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The Ubyssey Feb 4, 2010

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Array Emasculating sports editors SINCE 1918
Volleyball
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Learn how to bump, set
and kill your way to the
top. ubyssey.cal videos
THURSDAY   ^%    J|
2010.02.04
WEATHER @ UBC           ^
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UBC BY NUMBERS
76 DAYS'TIL END OF TERM
1163 BEDS IN TOTEM PARK
1370 BEDS IN PLACE VANIER
200 STUDENTS LIVING IN
RITSUMEIKAN
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC PLAN TO BUY ISLAND LAND
STALLED
UBC has been negotiating with
Western Forest Products (WFP)
to purchase up to 12,000 hectares of forestation on Vancouver
Island, reported The Vancouver
Sun. However, talks have
slowed down for a variety of reasons, making the possibility of
a UBC-owned research forest
remote.
The area, which stretches
from Sooke to Port Renfrew,
has been on sale for over a year.
UBC planned to do light forestry on the area, without touching old-growth areas, but the
economic climate and provincial
government's lack of interest in
buying the land has slowed the
deal.
In addition, intense logging has
since occurred in the area, and UBC
VP External, Legal and Community
Relations Stephen Owen told the
Sun that "conditions on the ground
are not as they were two years
ago."
"I think the situation would have
to change dramatically for us to be
in discussions now," he added.
CRIME WATCH
JANUARY27 A theft from Koerner
Library between 3pm and 9pm.
Police are still investigating.
JANUARY28 Complainant reported that while having a 20-minute
nap in Koerner Library, her backpack containing her laptop, textbooks and purse were stolen.
Police are still investigating.
JANUARY29 Complainant reported that her backpack was stolen
from an unlocked locker at the
SRC. Police are reminding students to secure their belongings with a lock at all times if left
unattended.
JANUARY 29 Police are investigating an assault on a UBC
Campus Security member. A
suspect was arrested and later released. Charges are being
recommended.
FEBRUARY 1 Complainant reported that sometime over the
weekend, there had been an
attempted break and enter to
one of the storage rooms in the
Neville Scarfe Building. Police
are still investigating.
FEBRUARY 1 Attempted break
and enter at an office in the
Henry Angus Building. Pry
marks noted on door. Police are
still investigating.
FEBRUARY 1 Theft from vehicle
from North Parkade. The vehicle window was smashed and
pry marks were noted along
the door frame. Police are still
investigating. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.02.04
FEBRUARY 04, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N° XXXVIII
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: jwakejield@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nultimedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
fax: 604.822.9279
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and al
students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of
the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written
permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student
number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey;
otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words
but under 750 words and are run according to
space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to
letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces wil
not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before
ntended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue
unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
Stranded on the island, Ginny Kloos and Spencer
Toffoli woke in a haze. Bryce Warnes tore through
the jungle to save Sophie Baider from the smoke
monster. Samantha Jung and Sarah Chung tried
to follow, but the mysterious Ashley Whillans
whipped out her gun, causing the two to become
LOST. Meanwhile, Begina Nyamekye, Mairead
Mackinnon, and Andrew Bates formed an alliance
to take over the others, Spencer Basmussen,
Trevor Becord and Kasha Chang. The others had
taken children Austin Holm, Jason Chu, Adrick
Brock, baby Adeeb Tawseef and little Tara
Martellaro. Andrea Breden and Chibwe Mweene
never fed them anything other than turkey strips
n the alternate universe, Krittana Khurana ran
from the police, forcing Nessa Aref and Matthew
Wetzler to form a bond over their love of Kate
Barbaria. Jonny Wakefield and Wilson Wong had
a tough time getting through customs because
sneaky Virginie Menard put wood in their luggage. Jealous Anthony Goertz then decided to
prank Ian Turner by hiding jello in his jacket. Stay
tuned to find out if Gerald Deo and Katarina Grgic
go back to the island, and if Paul Bucci makes the
smoke monster evaporate
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \__]Q
EVENTS
CLASSIFIEDS
Price Reduced. 2005 Acura
TL fully loaded, 56,000 klm. 4
doors, standard, white exterior, leather interior in good condition, $21,000. Contact calvin.
magic32@gmail.com.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby!
Learn about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every
Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
KOERNER'S NIGHT • Join us for
open mic night every Monday.
Listen to the different flavours
of music, all while enjoying a
nice cold beer or a competitive
game of pool. • Every Monday,
8:30pm onwards. Koerner's Pub.
VAGINA   MONOLOGUES   •     UBC
V-Day is proud to present their
2010 benefit productions of
The Vagina Monologues and
A Memory, A Monologue, A
Rant and A Prayer. • Feb. 9-13,
7:30pm-11:30pm, Freddy Wood
Theatre, $15 for either show, or
$25 for both productions, tickets
selling until Monday Feb. 8 outside the SUB main entrance.
NOON "FUN" RUN • Run for fun!
Walk for fun! Get healthy and
come run or walk the UBC
REC Noon "Fun" Run, hosted by the UBC REC Health
Promotions Department which
takes participants throughout
many of UBC's most scenic areas on a course ranging from
3 to 5km. • Every Thursday,
12:30pm, meeting outside
the doors of the Student Rec
Centre.
CHINA • William Yang's compelling storytelling, photography
and reflections about culture
and belonging against a haunting live score for the erhu and
pipa create an unforgettable theatrical experience. Presented
by Theatre at UBC with the
2010 Cultural Olympiad & PuSh
Festival of the Performing Arts.
• Feb. 2-6, 7:30pm, Freddy
Wood Theatre, $10 UBC Rush
student tickets, $30 regular
tickets.
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY
MUSIC & MEAL • Like to play
music? Just want to listen?
Looking for a sense of community? This is for all members of the UBC community who want to have a good
meal and great conversation.
All meals are home-cooked
and   are  vegetarian-friendly.
• Every Monday, 6:30pm-
8:30pm, Chapel of the
Epiphany  (6030  Chancellor
Blvd), more info revnathan-
wright@mac.com.
DRIPPYTOWN: VANCOUVER'S COMIC
ARTISTS ON DISPLAY • Want a different take on Vancity? The collection features contributions from
six local comic artists whose work
provides a look at life in Vancouver.
• Continues until Jan. 31, Rare
Books and Special Collections in
IKE, more info atpuddingsock.live-
journal.com.
CARDIAC CARE WEEK • The ladies of Alpha Phi invite you
to have a heart, and help fight
cardiovascular disease during
Cardiac Care Week! There
will be a booth in the SUB,
complete with Heart and
Stroke pamphlets, merchandise, Wellness and Nutritional
Store info, and (possibly) roses and chocolate for sale. All
donations collected will go to the
Heart and Stroke Foundation of
BC & Yukon. • Feb. 1-4, 10am-
3pm, SUB.
TANTRAMAR GOTHIC ART EXHIBIT •
Regent College Lookout Gallery
presents Tantramar Gothic,
a collection of work by Dan
Steeves. • Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-
5pm, Sat. 12pm-4pm, Regent
College, 5800 University Blvd.,
runs until Monday, Mar. 1.
FIDDLER ON THE ROOF    •   The
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
of UBC in partnership with
John Oliver Secondary School
is pleased to present Fiddler
on the Roof, the beloved
Broadway classic about family
and community, prejudice and
perseverance, love and duty,
new ideas and of course, tradition. • Runs until Saturday,
Feb. 6, 7:30pm with a 2pm
Saturday matinee, John Oliver
Theatre, 530 E. 41st Ave (at 41st
and Fraser), $20 general admission, $15 students, more
info at info@gsubc.com.
THURSDAY, FEB. 4
ALPHA PHI PRESENTS: THE DATING GAME • Part of Cardiac Care
Week, the Alpha Phi Women's
Fraternity is holding their annual
Dating Game. Prizes from many
wonderful sponsors including
Tim Horton's, Starbucks, Canucks
Team Store and Personal Training.
Proceeds go to the Heart and
Stroke Foundation. • 6:30pm-
9:30pm, Woodward 2, $2 tickets
with draw entry at Cardiac Care
Booth in SUB Feb. 1-4, 10am-
3pm, or $4 at the door.
STAND FOR THE DEAD CAMPAIGN   •
Join STAND Canada in launching the Stand For The Dead campaign with the tour of the new film
Darfur, starring Billy Zane, Edward
Furlong   and   Kristanna   Loken.
The campaign engages and inspires Canadians to stand for the
life of one Darfuri victim of genocide. Students across Canada will
have the opportunity to purchase
and proudly wear T-shirts with a
Darfuri victim's name across their
chest. Screening will be followed
by a Q&A session with STAND
leaders and a special guest. • 7pm,
SilverCity Metropolis (Burnaby),
$10 tickets can be purchased at
standcanada.org/darfurfilm or
at the theatre on the night of the
show.
COOKING WITH BEER • Part of UBC
E-Week, sample some of the
various beer-containing delicious
creations made by each of the
E-Week departmental teams. •
12pm-1:30pm, The Cheeze.
FRIDAY, FEB. 5
LOUIS RIEL OPERA • UBC Opera
Ensemble presents Louis Riel
by Harry Sommers, Libretto by
Mavor Moore with Jacques
Languir. In this presentation we
introduce cousins and countrymen of Louis Riel, and describe how they fit into the Metis
world that he died trying to defend. Pre-show talk takes place
from 6:30-7:30pm. • 8pm-
11pm, Royal Bank Cinema (Chan
Centre), $15 students, $20 seniors, $27 adults.
PIRATE RADIO • The UBC Film
Society presents Pirate Radio
(PG, 116 minutes). • 7pm-9pm,
Norm Theatre, SUB, $4 general
admission, $2 members.
SUNDAY, FEB. 7
GRADUATE STUDENT INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS WORKSHOP •   The
Instructional Skills Workshops
(ISWs) are designed for graduate
students interested in developing their instructional skills. It caters to individuals new at teaching as well as those who wish to
refresh and enhance their skills.
• ISWs run for three days from
8:30am-5pm each day, or four
days from 10:30am-5pm, 2nd
floor, IKBLC, $25 deposit.
MONDAY, FEB. 8
THE ASTRONOMY HUMAN ORRERY
PROJECT • The Human Orrey
Project involves 40 students placing sticky notes on the floor of the
Irving K Barber Learning Centre to
trace the orbits of Mercury, Venus,
Earth, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn.
Students then take turns acting
as the planets in orbit, while another team maps out other planets along with the Voyager spacecraft, the most distant man-made
object. The third-year course is designed for non-science students
at the university. • 11am-12pm,
IKBLC.
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
• Complete 30-Hour Seminars
• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Strategies
• Experienced Course Instructors
• Comprehensive Study Materials
• Simulated Practice Exams
• Limited Class Size
• Free Repeat Policy
• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
*sn   i in m
24 hour Rental for the
price of a 6 hour rental
(25% discount)
(Limit of one coupon per rental; Expires April 30, 2010)
630 Campbell St. Tofino        250-725-3800
2060 Peninsula Rd. Ucluelet    250-726-2700
www.longbeachsurfshop.com     info@longbeachsurfshop.com
Got a sweet event you want to advertise? All events
are free for UBC students!
i
E-mail us at events@ubyssey.ca.
LUCITERRA: TRIBAL FUSION BELLY DANCE PERFORMANCE AND
PRESENTATION • This academic
event hosted by Green College
is open to the University community and general public without charge. Those interested in attending dinner at Green
College before the talk are
asked to purchase a dinner ticket at least by noon the business
day before. • 8pm-9pm, Coach
House, Green College, 6201
Cecil Green Park Road, UBC,
more info at gc.events@ubc.ca
and greencollege.ubc.ca, or call
604-822-8660.
TUESDAY, FEB. 9
RESUMES 1 ON 1 • Looking for
work? Career Services can provide you with personalized strategies and styles to make your
applications stand out in the
stack. Small groups of students
will meet with a resume expert
and get ten minutes of personal feedback as well as the opportunity to learn from their peers -
picking up tips, tricks, and techniques along the way. Don't forget to bring a copy of your resume! • 2pm-3pm, ANGUS
295.
THE LIFE AND TIMES OF CHARLES
DARWIN • Greg Bole is a Biology
Instructor at the University
of British Columbia and also
has an interest in acting. He
has been portraying a young
Charles Darwin for the past
four years to classes and conferences in a wide variety of locations. Come watch as he tells
the story of the man behind the
idea. • 7pm-8:30pm, AERL
auditorium.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10
THE BUND SIDE • The UBC Film
Society presents the critically acclaimed film The Blind Side
(PG, 128 minutes). • Feb. 10-
14, 7pm-9pm, Norm Theatre,
SUB, $4 general admission, $2
members.
SWEET  VALENTINE'S   FAIR  •    Get
something nice and sweet for that
special someone! Shop the SUB
for the latest jewellery, clothes,
gifts, linens and more! • Feb. 10-
12, 10am-5:30pm, SUB Main
Concourse, more info at con-
co3@ams.ubc.ca.
FRIDAY, FEB. 12
ANNUAL AMS GENERAL MEETING
• The AGM is a great opportunity for you to get a glimpse of
your student union's direction
for the year to come as well
as meet and connect with other students, UBC & AMS staff,
and elected student representatives over free hors d'oeuvres
and drinks. • 3pm-4pm, SUB
207, more info affacebook.com/
event.php?eid=304224564594.
BIG SCREEN VIEWING OF THE OPENING CEREMONY • Part of the More
Than Gold Westside Events,
this is the first in a series of activities being hosted during the
Olympics ice hockey games.
Watch the opening ceremony on the big screen! • 6pm-
9:30pm, University Chapel, 5375
University Boulevard.
SUNDAY, FEB. 14
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT • Part of
the More Than Gold Westside
Events, Regent College is
hosting a number of activities for the Olympic ice hockey games, including a welcome center with an internet
cafe, pin trading, photo station,
prayer room and chapel series.
• 10am-4pm, Regent College,
5800 University Blvd. 20 10.02.04/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
l\
EWS
UBC-0 STUDENTS HOLD BENEFIT CONCERT FOR HAITI
An impromptu group of UBC Okanagan students work-    the Rock and Roll club to the Latin Dance club per-
ing to collect donations for victims of the Haitian earth-    formed to help contribute to relief efforts after the
quakes successfully held a benefit concert over the     quakes left an estimated one million homeless,
weekend in Kelowna.                                                                The group said they have only received assistance
The event was one of several that has been orga-    from the  UBC Students'  Union  Okanagan because
nized over the past week by Students for Operation     they wanted it to be a student effort, although their
OneLove, a group of friends and relatives who got    contributions will count towards donation matching
together to work with  a  national  NGO  called  the     from the federal government.
Humanitarian Coalition. At the concert, everyone from                    —Andrew Bates, CUP Western Bureau Chief
EDITOR SAMANTHAJUNG»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SARAH CHUNG »schung@ubyssey.ca
Barn gets another "lease on life"
ASHLEY WHILLANS
awhillans@ubyssey.ca
If all goes as planned, UBC's
only freestanding restaurant,
The Barn, will close on March
31.
This popular lunching spot
for Engineering and Forestry
students will stop serving
rice bowls and burgers and
instead serve parents and
their children when it becomes a temporary daycare
facility.
The cafe will re-open in
January 2011, adding 24-hour
care spaces for toddlers and
three- to five-year-olds. The
$700,000 renovation is part of
a larger project aiming to increase the amount of daycare
services available for students
on campus.
"We've already opened 108
new spaces this year. The total
spaces we are looking to open
through these renovations is 148
additional daycare spaces," explained Managing Director of
Student Housing and Hospitality
Services Andrew Parr.
According to Parr, The Barn
has not been "financially viable" for some time. He believes that the conversion
makes good logistical and
business sense.
So why a childcare centre?
"The demand for childcare is
very high and we were challenged with the task of looking for more short-term and
HISTORY OF THE BARN
While it may seem drastic,
this is not the first time the
building has undergone a
significant transformation.
Built in 1917 at a cost
of $5250, The Barn is one
of the university's original buildings and was
first used as a horticulture
classroom.
According to a
December 1967 issue of
UBC Reports, The Barn
was first given a "new
lease on life" in 1967
when it was converted
into a cafeteria, at a cost
of $122,322, which included building and interior
renovations.
This photo was taken from outside The Barn, as it is currently closed. GERALD DEO PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
long-term for the campus," said
Parr.
"With the growth of food [services] in other areas and the demand for childcare I see this as
a very positive move for UBC,"
said Parr.
Not everyone is as optimistic
as Parr about the change. UBC
student Jake Malone, who eats
at The Barn regularly, is worried that the loss of The Barn
will mean less original eating
options on the south side of
campus.
"There are a few other places on the south side within
existing buildings to serve
eating purposes, but they are
smaller and more indistinct.
They lack the qualities that allow for the inclusiveness of
The Barn and its atmosphere
within," he explained.
There will be food places
opening up on the south side
of campus for students like
Malone, assured Parr.
New restaurants and cafes
are set to open shordy after The
Barn re-opens, such as the Niche
Cafe, which will be located in
the Biodiversity Building. The
Earth Systems Science Building
and the Centre for Interactive
Research on Sustainability also
have food oudets set to open in
the next year.
Parr also said that The Barn's
staff were made aware ofthe proposal in advance and no jobs
would be lost as a result of the
closure.
The pre-existing Childcare
Administration Building at
Acadia Park will also become
a part-time childcare facility, and there are plans to develop the Penthouse Lounge at the
Graduate Student Centre pending approval, tl
PERSPECTIVE
Was I a one-issue candidate?
SPENCER RASMUSSEN
Contributor
Following two weeks of exhaustive campaigning, students
have chosen me as one of their
representatives on the Senate,
our university's academic governing body. Thank-you.
I made no secret of the fact
that I was passionate about, experienced in and running for
sustainability. That students
placed me fourth out of twelve
candidates testifies to the broad
support for this vision of UBC.
Yet at times, often when people were endorsing me, I was
characterized as a "one-issue"
candidate.
I see things differendy.
Sustainability is not an issue,
nor a collection of issues. It's
a vision for the better world we
must create.
To me, sustainability means
providing for this generation
without screwing over the next.
This is an important concept because a) we are screwing over
the next generation, and b) we
often don't provide for this one.
For a university, sustainability is both an opportunity and
an obligation. UBC educates
our future leaders, researches our most pressing problems
and has a $ 10 billion impact on
the BC economy. The potential
is enormous.
But what does this all mean
for students? Over my two-
and-a-half years on campus,
I've produced about two dozen essays, written as many exams and done coundess assignments. Each time, I know
my work will be seen only by
my prof and my recycle bin.
Meanwhile, I get passed up by
seven buses on the way to campus, grab a crappy lunch at the
SUB, and throw away the wrapping. What if we could apply
our learning to improve our
transit, food and waste? The result would be more meaningful
education, a more sustainable
campus, and a better student
experience.
So sustainability isn't an issue; it's a vision—one shared
by a growing number of students, staff and faculty. It's
far, far more than the sum total of botdes recycled and lights
switched off. Let's make this vision a reality, tl
NEWS BRIEFS
CORRECTION: FERRERAS
EXPLAINS IMPEACHMENT
ERROR
In the Monday issue of The
Ubyssey, we described the error in which the Election
Committee announced that
President Blake Frederick had
been impeached, only to retract the announcement the
next day, as due to a "miscalculation" of results.
Elections Administrator
Isabel Ferreras has informed
us that there was no miscalculation. They simply read the results of the referenda questions
incorrecdy.
"We assigned the correct values to the wrong questions,"
said Ferreras.
The Ubyssey regrets the
error.
UBC AND EMILY CARR
STUDENTS DESIGN OLYMPIC
FURNITURE
UBC students have teamed up
with Emily Carr students to
create the outdoor furniture at
the athletes' village.
Emily Carr students designed the chairs and tables, while UBC's Centre for
Advanced Wood Processing
made the designs whole using the blue pine that was destroyed by the mountain pine
beetle.
TRINITY WESTERN UNDER
SCRUTINY FOR FAITH
AFFIRMATION
The Canadian Association of
University Teachers (CAUT)
has stated that Trinity Western
University does not meet the
standard of proper academic freedom, reported The
National Post.
The university is being scrutinized because it requires its
faculty members to sign a statement affirming their Christian
faith before they are hired. A
few of the points that the statement makes is that there is one
God, Christ is God incarnate,
and the Bible is the Word of
God.
"A school that requires its
faculty to subscribe to a particular religious belief or ideology cannot be practising academic freedom," Executive
Director of CAUT James Turk
told the Post.
Trinity Western President
Jonathan Raymond said that
it is not a violation of academic freedom. "There is no topic...that can't be raised," he
said. "We assume faculty will
have their thinking informed
by their Christian faith, but we
don't influence it."
Three other Christian universities are being scrutinized by
CAUT. tJ
r i     w
JUDY MCLEAN
Working from
the bottom up
REGINA NYAMEKYE
Contributor
Judy McLean isn't just any
professor you may bump into
on campus—she works for
the Jolie-Pitt Foundation, the
World Health Organization
(WHO) and the United
Nations.
McLean will be spending her Olympic break in
Cambodia working with the
WHO on "improving child
health, nutrition and food security." Her work is focused
on "the development, implementation and assessment of
cost-effective evidence based
means of addressing malnutrition among young children, adolescents and reproductive-age women and im-
proving
pregnancy
outcomes."
McLean
earned her
BSc and PhD
in Human
Nutrition from
UBC. She
teaches World
Problems
in Nutrition
(FNH 355),
and Advanced International
Nutrition (FNH 490), which focuses on the "analysis of the political, social and cultural complexities of food habits and malnutrition in various cultures
around the world."
McLean also works as an advising consultant on nutrition
and food security and promotes
nutrition education at the post-
secondary level in developing
countries.
She plans to use the "train
the trainers" model right
down to the village level to
create more peer nutrition
educators.
"There is a desperate need
to get a critical mass of people trained in order to effectively address the widespread
malnutrition and for these
trained persons to educate
their fellow Cambodians and
Rwandans," she said.
Looking forward, McLean's
20-year plan includes "building an international nutrition program here at UBC,
which would be the only program of its kind in North
America."
"[Working] towards impacting policies at the governmental level that can reduce malnutrition among large numbers of women and children."
For students who want to
venture into her field, she suggests, "Get involved...go as
high up the ladder as you can.
But more importantiy, don't
make the mistake of thinking
you can save the developing
countries you visit."
McLean is modest about her
work. "It is hard to see anything
I have done as an accomplishment, because I have just been
lucky."
Mien asked about her greatest accomplishment thus far,
she said, "Being a mother." va 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2 0 10.0 2.04
Out with the old, in with the new
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
BLAKE FREDERICK: 2009/2010
ON THE PAST YEAR:
"The role as president has obviously been very difficult for
me. From the very beginning
I felt very strongly that a lot
of people, particularly a lot of
people on Council, were out
to get me, and the reason I believe that is because I was disqualified before I was even
able to take office. That started my term on the wrong note.
I've always had the best intentions to try to stand up
for those students who are
struggling to get by financially through university, and I
had a lot to contend with in
terms of trying to deal with
Council and I failed to convince Council. And obviously
I became frustrated with their
lack of action on issues of financial accessibility to post-
secondary education.
And I'm in the situation I am
in now because of that."
DO YOU HAVE ANY REGRETS?
"I regret not making the motivations for my actions [clearer]
than I did during my term....
If I made [clearer] what I was
doing...I think a lot of students
would have been more sympathetic and supportive of my actions. But because I failed to
do that, it wasn't clear what my
motivation was...and as a result, students and Council subscribed their own motivations
to me."
"The unfortunate part of the
whole impeachment issue is
that I did do a lot of good work
throughout my term which has
now been overshadowed. But I
do personally also recognize
that, despite my failing on tuition and the UN complaint. I
feel that I did do a lot of positive work for students in my
term."
NAME ONE SUCCESS
FROM THE PAST YEAR:
"Crystal and I have been very
successful with our negotiations on the SUB project. We
haven't been able to get what
we want in all cases, but I
think that we have worked
very successfully with the
university on making sure
that the new SUB project will
be one that benefits students
greatly."
WHY WEREN'T YOU AT
FRIDAY'S RESULTS NIGHT?
"I [was] with friends...! thought
it would be better to be with
friends when I heard the results
of the election instead of being
at the AMS party."
WHAT ARE YOUR
PLANS FOR NEXT YEAR?
"I will be graduating this year,
so I am going to be moving on
from UBC. I will be looking for
new opportunities outside of
student politics, and I want to
wish the best of luck to those
that were elected." tl
I'm really excited
about this team.
Everybody is
extremely talented,
extremely genuine,
in terms of caring for
students' interests.
They're in it because
they care about
students....We've
known each other for
a while. They all come
with experience with
the AMS.
BIJAN AHMADIAN
2010/2011 AMS PRESIDENT
The unfortunate
part ofthe whole
impeachment issue
is that I did do a
lot of good work
throughout my
term which has now
been overshadowed.
But I do personally
also recognize that,
despite my failing on
tuition and the UN
complaint. I feel that I
did do a lot of positive
work for students in
my term.
BLAKE FREDERICK
2009/2010 AMS PRESIDENT
BIJAN AHMADIAN: 2010/2011
ON THE PAST YEAR:
"I was always flustered by the
inability to get things done
for students because the AMS
was constantly sabotaging students. When the AMS doesn't
have a relationship with people who make decisions for
students, those people will
make those decisions in isolation of the AMS, and students
are left out. This past year was
the worst of it. We came pretty
much to a standstill.
"It came to the point when
the UBC president had to write
a letter to AMS Council, and
pretty much openly say, 'We
do not have a constructive
relationship.'"
BIGGEST FAILURE OF
THIS YEAR'S EXECUTIVE?
"The Olympics. That was the
saddest moment for me, knowing that the Games were coming here...it's a one time opportunity, and we didn't go into
a strategy on how to engage
students."
"[And] the fact that the SUB
agreements haven't been
achieved yet is another big
failure."
NAME ONE SUCCESS
FROM THE PAST YEAR:
"Honestly my mind has been
so occupied with failure, that
I'm having a tough time coming up with something I can
identify as an achievement."
"There  wasn't  anything  that
would   stand   out...I'm   sure
there have been some things
that were here and there."
WHAT ARE SOME
SOLUTIONS THAT YOU HAVE?
"We have to identify who the
people out there are who make
decisions for students. And the
two big ones are obviously UBC
and the provincial government. So we need to start contacting them...let bygones be
bygones...and [find out:] how
do we move forward? Then we
have to move to other stakeholders on this campus."
WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS SO
FAR ON THE NEW EXECUTIVE?
"I'm really excited about this
team. Everybody is extremely
talented, extremely genuine,
in terms of caring for students'
interests. They're in it because
they care about students....
We've known each other for a
while. They all come with experience with the AMS."
HOW WILL YOU INCREASE
ACCOUNTABILITY?
"Accountability also extends to
students-at-large....One of the
commitments that I am making this year is to make sure
that we are accessible to the
media, that we give them information when they need it." tl
GERALD DEO FILE PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
GRAND OPENING: FEBRUARY 6 20 10.02.04/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/5
Mixed reaction on
BC cell phone ban
MAIREAD MACKINNON
Contributor
As of February 1, drivers
caught talking on a hand-held
phone will face a $167 fine.
Those found texting or e-mail-
ing will also receive penalties.
Hands-free devices, or those
that are activated with a single
touch, are authorized, except
for drivers without their Class
5 licences. The Ubyssey presents opinions from students
and local politicians about
their thoughts on the new law
and provides you with a few
facts. U
IS THE LAW EFFECTIVE?
New research suggests that cell
phone laws do not result in fewer car accidents. An article on
CTV said that the study by the
Highway Loss Data Institute took
collision insurance claims in the
US, and compared them with a
cell phone ban. The study found
that the amount of claims remains almost the same.
KASH HEED, BC MINISTER OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND
SOLICITOR GENERAL
"While the focus of this new law is on cell phones
and other electronic devices, my hope is that people
will think twice from now on about changing their
other dangerous distracted driving behaviours."
"Driver distraction is associated with 25 per cent of
crashes, which, in BC, translates to 117 deaths each
year and 1400 hospitalizations. Texting while driving
is associated with a 23-times increased crash risk."
OTHER PROVINCES
Saskatchewan, PEI,
Quebec, Nova Scotia and
Newfoundland also have legislation banning the use of handheld devices while driving.
UBC STUDENT MARLEY MACVEY
"The government hasn't banned
cell phone use outright because
banning it in stages helps them
to remain favourable amongst
the public."
BC LIBERAL MLA FOR ABBOTS
FORD SOUTH JOHN VAN DONGEN
"This legislation will reduce the
number of accidents on the road
and it will reduce the severity of
accidents, particularly when pedestrians are involved."
UBC STUDENT ELIE WOLPERT
"[I] can't believe that some people would actually take their eyes
completely off the road to respond to a text.'
Ltj*|
ijljrjdmln:
THI UHIKUHT np  ■■ tkh rn.jHIii
UBC Student Housing Demand Study
Join us for a look at key findings.
Together, Campus + Community Planning and Student
Housing and Hospitality Services invite you to attend a
presentation of a recent study assessing UBC students'
housing needs.
Date Friday, Feb. 5r 2010
Time 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Location Room 211,
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd.
Refreshments will
be served.
Questions7
Contact Kcxa McArthur
Associate Of rector oF CommunFty Relations
kcra. m earth ur@ ubc.ca.
43% of students
who live off-
compus would
tive on campus
if they had a
choice
LI faccbnotjcoTi/ubc.candcp
t aiu3c_undcp
Full report avaFlablc at;
http://www.planninftubc.ca/ncws events/whats nrw/articlcs2t3.php
Campus +
Community Planning
planning.ubc.ca
Student Housing and
Hospitality Services
housing, ubc.ca
Public Open House
University Boulevard Neighbourhood
University Boulevard Neighbourhood will have shops and services
that meet the needs of our growing community of scholars, a new
Student Union Building, Alumni Centre and student residences.
Please join us at an open house to view and comment on master
plans for this neighbourhood,
stwJy area
^ ^ mi^ W * * b r d a i.
Unverarty Boulevard
Neighbourhood
Dale Mon. Feb. 8, 2010   Time 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Location SUB Concourse, 6138 Student Union Blvd.
Questions? Contact Laura Holvor at laura.hoiVor(fi]ubc.ca
EJ Facnbonk.cnrn/ubc.rjndcp
t ijp»br_cardnn
Campus + Community Planning
planning.ubc.ca 6/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.02.04
CULTURE
EDITOR KATE BARBARIA»culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE JONNY WAKEFIELD »iwakefield®
Standing
proud
The many lives
ofthe near-
mythical Cairn
SOPHIE RAIDER
contributors@ubyssey.ca
26 JAN 1966: First Cairn built
of stones and cement in
front of the Main Library as
a monument to Engineers'
"diversified and continuing
contribution to campus
life." The following day it
was removed by UBC Plant
Operations.
SEPT 1968: Second Cairn
constructed in front of what is
now Koerner Library. The slab
of concrete embossed with
an "E" was soon destroyed
by order of the UBC Board of
Governors.
FEBRUARY 1969: Science
students crown the Cairn with
a toilet.
E-WEEK 1969: Third Cairn
erected. Modeled, legend has
it, after a military tank diverter.
It was rumoured that they had
reinforced the foundation with
re-bar buried underground.
1970: When university
administration announced
construction of the Sedgewick
underground library at the
location of the Cairn, the
Engineers paid UBC $1000
to dig up the cairn and use
a crane to transfer it to its
current location.
1970's: Vandalism against the
Cairn becomes common
practice among other faculties
and clubs, notably Forestry.
1980: Arts students drive a
forklift into the Cairn.
1981: Cairn makeover. The
Cairn is enveloped in a new
layer of cement, adding
several inches to its girth.
"This bigger and better
monument stood firm against
the continued onslaught of
paint, fire, and other assorted
indignities. Itwas once even
tarred and feathered. A
particularly nasty trick was
'necklacing.' This specialty of
the foresters involved a ring
of flaming tires held together
with a cable chocker, which
was thrown over the top of
the Cairn in freezing weather,
in hopes of cracking the
concrete."
—wikipedia.org
MARCH 1988: Forestry students
demolish the Cairn with a
backhoe.
SUMMER 1988: Current Cairn built
with a substantial concrete and
re-bar foundation. Christened
with a bottle of beer broken
against it.
E ENGINEERS
are the only faculty holding aloft
the flickering flame of school
spirit. This is evident in E-Week,
the annual celebration of the
Engineering undergraduate
Society (EUS), which often features parades, arrests and the
placing of heavy stuff on top of
tall things. While the Engineers
have yet to pull one of their signature stunts as of press time,
the week is young, and the bar
is high after last year's botched
attempt to hang a VW from the
Second Narrows Bridge. Expect
Beetles in strange places.
The revenge
of the nerds
UBC Engineering
law, lore and larceny
WILSON WONG
Contributor
Engineers at UBC have always had a reputation for having the strongest faculty pride
and the silliest traditions. To
those not part of this faculty,
the stuff Engineers get themselves into seems odd, alien
and geeky. Whether you're a
first-year Engineer who wants
to know more about the social
side of Engineering, or you're
just another Arts kid looking
for some kind of explanation,
this short guide will go over
three of the infamous traditions of Engineering.
ENGINEERING CAIRN
Although it's known by non-
engineers as a great communal alternative to canvas, the
Cairn is a great source of pride
for Engineers. As Arjun Veer
Tuli, one of the three Keepers
of the Cairn, chosen to defend
and continually restore the
Cairn to a respectable state,
proudly describes, "When every
Engineer passes by the Cairn,
that Engineer just has a feeling
inside—a feeling of spirit."
Many students see
the Cairn as a kind
of metaphor for
life as an Engineer.
The stumpy
shape serves as
a dysfunctional,
impotent phallus.
KEITH MACKAY
FOURTH-YEAR ENGINEERING STUDENT
Keith MacKay, a fourth-year
Engineering student portrays
it in a rather different light. "I
think many students see the
Cairn as a kind of metaphor for
life as an Engineer. The stumpy
shape serves as a dysfunctional,
impotent phallus, representing
the shame and emasculation
felt by many Engineering students. The continual vandaliza-
tion of the Cairn by other faculties represents the humiliation
and mockery an Engineer undergoes before his or her peers.
Even the location ofthe Cairn itself, starkly placed in the middle of West Mall, with no other structures to the north or
south, is representative of the
isolation and social ostraciza-
tion one feels as an Engineer.
Never become an Engineer."
The Cairn has been the setting for myths. The most common is that the Cairn was built
with a propane tank buried
within it to deter anyone considering digging it up. Other
myths about people being
Saran-wrapped to it in their underwear contain some truth.
REDS
Undoubtedly you have seen
the engineers who wear their
bright-red Engineering jackets
or "Reds" a little too often, commonly sprinkled with an obnoxious dose of Star Wars patches
and a peculiar stench of dried
beer and grease. Reds have
their own system of rules and
traditions, the most prominent
of which is an extensive variety
of patches that one has to earn,
either for dedication towards a
charity, or (arguably) less prestigious ones recognising consuming an idiotic amount of alcohol. Supposedly, all faculties in
the past used to don their equivalent of the Engineering Red,
but all except Engineering have
since lost this tradition.
It is a cardinal sin to wear
a "naked" Red, or one without
patches. The perpetrator of said
sin is tanked in a disgusting
UBC fountain upon sighting.
TANKING
A popular tradition in
Engineering is "tanking." What
may seem like a barbaric act actually involves a carefully regulated ritual of throwing fellow
Engineers into the designated
"Tanking Pond" conveniently located outside the Cheeze, the engineering hideout behind Kaiser.
There exists an entire system of rules set up and a
speech to be read during a tanking. Eric Pospisil, a fifth-year
Mechanical Engineer (mecha-
tronics option) and former head
"tanking" representative whose
role included identifying appropriate targets to be "tanked"
details the proper procedure:
"There's a specific speech you
need to read. You need five people to carry out a tanking—four
to carry and one to read charges. So they'll go and ambush
the someone at the end of class,
bring them down to the tanking
pond, rotate them pi radians,
strip them down to their underwear and toss them in." va
A FEW MODEST
PROPOSALS
KATE BARBARIA
culture@ubyssey.ca
liiitt
MATERIALS:
Dirt
Goats
Teh intarweb
*****  ,
LADY GODIVA
JONNY WAKEFIELD
jwakefield@ubyssey.ca
In 11th century England, a noblewoman rode nude through
the streets of Coventry in protest of high tenant taxation.
Several centuries later, UBC
Engineers caught wind of this
and decided that their annual celebration of the Applied
Science was lacking in both
public nudity and horses.
E-weeks of yore were marked
by such a procession, called the
Lady Godiva Ride, in which a
nude woman on horseback was
paraded around campus—an
homage of sorts to the patron
saint of Engineers.
The parade began to step on
the toes of the AMS, the UBC
Senate and even the provincial legislature in the 80s, when
people became less tolerant
of the "boys will be boys" attitude towards the EUS' antics.
In 1982, then AMS President
Marlea Haugen wrote to the
RCMP "calling for Godiva's arrest and for fire hoses to be
turned on the Engineers attending the ride."
The RCMP apparency decided against such measures, and
the ride continued until 1986,
when the parade was perma-
nendy called off in response
to the murder of 14 women at
Dawson College in Montreal, va 2010.02.04/UBYSSEY.CA/GAMES/7
SUSC0MIC.COM, BY MICHAEL BROUND
If you like to draw, we
like you. Come down to
The Ubyssey office in
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TALENT NOT REQUIRED!
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20. Biblical garden
briefly
22. Golf club which
1. Floor coverings
53. Drug-yielding
can be numbered
5. Trojan War hero
plant
one to nine
9. Half a fly
55. Has a bug
24. Doles (out)
12. Bunches
57. Utter
26. Give merit
13. Capital of Japan
61. Sharp reply
27. Alma
15. Gaucho's
65. Arizona Indian
28. One of
weapon
66. Plain writing
Chekhov's Three
16. Currency of
68. Culture medium
Sisters
Turkey, and formerly
69. Make        for it
30. Simmons riva
of Italy
70. Brewer's need
32. Oven option
17. Inclined
71. "All The Way To
33. Helping theorem
18. Wall St. Debuts
", song by REM
34. Convocation of
19. Mender of pots
72. Connections
witches
and pans
73. Deuce topper
37. Lasso
21. Birth of Christ
74. Etta of old
40. Marmoset
23. Dutch cheese,
comics
42. Completeness
wrapped in red wax
45. Composer
25. Emperor of
DOWN
Schifrin
Rome 54-68
47. Broad valley
26. Parisian pa
1. Germinated grain
50. Dense
29. Former spouses
used in brewing
54. Everglades bird
31. Russian money
2. Et
56. Grim
35. Armed conflict
3. Ripped
57. Baht spender
36. Saltpeter
4. Post
58. French, e.g.
38. Nostrils
5. Tranquillity
59. Literary work
39. Arguing
6. Scribble (down)
60. Rime
41. Lofty nest
7. Analogous
62. Arch type
43. Hair untangler
8. Treegum
63. Tirade
44. Ofthe kidneys
9. Pith helmet
64. Horse's gait
46. Rise to one's feet
10. Narrow opening
67. Compass dir.
48. little teapot
11. New Orleans is
49. Stage plays
The Big _.
Puzzles provided by
51 _   ._boy!
14. Aquatic mammal
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Updated every Thursday, so you can get the skinny on performance art. 8/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2010.02.04
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The road to respectability
"There are no quick fixes," admits Olson as he begins reign as football coach
IAN TURNER
Contributor
UBC's football team didn't
get the turf field they were
promised.
They won one game last
year, if you exclude retroactive
defaults.
Their head coach, Ted
Goveia, was fired.
Their interim coach and former
defensive coordinator, the well-
liked Dino Geremia, quit after not
getting the head coach position.
So who'd take this position?
An alumni, of course.
"Oh God. There are no quick
fixes," said Shawn Olson, UBC's
new football head coach, of how
he'll turn the program around.
[Olson's new
direction] is
demanding and
expects a lot from
us, and that's how it
should be.
SPENCERBETTS
T-BIRDS WIDE RECEIVER
Hired by UBC last month,
Olson has an uphill climb, not
only with turning around the
program, but having a successful offseason. Hired two
months after the offseason began, his priority right now is
Olson, pictured here, knows that improving the football program won't be a quick fix. GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
bringing "positive energy to the
program" by establishing trust
with players and getting sought-
after recruits.
But there are plenty of other
things for him to juggle: alumni relations, recruiting, workout
schedules—to name a few.
"[I'm] going crazy," said
Olson of recruiting. He's used
to the grind, though. For three
years, he served as SFU's offensive coordinator, where he
frequently recruited.
While some have speculated that Olson may bring some
of his past Clan recruits from
Burnaby Mountain to Point
Grey, he doesn't foresee many
following him to UBC.
"Most kids who I recruited at
SFU wanted to go to SFU for a
specfic reason. The two schools
are very different, so I'm pretty
much starting new again."
So far, the Athletic
Department has been responsive to his needs. After his hire,
at his request, they increased
the number of dorm rooms
UBC sets aside for footballers.
By    August    1,    Thunderbird
stadium will have the long-
promised turf field.
But as a former player, he's
also looking for help elsewhere:
alumni. Many have contacted
him offering help and praise.
As he's busy putting together a
skeleton recruiting class, he's
hoping for more than financial
support.
But even though Olson is new
to the position—he's only been
on the job 13 days—the team is
very satisfied.
"Hiring Coach Olson was a
great decision.  He is young,
passionate and really knowl-
edgable about the game. It's
great that he played here and
won here as well, which will
bring experience that our team
needs," said quarterback Billy
Greene, just one of the players
who will need to step up his
game—Olson made it clear that
all positions are up for grabs.
"The team has responded
very positively, everyone is excited to get back to work now
that he is here. It's going to be a
tough offseason requiring a lot
of work, but we all know that it
is going to pay off next season,"
said defensive back Jeff Burt in
a Facebook message.
It's clear from Burt that
Olson's message has sunk in
already. In his "State of the
Union"—Olson's words—to the
team during their second meeting, he laid out the new direction: conditioning in the offseason will be key to success on the
field.
"It turned some heads," admitted wide receiver Spencer
Betts.
"It is demanding, and expects a lot from us, and that's
how it should be. Guys on the
team understand that it will be
difficult, but I think there is a
sense of excitement, and many
guys like the opportunity that is
being given to them to get better alongside their teammates."
Olson makes no excuses
though, for what he is doing to
turn the team around.
"Football is a tough sport. I'm
going to ask them to do things
that are going to hurt a lot." tl
WEEKEND PREVIEW
CAN THE BIRDS EXTEND
WINNING STREAK TO 33?
Fresh off a two-game sweep
of the Manitoba Bisons, the
women's volleyball team (17-
0) travels to Edmonton today for a series against the
University of Alberta Pandas
(12-6). Both UBC and Alberta
have already clinched playoff spots, but coach Doug
Reimer isn't concerned about
a lack of effort for either team
this weekend.
"Both our programs are
competitive, proud and will
enter this game not thinking
it's a preseason game," he
said. "It is slightly different
for us knowing so early what
our playoff route is, which we
normally wouldn't know. For
me, this has meant working
to maintain our focus, maintain our competitive edge and
use this to our advantage."
With 32 straight wins,
Reimer is doing all he can
to ensure the team doesn't
ira-i-z^^ra
2£_^_m-^_maSk
KEEGAN BURSAW FILE PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
become complacent in the
team's final three games before the playoffs begin.
"I've been harder on them
this week...when you don't
have matches you feel you
have to win, it is human nature to get a little complacent, and then when you
have to suddenly crank it up
in the middle of a match, it
becomes problematic."
BASKETBALL LOOKS TO GET
BACK ON THE WINNING TRAIL
After their first loss of the
season last weekend, the
road to the playoffs doesn't
get any easier for the men's
basketball team this weekend, as UBC (14-1) faces
their arch-rivals from Victoria
(8-7) in a two-game home
series (8pm start time). The
UVic Vikes have made the
Pacific Division playoffs each
year since 2004, but are currently in fifth place in the division and in danger of missing
the playoffs.
"With their backs against
the wall, and their playoff
changes on the line, they're
MICHAEL THIBAULT FILE PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
going to play like animals
against us," said UBC men's
head coach Kevin Hanson.
Fans of high scoring games
may want to stay away: UBC
has the no. 1 ranked defence
in the Canada West conference (68.6 points allowed
per game), while UVic is second (69.7 per game). Hanson
hopes that the expected
struggle doesn't deter his
team.
"I think if you ask a player, they'd prefer a free-style
flowing game and take shots
and get into a rhythm. But the
big thing is, we got to get our
guys not as frustrated against
such a good defensive team,"
he said.
The women (10-5) also play
the Vikes (11-4) this weekend,
with the second place—and
a home playoff series—in the
Pacific Division on the line, tl 2010.02.04/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/9
Mike Danton: school first, hockey second
Ex-convict and former NHL forward grateful for a second chance
CHRISTOPHER CAMERON
THEBRUNSWICKAN
FREDERICTON (CUP) - Making
his return to hockey after more
than five years in prison, Mike
Danton is back—but the game
isn't his main focus.
Although he's already scored
a goal for the Saint Mary's
Huskies, his main focus is on
the books.
Danton is keeping himself
busy, learning to handle the
balance of hockey and school.
The former St Louis Blues
player spent over five years
in prison for conspiracy to
commit murder, and chose to
go to school at Saint Mary's
University in Halifax because
their program was geared towards ensuring that academics fit in with what he needed.
"They don't put the focus on
hockey, and that was one of the
things I [liked] from the start,"
Danton said in an interview.
"It wasn't 'Hey, let's get him
here because he can help the
hockey team.' It was 'Let's get
him here so we can give him a
second chance at life.' Its been
school first and hockey second.
Like I said a few weeks back,
I'm a student-athlete, not an
athlete-student."
Danton joined the Huskies in
early January, making his Atlantic
University Sport (AUS) debut on
January 27 versus the Acadia
Axemen.
On January 29, he talked
about the adjustments he's had
to make with both school and
hockey on the go.
"It's just getting the routine
down," said Danton. "Having
to figure out how to study and
when to study, when to go to
the gym and how to have everything work in my favour."
He is succeeding on the ice,
but was quick to point out his
successes in the classroom.
"School is going really well.
Everyone has been welcoming and supportive," he said.
"I'm doing well in school and
I'm actually having fun—even
though I'm a little older than
everybody, but it's fun."
Starting off his AUS career, Danton took on the top
two teams in the conference,
putting his skills and Saint
Mary's play solidly under the
microscope.
In his second game with the
Huskies, he hit the road to take on
the number-one ranked University
of New Brunswick Varsity Reds.
The Reds beat the Huskies 3-1;
Danton said they were a challenge
to play, but it wasn't quite like facing a major-league team.
"There are a lot of skilled guys,
but it's not as quick as higher-up
levels," said Danton. "That's the
difference between the levels of
play as the skill level increases."
Huskies head coach Trevor
Stienburg has been pleased
with Danton's play thus far.
"I'm surprised he's as conditioned as he is, for him to handle as much time as he has with
that long off," said Stienburg.
"He hasn't played in six years.
His legs aren't allowing him to
do what he wants right now, but
he's going to will himself into
shape."
Danton agreed, but said
there were no excuses.
"There's lots of room for improvement, obviously, especially with my timing a litde bit
off," he said.
"I'm just getting used to new
line-mates, getting used to new
rules and making no excuses.
The only thing I can do on a consistent basis right now is bring
work ethic, and everything else
should fall into place." tl
dUSKICs
IGSWOC
Freder
Danton scored a goal for the Saint Mary's Huskies in his first game with the team, courtesy of the brunswickan
Bringing together contemporary ceremonial curtains
by Nuuchaanulth artist Ki-ke-in (Ron Hamilton)
and historical curtains from museum and
private collections in Canada and the United States.
January 17 to March 28, 2010
Ki-ke-in painting the thliitsapilthim of
Ha'wilth Nuukmiis of the House of
Iiwaa3aht, 0pit3at-h, Tla-o-qui-aht,
winter 1 988-89, Vancouver, B.C.
Photo: Haayuusinapshiilthl.
This exhibition is generously sponsored by
The Audain Foundation, and is presented with
the 2010 Vancouver Cultural Olympiad,
with support from the British Columbia Arts Council,
the Canada Council for the Arts and the
UBC Museum of Anthropology
MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY
The University of British Columbia I 182b Main Mall I Vancouver I BC V6T 1Z2
Phone: 604 822 2759 I Fax: 604 822 6689 I Web address: www.belkin.ubc.ca
Open Tuesday to FridaylOto 5 Saturday and Sunday 12 to 5   I   Closed holidays
Come kick that soccer ball.
sports@ubyssey.ca
The Winter Games are coming to UBC
Get Ready.
Follow us on Twitter ©UBCWinterGames
www.ubc.ca/2010
Get Involved. Get Around. Get Smart.
a place ol mind
THE UHIVEDSITV OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA
. d C   201D   OLYMPIC    '-
ARALYMPIC    SECRETARIAT 10/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2010.02.04
1
YOU SAID IT
IN RESPONSE TO "UBC GETS PRETTY FOR THE OLYMPICS [FEB. 1, 2010]":
DO YOU CARE?
WRITE US A LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
Ironically there is now a park on the site formerly known
as Trek Park. If anyone was wondering whether SDS
won just look at how every one of our demands have
now been met.
—Durgan
Because the SDS caused a deficit in public transit.
—Alex Lougheed
CURRENT VFMCOVERAGE
Misdirected rage
Hacks talking
about other hacks
Puppies, unicorns,
beer radicalism
ISSUES STUDENTS CARE ABOUT FOR THE 11
MONTHS BEFORE AND AFTER THE AMS ELECTIONS
Tuition
Academics
■   Beer
(sans radicalism)
Housing
The Olympics
GERALD DEO GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
VFM SHOULD BE CONTINUOUS
Every AMS election season, the AMS' Voter Funded Media (VFM)
contest pours $8000 of your money into student blogs.
This has a number of good effects besides keeping The Ubyssey
on its toes. It provides coverage ofthe elections and editorial opinion from multiple sources. It gets new students involved with the
AMS and makes it viable for independent student journalists to put
a significant effort towards reporting. And finally, it gives students a
chance to express what sort of media coverage they prefer.
VFM culminates in a payout based on student votes, which is announced along with the election results. But once the elections are over,
something eerie occurs. With the exception of UBC Insiders, VFM blog
activity goes from a continuous and unending downpour to a modest
trickle overnight, with occasional spikes when the odd scandal occurs.
Why? Firstly, there is generally a lot less easy reporting available
after the elections. But more importandy, there isn't as much of an
incentive to write multiple posts per week.
There is another option. While the AMS was running its VFM contest, the original creator of the contest, Mark Latham, was running
his own one. However, Latham's was a continuous model. People
voted every day on which blogs provided value to students—and he
paid out a percentage of a $50 daily pot to the blogs which received
the most votes. Why couldn't the AMS adopt this style of VFM, and
keep up funding throughout the year?
It create an incentive for blogs to do work throughout the year,
and increase coverage of issues beyond the AMS elections. If there
is more media reporting on governance issues, campus culture and
academic issues, students will be better off. This could attract more
bloggers as well—there were few VFM entrants this year, and most
were already involved with the AMS.
The Ubyssey would be more than happy to welcome the competition for breaking stories that year-round continuous VFM would
bring in. Or, at the very least, we'd welcome the photoshopped pictures of Joe Stott surrounded by glittery unicorns, tl
WHERE'S MY WOLVERINE?
Despite the abundance of big white film crew buses filled at UBC
this weeek, the movie industry is in decline in BC.
BC NDP leader Carole James has one theory why: Ontario. Last
year, Quebec and Ontario expanded the scope of their tax credits
for films to include all production costs. James claims that productions have been moving to Ontario, leaving the BC film industry in
the dust. On the other hand, Paul Klassen, IATSE Local 891 representative, claimed that it was the unusually strong Canadian dollar
that has been doing the most damage in a Georgia Straight article.
Don Cayo of The Vancouver Sun called for a decreasing the support we give the industry. He asserts that film is strong enough to
maintain itself, and that if it isn't, we shouldn't be propping it up
anyway.
The Ubyssey disagrees. Canadian film needs all the support it can
get; it's a valuable creative industry with plenty of ongoing potential
for growth. Tourism in BC generated $ 13.8 billion in 2008; film generates about $ 1 billion annually. In a province whose economy is still
dangerously resource-based, we need to encourage industries that
aren't based on exploiting natural resources. The creation and support
of always expanding industries such as video games, software development and film will be important for surviving the new millennium.
Finally, the film industry helps UBC. In addition to giving UBC
some quick funds with only slight inconveniences, filmingat UBC
supports the film production program. Which is awesome. vU
TOO SEXY
KASHA CHANG
& AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
Scholarly readership,
Too Sexy is here, yet again, to
answer your strange and wonderful letters. This week's letter
contains a question about the
merits of presumably unsolicited graffiti advertisement for
anal sex. Read on, if you dare!
Too Sexy,
On a recent trip to the rest-
room, I was unsurprised to find
writing on the stall, but didn't
expect what I read. While I am
paraphrasing, it essentially
said "name girls you know who
like anal." Well, there were
some names. Being a curious
person, I found some of the
people online. Given that there
is nothing wrong with anal sex,
should I do anything about
this? The easy solution was to
erase it, but my efforts failed.
Should I leave it alone? Should
I inform the people about this
so they know someone is trying to slander them? I have no
way of ascertaining the motivations for each person writing a
name, of which there weren't
many (so far). However, I think
it's fair to assume their intentions were not to provide their
female friends a large supply of
potential anal sex partners.
Sincerely,
—A Horny Archfiend Ruining
the Population's Environmental
Resources
Howdy HARPER,
There are three questions
here. Let's go through them.
First off, given that there is
nothing wrong with anal sex,
should you do anything about
this? Well, HARPER, that depends on you. There are two
possible futures in front of you.
In the first future, some other
'curious persons' also look up
this list of alleged anal aficionados and harass them for anal
sex. In the second future, you get
off your lazy ass, inform whomever owns, administrates or is
otherwise responsible for the
shit shack in question, and get
the graffiti cleaned off or painted over. So my question to you,
sir, is this: how do you feel about
standing idly by while people
are possibly being harassed by
horn dogs for sexual preferences they may not even have?
How do you feel
about standing idly
by while people
are possibly being
harassed by horn
dogs for sexual
preferences they
may not even have?
Should you tell them?
Probably not. How would you
feel to learn that your name was
on a similar list? Save them the
embarrassment and just get rid
of the graffiti.
Should you leave it alone?
Maybe. Maybe you shouldn't
have read it. Maybe you
shouldn't have e-stalked the ladies in question. But it's a little
late for that. We're past leaving
it alone.
And sure, HARPER, you've
no way of knowing the motive
of the writers. But like you say,
I doubt any of them were just
trying to pass along a litde man
meat to their female friends
with lax backdoor entrance policies. I doubt more than a third
(if that) of the ladies listed actually have a stated preference
for poop-chute pleasure. For the
sake of argument, let's assume
everyone on that list loves anal
sex. Let's assume that they
spend their days casually mentioning to their male bathroom stall frequenting friends
how hard it is to find anal sex
partners.
I doubt more than
a third (if that) of
the ladies listed
actually have a
stated preference
for poop-chute
pleasure.
It's still got to come down.
Just because you like something does not mean that you
want that information to be
available to every man/boy/
genderbender on campus who
has to take the occasional squat
on the porcelain throne. This
is because people usually like
to have their first impressions
take place in situations that
don't involve having someone
learning their sexual preferences as they defecate.
So unless that list was written solely by the women themselves, creeping into the bathroom in the dead of night to
scrawl their predilections on
the walls, and then disappearing back into the sexually liberated ether from whence they
came, it probably wasn't their
idea. It's a quaint belief perhaps, but "Oh, I've read about
you. Aren't you that girl who
likes anal" is probably not the
response most people are looking for after telling someone
their name.
Well, that's it for this week.
Remember, standing idly by
while people are slandered
makes you just as guilty of malicious misinformation as those
who started it. It doesn't take
more than a sharpie and ten
seconds to save a list of girls a
lot of sexual harassment. vU
Send your questions, quandaries, queries, and Quaaludes
to toosexy@ubyssey.ca or the
anonymous web form at ubyssey.ca/ideas. And if there are
any young women reading this
with an authentic zest for the
anal pleasures of life, remember: Craigslist is a better place to
advertise than a campus stall.
STREETERS
WHAT ARE YOU DOING DURING
READING BREAK?
NAZANIN MOGHADAMI Arts 4
I'm staying in Vancouver...I'm
hoping to get to Whistler for
one day, and study for my
midterms...I don't have any
plans for the two weeks.
ORION K0BAYASHI Forestry 2
Originally I planned on going
home, I guess I'm still somewhat doing that. I'm withdrawing from UBC, so I actually
start classes [back home] next
Monday, on the 8th. So I am
heading home, which is the
south suburbs of Philly...
ALANNA WOOD Science 1
I'm a hostess so [I do] just basic hostess stuff like greeting
people and thatkind of stuff...I
work at Cactus Club, so basically I seat guests and clear off tables and that kind of stuff...I
don't have tickets for any of
the Games but I plan on going
down to some ofthe venues.
KY0NG-MINLEEArte4
I'm going to go up to Whistler
for a couple of days...and then
probably study for my midterms...[I'm going to Whistler]
to snowboard. If I get a chance
to watch the Games [I will] but
because the tickets are so expensive I don't think I'll be
able to do anything that's related to the actual events.
(JENNY) EVNJ00 KIM Arts 1
I don't have plans but I'm probably going to volunteer a lot, in
Surrey..I'm going to go to homeless shelters and probably just
serve soup and sandwiches, tl
Coordinated by Chibwe Mweene,
Krittana Khurana and Tara
Martellaro 2010.02.04/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/ll
PERSPECTIVES
Get the guys on board early, sexual assault is a men's issue too
JASON CHAU
&ADRICK BROCK
AlliesUBC
Most men hear the words "gender issues" and shut down. It's
a dangerous and emotional
realm that they frankly would
rather not deal with.
Jackson Katz is an educator and cultural theorist whose
life goal is to bring men into
the discussion on gender violence. He visited UBC last week
as the keystone speaker for the
university's first Sexual Assault
Awareness Month.
Katz asserts that the term "gender issues" is problematic: it automatically causes men to tune
out, because it has become synonymous with "women's issues."
But sexual violence is definitely
not just a "women's issue."
Men are the perpetrators in
99 per cent of reported sexual
assault cases.
Women are told not to walk
alone late at night or wear short
skirts, and we put up signs that say
"Drink Spiking Happens—Watch
Your Drink" in order to "prevent"
rape. But this is not prevention,
this is risk-reduction. And there is
a big difference there, because the
impetus is put on the victims and
not the perpetrators.
Obviously, this does not
mean 99 per cent of men assault women. The issue is not
controlling the behaviour of individuals, it's revising the system that allows sexual assaults
to happen.
We need men to help. The answer is not going to be as simple as being a nice guy and
treating your girlfriend well.
This will be tough. Men need
to end their silence. Men often won't speak up against sexist behavior for fear of being ostracized. People tend to watch
their mouths when women are
present, but it's time to end the
old boy's club.
How does that change happen? The old model where activists meet and discuss solutions is not enough.
Change must come at an institutional level, not simply from
individual activists. We need to
make training workshops that
deal with sexual assault awareness mandatory. This is not a
far-fetched idea. In order for
seat belts to catch on, laws requiring seat belts needed to be
made. Why not make sexual assault awareness a part of orientation for first year students?
We can change groupthink if
we have institutional support.
The people who have the power to create ongoing and sustainable change are the people
in power at UBC: the president,
the heads of the residences and
the newly elected president of
the AMS.
Do you hear that, future AMS
President   Bijan   Ahamadian?
If you want to integrate the
Resource Groups into the AMS,
as you claim you do, this is the
way to do it.
Make sure our leaders take
sexual assault awareness training. I assure you, anyone who
takes a workshop with Jackson
Katz will come out better for it.
With their education, and grassroots dedication, true change
can come, tl
Jason Chau is the president
and Adrick Brock is the treasurer of AlliesUBC, a men against
men's violence against women Resource Group on campus.
Office: SUB 245F. E-mail: al-
liesubc@gmail. com.
For more information on
Jackson Katz: www.jacksonkatz.
com.
85.1 per cent ofthe student body doesn't care about the AMS? I disagree.
ADEEB TAWSEEF
Contributor
Last week the AMS concluded
the election for the its new executives. I would like to congratulate all the elected members. And to those who didn't
win; no nominee went home
with zero votes, which means
there are students who support you and want you to be
their voice. I hope you continue to represent those voices
through discussion and open
dialogue and try to bring positive changes to the AMS.
Today I am writing regarding something that I think is
very worrisome and alarming
to the UBC community. Despite
having the highest voter turnout in 25 years, only 15 per
cent of the student body voted
in the AMS elections. I believe
there is an important message
in the figures which all newly
elected AMS members should
take note of, especially the newly elected AMS President Bijan
Ahmadian.
In any democracy the main
source of opinion, dialogue and
suggestions come from the voters. When the soul of democracy—in this case the majority of students—don't vote or express their opinion, it is likely
that the elected leaders will not
act on the interest of the wider
population.
Why did only 15 per cent of
the student body vote? Doesn't
the rest of the student body
care what their AMS does or
works towards? UBC students
do care and there are common
concerns among students regarding various issues.
I believe that the next big
challenge for the AMS Council
is not to create a new SUB or decrease tuition and fees. Rather,
the AMS should narrow the gap
between Council and the student body. The 85.1 per cent
who did not vote represent a
majority of students whose
voices are not being heard. The
AMS should open dialogue, encourage discussion and most
importandy communicate with
the student body, especially
those that they are in contact
with the least.
Since a small number of students voted this election, AMS
council members may feel that
they are not accountable to the
whole of UBC. And when the
AMS makes tough decisions it
is likely to face more obstacles
because of low student engagement. The AMS is not a useless
or incompetent body, but they
don't engage most students in
their day-to-day activities. They
have often sent a cold message
to students who are looking to
the AMS for representation.
The AMS should
narrow the gap
between the council
and the student
body.
A good example—one which
is important to me—is the way
which international students'
issues have been dealt by the
AMS. In order to address the
concerns of international students, the AMS created a nonvoting International Student
Representative seat in the council, which they later attempted
to eliminate. International students will naturally feel that a
non-voting status in the AMS
council is useless and an insult
to them Perhaps that explains
why only 447 students voted
for the International Student
Representative post. So what is
the AMS doing for international
students?
In my opinion, a democracy will only be able to trust and
rely on its leaders if the majority votes. That is when leaders feel the pressure to be accountable. As a UBC student
myself I would like to see the
AMS campaign stronger in
the next year's election so that
more students actually vote. If
I were the President of AMS my
top priority would be to find a
way to open channels of communication to increase that voter turnout from 15 per cent to
at least 50 per cent. Once you
have a large portion of the student body expressing their voices through votes you will have a
true Alma Mater Society, tl
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^ i 12/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2010.02.04
OUTSIDE PERSPECTIVE
MICHELLE MUNGALL
MLAfor Nelson-Creston (NDP]
Deputy Critic for Advanced
Education & Labour Market
Development
As I got off my flight from
Castlegar in Vancouver the other day, the bright ads plastered
in the airport drove home the
fact that the 2010 Olympic
Games are almost here.
Like many other British
Columbians, I'll be watching my favourite sports on TV
and cheering on our athletes
when the Games begin later
this month. At the same time,
I am disappointed with the way
the BC Liberal government has
mismanaged this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.
Here is one glaring example:
rather than using the Games as
way to invest in the next generation, the BC Liberal government chose to spend almost a
million dollars on free Olympic
tickets for themselves and their
friends.
As one of the youngest MLAs
in the legislature—still strapped
with a load of student debt—
I find this particularly appalling coming from a government
that promised to protect education during last spring's provincial election and only weeks later and slashed $17 million in
funding for student aid.
These  cuts  to  student aid
have been devastating for many
students, particularly coming
on top of years of cuts and skyrocketing tuition.
When the government removed caps on tuition while at
the same time cutting funding
in 2002, universities and colleges had no choice but to raise
fees. So up they went—since
2001, when the BC Liberals
were first elected, tuition fees
climbed from the second-lowest in Canada to ten per cent
over the national average.
After eight years under the
BC Liberals, it isn't much of a
surprise that our students graduate with the second-highest
debt load in the country.
You might have heard the
BC Liberals claim that they are
spending a record amount on
post-secondary Sounds good—
just like it's supposed to. But the
truth is, when you take into consideration inflation and enrolment increases, the BC Liberal
government has cutper-student
funding. Real per-student funding has decreased 15 per cent
over the last 9 years, forcing
schools to raise tuition simply
to keep the lights on and pay instructors' salaries.
At the end of the day, the
BC Liberals are spinning numbers and hoping that you don't
notice.
After the Olympic Games are
over, we'll see another budget from the provincial government. Don't be surprised if
even more cuts are made to student aid, post-secondary funding, and other vital services
such as health care and affordable housing.
New Democrats are strongly  opposed to  these  cuts  to
education and will continue to
stand up and advocate for students, but we cannot do this
alone. Write to your MLAs, call
their constituency offices, and
remind them that they are elected representatives and their job
is to represent your interests.
Let the public know how you
feel by organizing rallies and
events. All British Columbians
should have a right to affordable education.
You have the choice to either
quietly accept these cuts, or to
stand up and make your voice
heard. Just like the athletes
who are visiting our beautiful
province in the hopes of winning a gold medal, let's work
together to make sure that
post-secondary education is accessible to all—so that no one
is left out from a golden opportunity. tJ
LETTERS
REFLECTIONS OF A PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE [INSERT
INSPIRATIONAL MUSIC HERE]
Congratulations to everyone
who ran in the AMS elections.
Win or lose, that took guts. I
commend you all for the effort
and I hope it was a valuable
learning experience. I know it
was for me.
I wish Bijan all the best in
leading the executive team in
their pursuit of meaningful initiatives. Jeremy's goals are especially important, in creating
a provincial student group and
finding a pragmatic approach
for students to finance their education. I also encourage everyone who invested time and
passion into the SUB project,
campus equity, governance issues and sustainability initiatives to stay involved! The repercussions of decisions made
this year will be felt for many
years to come.
So what's next for me? Over
the next year, I will bring UBC
students together to make their
university experience more
meaningful by connecting students in the natural sciences
programs. I am also more than
happy to apply my knowledge
of the AMS to help student initiatives move forward, so come
talk to me!
I would like to thank everyone who supported me, including past student leaders, current students, faculty, staff and
friends. I would especially like
to thank my campaign manager,
Tracy Wootten and volunteer coordinator Chantelle Chan.
All the best and have a great
year,
—Natalie Swift
UBC student,
BSc Natural Resource
Conservation
RE: VIOLENCE IN THE UBYSSEY
Dear Ubyssey,
Over the last few months, I have
noticed the frequent appearance of extremely inappropriate images of violence accompanying articles. The images I am
referring to include the image
of a bound and blind folded representation of Blake Frederick
on the cover of an issue discussing the UN complaint; an
image of a student head first
in a recycling bin in the SUB, a
student with a gun to his head
encouraging students to write
for The Ubyssey, the realistic
looking starting pistol advertising AMS elections, and most recently, the young naked man lying in a dumpster full of cardboard. These images, first and
for most, are staged. They are
fabricated images of violence
that often have very little to do
with the actual article.
When I open up The Province
or The Vancouver Sun and see
an image of violence, that image is a real depiction of an
event. When I open The Ubyssey
and see a violent image it is
something irresponsibly contrived by The Ubyssey team
in order to make their stories
seem more important. In my
opinion this is not only a pathetic attempt to hook readers,
but journalistically irresponsible. So, thank-you, Ubyssey, for
making violence and exploitation a joke. And thank-you for
providing students with yet another reason to doubt the integrity and legitimacy of your
"news" paper.
—Emily Griffiths
RE: TIMKACHU
Dear Ubyssey,
I'm so glad to see that the
Timkachu jokes are ending. I
think those things lack originality and communicate nothing other than personal insults. Good job putting an end
to it and please, please give us
something that's funny, if not
meaningful in the future.
Best regards,
—Alexia Xu
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