacob Derewenda (left) rowed with UBC for nearly four years until a shoulder injury ended his competitive career.
In life and sports, Jacob Derewenda is rowing with the current
Austen Erhardt
Opinions & Blog Editor
When it conies to sheer intensity,
few sports can compare to rowing.
Though the gliding of boats across
water appears tranquil, for the
duration of each race, nearly every
muscle in your body is strained as
each rower works in tandem with
his or her crew to pull their boat
across the water, their successes
and failures the product of years
of training, sweat and a lot of pain.
Until last month, Jacob Derewenda
was one of UBC's varsity rowers
— but now, thanks to a shoulder
injury, he's been cut off at the peak
of his career, before one of his most
important rowing seasons.
Derewenda, born in Edmonton
and raised in Virginia, is in his
fifth and final year of a philosophy
and economics degree. He's currently in the process of applying
to law schools, and plans on going
to school in Ontario or continuing
at UBC.
"I want to help the speed
of scientific and technological
progress through law. I think that
law is an important aspect and
one that's not necessarily thought
of too often in regards to science
and technology, because there are
a number of inventions or fields
of study that are going to require
either philosophical inquiry as to
whether or not the field should be
practiced or what our approach
should be ethically and morally,"
said Derewenda.
In novice, it's basically
like a 5,000 piece
puzzle. You're only
given five pieces a
day. By the time that
you put it all together
you can see what it
can offer you and how
much of a commitment
it really is."
Jacob Derewenda
Former UBC Rower and fifth-year
philosophy major.
Derewenda's first semester at
UBC was relatively typical, with
more of a focus on meeting people
than academics or clubs, but in his
second term he wanted to become
more involved.
"I've always played sports... so
I looked to do that again but I also
wanted to do something new and
different. I played baseball and
basketball in high school and I was
looking for something different so
I looked at all the sports that UBC
had, and I basically figured that I
wasn't good enough at anything
else and I maybe could try rowing
... So I gave it a shot and did pretty
well," Derewenda said. "I started
September of my second year full
time."
Most weeks, varsity rowers
train 11 times per week — including the infamous 5:00 a.m. rows.
Many varsity rowers — including
Derewenda — started at UBC with
no rowing experience, and joined
the program as novices training
six or seven times per week. At his
peak last summer, Derewenda was
rowing 12 times per week.
I couldn't have done
it without the rest of
the team. It's one thing
to promise something
to yourself, but it's
something completely
different when other
people are depending
on you."
Jacob Derewenda
"In novice, it's basically like a
5,000 piece puzzle. You're only
given five pieces a day. By the time
that you put it all together you can
see what it can offer you and how
much of a commitment it really
is. But, because it's done incrementally, it's not overwhelming or
burdensome."
Derewenda's injury — a torn
labrum — first surfaced two years
ago, though he remembers having
shoulder pain as early as high
school. While racing in Seattle
in late 2014, he realized that the
injury had progressed to the point
where it was impairing his performance and also threatening his
long-term health.
"As soon as that was done, I kind
of realized that I needed to get
this fixed soon. If I didn't, I wasn't
going to be able to do a lot of things
that I enjoy doing," Derewenda
said. "The unfortunate thing about
the surgery being when it is is that
I won't be able to get to row for this
next term — my last term — which
is kind of an important season for
us, because we have one of our
bigger races ofthe year: the brown
cup, against UVic."
Derewenda, who considers
himself to only be a "decent"
rower, stressed the importance of
teamwork in rowing — if someone
doesn't pull their weight it's felt
by the whole crew... literally. He
also highlighted the impact that
rowing has had on his personality
and his development of a more
disciplined lifestyle.
"I couldn't have done it without the rest ofthe team," said
Derewenda. "It's one thing to
promise something to yourself,
but it's something completely
different when other people are
depending on you. When it's seven
other people or 15 other people
depending on you, it's that much
more of a reason to stop whining
and get about what you need to get
about doing."
I'm only taking three
classes this term, but
doing so with one arm
for three weeks will
probably be pretty
interesting. I'm sure I'll
have my hand full in
that regard."
Jacob Derewenda
Having rowed full time for
almost four years, Derewenda is
going to have a much more open
schedule for his last few months
at UBC.
"I'm only taking three classes
this term, but doing so with one
arm for three weeks will probably
be pretty interesting. I'm sure I'll
have my hand full in that regard."
Though Derewenda's competitive rowing career is over, he plans
on staying involved with the UBC
rowing community and helping out
wherever he can. He hopes to build
awareness ofthe sport at UBC and
encourages anyone interested to
try out.
"Again, there's no experience
necessary — I didn't have any
experience ... you can wake up at
6:40 when we have our morning
practice, head to the Doug Mitchell
Arena and just follow the noises of
music and grunting and you'll find
yourself in the erg room and you
can introduce yourself and say that
you want to become a part ofthe
music and grunting." XI // News
uifORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
URSDAY, JANUARY 8,
EVENTS»
AMS Events gears up for new term with events, collaborations and contests
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
The AMS is launching a new series
of events to kick off Term 2.
Accordingto AMS Programming and Events Manager, Anna
Hillar, Frost Fest, a week of welcome-back festivities, has been a
major project for the events office.
"We wanted to do Frost Fest
because the past few Januaries
it seems like nothing really
happens on the first week, and
we just wanted to change it up,"
said Hillar.
The week-long event was
initially anticipated to go hand in
hand with the opening ofthe new
SUB, but despite building delays,
the AMS decided to pursue planning ofthe event.
Hillar said that the most important reason to host Frost Fest
stemmed from the desire to make
all students feel welcome upon
starting the new year and term.
"There's new students that
come [to UBC] in January too.
They didn't get a first week in
September," she said, expressing
hopes that this event will "speak
to more ofthe demographic."
As part of Frost Fest, the
society is hosting comedy, wine
tasting and trivia nights, special
lunches and live musical acts,
including popular Canadian band
July Talk in concert at The Pit.
"People seem to be excited
for [the concert,]" said Hillar.
"I don't think we'll be able to see
[July Talk] in such a small venue
again."
For the rest ofthe month and
term, the AMS is working on con-
The AMS Frost Fest is a new first week event meant to welcome back new and returning students.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
tinuing to grow their support for
various students' interests, starting
with a collaboration with Campus
DJ, a US music competition. To
participate, interested students can
apply to be chosen to open for a
bigger DJ who is set to play at the Pit
at the end ofthe month.
"The winner gets a whole bunch
of prizes, cash and the opportunity
to go to the main competition,"
said Hillar.
UBC will be the first Canadian
university to get involved with
Campus DJ.
In addition, the AMS will be
bringing back the Last Band Standing competition, which calls on stu
dents to vote for a fellow student's
band to win management meetings, prizes and a chance to play at
Block Party.
Accordingto Hillar, there are
also two special talks planned for
the month. The first is a co-presented talk with humanitarian
and CNN Top Ten Hero of 2011,
Derreck Kayongo, at the Student
Leadership Conference.
At the end ofthe month, the
AMS will also be hosting Canadian politician and cannabis
activist Marc Emery, who will
be speaking at the Frederic
Wood theatre.
"It'll be the first time he's
spoken anywhere close since he
got out of prison. I think that
will be a super interesting talk,"
said Hillar.
Moving forward with the new
term, Hillar cited collaboration
with other campus organizations,
including AMS clubs, The Calendar and Thunderbirds, as a main
goal for expanding the reach of
AMS events.
As the term goes on, Hillar
encourages student groups to
come chat with AMS Events about
potential collaborations.
The office also hired a new
events coordinator to help ensure
the society can balance large- and
small-scale events simultaneously.
"The AMS is here and we offer
all these amazing services lots of
people don't even know about,"
said Hillar, explaining the reasoning behind large promotional
events. "It's also just awesome to
give someone a free coffee and
they're like 'you made my day!'" Xi
NEWS BRIEFS
Ponderosa residence neglect
An elevator in the Ponderosa
residence complex has been out of
order for about two months, and
residents living on upper floors are
growing anxious.
Students were told that the wait
for maintenance comes as a result
of complicated parts needing to be
ordered and replaced — a lengthy
process, accordingto SHHS.
Residents also reported strange
noises and smells coming from other
elevators in the complex in the summer and fall. These issues have since
been resolved.
Students petion against mining
A student group called Stop The Institute started circulating a petition
asking the Canadian International
Resources and Development Institute (CIRDI), a mining and resource
extraction coalition between UBC,
SFU and the Ecole Polytechnique de
Montreal, be shut down. The letter
attached to the petition, which is
addressed to the heads ofthe three
universities, argues that the CIRDI,
which is funded in part by the
federal government and in part by
the universities, presents a conflict
of interest to the research that
will be conducted at the institute.
The students behind the letter and
petition expressed a desire to see the
three universities conduct research
on the impacts of Canadian resource
extraction that is independent from
funding by the federal government.
The petition currently has 1,037
signatures, includingthe names of
environmentalist David Suzuki,
UBC First Nations Studies professor
Glen Coulthard and SFU English
professor Stephen Collis. Xi
SCIENCE »
Researchers launch SPIDER telescope to study universe expansion
Scott Jacobsen
Contributor
Mark Halpern, a UBC professor
of physics and astronomy, along
with a team of researchers, is
studying patterns ofthe early universe with a specialized
airborne telescope.
Their SPIDER telescope will be
searching for Cosmic Microwave
Background Radiation (CMBR).
Accordingto Halpern, "this is
radiation from the early thermal
glow of the plasma that filled the
universe for the first few thousand years."
The team's primary goal is
to study the primordial process
known as inflation.
Accordingto Halpern, the early universe expanded extraordinarily rapidly. Halpern says the
math describing this phenomena
would not produce a stable universe over billions of years, even
though the age of our universe is
about 13.77 billion years.
A variable is missing.
"What you would expect is,
essentially instantly, the universe
would fly apart and be empty,
or re-collapse and vanish. By
instantly, I mean a tiny, tiny fraction of a second," said Halpern.
"We're missing part ofthe
physics that makes the thing be
stable for a really long time."
To explain, Halpern suggested
an analogy. If you were to roll a
marble down the top of a downward sloped cylindrical surface
such as a pipe, you would assume
that it would veer to the side and
fall off after a few centimetres.
"I push a marble down the top
ofthe pipe, and a quarter of a mile
Mark Halpern and his team are studying primordial Big Bang light patterns.
later it's still on top ofthe pipe,
you're going to say I'm missing
something," said Halpern, who
says the research team draws this
analogy with respect to the origin
and growth ofthe universe and
the missing variable.
SPIDER was launched to
search for this variable.
"We've built what we think are
the most sensitive telescopes in
wavelength regime anyone has
ever made. They can be so sensitive because they are up out of
the atmosphere." Halpern said.
The balloon-borne SPIDER
telescope took 10 years to construct and will operate for 20
days over Antarctica. It operates
with two distinguishing characteristics: extraordinary sensitivity and high vertical range above
the atmosphere, 40km above the
Antarctic, in the stratosphere.
=HOTOJIMTRODEF/FFICKR
Accordingto Halpern, the
researchers do not have explicit
predictions as to what SPIDER
will find.
"There is one concrete story
for what happened early on,
which is that in the first 10-34
seconds, the universe expanded,"
said Halpern.
"The thing we're trying to measure is, essentially, how long that
lasted and just when it stopped." Xi 4    I    NEWS    I   THURSDAY, JANUARY 8,2015
AMS»
School of Economics
Undergraduate Society to
be finalized
=ILE PHOTO STEVEN DURFEEFFHE UBYSSEY
Viet Vu is the president of the Vancouver School of Economics Undergraduate Society.
Dave Nixon
Senior StaffWriter
Despite setbacks, the new
economics student society is
on track to become an official
society by the end ofthe school
year and to set a precedent for
how new student societies will be
formed in the future.
New AMS constituencies don't
appear very often so the AMS has
been moving forward cautiously;
in November 2012, the Vancouver
School of Economics (VSE) was
formed and students have been
working with the AMS since to
create a procedure for the formation of future student societies.
"The AMS doesn't actually
have a set of rules or procedures
or steps that people need to take,"
said Viet Vu, president ofthe
Vancouver School of Economics
Undergraduate Society (VSEUS).
"Everyone was like 'let's just
make sure we move carefully'".
The VSEUS, formerly a student
club, will be taking its 916 students from the Arts Undergraduate Society (AUS). In March 2014
they held their first referendum
in which 89.5 per cent of 149
voters agreed to reallocate a
fee currently paid to the AUS to
the VSEUS.
The AMS approved a procedure for establishing new
student societies in August 2014
and ruled a motion to recognize the VSEUS in September
2014 as "out of order" until the
new rules could be followed.
AMS President Tanner Bokor
said that was to work out a few
more details with the university
and internally.
The new rules involved the
creation of a committee made up
of members of the AMS, VSEUS
and AUS, and it will be mobilized
during a meeting on January 19.
"The only purpose ofthe meeting
is to get the organizing committee set up," said Bokor, who said
there would also be a lot of general information about constituencies, in general, presented.
If the committee is not
satisfied with the new society's
governing documents, it can recommend the AMS cease to recognize the society, or amend the
society's bylaws. If the VSEUS is
established officially, they'll be
moving into student spaces in the
Iona building.
The last student society to go
through the process was architecture students, nearly a decade
ago, according to AMS President
Tanner Bokor. "[It] highlighted
that we didn't really have any
clear protocols on how to create a
constituency and ensure effective representation for students."
"It certainly took a little
longer than we had expected,"
said Bokor, who said they aren't
aware of any other new societies
on the horizon, "but it'll be for
the better of those students and a
better result in the end." 31
WILDLIFE »
Climate change may wipe out Chinook salmon
ERESTED
IN SHOOTING
FOR US'
ubyssey.photo@gmail.com
=HOTO A. HOEN ANDCO/FFICKR
According to Anthony Farrel, there's a 98 per cent chance that the Chinook salmon population will die out by 2100.
Edmund Henry
Contributor
While the wildlife of B.C. faces
many uncertainties due to the
changing global climate, new
research shows that the future of
the Chinook salmon might be an
especially grim one.
Along with several members of
an international research team,
UBC Zoologist Anthony Farrell
found that there is a 98 per cent
chance that B.C.'s population of
Chinook salmon could suffer irreparable losses by the year 2100.
In their study, researchers
investigated whether the Chinook
salmon could adjust to changing
temperatures and their limits
to these temperatures, based on
their heartbeat.
While human beings are able
to regulate their body temper
atures around 37 degrees Celsius,
the body temperatures of invertebrate animals like amphibians
and fish are determined by their
environment, which is increasingly
getting warmer.
Accordingto Farrell, while salmon could adjust their physiology
and even perform better in certain
warmer temperatures, the Chinook
salmon's heartbeat becomes irregular and fails to function at 24.5
degrees Celsius.
"You get to a certain temperature, and then at that temperature,
you go downhill," said Farrell. "It's
a bit like falling over, you've got
this trajectory of global climate
warming [and] those couple of
degrees [are] going to make all the
difference."
As the temperature ofthe
water that is home to the Chinook
salmon continues to increase, it is
possible that their former home
may become unliveable in the next
85 years.
"It's that kind of precipitous decline," said Farrell. "Once you reach
this threshold temperature, things
just end in a bad way.
According to Farrell, the prospects of reversing this alarming
trend look bleak. While the most
obvious solution would be to put
a complete stop to global warming, this type of change seems
unlikely. The study suggests
smaller, more realistic steps such
as making habitats cooler and
practicing aquaculture, where
humans cultivate the salmon
themselves.
"[Global warming] is very easy
to ignore, but I think ignoring it is
one's peril," said Farrell. Xi
Whether your passion is
kinesiology, music or anything
in between, the UBC Bachelor +
Master of Management Dual
Degree turns it into
a profession.
The dual degree combines the
deep knowledge of your Bachelor's
degree with the world-class
business skills employers are
looking for. It's your ticket to
making an impact as a leader in
the field you love. Best of all, you'll
graduate with both degrees in only
4.5 years.
For eligible Bachelor's degrees and to
apply now, visit followyourpassion.ca
SAUDER
School of Business
ROBERT H. LEE
GRADUATE SCHOOL THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 2015    |    NEWS
^ Quick Look
Animals tested
216,450
Decrease (since 2012)
The total decrease in animals
tested.
48 per cent
Category D+E
Defined as moderate to severe
distress or discomfort.
75,559
Increase
(since 2012)
The total increase in Category D+E
animal testing.
2.55 per cent
Most common purpose
basic research
132,815
126,290
-
■x
<
<
70,000
60,000
50,000
40,000
30,000
20,000
10,000
67,534
UBC's
annual
on
report
animal testing
BY VERONIKA BONDARENKO
UBC has released its 2013 report
on the number of animals it uses
for research.
In 2013, the university used
216,450 different animals, including small and large mammals,
fish, reptiles and rodents, for
different types of laboratory and
educational research.
UBC has released a report on
the number of animals used for
research to the Canadian Council
on Animal Care (CCAC), which
oversees animal testing and its use
for science in Canada, since 2011.
While the total number of
animals used for research has
decreased by five per cent since
the report in 2012, the number of
animals used for Category D research, which is rated as causing
moderate to severe distress or
discomfort to the animal by the
CCAC, increased by 2.55 per cent
from 74,556 to 76,494 animals.
Over 64 per cent of all animals
used fell into Categories B and C,
which range from causing little
discomfort to minor stress and
pain to the animal.
63 animals were used for
Category E research, which is the
highest category on the invasiveness rating scale and categorized
as causing severe pain to the
animal. This number is a 0.01 per
cent decrease since 2012, when
0.04 per cent of all animals used
fell into this category. Animals
that were used for both Category
D and E research accounted for
32.83 per cent of total animals
used in 2013.
23,691
22,975
98 per cent of all animals used
were rodents, fish or reptiles and
amphibians. CCAC also divides the
purposes for which the animals
are used into six categories, which
range from zero (breeding) to five
(educational purposes). More than
half of all animals used fell into
categories one and two, which
include basic and medical and
veterinary research.
Stop UBC Animal Research, a
group that has recently submitted
a petition to the university to ban
all types of animal use for research
and presented a request to end Category D and E research to the UBC
Senate in April, has continued advocating against any animal use by
the university, especially ones that
falls into the higher pain categories.
"One animal screaming in pain,
discomfort and fear is one too
many, let alone 76,496 animals
enduring moderate to severe discomfort and pain, and 63 enduring
severe [pain] at or above their pain
threshold," said Laura-Leah Shaw,
the president of Stop UBC Animal
Research in a statement released
shortly after the report. "This is
what science fiction novels are
made of."
Shaw also said that the university needs to shift towards research
practices that do not involve
live animals.
"Time will tell if UBC and their
researchers are prepared to modernize their approach to research —
but on behalf of the animals whose
lives hang in the balance — we
ask UBC to immediately stop the
Category D and E experiments,"
said Shaw. 31
1358 1,783      ll8i 9g6       1.778   go8
360    351
2013
2012
Rodents
Fish        ReptiLes & Amphibians       Birds SmaLLMammaLs   Large MammaLs Marine MammaLs II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
URSDAY, JANU
CLUBS»
Heart ofthe City Piano Program receives $10,000 grant
Funding will help buy keyboards and guitars for underprivileged schoolchildren to use at home
Lawrence Neal Garcia
Senior StaffWriter
After obtaining her ARCT diploma
in piano — the highest academic
credential awarded by The Royal
Conservatory — Jessie Wang wondered: "where do I go from here?"
Now, Wang — who was herself
a beneficiary of volunteer piano
lessons (though not from a formal
organization) — is the co-director
ofthe Heart ofthe City Piano Program (HCPP) Vancouver chapter,
an AMS club that provides piano
and guitar lessons to schoolchildren in East Vancouver.
Recently, the club obtained a
Musicounts TD Community Grant
worth $10,000, which will go to
purchasing keyboards and guitars
for students in the program to
practice with at home — all under a
new "loan-for-practice" initiative.
As a predominantly volunteer-driven organization, the
HCPP recruits musicians to teach
basic music skills to those who
might otherwise not have access
to such opportunities. With a
varying number of volunteers
(which last term numbered to just
under 30), HCPP Vancouver has
partnerships with nine different underprivileged elementary
schools, and sets up weekly lessons
(of about 20 minutes per student)
for those interested — a number
FILM»
The Heart of the City Piano Program provides East Vancouver children with free music lessons.
limited mostly by the lack of
available instruments.
The new "loan-for-practice"
initiative, which Wang hopes will
be implemented by the next school
year, will hopefully change that.
"Because most ofthe students
who take lessons with us are not
able to afford an instrument at
home ... this is something that
we think would greatly benefit
[them]," said Wang, who noted
that the added practice would give
students a more realistic learning
experience. "It will also help us
expand the program to schools
that currently don't have any
pianos or keyboards."
Aside from the volunteer
initiatives, HCPP also has a
Performance Troupe, a group
of highly skilled musicians who
volunteer not to teach, but to
perform at various local venues
and charity events in order to
fundraise for the organization as
a whole.
Are one-screen cinemas a thing ofthe past?
Movies such as The Interview may be changing the cinema landscape
HFE PHOTO GEOFF FISTERFFHE UBYSSEY
Shia Laboeuf on campus in 2011 while working on the film The Company You Keep.
Gabriel Germaix
Senior StaffWriter
Under the threat of terrorist attacks on American theatres, Sony
Pictures released The Interview
through online platforms such
as YouTube, Google Play and
Xbox Video, and only showed
the film in select theatres across
the world. While The Interview
is not the only film to be released
primarily online, the media
coverage following the hacking
of Sony Pictures and the success
ofthe comedy — having made $31
million online since its release,
accordingto CNN — shines a new
light on the decline ofthe traditional cinematic experience. In
Vancouver, the decline in cinema
screenings of films has left the
city almost bare of its smaller-sized cinemas.
"By the time we get to the year
2000, we see the beginning ofthe
demise of one-screen cinemas in
Vancouver," said Brian Mcllroy
ofthe film studies department.
"If you went from UBC 15 years
ago, you could have walked down
[to] the West 10th [Street] and
the Varsity Cinema and you could
have seen a film ... further to the
Hollywood Theatre in Kitsilano
and watched a movie there, you
could have walked on a little
bit more or taken the bus to the
Ridge Theatre in Arbutus and
watched a movie there. And all
those cinemas are closed."
Facing the competition of
free, illegal streaming or downloading, cinemas changed from
small and specialized theatres to
larger commercial theatres, Cine-
plex appearing as a leader and
model in present-day Vancouver.
The population of avid movie-goers is shrinking as cinemas
close their doors to lesser-known
international and independent
movies that are not deemed
safe bets of a $13 entertainment
investment. "You might have the
5th Avenue and Burrard cinemas
[showing independent movies].
Normally one or two of those
screens are dedicated at least to
challenging material," said Mcllroy, "The Tinseltown [Odeon
International Village] as well...
because it has so many screens,
they can risk with some films."
"If you only have three or four
screens, or one screen, like the
Dunbar theatre, you have to take
the blockbuster, because you
have to fill those seats."
That said, an alternative
independent culture still lives
through film festivals and arts
exhibition spaces. "Usually in
a medium-sized city there is
one venue which is dedicated to
non-mainstream activity." Here
in Vancouver, the Cinematheque
fills this role, but going downtown to see a movie might seem
too far for UBC students.
Vancouver thus sees two distinct groups further divide. Some
go see the blockbusters while
aficionados stick to more artistic,
often less visual movies.
Michael Johnston and James
Mackin are both students involved in the UBC Film Society,
which runs the Norm Theatre
on campus. Johnston saw the
near eradication of independent
theatre step into reality as the
Toronto cinema he worked for
almost closed its doors. "The
independent theatres could not
keep up. Our [digital] projector [at the Norm] is $100,000 ...
It is a major investment," said
Johnston, one that specialized
theatres cannot keep up with.
"Foreign films are probably
the ones that are hurt the most,"
said Mackin. "Any film that is
nominated for the Best Foreign
Film Academy Award would be
almost impossible to see here ...
I have seen maybe one or two
foreign films that have been
nominated in the last four years
that I have been here."
As The Wolf of Wall Street
became the first movie to be
entirely sold in digital copies,
old projectors that use film came
one step closer to being obsolete and with them the struggling cinemas of Vancouver and
elsewhere. With every theatre
closing, UBC students have yet
another step to take if they want
to keep up with some of the most
brilliant but also most discrete
productions. Gone might be the
days when sitting in a big red
armchair with a box of popcorn
was part of a normal Saturday. 31
The majority ofthe funding
goes towards the HCPP's annual
Year-End Recital, which gives
students in the program a chance
to perform on-stage at the Tom Lee
Music Hall.
And while a few minutes a week
may not seem like much at first,
the program's efficacy is more than
just technical.
"Basically it might seem small
that you're teaching simple things
to kids," said Lydia Yeo, a volunteer
teacher with the HCPP, "but it
really makes a difference because
at the year-end recital, even if
the kid is playing something like
'Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star' on
the piano, their parents come up to
us crying and are really happy that
their children have the chance to
learn even something as small as
that."
"It's more about empowering
the children than actually getting
them to become professional
pianists, because our volunteers
also serve as role models for the
students whose families might not
be the best conditioned for them,"
added Wang. "So it's a matter of enhancing their social opportunities
through access to music."
It seems safe to say that, with
each new student and volunteer,
HCPP certainly lives up to its name
of becoming the heart ofthe city. 31
Love
movies?
So do we.
Join the
force.
culture@ubyssey.ca THURSDAY JANUARY 8, 2015    I    CULTURE
MOA»
City before the city:
MOA's new exhibit
PHOTO COURTESY REESE MUNTEAK
MOA's new exhibit opens on January 25 in collaboration with two other museums.
Trisha Bernardo
Contributor
Vancouver is a blank canvass, a city
in the making. However, there is
nothing entirely new about Vancouver, at least not in the historical
sense. Beneath its shimmery veneer
of bright, energy-efficient lights and
glass towers lies something. Before
Vancouver, there was cesna?em.
The society of cesna?8mis one
steeped in culture. Just two years
ago, several intact ancestral remains
were uncovered at the site during
an initial survey, as it was slated for
development. Many protests ensued
and a 200-day vigil was eventually
held at the site by the Musqueam
community and their supporters,
in hopes of stopping the development. These events surrounding
the Musqueam site helped spur the
highly anticipated three-part exhibition cesna?8m, the city before the
city, set to open on January 25.
The exhibition, accordingto
co-curators Jordan Wilson and
Susan Rowley, comprises of three
different "sub-exhibitions," one at
the Museum of Vancouver, one at
the Musqueam Cultural Centre and
one at the Museum of Anthropology.
"They're all opening at the same
time, and they're all related to
cesna?em but they address different
areas or different themes in each
exhibit," said Wilson. "In some ways
they're standalone exhibits... but in
other ways they're all connected,
tied in one broader, larger story."
The three exhibits are collectively aimed at reversing the stereotype
of Vancouver being a new city.
Rowley explained that it is not right
to think of Vancouver as having no
history. "There was a long occupation of a very sophisticated group
of communities that interacted and
had a trade network and a governance system that has been here for
thousands of years," said Rowley.
The exhibits are largely products ofthe Musqueam community
itself. In choosing the items to be
displayed, Wilson said that they
worked with a "cultural advisory
committee ... comprised of six
respected community leaders."
They involved the Musqueam community as much as possible in the
development of all three exhibits.
Vancouver is built upon complexity
— Musqueam complexity.
Wilson and Rowley revealed that
one ofthe main focuses in MOA's
exhibit will be Musqueam world-
view and value. The exhibit is built
upon Musqueam teachings, which
Rowley briefly described as "the
things that you learn from when
you're young until you're grownup."
She elaborates that the teachings
include ancestors, territory and the
"oral history of people telling their
lived stories." Teachings also encompass what can be called a deep
history, the stories of how things
came to be. Rowley added that the
exhibit at MOA is "probably the
most experimental in nature."
"People expect to see objects, or
what community members would
prefer everybody to refer to as the
belongings, things that people used
in the past," said Rowley. However,
she noted that "there is none of
those at the MOA exhibit."
One ofthe features that Rowley
is particularly excited about is the
tangible table, "a thing that allows
people to actually touch plastic
replicas ofthe pieces." One of their
hopes with the tangible table is that
it will create conversation, so
that their stories add to "Larry
Grant's ... or Larissa or Mary
Roberts."
Wilson and Rowley stress that
the cesna?8m exhibit caters for
everyone. Their aim is for people
to interact with the Musqueam
through the stories on the exhibit
walls and the videos that will
be present. They want us to get
to know the story of the people
from the city before the city. 31
MUSIC »
Student Luke Wallace uses film and music
to spark discussions on conservation in B.C.
=HOTO COURTESY JONTIDEY
Luke Wallace is a fourth-year environmental geography student.
Mischa Milne
Contributor
Fourth-year UBC student Luke Wallace is using music and film to raise
awareness about the conservation of
British Columbia's coastlines.
His second album, The Kitimat
LP, was released on December 16
and the musician celebrated with a
show at the Fox Cabaret the same
night. It is the soundtrack to the
documentary One Big Coast that
Wallace filmed over the summer of
2014 in Kitimat, B.C. The documentary will be released in January
and was edited by Wallace and his
friend Ali Harris. Both the album
and the documentary focus on the
Kitimat coastline.
Wallace began writing the album
in November of 2013, and took
approximately one year to finish it.
A few songs were recently played on
CBC Radio over the winter break,
though Wallace said he was unsure
how CBC got a hold of his music.
"Right now they're just playing
my stuff because they heard it somewhere and they like it I guess, which
is pretty awesome," said Wallace.
As an environmental geography major and a researcher
for UBC, Wallace says he knew
whatever he was going to do with
his life would involve conservation. Born and raised in Vancouver, he spent a lot of time hiking
and camping in the outdoors,
which he said strongly shaped
who he is today. Additionally, he
is able to incorporate what he's
learned into his songs.
"I think that my writing
wouldn't be what it is and my
songs wouldn't be what they are
without constantly learning new
things about the planet and the
way that our society interacts
with it," he said.
He first started playing music
at 15, and now plays guitar, banjo
and harmonica, among other
instruments.
His first EP, From the Ground
Up, was released in October of
2013, but the two albums are
very different.
"They're like night and day.
The ideas in From the Ground Up
loosely carry over to The Kitimat
LP, but Kitimat is a lot more
direct and purposeful. I think
through maturity and writing
experience, I was able to refine
what I'm trying to say."
He decided to film the documentary, which is supported by
UBC Common Energy, as a way
to connect people across the
province, and to use multiple
arts forms in order to deepen his
argument.
"What I couldn't say through
music, I was able to say through
this film in visual footage,"
said Wallace.
He hopes that once people
have seen the film and listened
to the music they will be inspired
to get involved in the discussion
around the conservation of B.C.'s
coastlines.
Over the next few months,
there are plans for multiple
screenings ofthe documentary
and live shows throughout the
province. Wallace is also speaking with the Vancouver School
Board to discuss the possibility
of screenings at high schools.
"I don't think I will ever accomplish my grandest goal... to
inspire every human being in the
world to take better care of the
planet. However, I have accomplished more than I would have
ever thought I was capable of in
music and film." Xi
u
Crohn's Trial
The clinical research trial takes
place in Vancouver, BC.
For more information, call
1.855.209.9680 or email
qucrohnstrial.aa@gmail.com
a;*fts
Scan here to visit website
Do you have Crohn's di
Are you aged 19 or older?
Qu Biologies is recruiting for a Phase 1/2 clinical research trial
for people living with moderate to severe Crohn's disease.
Qu Biologies is working to develop a new platform of immunotherapeutic treatments.
Our novel Site Specific Immunomodulators (SSIs) are being designed with the goal
of activating the body's immune system to reverse the chronic inflammation
underlying many conditions such as Crohn's disease.
To learn more about the trial and complete an online pre-screening questionnaire to
assess your eligibility, visit www.qucrohnstrial.com.
Don't miss your opportunity to learn more about this fresh approach to better health. // Opinions
MINIMUM WAGE »
Re: Prasad's minimum wage letter
CIARAN DOUGHERTY
Copy Editor
Op-ed
Having received your letter regarding the increase in minimum
wage in B.C. I took issue with
some of your points.
Firstly I would like to clarify
that The Ubyssey did not state that
an increase was a bad idea, it only
questioned whether an increase
of this magnitude — the proposed
$4.75 — is too drastic. With this in
mind, your reference to a poverty
reduction plan is intriguing. Yes,
an increase in minimum wage can
be a part of such a plan, but only if
applied correctly alongside other
measures. However, that does not
necessarily mean that an increase
of nearly 50 per cent is wise.
Increasing wages moves our economy further from the equilibrium
point of perfect efficiency than we
already are, causing an even greater deadweight loss to society. We
must operate slightly above that
point because companies cannot be
relied upon to be fair with wages.
Yet an increase of this magnitude
is risky and could lead to a costly
strain on the economy.
While your point that workers
on minimum wage will have an
increased standard of living is
correct, you have ignored those
who are not on that wage. People
already earning at or just above the
proposed new wage will suffer a
drop in living standards as their living costs will go up but their wages
do not. This is due to the inflation
caused by the wage increase.
However, these are not the
people that will suffer the most;
your letter failed to address the
people who are unemployed,
people without work actively
looking for jobs. According to
John Rawls' famous Maxi Min
ethical rule, the way to increase
the net welfare of society is to
prioritize those who are worst
off. In this situation the unemployed are in worse poverty than
those struggling on the current
minimum wage, and increasing
that wage puts them in an even
worse scenario.
Imagine an unemployed single
parent who is having trouble finding work, their skill set and time
are limited, then add to these inhibitors that companies have to pay
=HOTOWILLMCDONALDfTHE UBYSSEY
a higher minimum wage to employ
them. Their chances of employment are severely diminished. And
it gets worse, the increased living
costs caused by the augmented
minimum wage make it even more
difficult for the parent to support
themselves and their child.
Yes the increase may help those
just below the poverty line, but
only at the expense of those who
are even worse off.
Now, as you said we here at The
Ubyssey do understand the struggle some students go through to
pay for their education. All of us at
the paper are students as well and
we are all working to either fund
or partially fund our degrees. Yet
the same logic that is applied above
is also relevant to students. Sure,
those of us on minimum wage
would love to get an extra $4.75 an
hour, but again what about those
students who also really need jobs
but cannot find them? It is going
to be even more difficult for those
with employers more reluctant to
hire at the new higher rate.
Now to another of your points;
companies are going to be affected
by such a drastic increase. There
is no way around this fact. What
is a little unclear is exactly how
this will affect workers. Maybe
companies will not lay off workers
as you say, but they will certainly
struggle to hire new ones. There is
also the possibility that people on
minimum wage will then be given
fewer hours to account for the
extra costs to companies. The costs
of having to pay so much more per
hour for every minimum wage employee will be felt somewhere.
One final thing to consider is the
loss of industry to other provinces.
With our minimum wage raised to
$15 an hour, work that would have
been done in B.C. may be done
elsewhere, where labour is cheaper. This would be damaging to our
economy as it would decrease investment, which would potentially
reduce our economic growth.
Thank you for bringing up the
subject as it is important for us as
students to consider how it may
affect us. There is plenty more
debate to be had on this topic and
I am hardly an expert. It should be
noted that I do not believe we are
currently in an ideal situation, but
I do believe we should be cautious
before supporting anything too
radical as it could have the opposite ofthe desired effect. '3
Have       |
strong
opinions?
Il
Want to weigh in on a UBC-related issue, or respond (
or editorials? Write to aerhardt@ubyssey.ca with your letter. Write it
first or chat with our editor to determine word limits and suitability.
LAST WORDS »
'^^g^^***^	
**
LAST WORDS//
UBCS ANIMAL RIGHTS
PROGRESS IS GOOD, BUT
NOT AN END POINT
UBC has released its yearly
report on the animals that it
uses for research and, in typical
UBC fashion, they want us to
know all about how great they
are at releasing the information
when no other university does
the same. While UBC definitely
does the right thing by making
these numbers available and
accessible, we also don't like that
the media release makes it seem
like being transparent about the
animals that you use for research
deserves praise. UBC likes to
brag about being a leader in just
about every area of education and
innovation, so using the 'other-
universities-are-being-sneaky-
so-we-could-too' excuse doesn't
seem cool.
And then there are the numbers themselves. While the categories about the animals used
are vague ('large mammals' could
mean anything from gorillas to
elephants to giraffes), the ones
on the purposes are even worse
(What exactly is 'educational
purposes'? Is the term 'basic
research' clear-cut to the average
person reading the report?).
This type of information
leaves many questions unanswered and even though these
categories are established by the
Canadian Council on Animal
Care rather than the university, this doesn't mean UBC
shouldn't do even more to keep
us informed about the types of
animals it is using. The problem
seems to be that UBC is treating
their current policy, at least to an
extent, as an end point — 'we're
better than our counterparts so
we don't have to do anymore.' But
for school that prides itself on
sustainability and moral respons
ibility, we should strive to go for
something beyond 'better than
the rest and that's enough.'
Don't just stay one step ahead
of everyone else — go into a higher league altogether and inspire
other universities by example.
SSC AND AND U-PASS
PROBLEMS PLAGUED
FIRST DAY BACK
The first few weeks back at
UBC were plagued with infra-
structural and technical problems, namely a severe dearth of
U-Passes and problems with the
SSC. Sometimes, these kinds of
problems are unavoidable. But
sometimes it's a result of poor
planning and administration.
The SSC wasn't down for
long, but when students can't
access their course schedules and
financial information (especially
when tuition is due in two days),
there's a bit of a problem. There
were probably a fair number of
people who missed a class (or
two!) because they didn't know
what building it's in. In fact, this
happened to some of our editors.
As for U-Passes, the problem
was both technical and administrative. The machine was down
for a couple hours, which is rough
on what was the first day back
for most people. But all machines
were out of passes at least as of
Sunday, which means that people
either have to pay for a service
that they're already paying for
(due to the machines not being
refilled in a timely manner), or
they simply don't pay and chance
getting fined a couple hundred
dollars. Our editors know a few
people who were caught at UBC
without change, leaving them
unable to pay the fare for transit
even if they wanted to.
The U-Pass program is great,
and we understand that it's
LLUSTRATIONJULIANYUfTHE UBYSSEY
probably a challenge to keep it
organized — but if things don't
go according to plan, some sort of
alternative should be made available and the problem should be
remedied as quickly as possible.
EMPTY REZ ROOMS AND
OVERCROWDED FLOOR
LOUNGES
Some of our editors have heard
this week that there are certain rooms in residence that are
currently unoccupied following
the winter break. One member
of our staff has knowledge of
several rooms in Fairview Crescent that have remained empty
since exchange students left in
December.
While we have very little
knowledge ofthe reasoning
behind this, it does seem odd
considering the reported demand
for rez at UBC. We can only
speculate but it would be a little
worrying if students on the
waitlist were not lined up to fill
these spots. Yet right now that
is apparently the case; residents
of four-bedroom townhouses
reported that some ofthe rooms
in their houses are vacant with
seemingly no indication of an
impending new tenant.
Hopefully the ever-dependable
Student Housing and Hospitality
Services (SHHS) has a solution to
this problem. However, we at The
Ubyssey are more than a little
concerned that there are rooms
free at this time of year.
If it's just a matter of the
rooms having been vacated by
single-term exchange students,
the problem should be easy
enough to solve: balance the
numbers of exchange students in
rez in each semester. Whatever
is done, don't let rooms sit empty
when hundreds desperately want
them. Xi
%Jy& -°«- Campus r
7 Sports * Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
RSDAY, JANUARY 8, 2C
I
The VbyMey preAentd
vur eaTEEIflEl} PANEL <f
The most extraordinarily knowledgeable coterie of gaming
authorities one could hope to assemble in 10 minutes of searching
Taco Bell dumpsters.
1. Best team of the
first semester?
2. Most
disappointing?
3. Who'll be the
best team for the
rest of the year?
4. How will the
football team look
next year without
Shawn Olson?
5. How can UBC
increase attendance
at games?
6. Which sport
would you like to
see played at UBC,
that isn't?
7. Best recreational
activitiyon
campus?
8. If you played a
varsity sport, what
would it be?
Men's soccer broke my
heart so I'm giving it to
women's basketball.
See above.
Women's softball, stealing
bases and hearts.
Angrier and hopefully
more Friday Night
Lights-y.
Beer. Free beer. Whiskey.
Free whiskey.
Polo. With horses and
caps.
Sex.
The women's field hockey
team continues to amaze.
The women's cross
country team also ran
really fast.
Football is obvious, but
the women's soccer team
again couldn't make
nationals and saw Andrea
Neil step down.
Both the men's and
women's basketball
teams will pump up
the jams and make
nationals.
See above.
Rejuvenated, but still a
year or two away from
winning a conference
title.
SFU vs UBC. Find a way
to make games happen.
Flonkerton, the national
sport of Icelandic paper
companies.
Campus golf reclaims
the title for the third
straight year.
Flonkerton.
Women's hockey.
Football.
Men's hockey?
Good, according to what
other people tell me.
Offer free food and games
with prizes.
Competitive Zumba.
Zumba, kickboxing.
That would never, ever
happen.
Austen Erhardt
ormer dictator of defunct 1
ex-Soviet nation.         1
The Ubyssey sports
section.
Whichever one lost the
most.
Rugby.
nhere will be less facial
air. Or maybe more. Get
on it, Coach Nill.
Partnering with the
Calendar seems to be
/orking out pretty well
for them.
Judo would be neat.
Quidditch!
Probably track (longdistance running).
Not football.
Football.
Well, I guess the one that
wins the most games/
races/general sporting
events.
I don't see why they
would change their
outfits just because
Shawn Olson's gone.
I want sparklers, fireworks,
loud (good) music, the whole
shebang. And I guess the
sports team needs to win the
sports thing too.
I want to see the caber
toss come to UBC.
Napping in the aquatic
centre counts, right?
Varsity caber toss
(obviously). 10    I   SPORTS   I    THURSDAY, JANUARY 8,2015
THUNDERBIRDS »
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
AMAZING AMERICANS
1. What made you decide to come to Canada
for university?
2. What would you say is the most "Canadian"
thing you've caught yourself doing?
Hockey
(Madison,
Wisconsin)
I was debating a few
different schools at the
time, but when I came and
checked out UBC campus I fell in love. I knewthis
was the place for me.
now say "hockey"
instead of "hackey."
KARA
SPOTTON
A
Basketball
(FortCollins,         i
Colorado)       ^M
SB.
DAVE
SCOTT
Football (El
Paso, Texas)
W4
ELIZABET
H
MVW ?!>]»)
_M^
Soccer
(Livingston,
Montana)
f|   JJ
I hold dual citizenship
(USAand Canada) with
familyup here as well.
Making fun of Americans.
I chose Canada
because I love maple
syrup and hockey. I
also really like UBC's
business program and
Vancouver.
Needing to buyTim-
mies coffee before my 8
a.m. classes.
My mom was originally
from here, so UBC and
SFU were always options and UBC ended up
being the best opportunity for me.
Talking weatherin the
much less precise Celsius scale.
I decided to come to
Canada foruniversity
because I had the oppor-
tunityto playsoccerand
receive one ofthe best
educations in the world.
Either saying "hey?"
atthe end of certain
sentences orfrequently
stopping byTim'sfora
doubledouble!
3. What's one thing you still just don't under
Apparentlythereisa
The misuse and abuse
1 just don't understand
How people can survive
1 don't understand
stand about Canada?
desert? Osoyoos?
ofthe word "sorry."
why Canadian football
has so many different
rules compared to
American football rules.
the winters.
the weather here! In
Montana it either rains
or snows, nothing in
between like the weird
misty rain.
4. What's the biggest difference between
playing your sport in Canada and the US?
Through different
summer hockey camps
hadmetGraham
[Thomas] and really
liked how he coached.
Biggest difference in
my sport is definitely
the popularity. Hockey
is part ofthe culture up
here.
In Canada a lot ofthe
players can dunk. Kris
Young has a crazy
windmill dunk — her
vertical is like 40 inches.
Canadian football is all
around way different
than American football,
but it's more of a passing
game, so I love it!
There are definitely
more people who call
soccer "football" up
here!
5. Name one other Canadian place you'd like
The Yukon— apparent
Toronto — strictly to
1 would like to visit
Montreal orQuebec City
1 would like to visit
to visit and what you'd want to do there.
lythereisa lot of money
hang out with Rob Ford.
Tofino.l would really like
to experience the French
Lake Louise again for
in mushroom picking. 1
to learn how to surf while
Canadian culture.
thespectacularviews,
have also always wanted
I'm there.
hikes and greatskiing it
togosailingin Nova
has to offer!
Scotia.
FITNESS »
Where to go to keep your fitness resolutions in 2015
Jack Hauen
Sports and Rec Editor
Now is the time of year when
those pesky New Year's resolutions start nagging at the back of
your mind. You can no longer use
the excuse that you're hungover
or ate too much holiday food,
because you're already a week
into 2015. It's time to get off the
couch. Luckily for you, we've
compiled some information to get
you started:
The Bird Coop
The most popular student gym on
campus is also the most crowded.
Located in the Student Rec Centre
near the bus loop, the Coop costs
MEC
clothes
tech
One stop
shop
rez supplies        S'fts
corner store
games
ubc bookstore
just $30/term and contains pretty
much every machine and free
weight you can ask for from a student gym, at the cost of extreme
crowdedness at peak hours. Good
luck getting a squat rack with
Johnny Six-Plate and five others in
front of you.
Rez gyms
They're not great. At all. They
usually consist of a treadmill
or two, a few stationary bikes,
and a couple basic strength or
bodyweight machines, and not
much more. Marine Drive's is
better than Totem Park's or Place
Vanier's, but still probably lacking
if you need to do a full routine.
If you need an hour of cardio,
residence gyms might be your best
bet, but anything more and you'll
want to find somewhere with a bit
more variety.
The Aquatic Centre
Completely free with your student
card, it has a basic weight room
with free weights and machines
and a cardio section consisting
of a treadmill, a rowing machine
and a few stationary bikes. It's
surrounded by UBC's pool, steam
room and sauna, making it a nice
spot if you like a post-workout dip,
soak or steam.
Gold's
Situated in the University Village and under completely new
management than during its
slightly shady past, Gold's boasts
the finest equipment around and is
definitely the most elite gym near
UBC. If you demand an all-around
great space to get your pump on,
you can get it — just expect to pay
the price. Xi
We've taken the liberty of gathering some information to help you get in shape this year.
=ILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY THURSDAY JANUARY 8,2015    I    GAMES    I   11
UBC's first snowfall.
1
4
9
2
5
4
7
9
6
5
1
8
3
1
5
8
7
4
8
6
1
7
2
9
9
4
2
3
8
9
M
A
S
'c
|
V
L
F
A
E
'b
E
R
T
A
R
A
L
'b
A
L
L
S
0
L
A
R
C
I
A
°
■1
H
U
T
P
R
E
C
0
E
A
R
S
H
0
T Ho 1 A
R
S
M
A
N
■ E
E
R
1  1 E ■■ R
1
C |
S
U
B
u
R
b In
0
R
T
H
1
N
C
E
R
U
p
T H'°E
D
N
A ll
0
0
L
I
A
L Hi l~E
A
L
0
u l*s In
S
A
S
T
L
0 If
V
E
R Ho
S
1
E
R
M
E
A
s
U
R
E
s Ha
R
c
A
D
E
|sc
N
N H'S | A
u
T
E |
I
M
P
u
L
s I'e H't
R
A
P
P
E
R
S
E
A
L
E
E
R
L
E
|
"T
0
R
E
A
R
R
A
S
L
U
A
u
-E
L
A
N
Y
E
A
R
S
S
E
S
s
""
E
S
T
JANbANSWbRi:
2
8
4
7
i
3
g
6
5
6
5
9
2
4
8
7
1
3
7
1
3
5
6
9
4
8
2
1
9
7
6
3
5
8
2
4
8
6
2
1
7
4
5
3
9
3
4
5
9
8
2
6
7
1
4
7
6
3
5
1
2
9
e
5
2
1
8
9
7
3
4
6
9
3
a
4
2
6
1
5
7
i
2
3
4
5
1
•
7
S
"
"
11
12
13
14
,s
"
17
IS
"
20
II
■ 22
23
■ 24
25
2S
27
■ 28
29
■ 30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
3S
33
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
■ 52
S3
■
"
■
"
5G
_
"
58
53
CO
1
"
G2
-
"
ACROSS
1-Contour feather
6- First name in spydom
10-Editor's mark
14-Lend	
15-Quickly, quickly
16-Bamboo stem
17-Persistent rasca
19- RivertotheSeine
20-Sped
21-Comics canine
22-Synthetic fiber
23- Pot used to contain the ashes
of a dead person
24-Inclined to flirtation
COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
JAN5ANSWERS
26-Staggered
60-Notfem.
9-Copycat
28- Like heaven's gates
61-Hackneyed
10-Smelting residue
29- Ruhrcity
62-Bluey-green color
11-Fit with clothes
30-Flat-fish
63-Work without
12- Endow with a spirit
33-The Archer
64-More tender
13-Minuscule
38- Religious offshoot
18-Olympian's quest
39-Siouan speakers
22-Suffix with Capri
42-TV chef Lagasse
DOWN
24-       shui
47-Soul
25- Impersonator
48-Permanence
1-Grassland
27-Grazing spot
52-Vitality
2-Curtain calls
30-Sault       Marie
53- Beat into shape
3-Proximity
31-Non-Rx
54-Seemingly forever
4-Neck part
32- Back muscle, briefly
55-Maryland athlete, forshort
5-100 square meters
34-Wight, for one
56-       even keel
6-       Gras
35-Charged particles
57-Deprived of reason
7-Light
36- Salt Lake City player
59-Actress Hayworth
8- Besilent, musically
37-Memento
COURTESYFREEDAILYCROSSWORDS.COM
40-Kuwait, e.g.
41- One's first needlework piece?
42-Exertion
43- Unification Church member
44- List of corrections
45-Pertaining to a reign
46-" had it!"
47-Attention-getter
49-Aired again
50-Like Eric the Red
51-Make into law
55-Bull
57-_ _ little teapot...
58-T.G.I.F. part; amazonstudent
^7
amazon.ca
FREE TWO-DAY SHIPPING
Amazon.ca/Student/UBC

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126205/manifest

Comment

Related Items