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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 22, 1991

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Array the Ubyssey
N
Where to get
help dealing
with stress
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Friday, November 22, 1991
Vol 74, No 22
Transcript backlog frustrates grads
by Dianne Rudolf
A six-week backlog of unprocessed requests for transcripts has
caused many students to miss application deadlines for other educational
institutions, despite requests for
transcripts to be sent immediately.
The backlog is due to a new
computerized system being imple
mented, which will eventually eliminate excess paperwork so students
can receive transcripts faster in the
future.
But the backlog poses a serious
threat to students. A late reviewing
process could adversely affect a
student's status and jeopardize opportunities for placement.
Audrey Lindsay, actingregistrar,
English facelift
for the future
by Mark Nielsen
A series of major changes to first-
year English, including the replace-
mentof the English Composition Test,
were approved in principle at Senate
last Wednesday night.
It is uncertain when those
changes will be implemented, as the
Senate curriculum committee won an
extension in the time it will have to
review the scheme.
The committee will have until
December to consider the ramifications ofthe plan and to make recommendations to Senate.
Dr. Luis De Sobrino, head ofthe
curriculum committee, said of the
plan, "It has many ramifications, an d
it now may take quite a bit of time
before it can be implemented."
The plan calls for the replacement of English 100 by a set of five,
three credit courses to give first-year
students some choice andflexibdlity in
scheduling. Arts students would be
required to pass two ofthe courses to
complete a degree.
Students entering first-year
courses would have to write a Language Proficiency Index (LPI) exami-
Proposed English
courses
Here's a look at the new courses
proposed to take the place of English 100. Register early:
English 110 • Approaches to Literature* Study ofselectedexamples
of poetry, fiction, and drama. Some
sections will be devoted to special
topics, to be announced annually.
Essays are required. (3 credits, one
term).
Englishlll • Approachesto Non-
fictional Prose: Study of a selection of prose texts rangingin length
from the essay to the book, with
emphasis an writing ofthe twentieth century. Essays are required. (3
credits, one term).
English 112. Strategies for University Writing; Study and application ofthe principle of university-
level discourse, with emphasis on
expository and persuasive writing.
Essays and exercises are required
(3 credits, one term).
English 120 • Literature and
Criticism: Enriched study of selected works of literature from a
number of critical perspectives.
Department permission must be
obtained. Essays are required. (3
credits, one term).
English 121 • Introduction to
Literary Theory: Study of various theories of literature. Department permission must be obtained.
Essays are required. (3 credits, one
term).
nation, which would replace the ECT.
The LPI must be written in September instead of in December during
exams as they have been able do with
the ECT.
Although essentially the same
as the ECT, students who fail the LPI
woul d have to take a writing course in
the University Writing Skills Centre.
Aregistration fee must be paid for the
non-credit course in addition to the
cost ofthe other courses.
And along with first-year students, those returning to UBC who
have not yet completed six credits of
first-year English must write the LPI,
as must all transfer students even if
they have the equivalent to six credits
of first-year English.
Students must attain the satisfactory LPI score before registering
for the final 30 credits of their degree
programme.
Sobrino asked Senate for an
extension, he said that the committee
has had only one month to look at the
proposal and needed more time.
The plan amounts to the biggest
issue the committee has had to deal
with since a bachelors in engineering
was increased to five years from four
in the early 1980s.
Senate members raised a number ofquestionsconcerningclass sizes,
who would teach the writing course,
and whether or not other faculties in
which students are currentlyrequired
to take the ECT are willing to join in
on the plan.
At one point Sobrino suggested
thatthe LPI mightbetoomuch trouble
for students to bother registering at
UBC.
"This might scare away the good
students," he said. "They might feel
ifs not really worth going to a university where they have to take an
exam that is in fact not part of the
regular curriculum."
But Arts dean Pat Marchak
warned that time is of essence because
theEnglish department is in a state of
crisis over the workload forced on
instructors by the ECT.
"The teachers, for all intents and
purposes, have gone on strike," she
said. "The one way to solve this crisis
is to charge students with the cost of
hiring markers or the equivalent is to
do it this way.
"It makes sense at this juncture
andinthisstate ofcrisistomake these
changes."
At one point, vice-president of
academic services Dan Birch said
Senate should take a stronger stand
than a "wishy-washy" principle motion.
However, Senate voted down his
motion to accept the proposals without further review.
said the combination of an increased
volume of students, the new system
and the new gradi ng procedure, make
the delay inevitable. "Right now, we
are primarily concerned about trying
to relieve the backlog and get caught
up to give better service to students,"
she said.
"People have been working overtime, an extra temp has been hired,
and jobs have been shuffled around in
order to concentrate on the problem.
"We lare concerned that students
have inadvertently missed time-sensitive requests. Requests have been
increasing at about a rate of 10,000 a
year—we're sending to more institutions because ofthe increase of students
and greater number of graduates,"
Lindsay said.
Actual office procedures may also
be contributing to the problem.
Clement Fung, science senator, said
"Someone who requested for transcripts later than you, may actually
have his or her order processedbefore
yours because she or he specified an
'(emergency) due date'. Why not a
first come, first serve system?
"This procedure of supplying a
'due date' is not concrete as there is
some disparity inhowthe office takes
transcript orders; sometimes the office asks for such a due date and
sometimes not," Fung said.
A student who requested her
transcript a month before deadline,
was made to feel at fault when her
transcript had not been sent.
After arguing at length with the
office personnel, who said it was
"tough luck" and it was her fault she
had not indicated a specific due date
onherrequestform,the student spoke
with the supervisor. Only then was
she assured a phone call would be
made and a letter sent to rectify the
problem.
Similarletters are now being sent
out automatically with the late transcripts. "A memo will accompany the
transcripts outlining that we are having difficulties, so students shouldn't
be penalized at all," Lindsay said.
Fung is concerned that the office
simply does not care about the students because such conflicting information and contradictory excuses are
being given to students. "Possibly,
there are communication problems
within the office resulting in workers
who do not know what is really going
on," he said.
Iindsaymaintainseveryeffortis
being taken to generate the transcripts. "We are concerned, and we are
trying to improve things for students
in the long run. The critical deadline
dates are priority."
Great food, pleasant ambiance and congenial service available at a bench near you.
TANIS TEICHRIB PHOTO
Controversy surrounds silencing
by Sharon Lindores
Some are saying AMS president
Jason Brettis abusing his power after
he interrupted and refused student
senator Carole Forsythe the right to
speak Wednesday at student council.
Forsythe said, "It really scares
me, if Jason i s willing to do this to me,
who else will he do it to? Why will
students want to be involved if they
are made to feel unwelcome?"
During constituency reports,
Forsythe addressed Brett's right to
state AMS policy without consulting
council.Brettmet with UBCpresident
David Strangway Wednesday morning and had supported the idea of
initial residence entrance pending on
academic standing.
Afteri nterruptingForsythe.Brett
said,"Carcilehasnorighttospeakhere
because she isn't a council member."
Mike Hamilton, science representative, appealed Brett's ruling,
putting it to a vote of council. This
failed nine to ten.
"I appealed it because it was a
difficult decision on the part of Jason.
Ifs important for a difficult decision
to be ratified or struck down by
council," he said.
Orvin Lau, a student senator,
said, "What Jason's doing is he's effectively silencing a student representative. To be interrupted and told
to cease speaking would be an insult
to anyone, particularly to a student
senator."
According to Code and Bylaws,
"A non-member may speak if a
member yields her/his place to her/
him on the speaker's list, or if the
chair recognizes him."
Brett had recognized Forsythe.
As the chair, he did not have the right
to say something or to take part in a
debate, without passing the chair,
which he did not do.
Brett said, "The real fact of the
matter is not whether I had the right
to do it or not, I shouldn't have done it.
I have bad days, too, and, urfortu-
nately, last night was one of them."
Forsythe said, "Jason was really
abusing the power of the chair. He
rudely interrupted Derek Miller's report, before me.
"Later when Julie Lahe gave her
report and spoke on a similar issue as
I had, Brett interrupted her and said
"we've heard that speech before.'
"I think we respond to philosophy differently. Either the executive
rules [as an] elite or council has a say
in policy. What I was going to say was
that councillors would have to demand [a say in policy], acknowledge
the difference and [I was going to]
appeal councillors to take a more active role."
Although Forsythe was not able
to say this in council, she thought
Brett knew what she was going to say.
"He heard, but did he listen?" Classifieds 822-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines, 60 cents, commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional lines
75 cents. (10% discount on 25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4^)0 p.m., two days before
publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A7, 322-3977.	
05 - COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Nov. 23
Judge Rosalie Abella
Chair
Ontario Law Reform Commission
LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY:
WHO DECIDES?
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward IRC
at 8:15 pm.
10 • FOR SALE - Commercial
COMPOSER & AUTHOR Ts & sweats at
bargain prices will be offered at the B.C.
Craft Sale at the SUB the week of Dec. 2.
Also tie dyed scarves, reusable gift wrap,
recycled paper, ceramics. Or come Tues. -
Sat to Festive Fabrics, 3210 Dunbar at
16th. Tel. 736-1016 for hrs.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
PRINTER - EPSON LQ800 excellent condition $110 687-2034.
1979 MERCURY CAPRI, hatchback, 4 sp.
good cond. $900. 222-1471.
1985 CHEV CITATION, 4dr, hatchback, 6 cl
auto, 79,000 km power steering, brakes, radio, new tires, black & grey, one owner,
$3900 obo, ph. 222-4748.
ISUZU BELLET DELUXE 1966,4dr sedan,
1500 cc. Queensize waterbed, 90% wave
reduction $150. Full-length cot $25. 228-
1584.
SINGLE PEDESTALsteeldesk&chair(with
wheels). Good condition, suitableforstudent.
875-0834.
IBM PC PACKAGE consisting of 256Kcpu,
amber monitor, keypronickeyboard & Roland
dot matric printer.   $700 complete.   222-
4748.
20 - HOUSING
5TH ROOMMATE FOR LUX Kits home
with 4 professionals. 30+ male preferred.
Non-smoker, no pets, 6 appliances. $405.
Plus util. available immed. 738-4774.
1-BDR, BSMT SUITE, utilities incl. Laundry facility, near Skytrain, 1 year lease -
quite n/s. $350/mo. 321-3009.
XMAS & NEW YEAR'S in WhisUer! Double
rm avail, in luxury ski cabin outdr. hottub,
sauna, lg. private room shared kitchen.
Comfortable & casual. Why pay $300/nt?
Create a memory! Call 932-5555,lv. message
for Brock.
NEW ATTRACTIVE lower level suite near
Kits Beach. Suits single n/s female. $550/
month incl. heat 734-3444 after 6pm.
30 - JOBS
MAKE $$$ WORKING partrtime. Flexible
Hours. Call Franco 8 290-9368.
Between
IMPROVE YOUR RESUME!
MANAGE
WITH
COLLEGE PRO PAINTERS
FOR MORE INFO
879-4105
THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY Orchestra has an opening for a student sales rep for
on-campus ticket sales. Please contact Noor
at 684-9100.
40 - MESSAGES
MESSAGE OF ISLAM 9: Muslims believe
that God revealed the Koran and made it
incumbent upon Himself to protectit against
interpolation and corruption of all kinds.
There is only one version ofthe Koran. Many
Muslims learn it by heart
70 - SERVICES
SINGLESCONNECTION-An Intro Service
for Singles. Call 872-3577, 205-955 West
Broadway, Vancouver (at Oak).
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF
TREATY CANADA
IMMIGRATE TO THE U.S.
LEARN HOW - CALL NOW
1-213-456-5906
75 - WANTED
ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS? A
local consul ting co. is looking for 3 motivated
people to promote and market quality products. Start now and ensure summer job and
pttimeand$inbankbygrad. Call224-4686
Between 4-6.
INTERESTED IN BEING involved in pro-
posed T.V. program(s). I need people with
various talents. Call Mike 879-9078.
80 - TUTORING
GENETICS GOT YOU DOWN?
Universityinstructorwill tutor genetics and
other biosciences. Call 731-7360.
85 -TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years exp.,
WD Process/typing, APA/MLA, Thesis.
Student rates. Dorothy, 228-8346.
• AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING *
Extended hours: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. M-F
Professional word processing service for
essays and reports. DONT PANIC.
WE'LL DO IT FOR YOU!
Room 60, Student Union Building
or phone* 822-5640.
Deadline for submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30pm, for Friday's paper,
Wednesday at 3:30pm.
NO IJWE SUBMISSIONS
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon" -12:30 pm.
Friday, November 22nd	
Free! Folk artist, Sandy Scofield. 8-
11, Fireside Lger Grad Ctr.
School of Music. Contemporary
Players. Noon, Recital Hall, Music.
Students of Objectivism. Discuss:
Should the gov't control the fire dept?
Noon, SUB 215.
Japan Exch. Club. Lang. Exchange
night II. 7pm, SUB 205.
School of Music. Opera wrkshp.
Evening of Opera; F. Tickner, dir.
8pm, Old Aud.
English Students' Soc. Bzzr grdn.
4:30-7:30, Buch A, Arts Lge.
Saturday, November 23rd
Baptist Student Ministries. Broom
Ball. 10*30pm-12, Tbird Sports Ctr.
WORD PROCESSING ON laser; essays,
proposals, theses, resumes, etc. & editing.
$2/pg&up. Donna 9 874-6668.
School of Music. Opera wrkshp.
Evening of Opera 8pm, Old Aud.
Sunday, November 24th	
Gala Benefit Concert, by The
Adaskin Society. UBC Symphony
Orchestra; R. Silverman, piano; J.
Read, con. 8pm, Hotel Vancouver.
Monday, November 25th	
Christian Fellowships. Food drive.
8:30-4:30, (Sedge.) across campus.
Student Counselling & Resources
Ctr. Wrkshp: Reducing Test Anxiety. Noon. Brock 200.
School of Music. UBC Percussion
Ensemble. Noon, Recital Hall, Music
Christian Clubs. Food Drive ($ donations to food bank taken) 11:30-
5:30. Chem, res, CEME.
Women's Centre/Jewish Students'
Assn. Jewish Women's Discuss Grp-
last mtg of term. All women & men
welcome. 5pm, SUB 130.
Hillel/Jewish Students' Assn. Student Board Mtg. Noon, Hillel.
Hillel/Jewish Students'Assn. Torah
discuss Grp w/ Rabbis Crandall,
Cahana & Zylberberg. Noon, Hillel.
WORD PROCESSING, professional and fast
service, competitive rates. West end location, call Sue 683-1194.
PROFESSIONAL WORD PROCESSING...
224-2678. Accurate, affordable, efficient
Student Rates; laser printing.
QUALITY WORD PROCESSING, laser
printers, student rates. Linda 736-5010 and
Agnes 734-3928.
WORD PROCESSING
$1.50 per page.
Call 224-9197
TYPING QUICK RIGHT by UBC all types
$1.50/pg, dbspc. Call Rob228-8989 anytime.
EXPERT WORD PROCESSING using MS
Word 5.0. Documents of all types. Audiotape transcription. $2.25/dbl sp. pg. ($4.50
single sp.). Dot matrix output Close to
campusat4th/Dunbar. Call Rick anytime at
734-7883.
PROFESSIONAL WORD PROCESSING -
High Quality, Accurate & Fast French &
Eng. service - Dictatyping - Laser Printing -
Fax - Student Rates ($14./hour) - Call 274-
7750.
PAPERS ETC. quickly typed, proofread &
laserprinted by exp. secretary, UBC graduate. On campus. 688-4734.
99 - PERSONAL
ATTN: PUNJABI MALES
Anattractive, outgoing, Punjabifemalegrad.
student (22 years) is interested in meeting
outgoing attractive male. Great sense of
humour a must Send letter describing
yourself, include name, phone #, and photo if
poss. P.O. Box 100SS, c/o this paper.
I AM AN ARTIST, gentle, nice looking,
honest, financially secure (22) (5'7"). Want
to be friend with open minded, honest (19-
24)lady. Pleasecallorlcave message. Robin,
681-6723.
LOOKING FOR A FUN-FILLED, LONG-
TERM AND MEANINGFUL RELATIONSHIP? Asingle(with two golden retrievers),
successful, and athletic Ph.D./entrepreneur
is looking for a reasonably tall, bright,
physically-active, and outgoing woman to
build a friendship - to hopefully evolve into
much more. If interested, please send picture
and one-page summary of your needs and
interests to: MR. RIGHT? P.O. Box 100,
Classified Dept, Rm 266 - 6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1.
SINGLE, MALE, 31, prim, teacher, successful, humorous, passionate, attractive, honest, spontaneous, would like to meet a success ful attractive up but not yup prof, women,
25-33 for friendship and creation of a tropical paradise here, there, in the country,
must have a good sense of Ha-Has and love
the outdoors. Box 16042 - 3107 Mtn. Hwy.,
N. Van., V7J 2N8A
MARLBORO Woman seeking Falcon Nose
for endless romance. I'll supply the
candlewax if you promise not to pick.
Join The Ubyssey at
SUB 241k.
mZXX VARSrTY COMPUTERSl
1 v«ww,b.c     SERVING VANCOUVER SINCE '87
1/TRISON 386SX       ^
( TRISON 386DX-25N
/Prison 3Mi)x-4o\
■ 20Mh* 386SX CPU
■ 25Mbz 386DX CPU
• -lOMhz 3K6UX t PL
•  1 Meg RAM
■ I Meg RAM
•  1 Meg RAM
• \2 or 1.44 Meg floppy drive
• 12 or 1.44 Meg floppy drive
• 1.2 or 1.44 Meg floppy drive
•  t lerikl, 1 pmllel, 1 game pon
• 1 serial, 1 parallel, 1 game port
• 1 icnal, 1 parallel, | game pon
•  101 keys axbmctd keyboud
• 101 keyi enhanced kcyboud
• 101 keys enhanced keyboard
• 52 Meg hud drive
• 52 Meg hud drive
• SO Meg hard drive
:■:■:■:■:■:
• Mono monitor wiih Haculet
• Mono monitor wiih Hexculc*
• Mono monitor with Hercules
compatible* cud
compatible* card
compoliUea caid
V    $850°°   Jm^    $iooo°° J \ v   $ii50°°  yil
(«lliiil2326    Fa# $04} 222^2372          ||
$ CASH $
PAID DAILY!
6 to 9 p.m.
CHILD FIND
Door to door Christmas card
campaign. A missing child is
everyone's responsibility.
432-6666 PLEASE HELP
HlUS   DISCOVER THE
i.,*   COMPETITION
&iU3   ' Colour Laser
r Print..$1.95
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2nd FLOOR
2174 WESTERN PARKWAY
VANCOUVER, B.C.
224-6225
FAX 224-4492
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
M-TH 8-9 FRI 8-6
SAT-SUN 11-6
ncc
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GIFT SHOP
"Experience a beautiful healing Quality"
• Psychic Reading
• Psychic Tarot
• Chakra Kits & Oils
• Astrology
• Aura Energy Reading
PLUS
Jewelry, Crystals, Cards, Posters, Incence,
Books & Tarot, Unique Collectables and more
Custom Stone-setting and Jewelry design
111', Discount with A.MS Student I.D.
228-9460
2615 Alma Street, Vancouver
ON THE BOULEVARD
Hair Care Services
Esthetician
$2.00 off cut
with presentation of this ad
Offer Expires Dec.20*/91
Suntanning Special
10 sessions for $39"
5784 University Blvd.
UBC Village
224-1922* 224-9116
SILKSCREENING
(1 WEEK DELIVERY ON STOCK ITEMS)
T-SHIRTS ... VJhite Crew Keck      $7.85   63.
SWEATSHIRTS ..Zf^;,Td.  $15.20 ea
Other styles, colours & fabric contents available
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TERMS AND CONDITIONS: Price includes 1 colour
print, choice of ink colour, screen set-up &
artwork. No hidden charges Options: flashcure-
add 38c/print (for solid coloured fabric) & puff
ink-add 75c/print. S-M-L-XL sizes only. XXL
by quotation only Additional colours by
quotation only PST & GST added where
applicable
Call the:
KENNY OYE SPORTSWEAR HOTLINE:
270-6348
RED LEAF RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SMORGASBORD
Unique Traditional Chinese
•    Cookint;.>n Campus        /*
LICENSED PREMISES
10".. DISCOUNT
un c,is/i pickup orders.
2142 Western Parkway,
Universit> Village
228-9114   rT^f fi
fc3eg fit
Tuesday, November 26th
Inst of Asian Research. "After the
Agricultural Transition in Kirala"
by B. Morrison. Noon, Asian 604.
Inst of Asian Research. "Women
writers in contemporary Korea" by
B. Fulton, U of Hawaii. Noon, Asian
509.
Student Counselling & Resources
Ctr. Wrkshp: Test Prep. Noon. Brock
200.
Christian Clubs. Food Drive ($ donations to food bank taken.) 11:30-
5:30. Chem, Res, CEME.
Poli. Sci. Students' Assn. Speaker:
Mayor Gordon Campbell. Noon, Buch
A205.
Hillel/Jewish Students' Assn. Famous Hot Lunch. Noon, Hillel.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship.
Prayer mtg. 7:30am, SUB 211.
January, 1992	
1 wkend day wrkshp: "Unlearning
Racism" wrkshp w/A.W.AR.E. (Alliance of Women Against Racism
etc.). To sign up/ info 222-4476.
DROP ANCHOR
ENHANCE YOUR JOB OPPORTUNITIES ...
BECOME BILINGUAL
You  can  enroll   now  for the  second  semester in   French
Total   Immersion   at   Universite   Sainte-Anne.      Learn   to
speak   French at this small univorsity (350 students) in
a rural  French community  (population  10,000)  along  St.
Mary's   Bay   in   Nova  Scotia.     Because   of   its   size   and
dedicated  stalf this  immersion  program  is considered by
many as the best in Canada and is availablo year round.
Write,   phone  or  fax   us  for  more  information   about  our
short-   or  long-term  programs.
Dr. Joan-Dougtas Comoau, Direcleur
Sessions d'uumorsion
Universite Saimo Anne, Box 25CO
Polntb-Uu-niylisu, Nouvelle-Ecossa
(Church Point, Nova Scotia)
BOW  1M0
luluphonu:   (902) 769-2114 Fax.:     (902)   769-2930
0/4>4/4/4>4>4>4><fcit>
2/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1991 NSWS
AMS rejects
green
$40,000 to go In fund-rasing gives Uniited Way volunteer reason to celebrate.
PAUL GORDON PHOTO
by Jana Dionne
The AMS is no longer accepting green glass for recycling.
Green glass poses a particular recycling problem because it is
not widely used in Canada. Most
green glass has been imported
from Europe in the form of wine
bottles.
Niki Ferrel, AMS environment coordinator, said that "Green
glass gets recycled, but there is no
market for it in North America."
The AMS recycling bin for
green glass has been changed to a
bin for aluminum cans. "We were
only getting about six green bottles
a week. It's not worthwhile if we're
not getting any," Ferrel said.
In an effort to help combat the
surplus of green glass in BC, the
Campus provides aid for coping
with November's month of stress
by Ratil Peschiera
November is the stress
month for students. Not only
are finals and first-term exams
coming up, but for many the
major projects and essays ofthe
term are due.
Fortunately, there are several student services available
on campus designed to help with
the stress brought on by this
time of year.
Student counselling at UBC
is handled by 'steps,' beginning
with the first step of peer counselling at UBC Student Support (USS), to the last at Student Health Service which has
a psychiatrist on 24-hour call.
Tanya Road, USS president, said, "Our business picks
up during exams, especially
during Christmas time. It's an
emotional period, some students
are away from their family, and
they have no one they can talk
to. It's the usual exam stress
syndrome."
Road said USS, located on
the SUB's main concourse, is a
peer counselling programme
designed to serve students.
"Our mandate is students
counselling students. Right now
we have 65 student volunteers
working two people an hour from
9:30am to 9:30pm. We provide a
confidential service for students
to walk or phone in and talk."
Alongwith counselling, USS
offers information on other services available to students.
"They can walk out with
some information feeling empowered, knowing that there are
places that will help," Road said.
At this time of year, the
Women Students' Office (WSO)
is also busy.
Marsha Trew, WSO director, said, "We always have more
people coming in November."
The WSO counsels women
students and, according to Trew,
the stress of upcoming exams
leads more women to come in
and seek some sort of counselling.
"[The type of counselling]
depends on the individual, and
students can see a counsellor by
walk in or by appointment. We
are open from 9am to 4:30pm
week days, but our hours are
flexible."
With full- and part-time
counsellors, as well as two stu-
dentintems, Trew said the WSO
(located in Brock Hall) is open to
all women and offers services
such as support groups for mature women students, women
with eating disorders and sexual
assault survivors.
Across the hall from the
WSO, the Student Counselling
and Resource Centre (SCRC)
provides a variety of services to
students.
Kenneth Kush, SCRC director, said, "At this time of year,
people are just pouring in."
According to Kush, the
SCRC offers "drop-in" counselling as well as workshops on
education, career and social
concerns.
"When a student comes in,
we try to evaluate how we can
help. If it's an academic problem, we will direct the student
to the faculty advisor, but if it's
more a personal problem, then
we can help," he said.
Students can receive 'drop-
in' counselling, which consists
of spending half an hour with a
counsellor, or making an appointment for a later date.
"We are open from 8am to
6pm Mon day through Thursday
and 8am to 4:30pm Fridays.
Usually there is no waiting list
but this time of year there is
about a one-day wait for drop-
ins," Kush said.
Counselling at the SCRC can
range from a single half-hour
session with a counsellor to
regular weekly appointments.
Student Health Service
(SHS) is located in the University Hospital and is open Monday through Friday from 7:45am
to 5pm for all students.
Helen Zarek, acting head
nurse, said," [Student Health] is
like going to your family doctor.
Eachpatientislistedon an individual basis."
SHS provides assistance for
a student from a doctor or a
nurse.
"[We deal with] a little of
everything. Some matters are
minor, but we mostly deal with
emergencies such as injured
students or students in crisis,"
Zarek said.
All organizations said students should not hesitate to come
in and use the services provided
for them on campus.
AMS is now purchasing Perrier in
aluminum cans. However, "It is
up to the consumer to be aware of
the recyclability ofthe container,"
Ferrel said.
Mary Jean O'Donnell of the
UBC Student Environment Center is familiar with the problem of
green glass, as the supply in BC
has become so great.
In California, wine companies
are required to buy back their own
bottles. "A similar system will
supposedly come around [to BC]
in a couple of years," O'Donnell
said.
Additionally, companies buying back their own bottles could
work through a deposit law like
the one BC has for beer bottles.
According to O'Donnell, green
bottles could be effectively dealt
with following a change in the
deposit law.
Consumer's Glass in
Lavington, BC purchases green
glass but they do not buy back
bottles they did not produce.
Jaunice Ansell, recycling coordinator, said, "We havelgreen glass]
in exceedingly high inventories."
"We were well aware that
green glass would become a difficulty because of import," Ansell
said, "but it doesn't have to go into
landfill."
Ansell is part of a task force
involving the Ministry of Environment, liquor distributors, and
the recycling community that is
looking at viable alternatives for
recycled green glass. She stressed
finding "uses that are economically and environmentally sound."
Martin Morrison of the
Greater Vancouver Regional District works in testing alternate
uses for crushed green glass. He
said that the company studying
alternative uses, TERRA Engineering Ltd., is halfway through
testing procedures that will determine the suitability of gTeen
glassfor construction applications.
"Crushed green glass has been
found suitable for limited use in
construction when mixed with
other granular materials, i.e.,
sand," Morrison said.
Crushed green glass can also
be used in sandblasting in
underdrains for houses and
stormdrains for roads. "We found
it works just as well as conventional drains," Ansell said. "We
have to become creative in finding
alternative uses."
compiled by Mark Nielsen
Women and Law chair
endorsed
The UBC Senate recommended
last Wednesday night that the Board
of Governors establish a chair in women
and the law.
The chair is intended to reinforce
and strengthen the existing expertise
in the faculty in the area of feminist
legal studies, according to law dean
Lynn Smith.
Funding for the chair is expected
to come through donations and
matching funds from the BC government.
Student senators
shuffle
Student senators completed a
shufflingof committee responsibilities
last Wednesday night—one month af
ter former AMS ombudsperson Carole
Forsythe was appointed to the body to
replace outgoing senator-at-large Lisa
Drummond.
The changes are:
Academic Building Needs • senator-at-
large Julie Lahey replacing pharmacy
senator Joe Jacob.
Academic Policy*senator-at-large
Orvin Lau replacing science senator
Clement Fung.
Agenda* senator-at-large Suzana Prpic
replacing senator-at-large Julie Lahey.
Curriculum*senator-at-large Carole
Forsythe and applied science senator
Stephen Mak replacingsenators-at-large
Dean Leung and Suzana Prpic.
University Library* applied science
senator Stephen Mak replacing dentistry
senator Eha Onno.
Research centre for
greedheads
The establishment of an "Entrepre-
neurship and Venture Capital Research
Centre" within the faculty of commerce
and business administration was approved by Senate.
Once the Centre is in operation, the
budget is expected to be $385,000 annually, or $1,925 million over five years.
You're just a number
A total of 30,103 students are registered in full-time studies for the 1991/92
winter session, Senate learned, when
the student information system registration statistics were released.
The total amounts to an 8.4 per cent
increase over the total for the 1990/91
winter session which was 27,768.
Distribution of
students by faculty
and gender
Facvdty
Students Female
Male
Undergraduates
Arts
7,318
4,583
2,735
Science
4,176
1,689
2,479
Eng.
1,860
200
1,600
Ed. (elem)
977
780
197
Comm.
1,395
594
801
Graduates
Education
532
368
164
Arts
413
232
181
Bus. Ad.
401
130
271
M.A. Ed.
398
300
98
Science
349
117
232
Arts, PhD
359
169
190
Sci, PhD
359
126
423
Eng, PhD
203
13
190
Law
676
334
342
Medicine
484
195
289
TOTAL
30,103
15,522
14.581
51.6%
48.4%
November 22,1991
THE UBYSSEY/3 I'TRAVELCUTS
Mw ^H   Canadian  Universities Travel Service Limited
PRESENTS
THE ULTIMATE
DEAL
$
VAUCOUVER/CALGARY/EDMONTON
WHEN YOU BOOK
THE ULTIMATE
HOLIDAY
+ Plenty ol lree lime to
explore, relax, meet Ihe
locals!
+ Come on your own or
with a triend!
■y Everyone is 18-35!
Stay in unique
accommodations, like
our French Chateau!
for !8-35s
forking For Learning
■Ipi?
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 57
(PRINCE GEORGE)
invites you to
join in
WORKING FOR LEARNING
IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S
NORTHERN CAPITAL
Prince George School District is one of British Columbia's largest
and most progressive school district. We are anticipating vacancies
for teachers at all levels for the 1992-93 school year.
Representatives of the district will be interviewing on campus in
February.
Interested applicants are asked to obtain an application form from the
S'ude**'' Emplnymcnl Centre in RrncW Hall   Deadlines for application
Jmtiiry 10  1992
ft
SCHOOL DISTRICT No 57 (Prince George)
1894 Ninth Avenue, Prince George, B.C V2M 1L7
Telephone: 564-1511 Fax:564-4439
H3i
OIJVER AND THE ELEMENTS
NOVERMBER 18-23, 1991
HARP DOG BROWN & THE BLOOD HOUNDS
NOVERMBER 25 - 30, 1991
BIG SCREEN SPORTS EVERYDAY!
SHOW STUDENT CARD FOR HAMBURGER & FRIES
WE'RE HAVING A NEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY
INCOGNITO
TICKETS $20 at the BAR
THE FAIRVIEW PUB 898 W. BROADWAY   TEL: 872-1262
\!
^-^
'/£*
lfek
HOW THE SUtNLE TE.ftM WON THftT
REStftKCH   &RRWT GrapMc/Ihe Mitotan
Not just geeks in lab coats...
by Yossarlan King
A new programme is bringing
school kids in touch with the
wealth of scientific knowledge and
experience in UBC's laboratories.
The programme began in
September and is a collection of
short courses, each lasting one to
five days and concentrating on
some particular area of science.
Courses explore topics from the
outermost reaches of the cosmos
to the inner workings of molecules;
from genetic engineering to life in
the bogs.
David Vogt, science director
for Continuing Education and director of the UBC observatory,
says Science Saturdays "provide
science adventures for kids."
UBC has dozens of scientific
labs doing work in many exciting
areas; the labs are typically accessible only to the researchers involved and often sit idle on week
ends. The Science Saturdays
programme is using this time to
provide access to "real science" for
students from ages five to 17.
Science Saturdays will continue next term, and although it
is a new programme, Vogt is confident it will be repeated annually.
In starting this endeavour,
Vogt was inspired by what he sees
as "a problem with the communicators ... science teachers have
never really done science."
However dedicated and well-
intentioned, most teachers have
neither the experience nor the resources to convey the full excitement of scientific inquiry. To make
matters worse, guidance
cousellors responsible for helping
students with career choices are
often ignorant about science and
thus unlikely to steer students in
a scientific direction.
On the other hand, researchers tend to be very knowledgeable
about science but have little opportunity to convey this knowledge to the community at large. In
addition, the "publish or perish"
attitude so prevalent in academia
means the focus is primarily on
research rather than teaching.
By bringing students onto
campus, scientists have an opportunity to "communicate the energy
that is in every single lab; to communicate the scientific lifestyle,"
says Vogt.
Over half of the instructors
for the Science Saturdays courses
are graduate students, who Vogt
says are often "our best ambassadors." Grad students have an in-
depth knowledge of the science,
yet are closer in age and lifestyle
to the students they are teaching
and can show that scientists "are
not just geeks in lab coats."
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CEREMONIES OFFICE
FALL CONGREGATION CEREMONY
NOVEMBER 28,1991
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
THERE WILL BE A MORNING AND AN AFTERNOON CEREMONY
9:30 a.m. -     Graduate Studies, Agricultural Sciences,
Applied Science, Commerce & Business Admin.,
Dentistry, Education, Forestry, Law,
Medicine & Pharmaceutical Sciences.
2:30 p.m. -      Graduate Studies, Arts, Science.
RECEPTIONS WILL FOLLOW AFTER EACH CEREMONY IN THE
STUDENT UNION BUILDING UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTIFIED.
HONORARY DEGREES WILL BE CONFERRED UPON:
DOROTHY E. SMITH
JUDITH FORST
ANTONINE MAILLET
- AT THE MORNING CEREMONY
- AT THE AFTERNOON CEREMONY
- AT THE AFTERNOON CEREMONY
PLEASE MARK YOUR CALENDARS AND PLAN TO JOIN US
4/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1991 ..^.^..v.^^
**".
■*^-^^A|»iicmi.
jJ£ -VW, v »fx. -■»■*■ j.'-.-Wi
Political turmoil is hardly
an encouraging   - a
environment for art.
However, a political activist who has been painting for about eight years will
be exhibiting next week in the
AMS Art Gallery.
Kazi Ahmed, a 23-year-old
science student who studied at the
University of Dhaka in
Bangladesh, is a self-taught
painter and photographer. Ahmed
has been in Vancouver since August 1990, after being imprisoned
for political activity.
The show will be his first
Vancouver art exhibit, and it will
include about 15 paintings and
photographs. He says the paintings are mostly about space, landscapes and science fiction, and the
photographs are about people living in cities.
"I'm interested in space, nature, mountains, stars and planets," Amed says.
Amed's artistic themes may
be peaceful, but his political involvement has certainly not been
similar.
"I was a leader in the student
movement in Bangladesh against
the military government," he says.
"I was arrested by the police. I was
imprisoned and tortured for more
than a week."
Street demonstrations were
bloody and many of his friends
died. He remembers one where
students were killed by the wheels
of a police truck that pushed into
the crowds.
"Many of my friends and colleagues were killed. One of my
best friends, Chunnu, was shot in
the student hall while I was studying with him," he says.
Amed was eventually arrested
at home.
"When I was in prison they
gave one piece of bread with some
vegetables for breakfast and dinner was a small plate of rice with
some dahl or beans," he says.
"Police would often come and
kick the students—many [committed] suicide. There were ten
to 12 people in one room without beds or mattresses."
In addition to the
physical acts of violence, such as being      beaten
with sticks
or rifles,
Amed
says he suffered emotionally. He
has blocked out some of his memories of the past.
"When you are in that kind of
situation, you get mentally tortured. I believe it is the strongest
kind of torture. The conditions are
so bad and you are in prison because you are asking for human
rights, the right to vote, speech,
freedom of news and radio.
"When you are harassed,
kicked or punched you get mentally sick and depressed," he
says.
When      Amed
came to Canada, he
claimed refugee
status.   His
claim    is
c u r -
rentiy
Z3
Art and
politics: the
experience of
an artist and
student activist
in Bangladesh
by Efffe Pow
economy.
I want to
change,    reverse that view."
Amed invites
students to see his exhibit and contact him if
they want to know more
about politics in Bangladesh.
"I ask students to be more
interested and that UBC students be more aware about
the studentmovementin
Bangladesh."
being
p r o -
cessed and
his first hearing is next February.
Meanwhile,
Amed is grateful for the
chance to live in Canada. He
keeps in touch with UBC clubs
such as Amnesty International
and the Global Development Centre, he swims and he uses the li-'
brary facilities.
"I would dedicate myself to
the people and country because I
came here and asked for shelter.
"I want to bring Canadian
students to the attention of refugees who have potential and skill,"
he says. 1 read in newspapers that
immigrants come to Canada, take
jobs and aren't useful to the
HILLEL   HIGHLIGHTS
MMAT ENGINEERS THANK
SPONSORS OF FIELD TRIP
The Society of Metals and Materials Engineers would like
to thank our sponsors: The Alumni Association, The
President's Allocation Committee,, The Walter H.
Gage Memorial Fund Committee and the Dean's Office for making our field trip to southern Ontario in the first
week of November a success. We were very proud to
represent our university in another province and very
enthusiastic about the seven industrial process plants we
toured. Once again, we thank you for your generous
financial assistance which made everything possible.
THE GRADUATE AND FACULTY
CHRISTIAN FORUM PRESENTS:
Two Lectures by
Dr. Owen Gingerich
Reflection on Natural Theology:
Kepler's Anguish and Hawkin's Query
Tuesday, November 26,4:00 pm at Woodward IRC #2
The Galileo Affair in
Contemporary Perspective
Wednesday, November 27,4:00 pm at Woodward IRC #2
Dr. Gingerich is currently
Professor of Astronomy, History and Philosophy
of Science and Senior Astronomer, Smithsonian
Astrophysical Observatory at Harvard University.
For further information please call 822-3112.
Sponsored by the UBC Munin Fund and the Templeton Foundation.
Office of the Registrar
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-timesiudents to run for election for the
following positions:
A. Board of Governors Two students
B. Senators at-Large Five students
C Senators from each Faculty One student from each faculty
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of nomination are
available atthe front counter in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room
266 S.U.B.jand in the offices of the Student Undergraduate Societies and the
Graduate Student Society.
Nominations must be in the hands ofthe Registrar no later than 4:00 p.m. on
Friday, November 29,1991.
WE WISH THE STUDENTS
GOOD LUCK WITH
THEIR EXAMS AND
LOOK FORWARD TO
SEEING YOU NEXT TERM
FOR HOT LUNCH,
ISRAEL WEEK AND OTHER
HILLEL PROGRAMMING!
HEBREW CLASSES
Advanced on Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m.
Beginner on Thursdays at 12:30 p.m.
HilteVs Famous
Hot Lunch
EVERY TUESDAY
12:30-1:30 PM
TORAH STUDY
Monday Nov. 25th
at 12:30
JEWISH MYSTICISM
Wed. Nov. 27th 5:00 pm
Hillel House is located on the North side of SUB next to the parkade. Tel: 224-4748
UCINAi
:ALirORNl, (
STUDENT NITES
every
Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday
15% Discount
on ali food items
Just show your student I.D.
1319 Robson St.
Vancouver BC
669-1319
Open Face Kitchen
Wood Burning
Ovens
November 22,1991
Corner of Robson & Jervis
THE UBYSSEY/5 Caustic Jello word concert
fey Paul Dayson
ONE might describe it as
black comedy, as the
laughter ensues.
But the man on the
stage is talking about black
reality and the jokes are
real events related to the
audience by Jello Biafra.
He is not a comic, he is
serious as he talks about
racism, the religious right,
censorship, militarism and
ties them together into a
frightening portrayal of the
halls of power in the United
States.
SPOKEN WORD
Jello Biafra
SUB Auditorium
November 26
Biafra is perhaps best
known as the singer for the
California punk band the
Dead Kennedys. Since the
group disbanded in 1986
Biafra has been engaged in
"spoken word" tours talking
about the dark side of
America.
It was in 1986 that
Biafra faced charges for
"distributing matter
harmful to minors" for a
print of surrealist painter H.
R. Gige^s Penis Landscape
enclosed in a Dead Kennedys
album. According to Biafra,
Penis Landscape lampoons
America's conformist consumer culture in which some
people are all intent on
"screwing each other in more
than one way."
Biafra's spoken word
projects, his performances
and three double albums,
continue to provide a witty
unique form of social commentary. It will have you
laughing on one side of your
face and twitching nervously, waiting for the tap of
the police state, on the other.
\j tbe daI^L aMa*c .
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By Harald Gravelains
THERE is enough vitality in
Judith Thompson's script
for two or more good shows in the
hands of another playwright.
Touchstone Theatre Company
serves up the energy of this
script in its entirety. What
happened that we should be
treated to such rampaging
theatrical brilliance?
THEATRE
Lion in the Streets
Firehall Arts Centre
until December 8
For one thing, Roy Surette is
back in the director's chair at
Touchstone ^rit-r a sabbatical
that took him to Europe for a
year.
Actually, even in Surette's
absence Touchstone continued to
provide among the best alternative theatre in Vancouver in
terms of arti?tic and social
sensibility and uncompromising
production values—this whether
or not the rest ofthe theatre
establishment cared to notice.
(The refusal of even a single
nomination for Touchstone's
1991 stag*— ^Unidentified
Human Remains or the True
Nature of J^»e ander director
Bonnie Gibson disgraced the
1991 Jessies, a theatre awards
competition.)
For another, Thompson's
script is still comparatively hot
off the presses, and still flushed
with the honour of winning the
1991 Chalmers Award for
Outstanding New Play.
Even with the inevitable passage
of time, it is difficult to conceive
of Thompson's plays becoming
anything close to stuffy. They
simply have too much bite.
Lion in the Streets is nominally held tocher by the visit of
the spirit of a murdered girl
named Isobel to her family's
urban Toronto neighbourhood.
Nominalism has nothing to do
with Suzanne Ristic's fine
performance in the omniscient (if
self-deluded) role ofthe girl. Age
and ethnicity seem to pose no
obstacles for Ristic's abilities.
(The mind boggles at the sort of
banter that takes place at home
between Ristic and multi-
accented, multi-sided husband-
actor Jay Brazeau.)
Rather, the intensity ofthe
script coalesces often without
Isobel. This forestalls the girl's
recurring narrative from
establishing any sort of foundational coherence for the interaction that unfolds.
It does not take anything
away from the effectiveness of
the other performances. Without
exception, each member of the
cast manages to knock the
breath out of us with the cut-
and-thrust dialogue that is the
cachet of a Thompson script.
In these sharp exchanges, which
come upon us rapidly and
without warning, Thompson
defies us to face our lives
without our accustomed pretensions. These are moments that
simultaneously explode and
implode before us.
One ofthe themes explored in
the play is the struggle of
defining the meaning of shared
experience. A woman attempts
desperately to resurrect the
sensuality in her crumbling
marriage despite her husband's
infidelity. A day-care instructor
stands up against yuppie-
puritan parents for rewarding
their kids' good behaviour with
candy. A cancer victim (Wendy
Noel) is derided by her friend for
requesting assistance to commit
suicide by reenacting what she
takes to be the beautifully tragic
drowning of Shakespeare's Ophelia, complete
with flowers.
One ofthe strongest scenes in the show has
Lani Mclnnes playing the role of Scarlett, a
woman afflicted by multiple sclerosis, against
Tamsin Kelsey as a journalist. Scarlett turns
against Kelsey's patronizing and opportunistic
concern for her apparent inability to enjoy life
with bawdy assertions of lust and independence.
Another incredible scene has Guillermo
Verdecchia and James Fagan Tait as two men
meeting after a separation that has lasted their
entire adult lives.
They relive an experience of innocent,
youthful eroticism that is unforgettable and
oppressive to one, but only now remembered
yet cherished by the other. "Free me from your
memory," Verdecchia's character demands to no
avail.
One experience, two memories. Two conflicting memories that grip upon and struggle
against the other. The events that give meaning and shape to our lives are understood
differently by those who shared the moments
with us.
This assures our lives will not fall into
place neatly or spontaneously, contrary to our
hopes and fantasies. In this, there is despair
but also humour and creative possibility.
Thompson sets up her scenes so efficiently
that she doesn't need to make many concessions to theatrical conventions of plot and
character development in order to get across
her vision. She needs no time at all to take her
characters from an introduction to the guts of
an issue.
The downside of such acuity is that it
facilitates neglecting the audience's desire for
cues indicating where the script is headed.
Without a convincing structure to carry it,
the script tends to become a series of vignettes,
a disjointed showcase, however brilliant, rather
than coherent, unified piece of work.
Under Surette's direction, the various scenes
glide gracefully from one to the other. But there
seems to be no clear reason why the play does
not follow a different sequence. I found this
randomness annoying.
Maybe Thompson wants us to meet her half
way and work out our own ideas on how the
script holds together. I felt ambivalent about
this sort of tack. Still, the show is well worth
seeing.
A slightly twisted comedy.
ii
WONDERFULLY APPEALING,
DARKLY FUNNY!
An exceptional film!"
-Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE
"A HILARIOUS
DEADPAN FARCE!
Hartley has firmly established
himself as a filmmaker
with a unique vision of the
absurdities of life!"
-Joe Leydon, THE HOUSTON POST
A Rim by HAL HARTLEY
ZENITH in auociolion with TRUE FICTION POMES presents A Film by HAL HAFTLEY TRUST
Wiih ADRJBNE SHELLY MARTIN DONOVAN MERRITT NELSON EDIKLCO IOHNMcKAY
Cinematographer MICHAEL SP1LER Production Designer DAN OUELLETTE
^gt. Executive Producer IER0MEBR0WNSTEIN Producer BRUCE WEISS
I±^ Written & Directed by HAL HARTLEY
Occasional very coarse and suggestive language
** ^^^^^f^^ri^
i Penman St. (at Barclay) •
ONE
WEEK
ONLY
7:30 & 9:30
SATURDAY MIDNIGHT:
Angel heroes, 1940s glitter
By Sharlene Azam
LOS ANGELES, the romantic and mysterious 1940s,
intrigue, deception, sensual
shimmering blondes, the detective hero and, of course, the
alluring femme fatale are all
part ofthe plot ofthe Broadway
musical City of Angels.
THEATRE
City of Angels
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
until November 30
City of Angels focuses on
young screen writer Stine
(Stephan Bogardus) and Stone
(Jeff McCarthy), his fictional
detective and alter-ego.
It glides cinematically from
colour to black and white, from
the glitzy intrigue of a Hollywood
studio to the film noir landscape
ofthe writer's imagination.
The character Stine lacks
integrity as a writer and as a
person. However, Bogardus plays
this inadequacy to an extreme,
which is unbelievable and
uncomfortable to watch.
Wisecracking McCarthy cuts
a fabulous Bogart-like Shamus in
his trench with the collar turned
up and with his hat pulled low
over his eyes.
McCarthy's portrayal ofthe
barely surviving private eye out
to make an "honest" buck is true
to the world of Cecil B. DeMille
and Raymond Chandler. He is
the hard-nosed detective whose
only weakness is the sexy femme
fatale able to match him drink
for drink, cigarette for cigarette,
wisecrack for wisecrack.
Charles Levine as the cigar-
smoking, fast-talking big wig
Hollywood producer, Irwin S.
Irving, is magnificent. He is
twinkle-toes Flintstone, delicately prancing down the stage
only to floor us with his ten-
pound bowling ball.
Catherine Cox plays dual
roles. She is the producer's
assistant and Stone's celluloid
secretary. In both roles, she is
the commonsense, "you can count
on me" kind of woman. But, what
Cox does supremely is pine for
Stone without exaggeration
while being his right-hand
woman.
Cox also gives a fabulous
performance with Gabby (Leslie
Denniston), Stine's love interest
in the song "What You Don't
Know About Women."
Alaura Kingsley (Lauren
Mitchell) is the femme fatale.
Mitchell turns heads with her
strong sensual performance as
the woman with a secret.
Tli^ rL~st act ofthe play is
thrilling. The acting combined
with the special effects enhances
the simultaneous unfolding of
the "reel" Hollywood film and the
"real" Hollywood story.
Big Band swing, group
vocal? "   lhy pop with naughty
innuendos composed by Cy
Coleman are sumptuously
orchestrated by Bill Byers.
While Act One moves at an
exhilarating pace, Act Two is
slower. Although the mystery is
solved ->":4:h appropriate tension,
surprise and of course humour,
the Hoiij v> ood ending is hardly
satisfying.
Upcoming Films:
Friday-Sunday (Nov 2224)
7:00 ALIENS
9:30 TOTAL RECALL
Wednesday-Thursday (Nov 27 &28)
7:00 BONNIE AND CLYDE
9:30 CASABLANCA
Next Week: DANCES WITH WOLVES & HOT SHOTS
MJLMA
SCCIETV
All Screenings are in the SUB Theatre
FRI-SUN SHOWS $3.00 WED-THURS SHOWS $2.5C
Call for 24 hour recorded info: 822-3697
Daily-   2:00 4:257:00 9:30        Evenings - 7:05 9:25
Additional Show Fri/Sat-11:45 pm Mats. Sat./ Sun. - 2:05
DUNBAR 8, 30lh AVE
RICHMOND
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Evenings - 7:00  9:30
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ARTS   FARTS
6/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1991
November 22,1991
THE UBYSSEY/7 PAGE WEEKEND
Scorsese's Cape Fear frustrates audience
fey Michael Gazetas
DO people need
faith as part of their
system of behaviour to
survive in an absurd North
American society?
For the sake of
argument I will define
faith as the quality people
see in themselves that
gives them the strength to
overcome adversity.
In a nutshell, this is
the central theme in Cape
Fear, the eagerly awaited
project from acclaimed
New York director Martin
Scorsese, which tries to
illustrate how fractured
and fragile North American society really is by
hammering home an
updated version ofthe
biblical story of Job.
Nick Nolte is Sam
Bowden, or the modern-
day Job, a man fated to
sacrifice his reputation as
a respected lawyer in
order to defend his family
from a vicious mad-dog
rapist, Max Cady.
FILM
Cape Fear
now playing
Played by Robert De
Niro, Cady is the kind of
guy who likes to convince
everyone else that he is
god but knows he is not the
genuine article.
Counter-balancing the
central question of faith is
the selfishness Bowden
demonstrates as he refuses
to make the sacrifice
necessary to deny Cady's
prophesy from materializing. Fate acts like the
fulcrum as Sam's lack of
faith weakens his family
and beliefs, allowing Cady
the opportunity to strike.
Unfortunately, it is not
worth sitting through
Scorsese's bombastic film,
complete with his trademark sexual Catholic
overtones, to discover his
unique point of view on the
intriguing questions raised
by this strong story.
From the over-bearing
theme music to the
opening and closing images
of a woman's face, presented in negative rather
than positive form, the film
reeks of a pretentiousness
that Scorsese should know
better than to fall prey to.
An obvious example is
his decision to over-use an
intruding camera technique, probing forward like
a male proboscis. It
becomes tiresome and
eventually parodies itself.
These and other shots
are now becoming stale
after being high-graded
repeatedly by Brian De
Palma in such schlock
thrillers as Body Double.
Where is the fresh and
vigorous filmmaking that
was brimming over in
Goodfellas?
Another problem is
that Jessica Lange and
newcomer Juliette Lewis,
cast in the roles of
Bowdin's wife Leigh and
his daughter Danielle, are
not given enough screen
time to offset the wretchedness of Sam and the pure
evil of Cady.
Both women are
strong characters and it is
essential the audience has
the chance to sympathize
with the major players as
they confront Cady.
Since Sam is easy to
dislike, Scorsese runs into
difficulties as the audience
begins to lose their ability
to root for the family as a
whole.
It is interesting that
both women are ready to
sacrifice themselves in
defence of the family while
Sam is incapable of any
kind of personal sacrifice;
he behaves more like a
wounded dog who all of a
sudden loses his meaty
bone.
It is impossible for any
film to keep up the pace
Cape Fear sets. Like a
marathon athlete who goes
out too fast in the beginning ofthe race, the film
stumbles and can't reach
the finish line. What a
shame the subtlety needed
to discuss some ofthe
story's important thematic
questions is absent.
You're Invited to our
CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION
PAY
Wednesday, Nov 27,1991
at both of our stores:
Enjoy refreshments and Christmas treats
while taking advantage of the savings...
it's our way of saying "THANKS!"
While shopping, enter our special gift draw
prize donated by Travel Cuts.
Exemptions: Coursebooks, computer hardware
and software, postal items, and special orders.
ft
2750 Heather Street
Vancouver, B.C. VSZ 4M2
TEL (604) 879-8547
TOLL FREE
(BC) 1-800-665-7119
FAX (604) 879-7613
HOURS
Mon-Sat 9:30 am - 5 pm
Cape
commentary
by Harald Gravelsins
VIOLENCE is a
personal and
institutional issue.
Reviewers of Cape
Fear have been quick
to respond on an
individual level to
Hollywood's glossy
depiction of three
women being victimized by a rapist.
They have been
disappointingly
unresponsive to the
institutional issue of
inadequate or nonexistent social and legal
safeguards for all
women in a culture of
violence against
women.
One ofthe things
Cape Fear does, is
make something of a
case in favour of a rape
shield law. Such a law
keeps a rape victim's
sexual history out of
the court room.
Its intention is to
focus the attention of
the legal system on the
alleged aggressor, not
on his victim. Survivors are usually
reluctant to proceed
with charges without
such a safeguard.
Last month,
Canada's Supreme
Court struck down the
rape shield law. It will
be some months before
an alternative is
devised that can pass
the constitutional
requirements ofthe
Charter of Rights and
Freedoms. Canadian
women have been
rendered more vulnerable in the meantime.
In Cape Fear,
defense attorney Sam
Bowden improvised his
own rape shield law by
deferring the rights of
his rapist client, Max
Cady, to the interests
ofthe rape survivor.
Contrary to an
explicit professional
obligation to his client,
Bowden buries a report
establishing the
promiscuity ofthe
woman, thereby
spurring the system to
incarcerate a man for
14 years who could
have otherwise been
aquitted.
While serving his
sentence Cady finds
out Bowden had taken
justice into his own
hands, so to speak.
Cady's vengeful and
predatory response is
the basis of the film.
But there is more
to Cape Fear than the
characters of Bowden
and Cady, or director
Martin Scorsese for
that matter. Analyses
should not be restricted
to the plight ofthe
individual when it is
obvious that social and
political institutions
are called into question
and found tragically
wanting.
8/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1991 warn
2L.ZU
Basketbirds
limp into
season
by Charles Nho
Itpromisedtobe afine Canada
West basketball season for the
UBC Thunderbirds.
Last year's All-Canadian
shooting guard J.D. Jackson was
returning after averaging a CIAU
high 27.1 points per game. The
return of forward Mike Clarke
added much needed size and
muscle underneath the basket.
Derek Christiansen, in his
third year, looked like he could
play the power forward position
while keeping defenders honest
with his outside shot which fell in
at a rate of 61.6 per cent—tops on
the team.
The improvement of sophomore guard Jason Pamer and fellow Richmond High grad Brian
Tait offered the T-birds a real
chance at the national title which
they had not won since 1972.
But injuries have affected the
men's team and contributed to two
losses at the University of
Saskatchewan last weekend.
Clarke, the tallest player on
the team, is out for the season with
a torn anterior cruciate ligament
in his left knee. Without the board
crasher, the rebounding will be
left to a front line consisting of
6'5"-6'6" players.
Mononucleosis, meanwhile,
will keep Pamer out of action indefinitely.
UBC head coach Bruce Enns
does not think the results in
Saskatoon were an indication of
how the team can be expected to
perform this season.
Leading for most of both
games, they simply let down defensively or suffered poor shot selections, and came away with two
L's, the second of which went to
overtime.
With the nation's leading
scorer playing in the backcourt,
UBC's offence should carry them
to many victories.
Enns is counting on, however,
a balanced production coming from
both the "inside" and "outside."
Jackson has attempted 206
shots in 140 games played. With
bombs coming and hitting from
the perimeter, it should clear the
way for some easier points from
the paint area.
The key is transition. Last
year, Al Lalonde finished off a lot
of breaks coming off opponent
misses. This year, the combination could be Jackson to Tait or
vice versa. Tait led the team in
assists for the past two seasons
and needs to feed the low post or
find the open man again this year
from his point guard position.
UBC plays at War Memorial
this Friday and Saturday at 7:45
against the University of Calgary.
The Dinosaurs' Ian Minifee
drained 50 pointsin a game against
Lethbridge a week ago.
• The women's game goes at 6pm.
Don't you hate it when you're riding along just after it's rained and a single drop falls off a leaf just as
you're coming down the way and whapMt hits you in the eyeball? Those really hurt.
PAUL GORDON PHOTO
Bud Kanke, CA President. Kanke Seafood Restaurant Lid.
The restaurant business for many is an expensive
lesson in risk management. Not so for Bud Kanke.
In 1971. with a $900 savings balance, Bud and several
partners gave Vancouver diners the city's first upmarket
seafood experience. The Cannery.
Mulvaney's followed in 1975. Seafood with a dash
of Southern spice. Viva in 1979. A classic supper club. In
1984, The Ninth Ave. Fishmarket. Then Joe Fortes, in
1985. Seafood downtown style.
The menu grows. And now Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd., with some 300 employees, reels in annual
sales of nearly $10 million.
Along the way, Bud Kanke has earned
the deserved reputation of a man with the skills
to transform the most modest opportunities into
prize catches.
He credits his CA for providing him the base to
develop his entrepreneurial strengths. "It gives me discipline ... going by instinct is one thing, but there's merit
in managing with good, sound numbers'.'
Bud Kanke. CA with a string of seafood restaurant
successes.
If you think a future in chartered accountancy
would serve your career ambitions, write the Institute of
Chartered Accountants of B.C.
Our standards are higher.
Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
1133 Melville Street. Vancouver. B.C. V6E 4E5
Telephone: (604)681 -326-1 Toll-free 1-800-663-2677
BudKankdsCA
helped him acquire
his taste in seafood.
HELP LINES:
Peer support line: 822-3700
Student counselling: 822-4326
Women Students Office: 822-2415
Student Health: 822-7011
Vancouver Crisis Line (24 hrs.):
733-7111
yitimy
Oiarlcriwf
ViouiiLaiiJ
of British
Columbia
November 22,1991
THE UBYSSEY/9 Wreck Beach
or bust
Fifteen hours of classes, 45 hours of study,
work 18 hours, six hours cleaning the house
and buying groceries. Three essays and one
presentation to do for this week and exams are
coming soon. Rent is due, the phone bill just
arrived, your bank account is suffering from
withdrawal, you're wearing your last clean
pair of socks for the second day. You are the
victim of time management deficiency syndrome.
The best cure: a reading week. UBC should
implement some time offin November as well
as February to help relieve academic pressure.
Most universities in Canada provide a break.
Face it—school isn't like a nine-to-five job.
Labs, tutorials and regular classes fill our
days while our nights are spent preparing
papers and doing required reading. There is
no escape. Inevitably you will have a few hell
weeks. In this case, don't hesitate to speak to
professors—even one extension might help.
There is little time for personal problems,
proper health care, a social life, or just plain
living—all of which build up and become
magnified and distracting.
Some students are away from home for the
first time, isolated from the comfort and support of family, friends, and a familiar environment. Many feel the pressure of family
expectations to excel, as well as personal challenges.
The combination of all these pressures and
problems signify the need for a reading break.
But until we get one, try putting things in
perspective.
Get a little existential—what will all this
matter in ten years?
Prioritize goals, making sure they are realistic. Leave time for recreational activities
and exercise. A healthy body fosters a healthy
mind. Re-examine study habits, take the occasional break, eat properly and get lots of
rest.
Check out Wreck Beach and see who's still
naked. Get off campus and bike ride around
Vancouver. Go for day trips up the mountains.
Sit around and talk with friends. Read something that you've been waiting to read. Do a
paint-by-number. Be spontaneous...and use
your imagination.
i 1
theUbyssey
November 22, 1991
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The editorial office is room 241K ofthe Student
Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 822-2301;
advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadian University Press
MARK NIELSEN, MARK NIELSEN, MARK NIELSEN!!! Where have you
been this millenium? Never fear, Effie Pow is here to fill our days with
musical fish. Did it feed the multitudes? While we ponder this question,
yossarian King ought to exert his omnipotence before his Kniggettes get too
plain silly. (Just joking.) All hell brokeloose until Rick Hiebert wheezed and,
pick-axing his way thru the outer reaches of Heaven, found Dianne Rudolf
standing on her head. Sharon Lindores' nasal passages are not to be messed
with, or face the wrath of her mother. Harold Gravel sins bought us all tiny
tims to commemorate the fall of man. It was all just a funky vision for Charles
Nho, who examined his nails for earthly goods and possible lacerations. "All
dear," Sam Green proclaimed, "And I dont take bribes, either. "Which really
put a wrench in Tanya Paz's prophesy. Paul Dayson. Gawd, he looks likehcll.
Raul Peschiera contends that any action is morally right; neither he nor
Michael Gazettes winces at the thought of consuming roast human flesh.
Stress management programmes are being implemented here at Morality
Asylum before Sharlene, Martin Chester, and Paul Gordon meet their inner
selves. Do you suppose Cheryl Niamath would consider sacrificing Europe
for Editor? Searchingforthe answer, Chung Wang drank ofthe stream oflife
and found only more questions. "Damn. I hate that." Carla Maftechuk
shrugged and decided to move before outaide forces took over the job. Mike
Mushroom Coury*s best spiritual performance was his recitation of the
Trumpet ofthe Swan. The world is too much with us, late and soon.
Editors
Paul Dayson  • Sharon Undores  •  Carta Maftechuk
Raul Peschiera  •  Effle Pow
Photo editor • Paul Gordon
-XX£    ~g>A^K-   OP jAoOtEtS^--
MTT>   A*   "RZJ^G-   JZl\>MC  (J&^O
Letters
Logical?
We think not
First, a big thank-you to
Dave Wareham for his letter
of November 5th, regarding
Frances Foran's "clever
CHOICE of words" in the
front-page article ofthe October 22nd edition of the
Ubyssey. I only wish I could
have said it first; I certainly
coul d not have said it better.
Secondly, as a long-time
Vernon resident, I feel I must
address Christine Pryce's
remarks about the Vernon
Hospital Board. They have,
indeed, "abolished a
woman's right to choose
abortion even in the case of
rape," although as a Pro-Life
supporter, myself, I question
the use of the word "right."
Through a few phone calls
home, I have discovered
an interesting fact as to why
the Hospital Board made
such a choice. Previous to the
implementation of this
policy, the Board sought the
top legal advice in the province and were warned ofthe
possible legal ramifications
of deciding amongst themselves who could and who
could not have an abortion.
Being Pro-Life, they merely
followed their moral instincts. This is, after all, only
logical. They cannot legitimately be chided for behaving responsibly. I would be
interested in seeing more
letters on this issue.
Heather Magusin
Psychology 2
We see the
light
"56 Reasons Not to Support the Reform party" could
perhaps be listed. But why?
What the Reform Party's
presence in the political
scene represents to me is the
disgruntled satisfaction the
Canadian electorate has
with the traditional political
parties in this country.
Canada is in the midst of a
tumultuous period, but I see
it as only a period, not the
inevitable denouement of
this tragically grand country. On all accounts it appears the country is falling
apart. The recent constitutional proposal which is
up for referendum indicates
i^-r/LHf^-
/
■;S2.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but It is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
just this. Not to mention the
discontentment of the Quebecois, the disaffection ofthe
native peoples., and virtually
every other minority group
in Canada. But there is a
light at the end of the tunnel, for when I attend lectures or discussions on the
future of Canada I see caring
Canadians who genuinely
want to understand other
perspectives and other
people's needs. Sometimes it
may appear that every
"group" is out for its own
interests...but I think this is
short sighted. Solutions to
Canada's problems will inevitably be complex and
multi faceted. Yet solutions
will only be reached through
discourse and the sharing of
ideas. We all must educate
ourselves on the issues, voice
our opinions and listen
compassionately to others.
We must, if we still want to
listen to Gord's The Railroad
Trilogy with a tinge of wonder.
Fitzgerald
Arts 4
Whip us with a
wet noodle
The article on page one of
the November first issue of
the Ubyssey entitled "UBC
professor outraged by engineers act of intimidation"
was not impartially written.
While one would not condone the behaviour of the
students described, The
Ubyssey article is intensely
anti engineer. The article
also contains factual errors.
The article states, "As
(the UBC faculty member)
walked away from the man,
she heard a water balloon
pass her head and explode
about two feet behind her."
If the water balloon passed
her head as she was walking
away from the student who
allegedly threw it, how could
it burst behind her?
In any case, the incident
was not directed by "the engineers" against women, as
was suggested by the article.
Rather, a single individual,
who was probably drunk,
was spotted by someone who
happened to be female.
Even if it had been a man
who had seen the student
and asked for his student
card, a water balloon might
still have been thrown.
I am disappointed by the
lack of objectivity of this article. It contains one factual
inaccuracy, and suggests the
event was an "act of intimidation" by engineers against
women. One engineer does
not represent all engineers.
I hope you improve the accuracy of your reporting in the
future.
Tabe Johnson
Applied Science
Blah, blah,
another
damn rant
Blah, blah, blah. Trivial
point about the state of
Canada. Blah, blah, non-
homourous anecdote, blah.
Blah, big word, big word; I
mean, condescending little
word, little word, long
drawn-out explanation.
Blah, blah, BOO
SOCREDS!!! Bums, all of
them. Big word, big word,
meaningless explanation of
government fiscal policy.
Damn good thing they're
gone. Blah blah. Sudden
revelation. YEA NDP!!!
Enter dream sequence- little
word, little word, little
word...preach to
unconverted masses. Don't
you get it yet; why must I
waste my time on you?
Blah, blah, proletariat,
blah, blah working classes.
Exploitation, blah, blah.
Where will it end? Bourgeoisie, blah, yech, evil- not
paying taxes (start foaming
at mouth). Blah blah,
dammit blah.
What's-it-doing-here?
Reference to Green Party.
Pathway to salvation.
Blah, blah, blah. DOWN
WITH BIG BUSINESS!!!
Blah, blah (restrained glee),
raise taxes- make them pay!
Blah, blah, blah; am I boring
you yet? YEA NDP!!! Fresh
blood, fresh ideas. Hollow
fact, empty promise, blah,
blah, blah.
Earth WILL be saved; the
sunll come out tomorrow.
Won't it be great?
Rob McGowan (substituting this week for
John Lipscomb, MBA)
MBA O.never
Shame on us?
This letter is in response
to The Ubyssey's editorial-
style apology regarding The
Roxys Halloween ad that
ran on October 29,1991. The
ad in question was designed
by me, yet no one from the
Ubyssey has made an attempt to contact me.
If anyone had bothered
to call, they would have
discovered that I, too, am
completely opposed to blatant sexism and violence
against women. Therefore,
I was shocked to discover
the way in which some
people interpreted this ad.
This was not our intention.
This was a Halloween ad.
The original picture to be
used was of amale bartender
with similar make-up as the
Marilyn Monroe look-alike,
but the exposure was too
dark and could not be reproduced. Therefore, we
substituted the picture that
eventually ran in the paper.
If the photo ofthe male
bartender had been used,
would the same attention
and controversy have
erupted? Or if we had used
another Halloween icon,
such as the devil, would you
have suggested that we are
Satanists?
The photo that ran in the
ad was not of a "blood spattered" or "battered" woman
as you suggested. If you had
investigated this issue, you
would know that the theme
of the costume was of a decomposing Marilyn Monroe,
coming back from the grave.
The costume was de-
signedby a woman and worn
by a woman, the photograph
was taken by a woman, the
ad designed by two women,
and eventually accepted by
a woman sales representative at The Ubyssey.
Shame on you, Ubyssey.
I think your readership expects a more professional
approach to journalism.
Cheryl Worobetz
Senior Account
Executive
The Georgia Straight
The Ubyssey runs all
letters submitted
provided they are not
racist, sexist or
homophobic, typed and
are under 300 words.
| CORRECTION: In the referendum article ofthe November 19 issue, the proposed levy ofthe first question was $8.50 not $15, and quorum was 5,030 not 2,874. |
10/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1991 LETTSfcS/OP-ED
Are you racist?
Not a week has gone by since
September that there isn't a
letter in the Ubyssey on racism.
Obviously, it is a hot and emotional issue, and one which
needs to be addressedin an open
and honest manner. Racism is
woven within the very moral
fibre of Canadian society. Many
people discriminate against
others without knowing it, ig-
norantly so, because it is so
much a part ofthe culture.
Others, knowingly and deliberately, discriminate, while
subtly pretending not to do so.
Some want to change their attitudes; others do not, while
feeling quite comfortable with
their racist attitudes.
In order to change, one
must be made aware of their
prejudicial attitudes, be honest
enough to admit them, and then
make a conscious effort to
change.
Below are a list of questions
asking, how prejudiced are you?
You be the judge of your own
behaviour.
Do you......
feel uncomfortable if you are
in a group and a person not of
your race comes over to talk to
you? Do you find an excuse to
move away? Are you afraid that
person will want to become your
friend, so you put up aninvisible
barrier?
shun people from groups who
have been historically discriminated against, such as
Blacks and First Nations people,
because you are afraid to be labeled yourself?
think your own race is superior? inferior? why?
value/devalue what some people
say because of their race, religion,
or colour?
have friends from different
races? If you had the opportunity
to do so, would you?
treat people differently (more
negatively) than those of your own
race?
think educated people are more/
less prejudiced than others? How
Perspective
so? Are you?
think prejudice and discrimination is a moral/amoral, issue?
think it is better to ignore your
own prejudices, or admit them and
try to change?
Do you	
think those being discriminated
against can detect it, however
subtle, or do you think they are
just being overly sensitive?
think prejudice and intolerance
is on the increase/decrease in BC?
on campus? in Canada?
think racism at UBC reflects
the racial climate in society, and
vice versa?
feel that you should have more
rights and privilegesin society than
other races? Why?
see all people as belonging to
the one human race, or do you
have a "we-they" mentality?
If you	
were sitting at a table
studying or eating and a person
not of your race sat down, would
you eventually find a reason to
go, without making it look too
obvious?
were in a group and you see
a person you know, not of your
race, nearby, do you invite them
to come join in? If the person
joined without being asked,
would they feel welcome? Would
you include them in the conversation?
Would you	
equate prejudice with hatred?
be reluctant to take home a
person of another race?
Why/Why not?
What do you think may
cause people to discriminate?
Have you ever been discriminated against? What did
you do about it? How did you
feel?
How do you feel after you
have discriminated against
someone?
What are you doing to stem
the tide of racism, or do you
care?
Maxine Madden
Education
The Ubyssey
pointing fingers?
I was saddened and disappointed when I saw your editorial
"This is an apology". I am one of
the women responsible for the creation ofthe controversial Halloween ad. Not only does your editorial misrepresent our intentions,
but I cannot understand why you
published this "apology" without
ever speaking with any of the responsible parties.
For the record, the photo ofthe
Marilyn Monroe look- alike was
not intended in any way to reinforce "the stereotype of woman as
victim", and we did not deliberately
create this pose to best exemplify
our Halloween perspective. Our
ads...in print and on radio... are
often deliberately tongue in cheek,
and our print ads originate from
photos from our archives...of actual
patrons at actual events in the
club. The offending picture was of
a former staff member, who chose
to attend the 1990 "Hollywood
Halloween" party as "Marilyn
Monroe come back from the grave":
her body was supposed to be decomposing. By designing and
wearing this costume, she seems
to have seen nothing degrading
about it, and appears guilty of only
exercising her own freedom of
choice.
Furthermore, this photo was
not actually our first choice for the
Halloween ad. We had a photo of
one of our male bartenders, dressed
up as an "accident victim", which
we were originally going to use...
thinking it a good example of a
"scary" Halloween costume. However, the photo itself was too dark,
and would not reproduce well in
print. Therefore, we went to option
B... the Marilyn photo.
If this ad has been construed as
a promotion ofthe image of women
as victims, I apologize on behalf of
the Roxy for this misunderstanding. I hope you can see that was
certainly not the intent of my female colleague at the Georgia
Straight or myself: the two people
responsible for the creative development of the ad.
I also question the self-righteous tone of your statement in the
editorial the "The Ubyssey will
send a letter to the advertiser stating that such sexist, derogatory
ads, and ads that feature such
violentimages, will not be accepted
for publication". As of this writing,
we have not received such a letter,
and as far as I know, no one here
has been contacted regarding either the content of that ad, or of
our future advertising. When it
comes to jeopardizing the continued flow of advertising dollars from
a regular client, it seems the
Ubyssey's bark is bigger than its
bite.
If you wish to campaign against
the presentation of women as victims, perhaps you should discover
the intent ofthe so-called "offending" parties before you start
pointing fingers.
Carol Schram
Advertising and Promotions
The Roxy Cabaret
Ed. The Ubyssey has since sent a
letter to The Roxy Cabaret explaining our new ad policies.
You've read it!
Now write it!
AMS WORD PROCESS! vH
WILL DOIT FOR YOU!
Essays and theses
... the formats you require, including APA AND..
Merge Letters • Letters • Mailing Lists
Typing on Forms
So don't sweat it... give us a call or drop in.
ROOM 60, STUDENT UNION BUILDING
822-5640
Extended Hours: Monday to Friday • 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM
MIQACLES PEPJOPMED
UPON QEQUE&T
November 22,1991
THE UBYSSEY/11 Canadians are currently discussing
proposals for the
renewal of the
Canadian federation.
The 28 proposals
contained in the document entitled, "Shaping
Canada's Future Together^',
are summarized below
to help you join in the
discussion.
DEFINING
"CANADIAN"
Proposals 1 to 7 deal
with what it means to be
Canadian. They include:
♦ reaffirmation of the
rights and freedoms of
citizens
♦ a "Canada clause"
in the Constitution that
speaks of our hopes and
dreams as Canadians,
our values, our diversity,
our tolerance and our
generosity of spirit
"4> a provision for aboriginal participation in the
current constitutional
talks
"#> a provision for aboriginal self-government
♦ a provision for a
constitutional process
for aboriginal issues
♦ recognition of
Quebec's distinctiveness
and Canada's linguistic
duality
♦ protection of property
rights.
MAKING
GOVERNMENT
MORE RESPONSIVE
Proposals 8 to 13 are
aimed at making federal
institutions more democratic and more responsive to Canadians. This
section proposes:
♦ reform of the House
of Commons
*#> an elected, effective
and much more equitable Senate than the one
we have now
♦ Senate approval of
appointments to regulatory boards and agencies.
♦ ensure a more open
and visible budget-
making process
# provide more
regional input into the
Bank of Canada, which
sets monetary policy
ABOUT
CONSTITUTIONAL
REFORM
HERE ARE
Tl I Wm fll .fW11^1^'
IN BLACK & WHITE
THE WAY TO A
MORE PROSPEROUS
FUTURE
The purpose of proposals
14 to 28 is to make Canada
a better-run country,
more competitive internally and internationally.
They are designed to
make it easier for
Canadians to live where
they choose, as they
choose, within their own
country. These proposals
would:
♦ ensure the free movement of people, goods,
services and capital
within Canada
♦ provide for cooperation with the provinces
in managing the economic union
# recognize training
as an area of exclusive
provincial jurisdiction
# provide for negotiations with provinces,
at their request, of
appropriate cultural
responsibilities
# ensure that provinces
are consulted on the
issuing of new licences
and in the nomination
of regional commissioners to the Canadian
Radio-television and
Telecommunications
Commission (CRTC)
"#> recognize exclusive
provincial jurisdiction
in a number of areas,
including forestry and
mining, tourism and
recreation, housing and
municipal affairs, while
maintaining the federal
government's responsibilities for international
and native affairs
4> provide for the delegation of legislative
powers between Parliament and the provincial
legislatures
♦ streamline programs
and services so that
Canadians are provided
the best service at the
lowest possible cost
# provide for agreement of the provinces
when the federal government establishes any new
Canada-wide shared cost
or conditional programs
in areas of exclusive
provincial jurisdiction;
the approval of seven
provinces representing
50% of the population
of Canada would be
required.
To receive more information on the proposals
and the process, or for
your free copy of
the document "Shaping
Canada's Future
Together", call toll-free:
1-800-56 l-l 188
~\
Deaf or hearing impaired call:
1-800-567-1992
Get involved. It's your
country. It's your right.
Canada
Shaping Canada's Future Together
12/THE UBYSSEY
November 22,1991

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