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The Ubyssey Mar 15, 2012

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ADMISSIONS
ABOUT-FACE 21 Page 2103.15.2012
What's on
This week, may we suggest...
15 THU
speaker:
What I Learned at Straight Camp: 7-9 @
Buchanan A103
Seattle journalist Ted Cox went undercover as a participant in an
evangelical "gay-to-straight" program. Here, he shares his experiences
in a free lecture. Sponsored by the UBC Freethinkers Club.
16™
trees:
Forest Ethics Talk: 3-4pm @
SUB 207
Jolan Bailey, the Canadian
outreach director for Forest
Ethics will be giving a talk for the
Student Environment Centre's
Responsible Consumption Week.
17 SAT
SHOW»
18 SUN
MUSIC»
UBC Horn Club Concert:
2-4pm @ Music Building 112
Interested in stimulating your
mind with soothing music?
Check out this afternoon concert
from the UBC School of Music.
Performances of pieces by Bach,
Handel. Mozart and others.
A Midsummer Night's Dream-.
8-10pm @ Graham House,
Green College
"Masters, spread yourselves."
Intrigued? Make sure to check
out the Green College Players
production of Shakespeare's
popular comedy. Tickets are
available by donation. Email
gc.everits@ubc.ca to reserve.
19 MON
GEOGRAPHY»
Telling Spatial Stories—
The Narrative Impulse
in Historical GIS:
12:30-2pm@ Geography 214
We don't really know
what this involves, but
students rave about the
geography department,
so why not check it out
and let us know what a
historical GIS was.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
THEUBYSSEY
Vlarch 15,2012, Volume XCIII, Issue XLVI
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
coordinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
orinteditor@ubysseyca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
webeditor@ubysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor   4
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writer
Will Johnson   1
wjohnson@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
sports@ubyssey.ca    *
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
featu res@u bysseyca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubysseyca
Senior Web Writer
Andrew Bates
abates@ubysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
joel@ubysseyca
Webmaster
Jeff Blake
webmaster@u bysseyca
STAFF
Bryce Warnes, Catherine
Guan, David Elopjor
Chiang, Josh Curran, Wil
McDonald, Tara Martellaro
Virginie Menard,Scott
MacDonald, Anna Zoria.
Peter Wojnar, Tanner
Bokor, Dominic Lai, Mark-
Andre Gessaroli, Natalya
Kautz, Kai Jacobson, R_
Reid, Colin Chia, Mine
Wong.CJ Pentland, Laura
Rodgers, Jeff Aschkinasi.
Collyn Chan, Anthony
Poon.ViniciusQd,
Veronika Bondarenko,
Yara DeJong
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
ousiness@u bysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
advertising@u bysseyca
Accounts
Sifat Hasan
a ceo u nts@u bysseyca
LEGAL
CONTACT
Business Office Room 23
Editorial Office: Room 24
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
Print Advertising:
604.822.1654
Business Office
604.822.6681
advertising
@ubyssey.ca
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of
British Columbia. It is published every Monday and Thursday by The
Jbyssey Publications Society. We
are an autonomous democratically
"un student organization, and all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written
oy the Ubyssey staff. They are the
expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society
or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing
n The Ubyssey is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories opinions, photographs and
artwork contained herein cannot be
reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society
The Ubyssey is afounding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUPs guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 w(   :   :---- iludeyour
phone number, student number anc
signature (netfor publication) as wel
asyouryear and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked wher
submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey. otherwise verification will be done by
phone. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit submissions for length
and clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before
intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction
or other matter deemed relevant
bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or dassified advertisinc
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the I IPS will not be greater
than the pUe paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
>3
Deb Pickman
a theatre
evangelist
Jonny Wakefield
Managing Editor, Print
There's a trace ofthe Wild West in
Deb Pickman.
In her time in the theatre business, she's played to crowded cabarets, wandered the prairies selling
women's wear and slung whiskey,
all in the name of getting butts in
theatre seats.
Pickman has been on the publicity side ofthe arts for manyyears
now, working for theatre companies big and small. She currently
acts as the communication and
marketing manager for the UBC
theatre and film program.
For Pickman, theatre promotion
isn't about selling snake oil. There's
an evangelical element to it.
"As I say, [theatre] is a better
kind of church. There's not punitive god. There's just all these crazy
stories."
"I come at it from that whole
'spread-the-gospel' kind of
mentality."
Pickman moved west from
Ontario over 30 years ago. She
settled in Nelson for a while—
a time she calls her "log cabin
days"—before taking a job as a traveling salesperson. She sold aline of
women's wear to retailers between
Vancouver and Winnipeg, but the
work lacked any kind of soul. She
decided to try for her BFA Theatre
at UBC, and graduated in 1992.
Since then, her company
Shameless Hussy Productions has
toured North America. One of their
most successful plays has been
Sonofabitch Stew. The Drunken Life
GEOFF LISTEmHE UBYSSEY
"I come from this 'spread the gospel' kind of mentality," says Pickman.
of Calamity Jane. Pickman played
the titular character—an infamous
frontierswoman best known as an
associate of'Wild Bill' Hickok.
The show was generally well
received, except for a performance
in San Francisco, where the fog
machine caught fire.
"Everyone was wondering why
it was so smoky," she said. "I was
yelling 'Fire! Fire!' but in a western
accent so people thought itwas
part ofthe play."
The show was produced on a
shoestring budget, and the only
crew member was no where to be
found. Pickman grabbed a drink
off of a patron's table and doused
the machine before returningto
the stage. "It's on with the show,
right?" she said.
Pickman started thinking about
publicity as a career option after
attending a trade show. Turns out,
she had knack for it from the start.
"We set up this booth, and for
our sample we gave out those little
tiny bottles of whiskey. Our poster
just happened to be a modified
Jack Daniel's bottle that said all
the information of our show, so we
shrunk it down and put it on the
bottles."
"And surprise, we were a hit."
Her work at UBC is an easier
sell, she said—due in part to the
ages of those involved.
"Ifyou haven't been to a play by
the time you're 30, it's kind of like
ifyou haven't had sex by the time
you're thirty," she said. "Chances
are your drive to reproduce isn't as
strong as it could be."
"Student audiences are very
open. They're not sitting there with
their arms crossed."
Given the state of arts funding in
BC, Pickman can't help but worry
for theatre students headed out
onto a especially uncertain frontier.
"They have to fight for their
square inch," she said. "They're
loving it. I've been there—I still am.
An actor, card-carrying."
"That's all people are waiting
for—a chance." ^
—Deb reminds people to check out
Macbeth, which runs March 22-31.
More info at theatreubcca.
Fast-track your career.
CAREER PROGRAMS AT LANGARA
Get trained and accelerate your career in journalism or publishing.
Apply now for September 2012. Learn more at www.langara.bc.ca.
JOURNALISM
• 8-month certificate
• Hands-on training for print,
broadcast and the web
• Work as editors, reporters,
publishers and producers
Contact: Gene Keith
604.323.5414
gkeith@langara.bc.ca
PUBLISHING
• 12-month diploma
• Graphic design for magazines,
web, branding, and more
• Work as designers, publishers,
editors, and copywriters
Contact: Darren Bernaerdt
604.323.5432
dbernaerdt@langara.bc.ca
Langara. News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
03.15.2012 | 3
ADMISSIONS »
Fairness of Faculty of Medicine applications called into question
Laura Rodgers
StaffWriter
Questions are being raised about the
fairness and transparency of UBC's
medical school application process,
but the university is insisting that
the accusations are unfounded.
In a memo obtained bythe
Vancouver Sun, former director
of admissions for the Faculty of
Medicine, Denis Hughes, made a
number of allegations against the
integrity and openness ofthe Faculty
of Medicine's admissions process.
Hughes stated that allowing students to submit documents late was
a "recurring theme" in the faculty,
and that "we have made more exceptions in this [2011] cycle than in
all three previous years combined."
Hughes wrote the memo just
under a year ago, and later resigned,
citing worries about the admissions
process as one of his reasons for
leaving.
However, David Snadden, the
Faculty of Medicine's executive
associate dean, disputed Hughes's
claims. Snadden said that in 2011
only one applicant was granted a
deadline extension. As stated in
Hughes's memo, this applicant's
father was a surgeon with an affiliation to UBC. He added that the total
number of students who had asked
for requirements to be bent—such
as submission deadlines or rules for
who can apply as a BC resident—was
"four or five, max," each year.
"I think [the process] is about as
fair and as equitable as it can be,"
said Snadden.
After the article's release, BC
Minster of Advanced Education
Naomi Yamamoto was asked in the
legislature on Monday whether she
had taken any steps to ensure UBC's
admissions process was fair.
Yamamoto replied the following
day, although Snadden confirmed
that no one in the UBC Medicine
admissions department was contacted bythe Ministry of Advanced
Education. "The admission to the
medical school at UBC is not tied
to who you know," said Yamamoto.
"It's not tied to who your family is.
I'm confident that the integrity of
the admissions process for UBC's
medical school is intact."
Students applying to UBC
medical school aren't happy about
exceptions being made. "Ifyou are
applyingto medical school, you
would think you could be organized
enough to get things in on time,"
said Kevin Lapeyre, who is currently applyingto study medicine at
UBC in the fall.
"I do not agree with them allowing late submissions. While it
doesn't give them an advantage in
the application process, the deadlines are there for a reason." 13
ADMISSIONS))
Grade 11 marks for UBC admissions
Micki Cowan
News Editor
UBC has voted in favour of using
Grade 11 marks for admissions, but
not without a fight from several
members ofthe university's Senate.
The decision was made at the
Wednesday Senate meeting, after
a motion to refer the report back to
committee was turned down. The
temporary admissions policy, called
J-52, will be reevaluated in five
months.
Paul Harrison, associate dean of
students in the Faculty of Science,
said that the proposal was necessary
if UBC is to give offers of admissions
on time.
"I think we would jeopardize
UBC's ability to accept the best students if we don't adopt policy J-52."
Richard Anstee, chair ofthe
Admissions Committee, spoke out
against the policy at the meeting,
stating that it was a manufactured
crisis.
"There is no crisis. All Grade 12
students have access to interim
grades, just not in the form of a report card," he said. "I don't see any
problem."
Prospective students have been
expressing their thoughts and anxieties on the policy through social
media.
"There's a whole bunch of
Facebook groups that have started
up," said Glen Hansman, second
vice-president ofthe BC Teachers'
Federation (BCTF). "Some talked
about report cards, others have
been expressing outrage about
their class sizes and lack of services
for their education over the past
decade."
Sally Casey, a Grade 12 student at
R.E. Secondary School in Langley,
voiced her concern by starting a
News briefs
UBC students place first in
engineering competition
This past weekend. UBC hosted
the 27th Canadian Engineering
Competition. "From Sea to Sky."
Engineering teams from all over
Canada competed in several categories. Both UBC teams placed in the
top three of their category.
Dan Came and Hans Seidemann
came in first place for the debate
category. The innovative design team
which included Chandan Deb. James
Haryett. Samim Safaei and Patrick
Tsai placed second in the design
category.
"Aside from UBC's performance
in the competition, the competition
itself was a huge success too." said
Seidemann.
*%->HiK
"___r-"C*-'~ "*,«
ft -^I^2&-5>5'"5' **. %%
The gates mark the entrance to UBC grounds
GEOFF LISTEmHE UBYSSEY
Facebook group, urging both the
teachers and the government to
come to an agreement. Her concern
was sparked when she found out
that UBC was considering adopting
policy J-52.
"I decided that we needed to create a side other than just the government and the teachers, and just try
to let everyone know that [the students] are actually being impacted
by this," said Casey.
Andrew Arida, associate director
of enrolment at UBC, said that he
sees most ofthe student concern
UBC gains three new Canadian
Research Chairs
Three UBC professors have been
appointed to newly created Canada
Research Chair (CRC) positions this
week.
Physics and astronomy professor
Gary Hinshaw was appointed the
CRC in observational cosmology.
Anthropology professor Shaylih
Muehlmann was appointed the CRC
in language, culture and the environment, and Asian studies scholar
Christina Laffin was awarded the CRC
in premodern literature and culture.
"The Canada Research Chairs
Program has helped to transform
research at UBC and across Canada."
said John Hepburn. UBCs VP
Research and International.
arising from a lack of information.
"I can certainly appreciate that
post-secondary admission and the
admissions process is very stressful
on Grade 12 students," he said. "We
found that generally the students
who are most worried don't have all
the information, and once they do
get all the information, that stress is
greatly alleviated."
Arida sees the policy as a positive.
"We're hoping that by being able
to use the Grade 11 grades, we can
get the bulk of our decisions out in
the first round, while still making
Immigrants face housing
problems in Canadian cities
A UBC study found that new immigrants to Canada have trouble finding adeguate housing in Vancouver
Toronto and Montreal.
Half of the immigrants surveyed
reported living in crowded, damp or
mouldy buildings with broken plumbing, insect infestation or inadeguate
heat. The study also found that the
incomes of new immigrants are below the national average.
"For this group, there is a persistent
need for affordable housing." said
UBC geography professor Daniel
Hiebert. "This goes contrary to the
myth that all immigrants do better
over time—that.things get better for
them."
sure that nobody who would have
been admissible on Grade 12 grades
doesn't get an offer," said Andrew
Arida, associate director of enrolment at UBC.
Still, Anstee said he was horrified
that the policy passed.
"There's a certain number of
students who won't get admitted
to UBC as a result. There won't be a
large number, it will be about 100,"
said Anstee. "There's a lot of anxiety
in the school. I feel for them, for
them being anxious about the situation. I feel for the teachers." 13
Methadone costs more than
heroin-assisted therapy
According to a joint study between
UBC and Providence Health Care,
medical heroin is a more cost effective treatment for heroin addiction
than methadone.
The study found a connection
between medically prescribed heroin
and reduced criminal activity and
health care costs.
"The guestion I get most about
heroin-assisted therapy is whether
we can afford the increased direct
costs of the treatment." said coauthor Martin Schechter. a professor
at UBC's School of Population and
Public Health. "What this study shows
is that the more appropriate guestion
is whether we can afford not to." 13
CONFERENCE»
World Model
United Nations
held in Vancouver
<ATHERYN TISSINGTON^HE UBYSSEY
Tanner Bokor
StaffWriter
Over 2000 university students
from around the globe are gathered in Vancouver this week
for the 21st World Model United
Nations (WMUN), marking the
first time Vancouver has hosted the
conference.
WMUN is a series of simulated
sessions modeled after the structure ofthe United Nations system.
Individuals take on the position of
an assigned country and attempt to
build consensus to pass mock resolutions on current real-world issues.
The largest student conference
ever to be held in BC, WMUN was
awarded to UBC in a bid two years
ago after being held in Taipei in
2010 and Singapore in 2011. This
year's theme is "Come together, go
beyond."
UBC organizers said they were
looking forward to the week ahead.
Lena Raxter, a first-year student
in the Faculty of Land and Food
Systems and a vice-chair for the
simulated UN Security Council
at WMUN, was first involved in
Model UN in sixth grade. "Itwas
the first..after-school activity I was
ever involved in, and I fell in love
with it. It's an absolutely incredible
experience."
Students also see the conference
as a training ground. Raxter said she
plans to pursue a career within the
UN after graduation.
Delegates from 65 countries and
203 different universities are at-
tendingthis year's conference to debate current world issues, including
the conflict in Syria, Afghan Spring
in the Middle East and diplomatic
issues in China.
WMUN was founded in 1991 by
students from Harvard University
looking to create a broader and
more diverse Model UN experience. Harvard continues to manage
the conference and moves to a new
city everyyear. The conference
runs March 11-15 at the Vancouver
Convention Centre. 13 4 I NeWS   03.15.2012
GAGESOUTH»
DOWN TO SERVICE SPACE INCLUDING POOL MECHANICAL
1:
-►
STOR
Hot Tub
Leisure Pool
CONTROL
OFFICES
LOBBY/ENTRANCE
50m pool
(10 lane)
Movable floor
Springboards class    kit    class meetsto
Movable Bulkhead
Spectator Seating
-v-^ ■
MAIN   FLOOR
Note: This is a schematic layout only; actual 	
configuration is subject to change through detailed AnniTlON   TO   EXISTING POOL T   union suh-oinc;
design process. «=^u^wc    ^ |;4-oo
DESIGNS COURTESY OFCAMPUS AND COMMUNITY PLANNING AND FRIENDS OFTHE AQUATIC CENTRE
Left: plans by Campus and Community Planning. Right the alternative option presented by Friends of the Aguatic Centre
Campus group opposes new UBC Aquatic Centre
Veronika Bondarenko
Staff Member
For at least one group on campus,
old is better than new.
Friends ofthe Aquatic Centre
(FAC) is a recently established
group that is protesting UBC
Campus and Community Planning
(CCP)'s proposal for a new Aquatic
Centre. They've said that renovating the current centre would be
more sustainable and cost-efficient
than building anew.
One ofthe first members to
join was Doug Aldridge, who was
AMS president when the original
Aquatic Centre referendum was
passed in October 1972. Together
with FAC, they've presented CCP
with a "renovate and expand" project proposal.
"The Friends Plan avoids the environmental cost of large amounts
of rubble being sent to landfills,
which the Maclnnes Plan would
create by destroyingthe existing
indoor pool," said Aldridge.
"It also leaves room for the
drastically needed additional space
required for the Student Recreation
Centre. The savings represented by
the Friends Plan could make a significant contribution towards the
planned expansion ofthe SRC."
But it doesn't look as though CCP
has been convinced.
"UBC's existing aquatic facilities
are reachingthe end of their useful lives," said John Metras, CCP's
managing director of infrastructure development.
"The Aquatic Centre no longer
meets the needs of UBC's high-
performance athletes, nor does it
provide appropriate facilities for
leisure and community users. The
new Aquatic Centre is being designed to strike a balance between
a high-performance competition
facility and a leisure facility."
Preliminary plans for the new
Aquatic Centre include adding family change rooms and three new
pools, one of which would have a
movable floor allowing pool depth
adjustments. The new centre will
be located across from the UBC bus
loop where Maclnnes Field now
sits.
Members of FAC are concerned
that CCP's plan would not actually
meet the needs ofthe community.
They think that the new facility
would lose some ofthe centre's
most widely used aspects, such as
the diving towers and deep water
tank that are now found at the UBC
Empire Pool, but will not be included in the building plans ofthe
new Aquatic Centre.
Tera Van Belen, a UBC swim
team member, is in favour of a new
facility.
"Building [new] is definitely a
better choice," said Van Belen, who
is currently training for the London
2012 Olympics. "A new pool will
benefit swimmers now and in the
near future, but by renovating, it
won't meet the needs that a new,
better established facility would."
A final consultation—whose date
is to be decided at the next Board
of Governors meeting—still needs
to be performed by CCP before the
new Aquatic Centre could move
onto its design stage. But it's not
likely that the Friends' concerns
will be addressed.
"The university has concluded
that renovating and expanding the
existing facility is a less viable option than building a new facility,"
said Metras. "We appreciate the
ongoing interest ofthe Friends of
UBC Aquatic Centre and Maclnnes
Field and welcome their participation in the development ofthe new
facility." 13
^mS1    Imi
(A
'Picture Me i
Smokefree
Picture Me
Smokefree
Current smoker?
Recently quit?
Picture Me Smokefree is a digital photography and social
media project for young adults that asks you to show how
you "picture yourself quitting."
Eligibility:
.   Men and women 19 to 24 years old
• Currently smoke or have recently quit tobacco
• Able to take digital photos and upload them online
Participants will receive up to $175 for the research. We are also
giving away over $2000 in photo contest prizes!
To participate or for more information:
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picture.me.smokefree@gmail.com
facebook.com/PictureMeSmokefreeProject
604-822-0545 voice
1-855-822-0545 toll-free long distance
UBC
Picture Ma Smokefree is a UBC study based at the School of Nursing (Vancouver) and the
Faculty of Health and Social Development (Okanagan); Principal Investigator: Dr. Rebecca
Haines-Saah
DEBATES))
UBC professor debates CCBR
founder Jose Ruba on abortion
Catherine Lai
Contributor
UBC's pro-life club held an abortion debate on Monday, highlighting the intractable differences between the pro-life and pro-choice
argument.
"Tolerance doesn't mean you
don't believe in anything, it means
you accept different views, so just
because we have a position doesn't
mean we're disqualified from
hosting a debate," said Lifeline
President Shawn Miller.
Scott Anderson, a UBC professor who was invited to represent
the pro-choice view, said afterward, "I think that the intention
ofthe organization is less to have a
debate...and that its intention is to
have an airing of a particular view
that they wish to forward and that
my role here is to allow them to do
so in the guise of an exchange of
views."
The pro-life argument was presented by Jose Ruba, co-founder
and professional speaker for the
Canadian Centre for Bio-ethical
Reform.
"[There are] 300 Canadians
killed every day and that should
concern all of us, whether we're
pro-life or pro-choice, to be able to
say: 'What is actually being killed?
What is it that we're actually doing?' And that's the kind of discussion that moral, intelligent, decent
Canadians should be having, because it's one that affects all of us."
Anderson said that he felt compelled to argue on behalf of what
is essentially the legal status quo
in Canada.
"Access to legal and safe abortion
is crucial for women's equality in
a society like Canada, and because
someone has to make a decision
about each and every potential
abortion that takes place, no one is
better placed to make that decision
than the woman who is pregnant,"
he said.
The debate was stalled on the
question of where life begins,
which neither side was able to
agree on. To Ruba, this is a question that must be answered before
discussing other aspects ofthe issue, such as women's rights.
The club, as well as the two debaters, hoped that the debate would
help convince people who haven't
made up their mind about abortion.
However, when asked if they saw
themselves leaving the debate with
a different view, not a single one of
the audience members raised their
hand.
After the debate, Ruba said that
he was glad to have had the chance
to speak to the 50 or so people in
the audience. "And maybe they
had already made up their minds,
maybe, but that doesn't mean that
they can't examine their facts or
the information."
Anderson was not so optimistic.
"If I managed to change anybody's
mind in the direction I was hoping
to, that would be a miracle." 13 Cnltnre»
Editor: Ginny Monaco
03.152012 | 5
Andrew Bates
Senior Web Writer
Sometimes you need a big
event to bring people into the
circle.
Circle painting is a collaborative art event where passersby
are invited to add themed illustrations to a banner. UBC's
"love and charity"-themed
event, which ran Tuesday and
Wednesday, was spearheaded
by a commerce student looking
to build a sense of community
at UBC.
"I feel like UBC is too big. We
have 45.000 students." said
My Le. a third-year marketing
major. "I want to bring students
together to work on the same
masterpiece."
According to artist Hip
Nguyen, who pioneered circle
painting, the idea came to
him while he was practicing
meditation.
"Nowadays even though we
have all the technologies and
we connect on Facebook. actually what I find is that people
are even more isolated in
their own space." he said. "The
dea is to go beyond our own
space and connect with others
through art and making something meaningful."
Participants added conceptual shapes to a continuing mura
while receiving some direction from Nguyen, like adding
defining lines and coordinating
brushstrokes with the painters'
breathing pattern. "[It] is not
only about the circles, you can
draw any kind of shape you
want." said Amanda Ng. a third-
year commerce student who
volunteered with Le. "The process of it. of adding onto other
peoples' shapes, that's what
makes it so special.
"With a circle, there's no beginning, there's no end. The circle's a huge shape, and you can
think about it as the community
that's inside this big circle."
Le first came across circle
painting while at a leadership
conference when she was a
high school student in Vietnam.
"After five years...I thought
to myself. I really want to do
something to engage the community more." said Le. who
helps coordinate community
projects reguired by Sauder
courses. "I thought circle paint-
ng would be the perfect avenue to do that here."
Le secured booking through
the Gage Residence Association
and the Vietnamese Student
Society, and $2000 for the
event came from the UBC
Global Fund. In addition to
UBC students, the UNA and a
number of high school students
from the community were
nvolved.
Donations are being collected at the event for Operation
Smile, a charity that helps fund
cosmetic surgery for cleft-
lipped children in Vietnam. The
murals will be auctioned to
raise funds for the charity.
Painting took place on
Tuesday and Wednesday, with
events at Buchanan. Gage and
the Global Lounge at Marine
Drive. The paintings are on display Thursday at the Old Barn
community theatre.
According to Ng. people who
get involved enjoy it.
"At first they might seem shy."
she said.
"But once they get into it,
you can tell from what they
have drawn that they actually
put [in] effort and they actually
loved it." 13
•-.,
Photos by Yara De Jong
THEATRE»
Playwright
mines for gold
in family's
prospecting past
Will Johnson
Senior Culture Writer
The story of Spinning You Home, a
new play by Canadian playwright
Sally Stubbs, started with a dead
body.
"My partner and his sister are
descendants of [prospector] John
Cariboo Cameron," said Stubbs.
"We received a copy of Bill
Gallaher's book, The Promise for
Christmas, a few years ago. I was
blown away by the story ofthe
journey John Cameron undertook
to honour the deathbed promise he
made to his wife, Sophia. "
Cameron's wife Sophia, dying of
typhoid, hated the Cariboo country—the mountains, the weather,
the filth associated with mining,
all of it—and begged him to get
her body back home to Glengarry
County in Ontario.
Stubbs read Gallaher's book,
then later traveled to Barkerville,
a gold rush town in northern BC,
for research. She also got her
hands on some notes written by
her partner's grandfather, Duncan
Cameron.
"He wrote about the opening of Sophia Cameron's coffin in
Glengarry County nine years after
her burial. Sophia had been preserved in over-proof alcohol and
when revealed was still very much
intact," Stubbs said.
Stubbs was amazed at the description of Cameron being faced
with his wife's preserved body.
"That image-the beautiful and
intact corpse coming face to face
with her husband again-stayed
with me, haunted me. I began to
imagine how she must have haunted him always," she said.
Stubbs originally started writing the play as a one-woman show
for a character named Sarah. But
then a second character, Sarah's
grandfather, "appeared" during
the writing process.
"When 'Grandpa' appeared
I found my way into this two-
handed version inspired by my
own family history, as well as the
Cameron tale. It's essentially a celebration of storytelling and a love
story filtered through the lens of a
very different love story," she said.
Stubbs said she's had some trouble finding a niche for Spinning
You Home.
"The script revolves around the
relationship between a 14-year-old
girl and her grandfather. That's
been a challenge. Artistic directors
who like the play say they don't
know where to 'slot it.'," she said.
"They say it's not TYA [theatre
for young audiences] because of
the grandfather. They say it's not
for general audiences because the
protagonist is a kid. This drives
me nuts.
Despite that, she's been thrilled
with the feedback.
"It's a play about love, loss and
storytelling. It's a play about human beings. And it's often funny.
The audience in Winnipeg ranged
from teenagers to octogenarians
and the response was great."
—Spinning You Home is playing
at Havana Theatre from March 21-24
and 27-31. Student tickets are $15.  03.i5.20i21 Feature 17
support for their position. As one
put it, it's hard for the general
public to feel too bad for a tenured
professor. Others have had their
complaints brushed off as a case
of particularly nasty academic
politics.
It is difficult to gauge what is really happening with these cases. Is
it a bunch of disgruntled professors,
as UBC argues? Or does UBC simply
want to avoid admitting that maybe
discrimination does happen on its
campus?
The threshold to dismiss a complaint
at the BCHRT is low. Since 2006, it
appears that no cases against UBC
have gone to a full judicial hearing.
But one professor's complaint has
survived numerous attempts bythe
university to have it thrown out. The
hearing, scheduled this summer,
will be one ofthe very few times that
the university has had to deal with a
complainant in a public forum.
That discrimination complaint
came from Jennifer Chan. Chan is
an associate professor in the Faculty
of Education. In May 2010, she filed"
a complaint of racial discrimination
with the BCHRT, naming the university and four employees—among
them senior administrators—as
respondents. Chan, who is Chinese
Canadian, alleges she was not selected for a prestigious research chair in
part because of her race.
That appointment was to the Lam
Research Chair in Multicultural
Education. Chan was shortlisted
for the chair in October 2009 and
when itwas announced that another
candidate—a white woman—was
given the appointment, Chan started
to make complaints about bias in the
process.
In short, Chan said the search
committee of five members from the
Faculty of Education broke every
hiring rule in the book. It failed to
keep any records of its procedures,
including how the search was conducted and what criteria were used
to determine merit. The committee
also failed to consult Chan's references, which included former Lam
Chair holders. The Ubyssey contacted Chan's references independently and confirmed that they had
not been contacted regarding her
application.
"A lot of my students would ask
for references for their part-time
summer jobs," she said. "This endowment chair is a very prestigious
position. Why were external references not contacted? Was it because
the candidate was predetermined?
Or was it because of some other
factor?"
One of those factors, she argues,
was her race.
When someone has a complaint of
this nature, one option is to take
legal action against the university.
But such action is costly and usually
a last resort.
Faculty or students who feel they
have been harassed or discriminated
against have another option open to
them. They can take the complaint
to UBC's Equity Office. Because
UBC receives federal money under
the Federal Contractors Program, it
is subject to certain equity requirements. Any large organization that
makes bids on government contracts
must have an employment equity
program that fulfills a number of
criteria, which include establishing
an office to combat discrimination
against women, Aboriginal people,
persons with disabilities and visible
minorities. The program must include an employer-side investigation
for complaints.
The UBC Equity Office is located
on the second floor of Brock Hall. Its
calm, utilitarian atmosphere belies
the fact that it was created during
one ofthe most sordid affairs in the
history ofthe university.
There's no real consensus on what
to call the period ranging from June
1995 to November 1998, when UBC
was the locus of a vitriolic national
debate on identity politics and academic freedom. Some call it the political science affair; others call it the
McEwen controversy, for the author
ofthe report that found a "basis" for
claims of "pervasive racism and sexism" in that department.
In June 1995, UBC announced
that it would close graduate admissions to the political science department after the results ofthe university-initiated "McEwen Report"
were publicized.
The investigation was carried
out by Vancouver lawyer and labour
arbitrator Joan McEwen. It was
struck in response to a 1992 letter sent to the Faculty of Graduate
Studies from 12 graduate students
in the department. It alleged that
"female students, both white and
of colour, [were] being marginalized, demeaned and silenced in the
classroom."
David Strangway, UBC's president
at the time, said that admissions to
political science would be suspended
until the department cleaned up its
act.
Allegations ranged from serious to spurious. In one instance, a
female graduate student of colour
had just handed out her first marks
to a class when a professor told her,
"Yeah, now they probably think you
€€
If [people] feel that the
internal process isn't
sufficiently distant from
the institution, they
can choose another
process...Whether things
become controversial or
not, it's not in the control
of this office.
TOM PATCH, ASSOCIATE VICE-
PRESIDENT EQUITY
are just one big, bad black bitch." In
another instance, a female professor
(one of five in the 25 person faculty)
was allegedly told that feminism
was "a Jewish-American Princess
conspiracy."
While the media initially focused
on these allegations, the focus
turned to the more trifling parts of
the 174-page report. Some professors
were apparently prejudiced because
they criticized students for making
Marxist arguments. Another professor mocked a female student, telling
her "even an undergraduate would
understand" material she was having difficulty with.
But a bigger problem quickly
emerged with McEwen's findings.
In the terms of reference for the
report—set by a committee includ-
ingthe deans of Arts and Graduate
Studies—McEwen was simply asked
to conclude if there was "any basis"
for the student's allegations. The
university had moved on claims that
had not been proven, which sparked
outrage across Canada. An editorial
in the Globe and Mail exemplified
the anti-McEwen stance:
"Laced with Orwellian euphemisms, reeking ofthe worst forms
of political correctness, lackingthe
slightest respect for due process, Ms.
McEwen's report is a cowardly, disgraceful thing. A strong university
president would have said as much."
Over the next few months, any
mention of UBC was invariably tied
to the unfolding scandal. The dean
of Arts condemned the university's
actions. Professors in the faculty of
arts voted 97-52 on a resolution urging Strangway to reopen admissions
to the program. A member ofthe
Board of Governors stepped down
in protest. Public opinion turned
further against UBC when it was
revealed that the administration accepted the report's $246,000 price
tag without question, and that several ofthe students who had written
the original letter were demanding
that the university pay their tuition
as compensation for their distress.
UBC lifted its ban on admissions
in October of 1995. Though the incident had only lasted five months,
everyone agreed that the healing
process would take years.
Some argued that all this could
have been avoided if the complaint
had been handled from the start
by UBC's Equity Office. In a postmortem on the incident in the Globe
and Mail, one columnist argued that
the whole incident could have been
nipped in the bud if the dean of Arts
had followed procedure and taken
the complaint to the Equity Office.
What the column failed to point out,
however, is that the complaint was
received in 1992, and the Equity
Office wasn't created until 1994.
The university quietly apologized
to the political science department in 1998. Then-UBC President
Martha Piper promised policies that
would prevent another such scandal.
"In 1994 the ad hoc procedure
devised to deal with complaints
against your department was inadequate and in part explains the
flawed report that emerged and the
university's subsequent, inappropriate action," she wrote. "To ensure
better procedures for dealing with
allegations, the university instituted its Policy on Discrimination
and Harassment and established an
Equity Office charged with the responsibility to administer it."
The political science department
accepted the university's apology.
"On behalf of my colleagues who
were so damaged by this whole episode, I accept your sincere apology
on behalf ofthe university," wrote
the department head. "We want
nothing more than to move on."
UBC's stance on Chan's case is
that the university's equity policies have functioned adequately. A
press release stated that "UBC takes
complaints of discrimination extremely seriously and has processes,
including a Discrimination and
Harassment Policy to address such
complaints.
"Both processes found no discrimination and the University has
accepted those conclusions."
Those processes are complex. In
the first phase, an aggrieved member
ofthe university community can
meet with an advisor from the office to discuss the situation and any
available options. Then, if the situation demands it, Equity will contact
the complainant's head of unit to
discuss next steps. At this point, the
respondent maybe informed ofthe
allegations. The most serious cases,
though, move to a level called a "formal complaint."
If the Associate Vice-President
Equity (AVP Equity) deems the
situation appropriate, the office will
retain an investigator—either from
the university or external to it—to
investigate the allegations. These
investigators generally have experience in human rights law.
Chan has problems with how her
formal complaint was handled from
the start. Others interviewed by The
Ubyssey have seconded her concerns.
They can be summed up by the following question: is a university-administered process to investigate the
university a conflict of interest?
The current AVP Equity is Tom
Patch. He has held the position
since 2005, but his work in human
rights goes back much further. Patch
has worked for the BCHRT as well
as the Canadian Human Rights
Commission.
"[UBC has] an internal process,"
says Patch. "And there is no way to
create an internal process that isn't
in some way connected to senior
management. And senior management has never interfered in any
way in our internal complaints
processes."
Chan was concerned that one of
the respondents in her case—VP
Academic David Farrar—is Patch's
boss.
"I'm not tryingto say that all
employer investigative mechanisms
are ineffective," said Chan. "But in
my case, I think it really raises the
question of impartiality. The AVP
Equity reports to VP Academic,
and the VP Academic is one ofthe
respondents in my case. Right off
the bat, you really question to what
extent is this an impartial, independent mechanism for any employee to
go through."
She also had issues with the AVP's
ability to set the terms of investigation. The merit of herself and the
other candidate for the chair was
not included in the terms of reference. This means that the most basic
question ofthe entire episode was
still not considered: was Chan in fact
more qualified for the job?
€€
In my case...you really
question to what extent is
this an impartial, independent mechanism
for any employee to go
through.
JENNIFER CHAN, COMPLAINANT
In other documents obtained by The
Ubyssey, a professor—who allowed
these comments to appear only on
condition of anonymity—alleges
that his investigation was repeatedly tampered with by the office. He
says that he was denied access to an
Equity Advisor and to documentation about the investigation of his
case. He also alleges that when he
tried to object to this, the AVP Equity
"repeatedly threatened to terminate
the investigation."
Patch was unable to comment on
any of these allegations, because cases that have gone through the Equity
Office are bound by confidentiality.
He was also unable to comment on
tribunal cases, because they are part
of an ongoing judicial process.
"If [people] feel that the internal
process isn't sufficiently distant from
the institution, they can choose another process," said Patch. "It is not
a goal of this office to prevent controversies. Whether things become
controversial or not, it's not in the
control of this office."
Chan's complaint was dismissed by
the Equity Office after the findings
of an investigation were given to
the office 16 months after her initial
filing. The investigation found no
wrongdoing on the part of UBC.
The Ubyssey has tried to obtain copies of this report through
Freedom of Information requests.
Despite having filed in August of
2011, this report has still not been
produced.
Chan decided to press on with
her complaint. She found pro bono
legal assistance and submitted her
complaint to the BCHRT in May of
2010.
Since then, as Chan's complaint
has worked its way through the
BCHRT system, UBC has twice
asked to have her case thrown out.
The BC Human Rights Code provides a number of conditions under
which the Tribunal can decline to
hear a case.
The respondent can argue that
there is little possibility ofthe
complaint succeeding, or that the
complaint was not made within six
months ofthe alleged offence. Most
often, though, UBC's lawyers will
argue that the complaint has been
adequately dealt with by another
proceeding—usually by the UBC
Equity Office.
"Bodies like the [BCHRT] will
[suspend a case] if someone hasn't
gone through the internal process first," said Nancy Langston.
Langston is head ofthe UBC
Faculty Association, and is familiar
with some ofthe BCHRT complaints. "They will make that person explain why it's so important
not to complete the process."
In January, the BCHRT decided
to let Chan's complaint have its day
in court. The hearing is set for this
summer. Tribunal member Norman
Trerise reasoned that "to allow
UBC to set out an appeal process in
its policy and then deny it through
an application to dismiss, on this
basis, essentially pulls the rug out
from under that faculty member."
Chan's free legal assistance has
since dried up. She will have to find
another firm willingto work pro
bono, or self-represent at her hearing.
This will be the first time UBC has
had to defend itself in the BCHRT in
at least five years. It will be a strong
test of whether the concerns by
multiple complainants about UBC's
equity process are justified or not.
UBC has a lot riding on equity.
Being nationally recognized as a
diverse and inclusive place to study
and work is vital for a university on
the drive towards becoming one of
the best in the world.
In 2010, the VP Academic office commissioned a review ofthe
Equity Offices on UBC's Vancouver
and Okanagan campuses. The
report found deficient equity practices at UBC Okanagan, stating that
the Equity Office there consists
of a single person without permanent office space. It highlighted the
problems this could have for international recruitment.
"We were told that external
community homophobia is common, to the point that hiring of
preferred candidates is compromised, and students have been
physically threatened," the report
said. "International students seem
to be at particular risk of abuse. Yet
UBC-O has far fewer resources to
address such issues."
The report concluded by saying
that UBC will have to redouble
its efforts in the Okanagan if they
intend to continue their plans for
international enrolment.
In comparison, the Vancouver
equity program has received generally positive reviews from the
administration.
"I don't think there have been
many cases which at the end of
those processes, UBC has been
found to be in breach," said UBC
President Stephen Toope, when
asked about these issues duringthe
2010 Town Hall meeting. "So the
fact that people might be unhappy
doesn't necessarily mean that there
has been, even objectively pursued
by a tribunal, an equity violation." 13 »  Opinion »
B Editor- Rrian Piatt
03.15.2012 | IQ
DAVID MARINO^HE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Broad-based admissions will
need transparency
The hubbub and hoopla surrounding
the allegations of unfair influencing
in the medical school applications
process are certainly disheartening
if true. However, when you have an
admission system that has elements
of subjectivity, it leaves more room in
the process for accusations of tampering. Medical school admissions
include an algorithm that weighs,
for example, how well prospective
students work with others.
UBC's move to broad-based admissions for undergraduates also
leaves room open for exploitation.
Currently, medical admissions are
highly regulated with a points system that determines who gets in. If
UBC wants to keep the process fair
for undergraduates, they should also
be clear and open about the specifics
of how decisions are made.
Our women's teams kick ass, and
you should know about it
This weekend, our women's basketball team head to Calgary. They're
aiming to win their first national
championship since 2008. And unless you read our paper front-to-back
every issue, none of you know about
it.
That's slight hyperbole. But the
women's basketball team is one ofthe
strongest athletic programs at UBC,
with three national championships
in the last ten years, and it gets very
little institutional cheerleading or
marketing. Sort of like the world-
class women's swim team or the
women's field hockey team.
Hey, remember how much you
heard about the men's football team?
Alright, that's not entirely fair.
Men's sports is a bigger draw than
women's in nearly any comparative case in North America. And the
women's basketball team plays in a
season when seven other varsity programs are all competing.
But there are things UBC could
do. They could create a rivalry series
against the SFU program and market
the heck out of it. They could schedule other high-profile games against
NCAA teams like the men's program
used to. Or, they could start playing
more games after the men's team,
instead of before them.
The point is this: women's sports
are habitually ignored wherever you
go, and UBC is no exception. And if
that's ever goingto change on this
campus, it will be due to the efforts
ofthe university administration.
UBC deserves a better athletics
reputation
About that women's basketball team:
They're really good. They destroyed
the No. 1 ranked Regina two weekends ago in the Canada West finals.
It's safe to say the Thunderbirds have
a serious chance of taking home gold.
If they do, it will be the fifth time
this year a UBC program has won a
national championship.
The University of Guelph has won
two national titles this year. They are
the only other school to have won
CIS gold more than once.
UBC may be known for being an
academic school, but this year it's
also hands-down the strongest athletic university in the country. This
is all the more impressive considering the high academic requirements
needed to play for the Thunderbirds.
Yet where has all the press been?
The only team to get substantial
coverage in the Vancouver media
this year was the football team.
While their season made for a compelling story, they didn't make it
out ofthe Canada West playoffs and
were blown out in their final game.
Yes, we know our student body
is ambivalent about almost everything, but it would be nice if someone other than us recognized UBC
as the top flight athletic school it is.
Clubs should get ambitious with
their conference ideas
The World Model United Nations
conference is taking place this week.
At 2000 students and 500 volunteers from around the world, it's
the largest student conference ever
held in the province. (You going
to take that, Student Leadership
Conference?)
Although much ofthe conference
is taking place off campus due to a
need for hotel space, UBC is still the
official host and will gain a lot of
benefit from this. It gets many of our
students involved in a huge international conference that will help with
networking and resume-padding
It also further establishes UBC's
reputation as a place that can handle
such large logistical endeavours.
We hope this plants a few ambitious ideas in some ofthe student
clubs on campus for conferences
that they could host. Here's a little
tip: UBC administrators will give
youtons of support in doingthis. If
you supply the energy and volunteer
time necessary, the money and bureaucratic assistance will flow quite
easily.
Yes, hosting events at UBC involves a fair amount of red tape to
get through, but all you really need
is a bit of determination. When large
conferences and other events are
pulled off successfully, it's a win for
both students and the university.
Dual UBC student unions might
finally work together
UBC's Vancouver and Kelowna
campuses might be part ofthe same
university, with students receiving
the same degree, but as anyone who
has tried to transfer from one to the
other knows, they aren't exactly
linked in practice.
This situation is all the more
pronounced within the student
unions themselves. Ever since the
Kelowna campus became part of
UBC in 2004, the student union
has been governed by the same
slate. They've had many names, but
generally have protested against
high tuition, promoted student
activism and haven't had any interest in working with the AMS.
They're also part ofthe Canadian
Federation of Students, which AMS
politicians literally compare to
Lord Voldemort.
However, earlier this month that
slate was unanimously dumped in
the student elections. With it comes
an opportunity for the two student
unions at UBC to work together.
We hope AMS President Matt
Parson picks up the phone, and engages in a new partnership. 13
Playhouse's demise
part of larger struggle
Editor's
Notebook
Karina
Palmitesta
At a press conference last Friday, the
Playhouse Theatre announced that
due to an overwhelming amount of
debt, it would never see a 50th season.
Within 48 hours, the theatre's doors
were shut and the box office closed;
their season wasn't even finished,
leaving three shows hanging in
uncertainty.
Speaking as a student of UBC's
BFA acting program, the Playhouse's
closure is a terrible blow to the
Vancouver theatre scene. It's one
less place for Canadian artists to find
work, one less place for Canadian
stories to be told. My acting class has
had two guest speakers in the past
week, and both of them brought up
the Playhouse almost apologetically
during pep talks that now seem hollow and unpromising.
Last year, the City of Vancouver
gave the Playhouse a bailout of over
half a million dollars, as well as forgiving another half million in debt. It
still wasn't enough to lift the strain.
The City's support could be seen as
admirable, although itwas understandably contentious within the arts
community at the time. But more
and more, it seems like a Band-Aid
solution slapped over a much larger
problem, one that's more important
than a single regional theatre going
bankrupt: theatre in Vancouver is
unsustainable.
Especially in independent shows,
audiences are usually filled with
fellow theatre artists, many of them
living below the poverty line. It's
become a recycling pattern: I'll give
your show ten bucks today, and you'll
hand it straight back to me when I
put on a show tomorrow.
Too many theatre artists head
to London, New York, LA, even
Toronto, or else languish for months
in Vancouver without work. Feelgood musicals and endlessly repeated
classics rake in older, wealthier subscribers, while young companies putting on risky new shows are snuffed
out after one bad season.
How is it possible that such a vibrant community is barely hanging
on by the skin of its teeth? What are
we doing wrong? And if the government-funded Playhouse can't make
it, how can smaller indie groups?
There are struggling companies
all over the city. The most recent
example that comes to mind is
Fighting Chance Productions, one
ofthe more prominent companies
in Vancouver's indie theatre scene.
They have put on over 20 productions over the last five years, many
of them critically acclaimed. Last
month, Fighting Chance announced
a fundraising campaign that would
save them from collapsing under a
deficit of $20,000. Their fundraising goal was $5000—which means
that even if there was an outpouring
of generosity that doubled the company's expectations, they would still
be $10,000 in debt.
The many protests following the
Playhouse's closure demonstrate that
theatre in Vancouver is passionate,
scrappy and wide awake. But something needs to change—something
deeply rooted in how our society
acknowledges the arts and how
we support artists. Otherwise, this
mad, tail-chasing cycle will never be
broken. <U
A disappointing budget
Letters
The AMS calls on the BC government to propose bold new measures
to improve and increase support for
post-secondary students and institutions. Quite simply, the February
21st provincial budget falls short.
In its pre-budget submission
to the BC Legislature's Select
Standing Committee on Finance
and Government Services last fall,
the AMS asked for improved transit, more childcare funding, and
student financial aid reform. This
winter, the AMS partnered with
several other student associations,
representing over 160,000 post-secondary students in BC, in asking for
reduced student loan interest rates,
increased core funding and the
restoration of needs-based up-front
grants. In each of these areas, BC
students and universities lag behind
their peers in other provinces.
We were disappointed that the
budget tabled last month by the
BC government did not set out
any plans to increase support for
students, post-secondary institutions or other services of interest to
students. On the contrary, student
support programs (loans and bursaries) will be frozen to current levels
until at least April 2015 and the government is asking post-secondary
institutions to trim their administrative costs by 2.2 per cent over
the next three fiscal years. Given
the additional impact of inflation,
it is difficult to see how this belt
tightening will not reduce services
to students.
The AMS believes that improved
funding for transit, child care and
post-secondary education is not only
good for the province's students,
it is good for its economy. Indeed,
various experts have shown that
well-targeted investments in these
sectors can lead to a more robust
and sustainable economy, increased
wages, reductions in unemployment and increased tax revenue.
The recently released Drummond
Report in Ontario recommends
significant budget cuts in most government programs—but in order to
help create a sustainable economic
recovery, it calls for more support to
post-secondary education, including
a modest annual budgetary increase
of at least 1.5 per cent until 2017.
Our province has the potential to
create one ofthe best higher education systems in the world. Although
a better deployment of resources
can achieve these aims in part, the
AMS believes that increased long-
term investments in several sectors
are also essential. We welcome the
opportunity to continue working
constructively with the provincial
government and other stakeholders, so that we may find viable solutions to better meet the challenges
faced by students at UBC and other
post-secondary institutions across
our province.
—Kyle Warwick
AMS VP External Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
03.15.2012 | 11
STUDENTBODY»
Managing your willpower reserves
Daily irritations deplete your ability to resist bad habits. Here's how to hold 'em off.
Happy
Healthy
Homy
RaevenGeist-
Deschamps
Suffering from senioritis?
In my basement apartment, most
every night is filled with conversations about the future. So far, my
roommates and I have decided we
might: disappear from the surface of
the planet, roam Canada in a camper van, become festival vendors,
start a colony of matriarchs who use
WWOOFers as sex slaves, become
conflict mediators, generally fuck
with the system or explore Siberia
on horseback.
With the last few credits (Unless
it's for medical school, I sincerely
wish to NEVER return to do another undergraduate degree), there's
an inverse relationship of increasing
anxiety.
A choice must be made, says
the part of my brain attached to
security, plans and goals. In the
many ways in which we discover,
articulate and immerse ourselves
in the beauty of our own identities,
the Eden within does not always
find its mirror within the material world—especially the professional identities we may choose to
adopt. As my father once told me,
what's amazing about this life is
that you have all the possibilities
in the world, but you can't have
a life without making choices. In
the meantime, I'm dabbling in
uncharacteristically nervous brain
spaces.
In an effort to sift through some
of my intense anxiety, I'm currently
reading Willpower: Rediscovering
the Greatest Human Strength by Roy
Baumeister and John Tierney. Their
thesis is that willpower provides the
drive behind anything we do, and
this willpower is finite. As you use
it up for various tasks, like doing
homework or studying for exams,
its reserves lessen (they call it "ego
depletion") and your ability to resist
negative behaviours (like overeating, spending, etc.) is severely
decreased.
Willpower is finite. As
we use it up on things
like homework, its
reserves lessen, and
your ability to resist
behaviours like over
eating and spending is
decreased.
He quotes a study on how the better students did on exams, the more
likely they were to have unwashed
socks. In other words, their willpower was so caught up in studying
that things like hygiene and cleaning went out the window.
The book goes on to suggest a
bunch of ways to deal with this, but
the underlying idea is to work on
Ubyssey editors are a hard working bunch. As a result, they sometimes find themselves given to the baser pleasures
one thing out at a time. You have to
follow the thread of possibility until
its endpoint, when you notice that
it no longer fits you in the way that
you want to work or be involved
in the world. The same applies to
changing one behaviour you no longer find useful. Focusing the bulk of
your attention on a single project or
change will help you actually make
a decision and change your behaviour because you won't be distracted
by all the other possibilities.
Part ofthe uncertainty in this inner dialogue is about losing control.
Ifyou can embrace, for once and
maybe just for a time, not having
control over the outcome ofyour actions but acting out of a love of life,
then you can derive meaning from
anything you decide is worth invest-
ingtimein.
Best of luck with your late term
musings. ^
Confused by
columns?
Jonny Wakefield
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
Dissertation, Thesis, term paper and
essay-writing assistance offered by
retired English instructor. Reliable and
ethical help with revision, editing,
proofreading, formatting and formal
documentation ofyour manuscript.
Contact Linda at lchowell@shaw.ca
THE GRADUATE
STUDENT SOCIETY
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
MARCH 28, 2012
5:30 PM
THE MEETING WILL BE HELD AT THE BALLROOM
OF THE GRADUATE STUDENT GENTRE
6371 CRESCENT ROAD
FREE DINNER!
PROPOSED AGENDA:
*STRUCTURAL REVIEW OF THE FACULTY OF
GRADUATE STUDIES
*YEAR IN REVIEW
♦APPOINTMENT OF NEW EXECUTIVE
♦FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND PROCEEDINGS
*BYLAW CHANGES TO AFFECT FINANCIAL PROTOCOLS
AND EXECUTIVE TRANSITIONS
GRADUATE
STUDfcN I SOCIETY
UBC■ VANCOUVER
WITH    BC   ABORIGINAL    STUDENT   AWARDS
YOU CHOOSE WHAT AND WHERE TO STUDY, AND WE'LL HELP
YOU GET THERE. THE IRVING K. BARBER BC SCHOLARSHIP
SOCIETY OFFERS AWARDS TO APPLICANTS WHO:
► Are BC residents
► Are of Aboriginal ancestry
► Are involved in their school or community
► Are planning to study in BC in:
- An approved trades training or apprenticeship program
- A certificate or diploma program
- An undergraduate or graduate degree program
Including a new award for Aboriginal students
studying to become teachers
FOR AWARD INFORMATION
AND APPLICATION, VISIT:
www.bcscholarship.ca
THE IRVING K. BARBER
British Columbia Scholarship Society
in partnership with
Victoria Foundation
o 121 Games 103.15.2012
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Across
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5- Organization abbrev.
10-Thick slice
14- Literary work
15- Birth-related
16- Circle at bottom, point at top
17- Mixture that has been
homogenized
19- Feminine suffix
20-Sun Devils'sch.
21- From the US
22- Armed guard
24- Kathmandu resident
26- Taylor of Mystic Pizza
27- Largest ocean
33- Disconcert
36- Charged
37- kwon do
38- Network of nerves
39- Standard for comparison
40- Metallica drummer Ulrich
41- Schwarz
42- More delicate
43- Quotes
44- The act of superseding
47- Interpret
48- Contrive
42- At liberty
52- Sterile
43- Seashore
55- Enervates
45- Mistakes
57- Treasure Island monogram
46- Disclose
58- Black-and-white treat
49- Bandleader Shaw
59- Inflammation of the skin
50- Move effortlessly
62- Actor Epps
51- Ruhr city
63- Chopper topper
52- Rubber overshoe
64- Pro or con
53- Upper limbs, weapons
65- Cookbook amts.
54- Gather, harvest
66- Brewer's need
55- Mex. miss
67- Hammer end
56- Author Oz
60- Fair-hiring abbr.
Down
2- Strike _
3- Add together
4- That, in Tijuana
5- Weak
6- All there
7- Celestial body
8- Bran source
9- Pertaining to an office
10-Attractive route
11- Protracted
12- Actress Heche
13-Ale, e.g.
18- Australian cockatoo
23- Bunches
25- Basilica area
26- Passenger ships
28- Decreased?
29- Loses color
30- Coup d'	
31- Bern's river
32- Capone's nemesis
33- Pound sounds
34- Boyfriend
35-At the apex of
39- Hostility toward men
40- Waterfall
61-AOL, e.g.
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©2012 KrazyDad.com
Like you.
You've got a lot on your plate
balancing education and life.
At Athabasca University's
Faculty of Business, you can
pick up an online course that
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Learn more at
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COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
UBC Housing Action Plan
Public Workshop - March 29
Join us for a discussion of potential housing program options to improve
housing choice and affordability for faculty, staff and students on the
Vancouver campus.
irsday, March 29, 2012 Ponderosa Centre, 2071 West Mall
irkshop 1: 12:00pm (Noon) - 2:00pm Registration at 11:30am
.. jrkshop 2: 5:00pm - 7:00pm Registration at 4:30pm
Fhe workshop is repeated to accommodate different schedules.
Dlease only register for one workshop. Lunch or dinner will be provided.
The Community Planning Task Group of the UBC Board of Governors, chaired by Dr. Nassif Ghoussoub,
is leading the development of a Housing Action Plan for the Vancouver campus. Read the full
discussion paper, including potential program options, online at www.planning.ubc.ca/housingplan.
Have your say! Participate online between March 20 and April 2 or attend one of two workshops.
RSVP to participate in the workshop sessions before March 27,2012:
Email Stefani Lu at stefani. lui ubc.ca
For more information, visit www.bog.ubc.ca
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
oi «xit g§« nis ^ xjfe gs&gfi7h#cn ai^M^K
gf-tlS SlsH =l #« Bsjsfe AHf§ £2|SW7| HhirHcl-.

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