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 The Stark County treasurer's office is a MESS SINCE 1918
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PAGE 4
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SEPTEMBER 20,2010
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER VI
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING
• PUBLISHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
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SEPTEMBER 20, 2010
VOLUME XCII,  N°VI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sally Crampton : associate.news@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Anna Zoria: associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Jan Turner: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
Matt Wetzler: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
AD TRAFFIC
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
AD DESIGN
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Michele Helmeczi
Henry Lebard
Drake Fenton
David Elop
Josh Carron
Jon Chiang
Tim Blonk
Michael Thibault
Micld Cowan
LEGAL
Blake Frederick
Kiisty Dindorf
Teresa Matich
Phil Storey
Kimberley Allan
Katherine Leibel
Jesse Singer
Priscilla Lin
Karina Palmitesta
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
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UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
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EVENTS
MONDAY, SEPT. 20
DROP-IN TUTORING:
PHYSICS
CHEMISTRY, MATH AND
Feeling overwhelmed in your classes?
AMS drop-in tutors will assistyou with all
your first-year mathematics, chemistry
and physics course-related problems. •
3-7pm, Mon-Thurs, the Qualicum Room
in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 21
DISSOLVE: SEXUAL ASSAULT AWARENESS
Dissolve is a one-woman show promoting sexual assault awareness. This performance contains information about
sexual assault and/or violence against
women which may be triggering to survivors. A Q&A with the performer will follow the show. • 8pm, Izzy Mac Lounge
at Walter Gage Towers.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22
NETWORKING 101
When employers descend upon campus
looking to hire UBC BSc students, will
you be ready? Through an interactive
workshop, we'll provide you with the effective skills and strategies you'll need
to approach potential employers in time
for Career Days. • 12pm-1pm, Lillooet
Room at the Irving K. Barber Learning
Centre.
TRANSPORTATION    L
CONSULTATION
Phase Two
September 14-30
In March, we heard your ideas about where to locate permanent transit
facilities on campus and how to improve pedestrian and cycling
experiences (Phase One). Now, we're back to report on how we used
your ideas and present three options for your feedback (Phase Two).
Your input is important so please join us in-person at two open houses
or submit your feedback online at planning.ubc.ca.
OPEN HOUSES
ONLINE
September 23
September 14-30
5PM-7PM
planning.ubc.ca
Michael Smith Lab 101
2185 East Mall
September 27
10AM-4PM
SUB Concourse
6138 Student Union Blvd.
a place of mind
Campus
Community
Planning
Find out about events,
our newsletter, and more at
planning.ubc.ca.
SECOND FRATERNITY RUSH
A chance for those who missed the first
Rush to come check out the Greek system. Campus fraternities will host an
open house for any interested people to
learn about who they are and what they
do. • 9:30pm, at the Greek Village (2880
Wesbrook Mall), Beta Theta Pi (2140
Wesbrook Mall), and Hillel House (next
to the SUB).
BIKE REPAIR
Volunteers needed to help maintain the
fleet of community bikes. No experience
is necessary and new volunteers will
learn how to do repairs by being paired
with more experienced volunteers. Pizza is provided! Please wear something
that can get dirty. • 6pm-9pm, the Bike
Kitchen in the SUB.
FILM SOCIETY SCREENING: KICK-ASS
The UBC Film Society will be showing Kick-Ass, an ultra-violent superhero
comedy based on the hit comic book by
Mark Millar. The film tells the story of an
ordinary teenager, Dave, who sets out
to become a real-life superhero, calling
himself Kick-Ass. • Sept. 22-26, 9pm,
Norm Theatre, SUB, $2.50 Film Soc.
members, $5 non-members.
r
First thing
you check
•
mthe
morning is
what there
is to do,
right?
Obviously.
Send
us your
events.
events@ubyssey.(
^1      UBYSSEYc 201 0.0 9. 2 0/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS 13
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
AMS says no to October referendum
Linking questions to UPass vote seen as more politically feasible
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
After months of planning and
meetings, there will be no October referendum on student fees.
At Wednesday's AMS meeting,
council decided not to bring forward any motions for a referendum, instead opting to wait until the new year in order to synchronize it with the UPass vote.
The planned questions for the
October referendum included tying AMS fees to the Consumer
Price Index, a number of fee increases that totaled $23 ayear
and various by-law changes.
In a presentation to council,
VP Finance Elin Tayyar and VP
Academic Ben Cappellacci argued to councillors that while
a referendum will be necessary
in the near future, it was in the
AMS's best interest to hold off.
"We've hit a bend in the river, a fork in the road," said Cappellacci. "And we'd be shooting ourselves in the foot by doing it now."
The AMS will hold a referendum early next year over whether or not to renew the UPass at
a new $30/month rate. In previous referendums for the UPass
in 2005 and 2008, other questions on the ballot achieved quorum with ease because of the
overwhelming number of students who voted. The proposed
October ballot initiatives will
now likely appear alongside the
UPass referendum.
Despite being the strongest
proponent of an October vote for
several months, AMS President
Bijan Ahmadian is confident
that postponing the referendum
The AMS hopes that tying their fate to the UPass will be a winning strategy. DAVID EL0P PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
means the questions are more
likely to achieve quorum.
"I think it was the right decision," he said.
"We need to do some more
market research on this to see
what it is students want and
what is of value to them and
[we] need to look at brand awareness a little bit more."
The delay in the referendum
also reopens the question of
whether the AMS will ask students to increase their fees in
addition to tying them to CPI.
"The CPI question is the minimum question we should tie
in and the [increased] fee is...a
question for market research,"
said Ahmadian.
"The by-laws [are] also something we should tie in, because
the by-laws are really out of date
and incompatible with the Society Act and we need to change
that."
According to Tayyar, the executive made the decision to not
pursue an October referendum
only the night before Wednesday's council meeting.
Cappellacci still believes that
a referendum is essential to the
financial survival ofthe AMS.
"If we don't want to face a
bunch of cuts and if we want
to keep the budget, we need to
face a referendum," he said, va
"We've hit a bend
in the river, a fork
in the road..we'd be
shooting ourselves
in the foot by doing
it now"
BEN CAPPELLACCI
CUS to decide fate of conference tonight
Chair and founder abruptly resigns, leaving event in doubt
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
A conference overseen by the
Commerce Undergraduate Society (CUS) is in jeopardy following the abrupt resignation of its chair and founder
last week under mysterious
circumstances.
Khalil Kassam, a second-
year Commerce student who
was the driving force behind
the Canadian Investing Conference (CIVC), stepped down.
Members of the CUS and the
CIVC have declined comment as
to the why he left the position,
with CUS President Connor Mc-
Gauley telling The Ubyssey that
it was a police and UBC matter.
He said the CUS would release
a statement on Monday.
It is unknown at this point
whether CIVC will be retooled,
or cancelled altogether.
"We're going over a speed
bump right now, but like any
speed bump, we'll get over it,"
said Dylan Callow, a member of
the Board of Directors.
The CUS Board of Directors
will meet Monday evening at
6pm to discuss the future of
CIVC, which was scheduled to
take place November 12-14 at
the Fairmont Pacific Rim.
They had committed
$49,000 towards the conference, which promised to offer "high profile professionals the opportunity to share
perspectives, experiences
and technical skills amongst
the top business students in
graduate and undergraduate
[programs]."
Callow added that while no
decisions had been made on the
viability of CIVC, he was confident in the revamped team organizing the event.
Kassam, whose voicemail
still identifies him as CIVC
chair, resigned on September
14, hours before the CUS had
an emergency meeting regarding the conference.
At that meeting, Ethan Gold,
formerly Vice Chair and Corporate Relations of CIVC, was
named acting chair until Monday's meeting.
"[Kassam's] out ofthe picture,"
said Kriti Dixit, Director of Marketing for CIVC "I haven't been
speaking to him."
She added that the CIVC website had been taken down "because we didn't want students
to register when we couldn't
promise them anything at this
point."
"There's a lot of uncertainty at this time," Gold added. He
declined further comment until after the meeting that will
decide CIVCs future.
In July, CIVC was admitted
as an official CUS event, making the organization financially and legally responsible for
the conference. At a Board of
Directors meeting on August
30, their budget, which included a $49,000 contribution from
the CUS, was passed.
However, McGauley was adamant that the CUS was not in
any financial risk, and that the
society was focused on salvaging both the conference and the
reputations ofthe organizers—
Kassam excepted.
"I feel for what Khalil's going
through as a human being right
now, buthe has his own problems
to deal with," said McGauley.
Dixit hoped that a compromise could be reached that
would see the conference continue, albeit with a smaller budget than before.
"There are a lot of people who
put a lot of hard work in this and
will try and deliver," she said.
"The hope is that the hard
work we put into it doesn't go
to waste. Instead of scrapping
this whole thing all together,
we can come to consensus.
"A lot of people's reputations
are in jeopardy." tl
Tonight's meeting is at 6pm in the
Henry Angus Building.
NEWS BRIEFS
AUS HOLDS BY-ELECTIONS
THIS WEEK
Voting for an Arts Undergraduate
Society by-election begins on
Tuesday, September 21. Over
29 candidates will be fighting
for the 15 positions that are
up for grabs. These include
AUS president, VP internal, VP
finance, four AMS reps, three
general officers, two first-
year reps, one second-year
rep, one third-year rep and a
fourth-year rep. Voting opens
8am on Monday and closes
Friday, September 24 at 4pm.
You can vote online at WebVote
or at one of the several voting
stations in Buchanan. For
information on voting and a
list of candidates, visit www.
ubcvotes.cal arts.
UBC MOVES UP IN WORLDWIDE
RANKINGS
The University of British
Columbia is ranked the 30th
best university in the world,
and the second best in Canada,
according to the Times Higher
Education's World University
Rankings. Canada ranked as the
fifth best performing country
with eight other Canadian
schools in the top 200 of the
British-dominated list.
U of T was the highest
ranked Canadian school at 17,
dethroning McGill, which came
in at 35. This year's version
sees research heavyweights
Waterloo, Calgary, Western
Ontario and Queen's fall
out of the top 200 entirely.
In contrast, one relative
underdog, the University of
Victoria, was celebrating after
being promoted into the global
elite for the first time.
BC RESEARCHERS GAIN $3.1M
FOR CANCER RESEARCH
A team of researchers from
UBC, the BC Cancer Agency
and Vancouver Coastal Health
Research Institute have
received a $3.1 -million grant
from the Terry Fox Foundation
to study genetic aspects of
rare cancers.
The team is one of four in
Canada receiving a total of $14.8
million from the foundation
under a new partnership with
the Canadian Institutes of Health
Research (CIHR) for the Terry
Fox New Frontiers Program
Project Grants at CIHR.
The team will use DNA
sequencing technology to
study 12 tumours that currently
lack effective diagnostics and
treatments.
PRESIDENT TOOPE HOLDS
TOWN HALL ON MONDAY
On Monday, September 20,
UBC President Stephen Toope
will hold a U BC Vancouver Town
Hall at the Chan Centre. The
event will run from 11:30am to
1pm. Toope will be giving an
update on Place and Promise:
The UBC Plan, and other
important initiatives at the
university. Q&A opportunities
with the UBC community and
senior administration will be
available. 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2010.09.20
TECHNICAL & COMMERCIAL STUDENTS
The mosl successful problem solvers look at things differently and
see solutions no one else con. Who would hove thought to use fish
protein to stop gos freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did.
And right now we're looking for more people who can bring a fresh
perspective to the energy challenge. We'll provide training, support
and career choices to develop your potential. We'll get you working
with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together
we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further.
Learn about student and graduate opportunities and apply at
www.shell.ca/iompus
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SMI it on Equal Opportunity Employer
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New challenges. Global insight. Opportunities to grow.
An internship at Ernst & Young offers you all this and
more. From day one, you'll be part of an inclusive
environment that welcomes your point of view and
supports whatever you bring to the table. We're looking
for future leaders, so this is your chance to show us
what you've got.
What's next for your future?
Text EY Edge to 58592 to learn more about our
people, culture and opportunities.
=U Ernst &Young
Quality In Everything We Do
Have a news tip? We're always looking for an awesome lead. Or even
lede. Send us an email, and watch your scoop be on our cover.
sally crampton | associatenews@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc
UNA and Athletics
divided on DJ shows
the streets be filled with techno? DAVID ELOP PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
UBC Athletics wants to host DJ
concerts in Thunderbird Arena.
One small catch—they need the
support of their neighbours in
the UNA and RCMP.
Representatives from Athletics, the AMS, the RCMP, and the
University Neighbourhoods Association (UNA) will be meeting with UBC VP Students Brian Sullivan on Wednesday September 22, to discuss the possibility of hosting up to eight
DJ shows throughout the year.
"I honestly think it would be
amazing," said AMS VP Academic Ben Cappellacci. "I'm confident that it's going to be a great
thing for UBC Athletics and a
great thing for students at UBC."
Alnoor Aziz, the associate director and Chief Financial Officer of UBC Athletics, believed
the shows would be enjoyed by
UBC students and would improve a tenuous financial situation for UBC Athletics with regards to the arena.
"The concert business has
dried up," he said. "The biggest
promoter, Live Nation, is not doing mid-level concerts anymore."
Aziz went on to say that because Thunderbird Arena is not
attracting the medium sized
concerts it was intended to,
Athletics needs these shows to
help pay for the maintenance of
the arena. They are asking for
two trial shows to see whether
or not events would work well
on campus.
Mike Feeley, the outgoing
Chair of the UNA, expressed
some concerns about the proposed events.
"If it is supported by AMS
students, this is something we
would very strongly support,"
he said.
"But we never know with Ath-
letics if it's something they're
doing in their role to provide
services to students, or something they're doing in their
role to maximize revenue."
At a UNA meeting in August,
RCMP Staff Sgt Kevin Kenna
worried that DJ shows could
attract unsavoury characters,
including gang members and
drug dealers.
Cappellacci, however, didn't
believe this would be an issue.
"I think given trends of music and the culture of DJ shows,
they're a lot more constructive,
a lot less violent," he said.
"I've thought about it quite
a bit and the only thing that
I can see as a problem would
be if the police started doing
huge crackdowns." tl
UBC library goes live
with a personal touch
SALLY CRAMPTON
as soci ate. news@u byssey. ca
Irving K. Barber is set to get
alive and kicking this week with
the first ever "living library," a
unique project that rents out
people, as opposed to books.
The aim ofthe living library
is to allow students to engage
with people with interesting
and different experiences in a
respectful environment. It will
take place on Wednesday, September 22, from 10am to lpm.
The first of its kind at UBC,
the idea is that people are, "lent
out like books," and given the
opportunity to share their experiences with students.
Glenn Drexhage, one of the
event organizers, said he is excited for the big day to come.
"This is a unique way to engage with members ofthe UBC
community that can provide
students with an open-minded comparison to their own
lives," he said. "If people aren't
interested, that's completely
fine. This may not be the sort
of event that suits everyone.
But if they are interested, all
the better.
"The idea is to reach out to
staff, students, faculty, and the
broader community and encourage them to get involved
and meet some candidates who
come from very different backgrounds," he said.
"We certainly don't want to
reinforce stereotypes or cliches. Rather, we want to encourage open conversation and
an exchange of ideas."
Drexhage hopes that this
event will attract a lot of interest, so as to become a regular
fixture on campus.
Joanne Ursion, one of the
participants, is an equity officer at UBC and a campaigner
for queer unionists.
"Having my voice shared
with students will not only
bring a new and creative way to
share conversation, but build
connections between faculty
and students," she said.
"I think that during these
tough times economically, we
need to not forget our creativity. We need to be aware of social
justice within the UBC community, and how to respond to it
creatively together, and this is
my offering." vl 2010.09.20/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/5
ams Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
NEW SUB
PROJECT
Drop bythe Design Cube!
In the SUB by Starbucks
k own
ewsub
.com
'MINI
SCHOOL
Don't miss out!
Registration for the
winter session ends
on September 29th
Visit:
www.ams.ubc.ca/services
for more information
LOOKING FOR MORE PRACTICAL
EXPERIENCE IN YOUR CAREER FIELD?
The Internship office is recruiting for over 90 amazing internships
including Veterinarian's Assistant, Producer's
www.ams.ubc.ca/services/ams-votunteer-connect for more info.
Applications due Sept 20th.
STAY  UP TO  DATE WITH THE  AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
y Twitter:
AMSExecutive
New ideas.
New approaches.
The future looks pretty exciting, and as a student we hope you think so. too.
We're always on the lookout for enthusiastic high achievers who want jobs with
accountability, who can bring fresh ideas to the table, and who are willing to learn
from some of the industry's most innovative and talented people.
Visit us on campus!
Cenovus Energy Information Session
Wednesday, September 29, 2010,4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
MacLeod Hall (2356 Main Hall) Room 418
cenoVus
ENERGY
www.cenovus.com 6/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.09.20
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE ANNA ZORIA»associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
Over 1000 attend FarmAde
Despite success, future of farm still uncertain
TERESA MATICH
Contributor
People sipped locally brewed
beer from compostable cups.
Kids played around a chicken
coop as the twangy sound ofthe
Agora String Band reverberated across the open field. It was
a perfect fall day.
For many who attended last
Friday's FarmAde, the threat of
development of the UBC Farm
is a thing of the past. Others
warn that there is no reason to
relax just yet.
FarmAde is an annual fund-
raising festival held at UBC's
24-hectare learning and research farm. The festival is organized by Friends ofthe Farm,
a club that coordinates action
and advocacy around the farm,
and is sponsored by the Alma
Mater Society (AMS). The event
began eight years ago as an attempt to raise awareness about
the Farm, nestled deep in south
campus and not often frequented by students. In 2008, the farm
was thrust into the spotlight
by an aggressive publicity campaign led by Friends of the Farm
over the lack of clarity surrounding its future.
When options discussed with
Campus and Community Planning, the body responsible for
development on campus, failed
to produce results preserving
the farm's current size, Friends
of the Farm turned to the student body. Friends of the Farm
collected 16,000 signatures in
favour of keeping the farm at 24
hectares. Two thousand students
marched across campus in the
Great Farm Trek in 2009, and
1000 people attended FarmAde
in 2008 to help 'save the farm.'
These actions resulted in a
statement from UBC's Board
of Governors promising not to
Revellers at FarmAde. More than 1000 people attended thisyear'sfundraiser.MICHAELTHIBAULTPHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
develop the farm as long as housing density could be transferred
to other parts of campus. With
last year's event drawing fewer than 500 supporters, some
felt the farm was no longer in
danger of development. But Andrea Morgan, then president of
Friends of the Farm, stressed
that the area was still zoned for
future housing. "We are winning
the fight to preserve and secure
the future of the Farm, but the
process could drag on," she said.
This year, the mood has
changed. Anelyse Weiler, current president of Friends of the
Farm, believes that things have
come a long way. "[The farm] is
a lot better as far as the land
security," she said. "Right now
it's still designated as a future
housing reserve/academic reserve. What Campus and Community Planning and the Board
of Governors are proposing is
to change that designation to
green academic.
"We are pleased with the dynamic of discussion that we've
had with them."
AMS president Bijan Ahmadian shares Weiler's optimism,
"I have full confidence that the
farmland is completely secured,
so it's not something that is on
our radar as something that is
in danger any more."
According to AMS Food
and Beverage Manager Nancy
Toogood, one of the event's organizers, this year's FarmAde
broke records. While there is
no official count, Toogood estimated between 1100 and 1500
people were in attendance. Most
people said that they had come
to have a good time and enjoy
the music. "This is definitely the
perfect time to have FarmAde,
on a Friday," said one Forestry
grad. "It's nice, the weather's
awesome, the music is good, although it could bea little louder."
Toogood remarked that holding the event on a Friday was
part of the reason for the bigger
crowd. FarmAde 2009 was held
on a Thursday. "Thursdays just
aren't the party days, so we've
gone back to a Friday," she said.
"Itwas spectacular. Itwas the
best FarmAde we've ever had."
Peace, love, laser tag and hippie parenting
LIFE WITH
KRISTYDINDORF
My mom was a hippie. This
meant that throughout my childhood, while other children got to
play Grand Theft Auto and shoot
guns at various Playstation characters, I was playing the Sims
on my mother's ancient Dell laptop. The most violent I ever got
was building a metropolis in
SimCity and then completely
destroying it by alien attack (is
there any other reason to build
a city in that game other than
for the pleasure of using the
"destruct!" button?). The main
thread of my mother's teachings
were: violence is bad. Guns are
bad. Peace, love and all that. So,
the other week, as I strapped on
a suit of body armour and hoisted my laser tag gun for the first
time, I knew I was about to be
slaughtered.
Laser tag is basically running
around in war gear shooting
people in a darkened room. Intellectual stimulation? Naught.
Encouraging violent tendencies
involving weaponry? Quite possibly. I doubt my mother would
approve. As I ran into the room,
I was immediately shot by an
evil-looking eight-year-old girl
with pigtails. Yet another example of how children are being
corrupted by violent games. By
the end of the first game, I was
drenched in sweat and dead last
in the round.
The main reason I lost? Little
children. We should all love little
children. They are the future, and
they will provide us with peace
once The Man is dead and gone.
In laser tag, though, they're evil
personified. That eight-year-old
girl with pigtails shadowed me
the entire game, shooting me in
the back. My fellow teammates,
all of us university students, were
being massacred by tiny minions
of doom, who we hated with a
burning passion. If thatlittle girl
ever brings peace to Earth, it will
because she has killed everyone
else on the planet.
That being said, laser tag is the
most fun anybody could ever have.
Ever. There is nothing more amusing than shootingyour friends and
running away. (Do not shootyour
friends in real life. That would
make you a bad friend.) Particularly fun is shooting your boyfriend repeatedly from various sniper positions. I suppose
this makes me a terrible hippie child, because I enjoyed the
whole shooting experience.
However, it has inspired a brilliant International Diplomacy
plan. Instead of real war, we build
a giant laser tag stadium in Geneva and have our best soldiers
battle it out in three rounds. And
we unleash eight-year-old children into the ring as well. How
much fighting can world powers
do when they're all trying to fend
off evil moppets from Hell?
Yes, laser tag will end war as
we know it. And that is definitely in keeping with my upbringing. Peace, love, and laser tag. vl
ALBUM REVIEWS
PHIL STOREY
Contributor
BLACK MOUNTAIN—Wilderness Heart
Black (insert-noun-here) is a popular name in the indie world. Black
Angels, Black Keys, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Black Francis, Black Lips and Black Mountain. Someday soon I hope to see
a band with a less hard-core colour/shade name (perhaps Pink
Mountain—oh, wait). Black Mountain have been around for years,
and though they seem to have a lot
of talent, I'm not sure they know
how to use it. Generally, each album starts out with an amazing
song, before retreating into banality. WildernessHeartis no different.
After "The Hair Song," a top-
notch opener, the bandloses steam.
The second and third tracks are
nothing worth mentioning. The
album picks up again somewhat
with "Rollercoaster," an epic rock
song that goes on too long for my
liking. There are a few more flashes of brilliance with "Buried Bythe
Blues," "The Way To Gone" and "Wilderness Heart," an excellent song
that reminds me of my favourite
track off of their self-titled album.
While Black Mountain's schizophrenic style is a credit to them, I
always wish thattheir albums were
better put together. I would, however, heartily recommend Wilderness Heart, especially ifyou think
that indie rock has become boring and formulaic.
NO AGE—Everything In Between
While No Age haven't lost much
of their explosive energy, it does
seem that they have gotten older. Where Nouns, their previous album, started out with a
bang, Everything In Between is
more laid back.
"Glitter," a noisy but beautiful
soundscape and their first single,
is probably the most accessible
they have ever been. This isn't to
say that No Age has lost all of their
intensity. It's almost as if they
were afraid of their newfound
approachability as the next song,
"Fever Dreaming," once more
transports the listener to a Nouns
era rock out. It's a mixed bag of
everything in between their old
grungy out-of-control rock, and
a new, much more controlled or
polished sound.
I have a feeling that old No
Age fans might not get what they
are looking for, but for what it's
worth, I enjoyed their new complexity—even as the band struggles for identity. *vH 2010.09.20/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/7
Arkells on Hugo Chavez, Canadian financial system
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
The hook? Pizza. Line? Rock
concert. And the sinker—some
good old aggressive marketing.
While the Toronto Dominion
Bank-sponsored Arkells show
last Thursday was probably
dreamed up in a boardroom,
the golden boys of Hamilton,
Ontario managed to bring
some honest to god rock 'n
roll to an audience that actually seemed excited about what
they were seeing. Take that,
you suits! The Ubyssey caught
up with keyboardist Dan Griffin after the show.
UBYSSEY: How didyou guys start
playing together?
DAN GRIFFIN: We met in Hamilton
[Ontario] and we were all kinda
looking for other people to play
with. We'd been going to school
at McMaster, and we came together through a lot of different ways.
I think we were all really happy
that we found a band finally.
U: What was McMaster like? Was
it hard to form a band there?
DG: We were out playing open
mics, and hanging around at
the Casbah, which is a local club,
just trying to meet as many musicians as possible. I think itwas
only a matter of time before we
came together.
U: You guys won the Juno award
this year for New Group of the
Year. Can you tell me a little
about this experience?
DG: The coolest part was the
amount of emails, support and
love we got from family and
friends and fans of the band. It
was one of those moments where
you stop and look back on the
past couple of years.
U: Has anything changed since
you got this award? For example,
how you think about the band
or the sort of gigs you've been
getting?
DG: It's hard to say. We just sort
of stick to our plan, which has
always been to put on the best
shows we can and write the best
songs we can. It's a really nice
thing, but at the end of the day,
it's not why we do it. Whenever you get some sort of recognition like that, you sort of stop
for a moment, then you get back
to work, back to rehearsals, back
to doing what [you] love.
U: Do you guys play Vancouver
often? Have you ever gotten into
anything wild in Vancouver?
DG: Vancouver has always
been a really supportive place
for us and we've met a lot of
great people out here. Tonight we're gonna go see the
Said the Whale guys, Mother
Mother, there's so much great
stuff out here. So we've never felt Vancouver [is] too far
away—even though it really is.
We played a strip bar that had
been turned into a club for the
weekend. Itwas one of our first
introductions to Vancouver.
U: What bands are you listening to these days?
DG: Right now we're listening to
a lot of Spoon. We love a lot of
Canadian stuff that's going on:
Joel Plaskett, Tokyo Police Club.
We're all over the place. We listen to a lot of 60s music. A lot of
Motown, Stevie Wonder. We love
the Constantines. They were a
really inspirational band to so
many Southern Ontario bands.
U: I was wondering ifyou could
talk a little bit about the song
"Ballad of Hugo Chavez"?
DG: We did a lot of PoliSci in
school, and some of us read his
biography. From a songwriting
perspective, we love writing
songs about real people and using their stories to relate back to
us and things around us. Hugo
Chavez has such a weird history. This song takes place in
the early 90s whenhe was in jail
and lost his eyesight. A lot of the
songs onjackson Square are based
on true stories. "Champagne Socialist" is about a relative of ours.
U: Do you guys identify as lefties?
DG: We're not involved a lot in
politics. What's most important
for us is writing good songs.
We try to take care, if we're doing a biographical song, to approach it with as much honesty and compassion as possible.
U: I have to ask: does anyone in
the Arkells bank with TD?
DG: (Laughs) I think a few of us
bank with TD. There's only a handful of banks to choose from in
Canada.
U: At least they don't need bailing out.
DG: They're all staples ofthe Canadian economy. The cool thing
The Arkells rock 'n' Knoll. JON CHIANG PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
is when a place like TD wants
to step up and put on a concert
outdoors, I think it's really cool.
I thought they did a good job.
We love any chance we get to
play a university. It reminds
us of back when we were in
school. *v3
UNIVERSITY     FAIR
Experience
the World
of education
Don't miss it!
Over 70 universities and colleges
conning to Vancouver
Thursday, September 23rd
from 2:00 - 7:00 pm
Vancouver Convention Centre [Canada Place/Pan Pacific]
3TUDY AND |
GO ABROAD 2
<K>i?M»y  IffiSBIW   **
Research top-ranking Fields of study include
Graduate and Business, Law, Medicine,
Undergraduate Humanities, Sciences,
programs Art and Design....
Schools from over
a dozen countries
attending to meet with
you - learn about your
options abroad and
in Canada
Free seminars, starting
with feature speaker
Jean-Marc Hachey.
author of The Big Guide
to Living and Working
Overseas
FREE REGISTRATION
www.studyandgoabroad.com
GET ALL THE DETAILS 8/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2010.09.20
SPORTS
EDITOR IAN TURNER»sports@ubyssey.ca
UBC loses homecoming
30 unanswered points give winless Bisons a victory
DRAKE FENTON
Contributor
Last weekend, the Thunderbirds
shocked the CIS by travelling
to Saskatchewan and beating
the No. 2 ranked Huskies, 31-
12. The win generated a lot of
confidence and swagger within the 'Birds locker room. They
had proved to themselves that
they could play and beat anyone in the Canada West.
Fast forward one week to
UBC's homecoming: the scene
is a dejected T-Birds squad retreating from Thunderbird field
to their locker room after suffering a 40-17 defeat at the hands
ofthe visiting Manitoba Bisons.
Are these Birds Doctor Jekyll
and Mr Hyde? Coach Shaun Olsen doesn't think so. In fact, he
wasn't even shocked with the
outcome on Saturday.
"I thought Manitoba was a
good football team. I was wondering how our guys were going
to respond. Our team lacks a lot
of experience, and people think
games are won on Saturdays,
but they are won every day, and
I think we lost this one through
the course of the week."
Olsen felt like his squad
didn't have a great week of practice, and came into the matchup mentally unprepared to
challenge a winless but hungry adversary.
Manitoba proved this point in
the second quarter. After UBC
established a 17-10 lead, Manitoba's offense responded. Bison
Khaleal Williams threw a pair
of touchdown passes to catapult
the Bisons into the lead. One of
these was a 69-yard bomb to receiver Quincy Hurst. Hurst, a
Thunderbird Victor Marshall had one catch for eight yards on Saturday. JON CHIANG/THE UBYSSEY
former track star, blew past the
'Birds' secondary, en route to
the touchdown that marked the
beginning of Manitoba's dominance over UBC.
At half time, when Manitoba led 24-17, the game was still
up for grabs. The third quarter
was decisive and exposed the
lack of experience and maturity
that Olsen felt was his squad's
downfall.
It was not until the very last
play ofthe third that UBC generated a first down. The offence
was out of rhythm and unable
to move the ball up the field.
'Birds' quarterback Billy Greene
had made eleven completions
for 238 yards in the first half,
whereas in the third quarter he
only had two completions for
37 yards. The defence wasn't
much better. At times it was
stingy and aggressive and at
other times itwas tame and uninspired. The Bisons were able
to pile up 283 yards rushing,
with roughly 200 of those yards
coming in the second half.
Though it was a tough loss,
moving UBC to 1-2, Olsen felt
there was no need to panic.
"It doesn't mean we are out
ofthe playoffs...I hope our guys
learn from this. We need to
bring it every single play and in
every single rep [in practice]...
so much of this game is mental,
and comes down to execution.
I don't think our guys had that
mental edge this week."
GAME NOTES
Star running back Dave Boyd
left the game with a high ankle sprain. His return is undetermined...Fifth year middle
linebacker Nathan Kanya sat
out the game with a neck injury... Receiver Spencer Betts tallied 4 catches for a game-leading 133 yards....UBC quarterback Billy Greene completed
ten more passes, 19, than his
Manitoba counterpart, Khaleal
Williams...UBC plays at home
next Friday night against the
University of Regina. tl
SCOREBOARD
2
The number of goals Vickie Pearson, who missed last season because of a knee surgery, scored
in the second half of the women's season opener against the
Calgary Dinos.
2
Final standing of the men's
cross-country team at the Sun-
dodger Invitational in Bellingham, Washington.
3
Consecutive games UBC men's
soccer has scored the winning
goal on a penalty kick.
3
Number of UBC varsity teams
that will set foot in Asia this
month.
30
Unanswered    points    by
Manitoba's football team against
UBC in Saturday's homecoming
game
2746
Number   of   people   at
Thunderbird Arena for Saturday's
football  match against the
Manitoba Bisons.
Women's basketball hopes to capture Fu Gong Cup
MICHELE HELMECZI
Contributor
When you think of Asia, you
usually don't think of tall, athletic basketball players. But that
is exactly where UBC's women
will be traveling this Tuesday
to take on some of Asia's top
universities in the Fu Gong
Cup. They will return on October 2.
"I had no idea that we were
going until I was already attending UBC," said rookie Krist-
jana Young, who thought she
wouldn't be going on a trip any
time soon because the team
went to Cuba last December.
Held in Taipei, Taiwan, the
eight-team tournament is invitation-only The T-Birds were
able to secure a spot because of
long-time supporter and Taipei-
native, John Wong.
Abroad, the veterans will have
a chance to better get to know
the team's three rookies. "Everyyear brings new faces, and
this tournament will allow us
to bond as a team on the court
and off," third-year Lia St. Pierre
said.
"China and Taiwan will be
very cool. It's the beginning
of the season... I'll get to know
my teammates a little better...
that's what I'm looking forward
to most," Young said.
Flying to Beijing after Taipei,
the team will have two days to
see some ofthe Far East's gems.
"A big part of [the trip] is the
cultural experience... It's a big
emphasis in our recruiting efforts to get some international travel experience.... the girls
get to see some sights they may
never see. We're going to try and
get to the Great Wall. We're going to try and get to Tiananmen
Square. It'll open their eyes,"
Watts said.
But the athlete's academics
won't be forgotten. Even though
these girls are missing school
to travel and play basketball
they will not get a scholastic
break, women's head coach Deb
Huband said.
With their regular season
starting on October 22, the
coaches wanted to get a chance to
play against some foreign teams.
"We always try and plan some exhibition travel in early October
just to see where we're at against
other people, other teams," assistant coach Carrie Watts said.
Recognizing and being able to
counter different playing styles
and learn from them, St. Pierre
said, was something that Huband has stressed frequently
in the past few weeks.
Huband has had the women
training over 10 sessions per
week, including on-court practice, weight sessions and early
morning sessions, to give her
team a fighting chance in Asia.
Last season ended early for
the T-Birds. They did not make it
out ofthe first round ofthe playoffs. "I want to see us take what
we ended off with, and what we
have added in the off season
and build on it going into the
preseason," St. Pierre said, tl
—with files from Ian Turner
ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
NATHAN KANYA Football
Nathan "Congo" Kanya is
a linebacker on the football
team. Back from a season-
ending injury last year, the
fifth year was a defensive
powerhouse against the
Saskatchewan Huskies. He
made an impressive nine
DAVID EL0P PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
tackles, helping pull off the
31-12 upset in the Prairies.
UBC's first win against Saskatchewan in ten long years.
Kanya's consistently strong
and key plays earned him
Canada West and CIS defensive player of the week, tl
— Amelia Rajala,
Thunderbird Athletic Council Working out on campus
2010.0 9.2 0/U BYSSEY. C A/SPORTS/
HENRY LEBARD
Contributor
BIKING
For road cyclists, pedalling
along Marine Drive and down
to Spanish Banks can be a delightful activity any time of day
but don't forget that the return to
UBC is quite a demanding, steep
climb on Tolmie Street from the
beach to West 10th Avenue. For
those who prefer mountain biking, the endowment lands provide
a pleasant and somewhat serene
path through tall coniferous forests, where coyotes roam. Unfortunately, the rainy season makes
for muddy paths, as the sun rarely
seeps through the canopy.
BASKETBALL
The most popular place to play
basketball is at the Recreation
Centre, adjacent to the Student
Union Building. Unfortunately for basketball enthusiasts,
basketball is not the only activity reserved at the gymnasium. For drop-in hours and
schedules, visit www.rec.ubc.
ca. When you go, remember to
bring your student identification card. For outdoor bailers,
there is one full-length outdoor court across from Osbourne Centre on Health Sciences Road, and Place Vanier's
tennis courts have two hoops
installed for use.
TENNIS
Place Vanier and Totem Park
residences each have their own
courts on their respective south
corners that are available year-
round. For indoor tennis, the Tennis Centre on the corner of East
Mall and Thunderbird Boulevard
is available. Unfortunately, the
cost to play there is quite whigh.
SWIMMING
For you first-years with no fear
and a hunger for pain, Wreck
Beach's waters await. Note that
controlled substances may play
a role when you and Wreck Beach
meet. Sane citizens who prefer
more comfortable conditions
can enjoy the pool at the Aquatic Centre, in addition to the other soothing amenities such as
the sauna or Jacuzzi.
SKATEBOARDING
The multi-level parking lots are
a great, yet dangerous place for
long boarders looking for highspeed rides. Cruising through
campus on a long four-wheeled
board can be very soothing. For
regular skateboarders, there
aren't great places on campus
as many ofthe rails and benches
are skater-proof. But then again,
the world is your playground, so
you can make it work. And remember, don't piss off campus
security—they've got nothing better to do than tell off college kids.
Oh, wait, that's their duty. My bad.
FRISBEE
Take a Frisbee anywhere with
you on campus with hopes of
tossing it around, and if the sun
comes out, you're bound to get
some takers. Ifyou're looking
for a proper game of Ultimate
Frisbee, your best bet is playing
in an intramural league, or finding a decent playing area such as
Maclnnes or Thunderbird Park
Sports fields. Ifyou're new to Frisbee, join quickly because it's
one ofthe most popular outdoor
activities.
FOOTBALL
The same goes for football as
Frisbee—except with football
you can make yourself look like
a hunk.
HOCKEY & ICE-SKATING
Father Bauer arena is the
place to play if you're looking for a pick-up game. Otherwise, intramural leagues are
your best bet for more competitive games. Ifyou're just
looking to skate, there is a
small fee to rent skates at the
same location. Check thunder-
birdarena.ubc.ca/vcalendar/
index.php?category_id=l for
drop-in hours and information. The rink is a great place
to make friends.
SOCCER
The intramural leagues are
whatyou're looking for. Well-organized games with great fields
make for a fun, yet competitive
environment. Indoor games
are also available through the
recreational leagues. If you just
want to create your own game
with some buddies, find any
field. The turf pitches at Thunderbird Park Sports Fields are
often not in use, and the goals
aren't chained up.
GOLF
The University Golf Course is
just a few hundred yards from
the University Village. If you join
the UBC Golf Club for $10, range
balls at the course are half-off.
Unfortunately, rounds of golf
aren't quite as cheap as the average student might like, but there
are several chipping and putting
greens around the course that
are open to the public, %&
Women's soccer
team still undefeated
UBC Thunderbirds' Janine Frazao. JON CHIANG PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
On Friday night, the women's
soccer team played in a scoreless home opener against the
Manitoba Bison.
Women's head coach Mark
Rogers was impressed with his
defence, which is adapting to
his new system, as well as the
new goaltender, Meghan Best.
He said his offence could have
improved, however.
"It's one thing to play with a
strong work rate but it's another
thing to play with good quality,"
Rogers said.
Striker Natalie Hirayama had
one of the more lethal shots of
the game. With less than three
minutes remaining in regulation time, Hirayama hit the
crossbar off a corner kick by
teammate Rachel Sawer.
On Saturday night, the women's team won 3-0 against the
Regina Cougars, tl
CANADIAN
BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION
it)
FONDATION
CANADIENNEDU
CANCER DUSEIN-
POSTGRAD FELLOWSHIP
COMPETITION
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
RECEIVE UP TO
$50,000 - $80,000
DEADLINE
NOVEMBER 15, 2010
REGISTER AT
www.cbcf.org/bcyukon
and click 'funding' for more details.
All qualified candidates are invited to apply for funding to study breast health and breast cancer. Three (3)
fellowship awards are available, each of which is valued from $50,000 - $80,000 per year, depending on
fellowship track and experience, over one or two years. Funding is available through the Canadian Breast
Cancer Foundation, BC/Yukon Region Fellowship Program, which aims to foster independent breast cancer
research in BC. It is intended for qualified health care professionals, MD graduates or recent PhD graduates
to provide assistance in launching a career as independent, social, clinical or basic science investigators in
breast cancer research. Candidates from all research disciplines are encouraged to apply. The deadline for
online submissions is before noon PST on Monday, November 15,2010.
For more information, please contact the Director of Health Promotion at 1.800.561.6111 ext 231 or email at ewebb@cbcf.org 10/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/2010.09.20
GAMES 8 COMICS
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Tomorrow's Professionals Apply Today!
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OMSAS      www.ouac.on.ca/omsas/
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September 15, 2010: Last day to create an account for the online application
October 1, 2010: Application deadline
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1             "34^ *»'	
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OLSAS     www.ouac.on.ca/olsas/
Ontario Law School Application Service
November 1,2010: Application deadline for first-year English programs
May 1, 2011: Application deadline for upper-year programs
TEAS       www.ouac.on.ca/teas/
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%*i
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(Audiology, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy/Physiotherapy, Speech-Language Pathology)
January 7, 2011: Application deadline
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EDITORIAL
REGARDING THE REFERENDUM: GOOD RIDDANCE
From passionate CPI-thumping speeches by executives to a number of fancy powerpoints, The
Ubyssey has been hearing a lot about the AMS referendum over the past month. The problem was,
we were pretty much the only ones.
The vast majority of students hadn't heard a
thing. Maybe you read an article we published
two weeks ago about the proposed October referendum. But the much-vaunted publicity campaign for September never materialized.
No expensive banners were unfurled, only a
few of the meetings with student leaders went
through, and the AMS remained as (in)visible as
it is during times when it's not planning on asking students for more money. So it was a wise decision made by the AMS Executive not to push for
an October referendum.
Many councillors have been as skeptical as The
Ubyssey about the decision to pursue an October
vote. Why place so much political capital into a
referendum removed from elections or UPass,
when reaching quorum—over 4000 yes votes-
is incredibly difficult? Especially when a UPass
vote, a magical thing that makes certain every
initiative on a ballot reaches its quorum, is slated for early 2011?
The answer, of course, is ego. The executive
thought they were supremely competent. If they
would just explain to everyone why the AMS needed more money, people would agree, right? Not
to mention get some extra money for their personal projects, and extend their terms in power
by another two months.
Ah, the sweet, frothy smell of comeuppance. In
order for the October referendum to reach quorum, it would have required a superhuman effort on the part ofthe executives, something they
discovered over the past two weeks. They rightly came to the decision that at this point in their
term, their time is better spent on issues that require immediate attention: land use plan negotiations, advocating for a better student loan program and moving forward on the new SUB project.
No doubt, the AMS suffered some severe whiplash in this flip-flop. But they deserve credit for
coming to their senses.
CONCERNING THE "SERVICE" AT WHITE SPOT
A full-service restaurant in the middle of campus, with a well-known brand name and reasonably priced drinks? Putting a White Spot on campus should have been a slam dunk. But a year
into service, their performance is still—pardon
the wince-inducing pun—spotty.
Most of this has to do, frankly, with service,
or lack thereof. We held off writing this editorial
simply because the service at the Spot is so predictably bad we began to delight in it. Finding out
what exactly what new and horrible way our dining experience was going to be inconvenienced
became the reason to go.
Of course, being hilariously bad at satisfying
customers is never an excuse. If you've ever waited far too long to be seated, or to getyour food, or
to getyour bill, you're not alone in your fruststra-
tion. Reviews on Yelp, DineHere and UrbanSpoon
also note the service you get isn't whatyou would
normally associate with the chain.
That's because UBC White Spot is operated by
UBC Food Services. While UBC Food Services is
perfectly competent at operating cafeterias and
catering companies, they still haven't figured
how to manage restaurants that aren't self-serve.
Aside from the ultra-swank Sage Bistro, Food
Services didn't operate a full-service restaurant
until lastyear, when they opened both White Spot
and Point Grill over at Marine Drive. Crafting
a fully satisfactory customer experience takes
time, but shouldn't a year be more than enough?
Food Services, being part of the university,
doesn't have a large economic incentive to improve. Not to mention that "change" and "customer service" aren't terms usually associated with
being part of a large bureaucracy.
So we're not terribly optimistic things will
change in the short-term. Still, perhaps in the
coming months UBC can And that secret ingredient to make its White Spot feel like, well, a
White Spot. tJ
PRISCILLA LIN GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
FREDERICK: BRING LOCAL DEMOCRACY TO UBC
BLAKE FREDERICK
Columnist
Would anybody care if Vancouver were
run by a board of appointed property
developers instead of elected representatives? I suspect that citizens would
be furious, and demand control over
their local government. This hypothetical scenario is the reality at UBC, but
no such fury is anywhere to be found.
The UBC Board of Governors, which
consists of a surprising number of
unelected property developers, is responsible for collecting taxes, administering municipal services and deciding what gets built where on campus. This leads to a number of clashes, most recently one over the UBC
Farm. The Board wanted to develop
a large portion of the farm into high-
end condos despite unanimous opposition from residents, students, staff
and faculty.
This conflict exposed quite clearly
that when your "representatives" are
unelected—as 11 ofthe 21 are—it becomes incredibly difficult to hold them
accountable. The Board finally caved
on their initial plans, but it was only
after they received immense political
pressure from the Metro Vancouver
Board and Premier Gordon Campbell
and were faced with 16,000 petition
signatures and a 2000-person rally.
The AMS, your student government,
doesn't seem to care about the democratic deficit at UBC. AMS President Bijan Ahmadian said new provincial legislation that takes UBC land use planning control away from elected representatives and puts it in the hands of
unelected appointees is "a promising
first step." A promising first step towards oligarchy, perhaps.
The University Neighbourhoods Association (UNA), which in large part represents the thousands of wealthy residents
on campus who have no affiliation with
UBC, wants to maintain the status quo at
all costs. Their president, Mike Feeley, is
mad as hell that Metro Vancouver wants
to infuse genuine local democracy in the
only area of Metro Vancouver where it
still doesn't exist. Don't expect much fury
from the UNA. They won't entertain any
new governance proposals because they
are fearful it might affect their comparatively low rate of property tax.
UBC has responded to criticism by
claiming that adopting democratic reform would compromise the University's academic freedom. They know
very well, however, that local governance would only democratize decisions related to the non-academic areas of campus. UBC's defence is nothing but a fine piece of rhetoric fabricated by the public relations department
in order to win over public support.
The university now claims to be running a consultation process to gather
feedback from the community about
the manner in which UBC should be
governed in the future. This consultation process is non-binding and will
merely result in the Board of Governors choosing the option it preferred in
the first place anyways. Ifyou're thinking that maybe we should just give the
consultation process a chance, remember that the people responsible for administering it are the same people who
brought you the meaningless consultations on the UBC Farm, the results
of which the Board blatantly ignored.
UBC is run by a board of politicians
who make political decisions that dictate nearly every facet of campus life.
Until they are elected or replaced by
an accountable governance system,
UBC will remain one ofthe very few
places in Canada devoid of local democracy. *vU
LETTER
COUCHSURFING IS SAFE
Where am I coming from when I say
that CouchSurfing is a great way to travel? Well, this summer I CouchSurfed my
way through Argentina and Uruguay.
In two months I met over 30 people in
more than 10 different cities through
this network. Putting it all together I
stayed in apartments, in houses and
farms, in cities and in tiny towns. I
slept in small beds, big beds, bunk beds,
rooms for myself, floors, tents and, of
course, couches. I met families, students, professors, doctors, cooks, bartenders, farmers, kids and many more.
If I had stayed atyouth hostels while
backpacking, yes, I would have met a
lot of people from different places and
I would have liked the parties and enjoyed the landscapes. But with CouchSurfing, I got to truly live Argentina
and Uruguay. I was able to immerse
myself, for a tiny little while, in the
lives ofthe wide variety of people with
whom I stayed. I got a taste of what Argentina and Uruguay mean for the people that were born there, live there,
work there and, in some cases, can
trace their ancestors to their fights
for independence. I experienced these
countries for what they mean to their
people and was thus able to see much
more than what I would have with another way of traveling.
CouchSurfing, I believe, is a very
creative and effective way to connect
like-minded people. It is a network
of people that believe in sharing and
trusting other human beings—people
who want to build relationships that
will help them grow and understand
the world in a more holistic way. It
also gives people the opportunity to
experience the world even if they cannot afford to travel, while at the same
time showing off their countries and
cultures. It brings people together and
helps them understand and celebrate
differences, and I am a Arm believer
that from understanding comes peace.
I know that there are risks, as in everything that we do on a daily basis. Yes,
people should be warned and aware of
them, but they should not be discouraged. They should rather be encouraged to be part of movements that give
rise to change, such as CouchSurfing.
CouchSurfing believes in people's
good nature. As present and future leaders, we have to give ourselves a space
to trust, taking on the challenge of destabilizing the status quo of "not being
allowed to talk to strangers."
— Valentina Ricca 12/UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2010.09.20
OUR CAMPUS
TIM BLONK PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
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