UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 27, 1970

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126176.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126176.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126176-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126176-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126176-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126176-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126176-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126176-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126176-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126176.ris

Full Text

Array Bomb causes $400 damage in Brock.
—doug canning photo
Brock Hall second target of mysterious bomber
It was a hell of a weekend. Even Brock Hall was
bombed.
For the second time in a month a bomb exploded
causing considerable damage to a UBC building.
The first explosion, Jan. 9, destroyed a heat
register and damaged a wall in the south vestibule of
the mathematics building, causing $600 damage.
The second explosion, Friday, blew out a heat
register in Brock Hall 304, causing $400 damage.
RCMP are continuing an investigation but are not
making any of their findings public.
"The circumstances of time and nature of the
explosive devices, and locations where they were set
off are more than pure coincidence," said RCMP Sgt.
George Strathde.
Both bombings were detonated on a Friday at
approximately 7:30 p.m.
Both bombings were set off behind heat radiators.
Strathde gave no indication of possible motives
behind the bombings.
A security patrol spokesman said an increase in
security precautions is probable but with over 200
buildings on campus policing will be difficult.
Said UBC information director Arnie Myers: "The
last thing we want to do is to lock up available study
space when there is such a shortage of it compared to
the need."
Page 2:     Will the AMS cease to exist?
Page 3:     Trials and tribulations ot a day care
centre
Page 7:     Life in UBC residences
Page 8:     An exciting new co-op housing plan
Vol. LI, No. 28
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1970
228-2305
English tenure conflict escalates
By JOHN ANDERSEN and JOHN TWIGG
Two of the six assistant English profs refused
tenure by the English department have had their cases
elevated to the arts faculty tenure committee for
judgment.
The two, Brian Mayne and David Powell,refused an
offer by the department that their cases be reviewed in
two years. They were hired five years ago on the basis
of tenure consideration after seven years, but since
then, the university has changed the probationary
period to five years.
The other four accepted the two-year extension.
"The eventual decision will reflect whether we
want a teaching or publishing university," said
associate English prof Keith Alldritt, spokesman for
Mayne and Powell.
"In this case, both are brilliant
teachers," he said.
The six assistant profs were
originally judged by the English
department promotion and tenure
committee, which has three
sub-committees for each rank of
professors.
"The six people were judged
by peers in their department," said
administration information officer
Arnie Myers.
Because Mayne and Powell rejected the two-year
extension, their cases will be studied by the arts faculty
tenure committee.
(Tenure means permanency of appointment: the
right of a faculty member not to have his appointment
terminated once he has passed a five-year probationary
period.)
In a press release Thursday, acting arts dean Doug
Kenny denied the six profs had been "fired". The same
press release contained this definition of firing:
"Neither failure to renew a probationary
appointment nor a decision not to grant tenure at the
end of a probationary term constitutes dismissal.
KENNY
"Dismissal is the termination by the university,
without the agreement of the appointee, of a
non-tenure appointment (made by the board of
governors) before the expiry of its term or the
termination of a tenure appointment at any time other
than normal retirement age ..."
There is some confusion over what criteria were
used in the decision not to grant the six profs tenure.
Kenny referred The Ubyssey to the faculty
handbook for an outline of criteria used in tenure
cases. The handbook says:
"Such decisions (the failure to grant tenure) shall
be based on the individual's academic qualifications,
his ability to perform his duties, and the interests of
the department and the university in generating
academic strength and balance.
"Academic qualifications include, of course,
scholarship, research, teaching ability and academic
integrity. In so far as this is possible, departments
should avoid making judgments on the basis of
personality."
When asked if the decision was based on political
or purely academic considerations, Kenny replied:
"I hope it was a purely academic decision."
"Were political considerations involved?" he was
asked.
"I have no reason to believe it wasn't a purely
academic decision," Kenny replied.
English department head Robert Jordan would not
comment on the reasons for the tenure decisions.
Myers said: "As far as I can see there are no
political considerations in this case.
"Rather I should say there is not one political
faction being purged from the department."
He added: "Everything I've heard indicates it is
solely an academic dispute."
Someone is busy judging Powell and Mayne
because their biography files are missing from the
information office files.
An information officer unaware of the situation
was asked by a Ubyssey staffer for information on the
two professors and the officer proceeded to look in the
files. But all he found were holes.
The other four professors did not want their
names released because it could jeopardize their
bargaining position with other universities should they
not be granted tenure at UBC.
Myers was reluctant to make the issue public
because the thought it should not be pre-judged by
anyone. He admitted, however, that the topic had
become highly speculative and many false rumors were
being passed.
Kenny belittled speculation that the situation
would develop into a case similar to that at Simon
Fraser University, in which political science, sociology
and anthropology department professors were fired for
political beliefs last year.
"The criteria in this case are not the same as they
were at SFU," said Kenny.
Alldritt said democracy within the university
departments is also at issue.
"The majority of tenured members of the English
department would vote to grant tenure to those two
professors," he said, "but general meetings of the
English department were suspended last September."
The departmental meetings have been replaced by
a council of which 10 members are elected by members
of the department and the remaining seven members
are appointed.
"A minority in the department in favor of
publishing (instead of teaching) has gained excessive
influence," he said.
Alldritt said a petition presently circulating in the
department has been signed by a majority of assistant
and associate profs.
Kenny said he did not know when the decision on
the Mayne and Powell cases would be made, but said in
his release they are under intensive review.
"It is inappropriate to discuss the cases at this
time," he said. Page  2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27,  1970
Feb. 4 referendum to decide future of AMS
By JIM DAVIES
UBC students will vote a week
from Wednesday on the future of
the Alma Mater Society.
At the AMS council meeting
Monday, John Cherrington, arts 2,
presented a petition with 591
signatures demanding a
referendum as to whether or not
there should be voluntary
membership and payment of fees
into the AMS by the students of
the university.
The motion, as it involves a
constitutional change, will require
two-thirds majority of 20 per cent
of the student population in order
to pass.
AMS president Fraser Hodge
told councillors exactly what such
a referendum would accomplish,
if passed.
"The intent of this motion
would be to spell the end of the
AMS," said Hodge.
"It   seems   to   me   that   the
See Cherrington statement below.
More comment, page 11.
principle of people working
together in a student union was
the idea in the founding of this
body of the university."
"If the AMS was made
voluntary, nobody would bother
to give the $24 at the beginning of
the year."
The $24 is the current AMS
fee.
Cherrington then presented
points in favor of such a
referendum.
"We haven't had a vote on
membership in the AMS for over
50 years. The last vote of this
type was held in 1918.
"If the AMS has the support of
the students, then it will survive
this referendum.
"Instead of the board of
governors pushing through
compulsory membership in the
AMS annually, why don't we let
the students decide it for once?"
Cherrington demanded.
When AMS treasurer Chuck
Campbell raised the point that
any student can disclaim
membership,    Cherrington    said
administration president Walter
Gage had told him otherwise.
Hodge clarified the issue when
he remarked: "It is true that a
student can withdraw from the
AMS, however, he must still pay
the AMS fee."
The issue was then raised by
past AMS president, Dave Zirnhelt
that the meaning of the petition
was unclear because of its wording
and, that such wording should be
clarified on a referendum.
Cherrington was amicable to a
change in the wording, however,
he demanded that it be made clear
that the fees would not be
compulsory as well as the
membership.
Law  student  president  Carey
photo
BOAT RACING got a new face Friday noon when Aggies changed the traditional beer chug-a-lugging contest into a milk sloshing one.
Linde warned that a re-wording of
the petition might make it lose its
legality.
The referendum was then made
to read: Are you in favor of the
membership in and the paying of
fees to the Alma Mater Sociey
being made voluntary?
The motion that the
referendum be placed before the
students passed unanimously.
AMS law faculty
representative, Dell Valair, echoed
the sentiments of councillors
when he said, "There is no
question that this issue must come
before the 22,000 students of this
university. The issue is building
and must be faced."
"I am against a concept of
voluntary AMS," he added. "The
very idea is pernicious."
Council then voted 15 to one
on graduate studies representative
Art Smolensky's motion to go on
record as opposing the referendum.
Extension classes
A program on the Art and
Culture of Traditional Societies
will be conducted at the Maritime
Museum by the UBC extension
department beginning Jan. 28, 8
p.m.
The topics are The Beaver
Indians, Jan. 28 — Feb. 18; Art
and Architecture of India and
Pakistan, Feb. 25 - March 18;
and Eskimo Myth and Art, March
25-April 15.
Further information is
available at the UBC extension
department, 228-2181.
Heads for Free U
The Free University is looking
for group discussion leaders.
Organizer Gordon Mullin said
the main idea of university is to
experiment with new approaches
to learning.
Free University organizers
hope to have a curriculum of
groups by next week.
Interested persons call
Margaret Bailey at 879-7856.
Do UBC students want a voluntary AMS?
By JOHN CHERRINGTON
As     required    by     the    AMS
Constitution,   five   hundred  signatures
were handed   to   the AMS Secretary,
(January    23)    for    the    purpose   of
bringing    about    a   referendum.   The
wording asked for runs as follows:
"Are    you    in    favor    of
students   being   given   the
choice   of  joining   or   not
joining the AMS each year, I
thus  removing the   present
compulsory    requirement?"
or II contributing funds.
The purpose behind the referendum
is   to  bring about  a  voluntary  AMS,
where a compulsory fee could not be
levied on students for such things as
social, cultural , or political events. It is
quite realized that a compulsory fee for
the payment of SUB would have to be
retained. It is thus proposed that UBC
adopt a system comparable to that of
another   Eastern   Canadian   university,
(Carleton) where a fee levied for the
payment    of    SUB    is    compulsory,
whereas the main student organization
is    voluntary.    In    this    way,    every
student's    individual    rights    are
protected.
Under the voluntary system
proposed, no student would be forced
to   pay   for   the   running   of political
candidates, for causes of pressure
groups, or for a newspaper. Those
students who desired to participate in
clubs, moreover, would still find it
beneficial to join the AMS, as would all
other students who found that they
needed AMS services—but not one
penny, (other than for SUB) of student
money would be collected by the
administration for the AMS, without
the expressed permission of the
students themselves.
At this time, it should be stated that
recent statements by AMS President
Fraser Hodge on the nature of
membership in the AMS are not wholly
correct. According to the January 9th
edition of The Ubyssey, Hodge is
quoted as saying, "The Universities Act
gives us the right to levy fees, but
nobody is forced to join the
AMS" ... "Anybody can have a special
library card made up that makes no
reference to the society but bars the
bearer from entry into SUB."
In fact, the administration of UBC
makes it quite clear that all students are
required to join the AMS upon entering
university. It is true that some students
are not required to join — but this is
only in special cases where sufficient
cause has been proven by that student
to the administration. Up to this time,
administration policy has not changed.
The reason "of contributing funds"
was added to the wording of the
referendum is to prevent the AMS from
beginning a legal hassle over the possible
distinction between AMS membership
and the payment of the AMS fee. It was
considered when this referendum
wording was drawn up, that the AMS
might produce their lawyer to claim
that membership is legally distinct from
the fee payment — that is, you cannot
be legally forced to join, but can be
forced to contribute funds. Such a
claim would of course require two
changes: the administration would have
to be persuaded to allow any student to
opt out of the AMS (still having to pay
the full fee), and the AMS constitution
would have to be revised, so that
provision would be made for those
undergraduates who didn't wish to join.
Of course, the benefits from this kind
of "voluntary AMS" are virtually
negligible. Only when a student can
withdraw his financial support as well
as membership, can the organization be
considered truly voluntary.
Finally,    the    reason    why    the
referendum wording does not refer
specifically to the $9 collected for AMS
political and social activities is because,
since it is the Board of Governors that
maintains the compulsory fee, it is the
Board of Governors that will have to
decide what kind of a voluntary AMS is
feasible. What is at question is free
association — and the fact that the AMS
has acquired a huge debt for the SUB
does not alter this issue. But clearly,
any change to a voluntary AMS could
never apply to the Student Union
Building itself. It would be up to the
administration to decide how best to
meet the financial obligations.
Aside from protecting the rights of
students, the proposal for a voluntary
AMS is an attempt to bring to focus
more clearly the general attitude
towards the organization. This will be
the first time in decades that students
will be faced with the question of
compulsory membership. At the time
of its original inception, the AMS levied
a tiny fee, and was primarily
responsible for social and athletic
activities. Today, these activities have
been largely taken over by voluntary
organizations, while the AMS has been
let free to roam into political affairs.
Since the nature of the AMS has been
greatly changed, it is felt that it is high
time that students themselves decided
whether compulsion is still needed —
compulsion that is maintained by the
UBC Board of Governors. Tuesday, January 27,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Day-care centre planners still searching for home
UBC students and staff
members brought their children to
SUB Monday to discuss finding a
permanent location on campus for
a Parents' Nursery Co-Op.
In an attempt to demonstrate
the desperate need for permanent
space on campus for a day-care
centre, about 20 parents involved
in   the   co-op   moved  toys   and
toddlers into SUB 125 at 9 a.m.
Monday.
One mother, Jan Phelps, wife
of a part-time UBC physics
instructor , described the
difficulty of attempting to look
after her 17 month old child and
study for her one night school
course at the same time.
"I'm just about ready to turn
Story by Robin Burgess
Photos by Dave Enns and Maureen Gans
my course into an audit course,"
said Phelps. "The thing is I'd like
to take a full course load next
year. If I had one more year I
could get my Public Helath
certificate."
Judy Rafferty, a second year
arts student said that she and her
husband have been relying on a
baby-sitter to look after their
two-year-old child up to now.
"I've been relying on a sitter at
my home but that's very
expensive."
Ray Green, a graduate student
who has been staying at home to
baby-sit while his wife works, said
studying under such conditions
has been virtually impossible.
Green suggested that a parents'
lounge be set up in SUB where
parents can take their children.
"Even the Hudson's Bay
provides a place where you can
change your kid's diapers," he
said. "The student government
has paid no attention to the fact
that some students have
children."
Another mother, Anita Olsen,
a waitress in the SUB cafeteria,
lives with her student husband in
AN DA,     11/2,    gives
attention to telephone.
rapt
the Acadia High Rise.
"Acadia provides day-care
service but only for children over
three years old and our child is
only 1 5 months," said Olsen.
Allan Graham and his wife
Evely explained that they'd
brought their two-year-old
daughter to SUB 125 to give her
an opportunity to be with other
children, a unique experience for
many of the children.
"Child psychologists are
starting to realize the importance
of the ages between birth and
three years old in the
development of a child," said
Graham.
"This is why exposing them to
a learning situation such as this is
really important."
"We both really dig being here
and helping with the kids," he
added.
Kindergarten teacher and
proposed supervisor Monica
Mitchell described the operation
in SUB as a survey to assess
parents' needs an difficulties that
might arise in the actual running
of the day-care centre rather than
a demonstration.
AMS goes after baby building
Representatives of the group of UBC
students and staff members seeking facilities on
campus for a parents' nursery co-op received
support from the Alma Mater Society council at
its Monday night meeting.
Group leader Monica Mitchell asked
councillors if they would help find a location on
campus for the co-op, suggesting the recently
vacated UBC traffic control office east of SUB
on Wesbrook as a desirable site.
"This building would be ideal for our
needs," she said.
Mitchell also asked council if they would
continue for the remainder of the week to make
office space in SUB available from which they
could inform any persons interested in the co-op
about the project.
A subsequent motion to support these
requests passed unanimously.
AMS president Fraser Hodge said he would
speak to administration vice-president Bill
Armstrong about obtaining the old traffic
control office for this project today.
"We want to find out how
many people need the service and
how much time they can
contribute as volunteer staff," she
explained.
She emphasized that the
day-care centre is not being set up
in SUB but room 125 is merely
being used as a place for the
members of the co-op to meet and
make plans for finding a
permanent location.
Until the Parents' Nursery
co-op can obtain a licence one or
more parents must be with each
child at all times.
"If we don't obtain permanent
space we'll just stay in SUB until
the end of term if necessary," said
organizer Sibylle Klein.
"Hopefully we may be able to
obtain a temporary licence to
operate as a day-care centre like
the one at SFU," she said.
Klein indicated that the
centre could be moved to rooms
115 and 117, two rooms with
windows.
At the moment the Blood
Donor Clinic is operating in those
rooms.
As long as the co-op continues
to meet in SUB anyone interested
is welcome to come and visit, said
Mitchell.
Questionnaire asks citizenship of UBC profs
By JAN O'BRIEN
The citizenship of UBC faculty is being questioned.
In a letter to 200 faculty members selected randomly
the Alma Mater Society and the Graduate Student
Association enclosed a questionnaire dealing with faculty
citizenship.
The purpose of the questionnaire is to refute or
substantiate the two Carleton professors - Robin
Mathews' and James Steele's first degree method of
assigning nationality.
Mathews and Steele said the nation that most
professors obtain their first degree in is the nation they
are presently citizens of.
"According to Mathews and Steele, 90 per cent of all
professors remain citizens of the country where they get
their first degree," said GSA president, Art Smolensky.
"This has been under great criticism by the University
ofTorontoandUBC."
The questionnaire asks the faculty their present
citizenship, citizenship when first listed degree was
obtained, how many years they have been at UBC and if
they have tenure.
Non-Canadians are asked their present citizenship,
how many years they have been in Canada and if they
intend to become Canadian citizens.
The letter stated the AMS and GSA did not intend to
incriminate non-Canadian faculty, but discover if the
claims of discrimination against qualified Canadians are
true.
Mathew's recently compiled statistics show Canadian
universities hired three times as many Americans as
Canadians last year, said Smolensky.
In an estimation using Mathew's first degree method
the UBC Arts faculty employs 162 Canadians, 127
Americans, 63 British and 49 others.
The three departments with the greatest number of
foreign faculty are the English department v/ith 34
Americans, 35 Canadians and 19 British professors; the
Anthropology-Sociology department with 15 Americans,
7 Canadians, and 6 British members; and the Philosophy
department with 11 Americans, 2 Canadians and 1 British
faculty member.
The Science faculty employs 138 Canadians, 64
Americans, 63 British and 44 other professors.
The math department has the highest ratio of foreign
professors with 25 Canadians, 24 Americans and 16
others.
Students threaten strike at St. Thomas
FREDERICTON (CUP) - Students at St. Thomas
University here have told their administration to abolish
curfews and visiting regulations for residence students, or
face a student strike by February 1.
The student ultimatum was unanimously passed at a
general meeting by one-third of St. Thomas' 900 students:
The move followed a year of fruitless negotiation
with the Roman Catholic administration over residence
rules.
Students are demanding that administration president
Donald Duffie set up a student-faculty-administration
committee to work out details of a new policy no later
than the beginning of the next academic year.
If the administration refuses, students will call a
general strike for February 1. Plans for further action have
not been worked out.
A brief outlining suggestions for a new residence
policy was presented by the St. Thomas student council
to the executive of the board of governors last December.
The executive refused to vote on the issue, stating that
open rooms were "an internal matter'" the final dicision
resting with Duffie.
Students at St. Francis Xavier University at
Antigonish, N.S. unilaterally opened their residences
October 22, 1969: students at St. Mary's University at
Halifax incurred administration wrath when they
unsuccessfully attempted the same action in November.
The St. Mary's administration ordered new, harsher
penalties for violating residence regulations and posted
security guards at residence doors. Page 4
THE      UiYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27,   1970
THI UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
JANUARY 27, 1970
Bombs and ass
There's a crazy man on this campus.
Maybe there are several crazy men. Right now,
nobody knows. But some person or some group of
people is going around leaving bombs to explode in
UBC's buildings.
This is not a good thing.
This sort of thing that in its immediacy
overshadows all the problems of overcrowding, lousy
lectures, corporate influence, student council
blunderings, senate blunderings, board of governors
conniving, faculty power plays, political circle-jerking,
SUB coffee, soggy lawns and parking tickets.
Because what it boils down to is that there is the
distinct possibility that I am going to get my ass blown
off. Or you are going to get your ass blown off. Or
somebody is going to get his ass blown off.
Nasty. We did not come to university to have our
respective asses obliterated by bombs set by some
unknown force. Nope. God knows what 80 per cent of
us are doing here, but certainly we did not come with
the idea of having our bodies damaged.
And this is a very clear possibility. Two bombs
have now exploded, fortunately without injury. But it is
only fortunately, because in each case people were near
the explosions and could have been nearer.
At Brock Hall, for instance, a little gnome named
Paul "Rhythm" Green was sitting more or less
peacefully in the creative writing department reading
room on the ground floor, working out a poem,
wrestling with this image, creating, twisting language,
mind churning, transported . . . and BOOM!
A few feet away a hole is blasted through the
ceiling. Upstairs, a radiator is destroyed, a window
smashed and the frame twisted and sundry other
damage done.
Granted, Green then had the opportunity of
blowing RCMP minds by saying he was working on a
poem at the time of the explosion and got a chance to
play Perry Mason-style witness, but at the same time,
somebody might have had to publish that poem as part
of the Collected Poems of Paul Green (Posthumously).
Besides, who wants little pieces of Paul Green lying
in gutters, streets, on windows, in briefcases, on faces all
over campus. Not us.
So, in order to avoid getting our asses blown off,
we urge people to report strange packages to the RCMP
and also help them with any possible leads to who the
meatloaf is that's running around blowing up things.
There's no politics here, no complicated issues, no
commitments to be made.
It's very simple: bombs kill.
And we've got work to do yet.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News         Paul   Knox
City  Nate Smith
Managing       Bruce  Curtis
Photo     Bruce Stout
Wire         Irene   Wasilewski
Sports    Jim Maddin
Senior  John Twigg
Ass't News  Maurice Bridge
Ass't City        John Andersen
Page Friday    Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Brian  McWatters went through his
third   day   as   temporary   acting   city
editor. Power started going to his head
and the masses began to chant "we
want Smith." Jim Davies picked up a
strange sandwich, which he discovered
belonged to Robin Burgess, who, in
turn, was promised a night on the town
with David Bowerman.
Christine Krawczyk blew her stories
and, blasephemy of blasphemies, went
to a class on a press day.
David Schmidt looked in amazement
as Ginny Gait, Elaine Tarzwell, Jan
O'Brien, Lesley Minot, Jennifer
Jordan, Leslie Plommer and Sandy
Kass demonstrated an ancient
hottentot fertility dance.
Sporting types Dick Button, Tony
Gallagher and Scott McCloy
announced they would try out for the
varsity circle jerk team, while Dave
Enns and Maureen gans snapped.
Senate and community
The following is a collective statement of the
Campus Left Action Movement.
UBC's Senate says it has no obligation to serve
the surrounding B.C. community. Despite the
university being paid for out of the pockets of the
people of the province — including the students —
the university's chief academic body refuses to
accept the principle that the community ought to
have some control over how its money is spent, or
have the use of the university to serve its needs. The
issue which sparked this undemocratic, elitist
response from UBC's senators was a motion at the
last senate meeting calling for a report to the people
of B.C. about what the university is doing to solve
the community problem of pollution.
Senators may phrase the defence of their
position in differnt kinds of rhetoric about
academic neutrality or the better qualifications of
trained professionals to determine what academic
research is needed and what is not — but their
answer to the taxpayers boils down to this — "pay
up, shut up, and let us do our thing."
The revelation that the university has no
intention of dealing with pressing problems faced by
the community and its people, and students, should
come as no surprise, however, for the university has
long been oriented towards serving the desires of a
very particular and select group in society — that of
corporate big business. For although the people of
the province put up the money to build the physical
facilities to house students and researchers, it is big
business which provides the cream on the top that
pays the research grants that allow the top
academics to live in comfort: and in return for the
cream the researchers provide the information and
public pronouncements that assist the corporations
in their bid for profits and social control.
From the university's position, it makes sense
for it to refuse to help the community. Since it is
the corporate search for profits which cause the
major community problems in the first place — air
pollution from factories and automobiles, ecological
destruction from industrial waste in rivers and
oceans, poverty from forced unemployment — it
would be difficult for the university to effectively
fight for both sides. So it opts for the side of the big
corporations and the military, and their research
grants. "
A case in point is the Kaiser Coal development
in B.C.'s East Kootenays. Not only does Kaiser, a
U.S. corporation, purchase rights to Canadian coal
for virtually nothing and get the governments to
build a superport and improve railway facilities to
help it ship the coal out of B.C. at huge profit to
itself; it also plans to destroy mountainsides and the
whole ecology of the area by using the technique of
strip-mining. To assist them in their propaganda,
Kaiser pays $5000 to buy a tame UBC forestry
professor to make public statements about the
harmlessness of strip-mining — in opposition to
other experts on ecology like the B.C. Wildlife
Federation and the B.C. Mining Association.
Multiply this one grant by 50 — approximately the
number of research fellowships UBC receives each
year from big business - and you can realize the
impact this has the on the university.
The influence of corporations, and of U.S.
economic and cultural domination, are felt just as
strongly but more subtley in other activities carried
out by the university — the teaching of an economic
theory which says that Canada as a country can
only survive by letting its material wealth be
exploited by U.S. capitalism: and the overwhelming
domination of a theory of society that says these
same corporations and individuals representing them
are the only important and worthwhile entities and
that the majority of the people in society, the
workers, are either unimportant or exist only to
cause trouble.
The university goes so far in ignoring the
PEOPLE of the community that it even neglects to
make any attempt to ensure that the students it
graduates are able to find jobs. The university
refuses to take responsibility for what happens to its
graduates — it would not care if it turned out
80,000 graduates per year and there were no jobs.
Problems students face during their time at
university — lack of housing, poor transportation
facilities, etc, — are similarly ignored.
If the student community, or the community in
general, wants the university to begin to serve its
interests, it must stand up and make specific
demands on the university.
The community must demand that the
university investigate and work towards building an
economy that can provide meaningful jobs for all its
members - both inside, by allowing open
admissions and more teaching jobs - and outside. If
the social system does not provide for the people of
the community, then the people for their own
survival must undertake the changes that will bring
about the desired end. The university must be
forced, in large or small ways, to meet the demands
of the members of the outside community who are
trying to meet their own basic needs or solve
particular problems that prey upon their lives.
Thy students in the university must demand
that the university deal with their immediate
interests — like lack of job opportunities upon
graduation. UBC presently is limiting enrolment and
allowing huge inefficient classes — thereby stifling
academic job opportunities within the university.
And of all university teaching staff hired by
Canadian universities in 1969, only 14 per cent were
Canadians — showing the universities' total disregard
for the culture as well as the people of its
community. The university steadily develops
techniques of industrial automation yet refuses to
deal with the problems caused by widespread
dislocation of the labour force. Students must force
the universities to hire Canadians, and to deal as
much with the problems caused by automation as
with its techniques. For their own self-preservation,
students have to deal with these manifestations of
the university that threaten their lives.
* * *
CLAM is initiating weekly 'rap sessions' to try
to get ideas and response from students and build
methods of working together on common actions. ,
We want people to participate - if the problem
strikes home to you, you can come up with
suggestions on how to deal with it. The 'rap
sessions' will be held Wednesday at noon and this
week's subject is the preceding topic of 'Serving the
Community'. It will take place in Buchanan 234. Tuesday, January 27,  197*0
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
page tuesday
"The aspiring pop writer should be familiar with all facets of
the culture, or sub-culture, that he purpots to comment upon."
—Brian McLeod, Province pop critic
For the purposes of this column, I would like to
assume the guise of John Q. Public, mild-mannered
and curious reader of such underground newspapers
as the Georgia Straight, Rolling Stone, the Berkeley
Barb and the L.A. Free Press.
During the flowering of
the Haight three years ago,
it was possible to pick up an
underground and find in it,
for the most part, a printed
pipeline to peace and passive resistance.
Brian McLeod
Pop loses out
to propaganda
Words were being used
that had, as their common
denominator, feelings rooted
in tolerance, understanding
and love. Humor was not
restricted to heavy-handed
sarcasm.
Cops were still cops, and
people outside the scene
were viewed humorously but
compassionately as unfortunate human beings, not as
inhuman cogs caught up in
the big brother machine
known as "the establishment."
Evolution took preference
over revolution, as if the
leaders of the new community instinctively seemed to
know that no revolution in
the history of mankind has
been an uncorrupted success.
And when the underground papers covered
music, it was commented
upon as music. A group
played well, or poorly, or
genuinely or artificially. For
the first time, pop stars
were not looked upon as
idols. Nor had they yet
received the rank of political oracles and demigods.
The past three years have
wrought some distressing
changes in the underground
print machine, however.
Today, when John Q. Public
picks up a copy of the
Straight, he will find its
contents about as interesting, humane, unbiased and
humorous as a Mao memoir.
Page after page deals
with "the revolution." Pop
commentary Is restricted to
propaganda-flavored political comment, mostly
imported from California.
And in the local pop commentary spot, written by
Stan Persky on the last
page, I found a totally incoherent and meaningless little
infatuation blurb about a
series of past events totally
unrelated to today's music.
Underground papers have
become stereotyped — to
the point where a revolutionary concept which may or
may not be imminent in the
United States, is being
forcefully and falsely transplanted to Canada.
And if the inflammatory
issues prevalent in California  do not exist here, the
editors busy themselves
hyping our own social problems into paramount evils,
praying as it were for a
bloodbath.
Surely the past few thousand years of documented
conflict and power struggles
in human society hava
proven one point conclusively, namely that conflict
solves nothing. It Is the
mother of death and the
degradation of the human
soul.
And perhaps it is about
time that the so called "free
press" took a look at the
"freedom" they are propagating. There are good
things happening every day
just waiting to be recalled in
print, whether they are confined to a good rock concert
or a bright sunrise. Somewhere in Vancouver every
day, someone is helping
another human being.
And these are the stories,
along with constructive and
compassionate sociological
editorials, which should find
their way into a free print
situation.
Logic Eoses out
to schizophrenia
THE PROVINCE, Friday, January 23, 1979
Brian McLeod's most recent Spotlight column,
reprinted above, could lend itself to a great deal of
discussion and criticism. However, the article's
incredibly diffuse writing syle ultimately defeats any
arguments its author wishes to present
McLeod seems afraid of
progressing logically from one
idea to the next, employing a
style which suggests a dashed-off
quality and lack of revision.
Roughly speaking, what
McLeod wishes to say in the
article can be reduced to two
points: (1) that the "old"
underground press was really an
inoffensive "peace-seeking
medium and (2) that the "new"
underground press, exemplified
by recent issues of the Georgia
Straight, is saturated with
extraterritorial revolutionary
concepts.
I find his first claim hard to
accept. In spite of the fact that his
space is limited, McLeod offers no
concrete examples or quotations
to back up his statement that the
old papers offered "a printed
pipeline to peace and passive
resistance." (an egregious example
of illiteration if there ever was
one). Since most of McLeod's
readers are presumably unfamiliar
with the issues of the three
American newspapers from three
years ago which he mentions, he
might at least have shared some of
his reminiscences with his readers.
McLeod's second point might
make sense if it were not that the
pretext on which it was based is
manifestly  ridiculous.   I refer to
the paragraph, "Surely the past
few thousand years of documents
conflict and power struggles in
human society have proven one
point conclusively, namely that
conflict solves nothing. It is the
mother of death and the
degradation of the human soul."'
(How about that last line for
sounding like a Mao memoir?).
McLeod is plainly out of his
depth in attempting to deal with a
political concept which is in itself
absurd. I make no pretence to
having any great knowledge or
interest in politics, but several
politically inclined friends of mine
pointed out to me that without
"conflict" we would probably be
back    in    the    dark    ages.
Finally, as a solution to the
"misplaced" revolution
propagated by the new
underground press, McLeod
proposes that the papers should
concern themselves less with
revolution and more with "good
things happening every day."
He might take a look at his
own   newspaper   in   its   recent
sensational coverage of the
aftermath of Evangeline Azarcon's
death, or the Vancouver Sun's
treatment of the death of nurse,
Myrna Inglis, and then ask himself
what, if anything, he has done to
counteract these efforts. He might
also ask himself which are
ultimately more valuable — these
ghoulish articles or the articles in
recent Georgia Straights on
subjects such as ecology.
He also apparently has not
made up his mind as to whether
he should be educated or
entertained by elements of pop
culture such as the underground
press. This is evident in his
attitude to the old and new papers
- the old one he found tolerant,
the new ones are humorless and
biased. Perhaps McLeod is afraid
of change or evolution within a
medium such as the press or
within the structure of society
itself.
Or perhaps, more bluntly,
Brian McLeod's mind is unclear
about the distinction between
growing old and growing up.
". . . curse him or agree with him, write him nasty letters (and
you may be surprised at the replies) or phone and say hello.
But don't ignore his comments, because they are based on
popular culture, popular as in people, popular as in you."
San Francisco
Weekend for
YOU&A FRIEND
For Details - See Page 11   r IC E E ■
MINING ENGINEERING
SCHOLARSHIPS
For GRADUATES in any branch of
ENGINEERING/APPLIED SCIENCE
$4500 - 9 months
PLUS Planned summer employment
For information contact: The Chairman,
Dept. of Mining Eng. & Applied Geophysics
McGill University, Montreal 110, P.O.
- CLOSING DATE: 20 FEBRUARY 1970 -
I
S
SWING OUT & SAVE $$$
Rent
A Brand New
BUICK
SKYLARK
or
COUGAR
$10.95 overnight
and   pay  for  only
the gas you use.
Additional insurance
required for students
under Age  25.
Call
685-0536
Budget
Rent a Car
1058 Alberni St.
Vancouver, B.C.
THE MANY FACES OF FOLK VOL. II
SPECIAL EVENTS
PRESENTS
Russ
Thornberry
— formerly of Pozo Seco Singers and New Christy
Minstrels
— Already with an album released
• v
'.   -;    , »"
TUES., JAN. 27
SUB BALLROOM
12:30 V. M.
ADMISSli)
i\ Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27,   1970
BCUS attempts to solve
student employment problem
Student unemployment is being tackled by the
B.C. Union of Students.
"The BCUS task force on student
unemployment, formed in October 1969, has
dedicated itself to the job of getting best summer
jobs for the greatest number of students," said
BCUS secretary Erwin Epp.
Last summer, BCUS passed motions asking
government and industry to hire more students and
condemning scabbing during the telephone strike,
but took no follow-up action on either of these
motions.
"In an attempt to avoid past mistakes, the
BCUS will attempt to construct a program of action
and education," Epp said in a press release Monday.
Epp is leaving on a six-day tour of B.C. to talk
to student unions and profs about the possibilites of
students doing research on the student
unemployment problem and receiving academic
credits for their work.
"We need students who are willing to research
the problem of unemployment and suggest ways of
dealing with it. We also need profs to participate in
accepting  these   papers  as  part   of the students'
academic work," said Epp.
A tentative BCUS plan is to stage a
province-wide two day blitz on employers to
discover the job situation all over B.C.
A meeting of a Vancouver co-ordinating council
for student unemployment will be held at UBC on
February 3.
Represntatives from Youth Employment
Servies (YES), The Action Council for
Unemployment Students (TACUS), Chamber of
Commerce (CC), Manpower, UBC placement
office, and the provincial government are expected
to be at this meeting.
AMS vice-president and BCUS treasurer Tony
Hodge will be attending a western student union
conference in Calgary, Feb. 7 and 8.
The principal topics will be student financing
and unemployment.
Speak-Easy 'gets off the ground'
After Speak-Easy's first week
of operations, John Morrison,
social work 2, said, "It sure feels
good to get off the ground."
"We've talked to about 45
people. The main problems are
birtli control, abortion, legal
problems, and general alienation,"
Public health
Dr. John Williamson of Johns
Hopkins University, Baltimore, is
guest teacher at the continuing
course for health officers being
held at the Christmas Seal
Auditorium, Tenth and Willow.
He will talk on local needs and
priorities in public health. The
course lasts until Friday.
he said.
Speak-Easy is made up of 20
social work students who are
trying to help people solve
problems.
The students try to handle all
problems themselves but a few are
referred to other agencies such as
Legal Aid and the Family
Planning Centre.
"We want to establish a
nucleus this year from which to
establish a full-time group,"
Morrison said.
"We can only handle one case
at a time in our office," he said,
"but we are getting used to
slipping out and talking to people
in   the  clubs   lounge   or   over
coffee."
If you have any problems, go
see them. They are open Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday from
noon till 9 p.m. Or telephone
228-3706. They will be glad to
help you.
EAT IN <• TAKE OUT . DELIVERY-
3261 W.' Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One  Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to U.B.C. Barber Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT  REASONABLE  PRICES
For Take-Out   Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30  p.m.  to  11:30  p.m.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,  DARK  SUITS, TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL  STUDENT  RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
w d e d v,  /I
e n s aJ ' s *fa**»J
a multi-cultural series
jan.28
feb.U
feb.ll
dance
poetry
fashion
international house
Wednesdays at 7:30 pm
CUSO WEEK
Jan. 26-31
TUES., JAN. 27 — SUB 215, noon — Panel discussion —
"Canada and Africa"
WED., JAN. 28 — SUB  211,  noon — Film on development
THURS., JAN. 29 — ED. 207, noon — Panel discussion —
"Ethiopia"
THURS., JAN. 29 — International House, 8 p.m. — CUSO Information Session — film, talk and discussion with returned
CUSO Cooperants
FRI., JAN. 30 — BU 202, noon — Panel discussion — "Canada
an-' Developing Countries."
.AN.31  — International House, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m., Caribbean
Workshop — the present situation — with Caribbean students.
CA"
CLIP AND
-4D SAVE^VJT _.
DEBATING TOURNAMENT
UBC vs U. VICTORIA
"Resolved Marijuana Should Be
Immediately Legalized ..."
- 3:30 -
Fri., Jan. 30 - SUB Auditorium
Bagdad - by - the Bay
San Francisco
home Could send you there
■"■■ For a FREE Weekend!
(There are Six)
For Details - See Page 11
VISIT OUR NEW VARSITY BRANCH - 4517 West 10th Ave.
(1 blk.from U.B.C. Gates)
©ffrbanks
Downtown Brentwood Park Royal
10% Special U.B.C. Discount - Students and Faculty
GRADUATING IN 1970?
ARTS AND COMMERCE STUDENTS
INTERESTED IN CAREERS IN
• ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT
• ACTUARIAL SCIENCE
• SALES AND SALES MANAGEMENT
will be interviewed at the Placement Office
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3
efvi. Metropolitan
^ApLife Tuesday, January 27,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC residences
Gripes: food, noise, money, privacy
Ask a student living in residence at
UBC what he thinks of life there and you
will get a few standard responses.
"The food stinks."
"I don't get any privacy."
"It is too noisy to do any work."
"The visiting hours are not adequate."
"It is a good place to meet people."
"It costs too much."
One student in every eight lives in an
on-campus residence. They are students
whose homes are to far away from the
campus to make daily commuting possible.
Students living in residence have different
concepts of the type of student that
chooses to live there.
"You talk about Walter Gage patting
people on the head; well, this place is full
of people who like to be treated like that,"
said Kim Waterman, Science 1, of
Kootenay House, Place Vanier.
Virgins in Ann Landers tradition
2,
of
All
in
Said   Barry   Sheahan,   Science
Cariboo    House,    Place    Vanier:
different    types    of    persons    live
residence."
Said Steve Mitchell, arts 1, of
Kootenay House: "People that live in
residence are people with no place else to
go."
A Place Vanier girl resident who asked
not to be identified, said: "Girls that live in
residence are the ones that brag if they get
a kiss on the first date. They are all virgins
in the Ann Landers tradition. They don't
drink, don't smoke pot, and are usually
homely."
Administration housing head, Les
Rohringer, said: "There is definitely a
cross-section of students entering residence
each year. However, when they have spent
some time there they all learn to live with
people."
Food is always an issue in residence.
"if you talk to anyone, the first thing
they will complain about is the food," said
Mitchell.
"The food is disgusting," said Joan
McClure, Education 2.
Said Marilyn Swales, phys ed 1: "The
fact that you have to be at meals at a
specific time with very little'leeway is
terribly inconvenient."
By JIM DAVIES
"All they need in residence is a siren
to blow before and after meals and at
bed-time," said Alf Crema, Science 3, a
student that left residence.
Food services director, Ruth Blair
presented a different picture of resident
students' acceptance of the food.
"From the large amount of
compliments we have received, I would say
the food is excellent," she said.
Blair also said residence food is
economical. "We are proud that we have
the lowest food costs in Canada," she said.
"Do you know that grilled cheese
sandwiches are the most popular thing on
the residence menu?"
Blair gave high food and labor costs
and the total lack of subsidization from the
university as answers to any complaints
about the food and limited meal hours.
Perhaps the largest amount of
controversy concerning the food occurred
after ptomaine poisoning in the Christmas
dinner in Place Vanier sent several students
to the hospital and caused an epidemic of
diarrhoea.
"The problem did not originate in our
facilities, but in the previous storage of the
food," said Rohringer.
"Students treated it as a joke. I believe
this reaction shows a favorable attitude
towards the dieticians."
Residence advisor Ken Hutton said: "I
know Ruth Blair felt very badly about it.
It's too bad that it had to be the big event
of the year. I guess it kind of laid an egg."
Hutton commented on the high cost
of living in residence. "We are the only
university in the country that receives no
subsidization for its residences," he said. "I
know it's damn hard for people who live
up country to come up with the money it
takes to live in residence."
120 left residence last term
Besides high costs and poor food,
noise and lack of privacy are the major
reasons given by students for leaving
residence.
About 120 students left residence at
the end of the first term.
One student who left at Christmas,
Bruce Russell, Arts 4, said he was sadly
disillusioned with residence life.
"Residences,  with  all  these students
together, should be an ideal situation for a
meaningful forum of thought. Instead, it is
the dullest form of life on campus," he
said.
"The Place Vanier residence
association (the residence council) fulfills
no purpose for the students in the
residence. The money it gets from the
students is spent on such things as 16 cases
of beer for bouncers at a residence dance
and equipment for the hockey team.
Nobody rocks the boat
"Nobody questions the council nor do
they question the standards committee, a
group of students appointed by the council
to judge and discipline other resident
students.
"Nobody wants to rock the boat. I
tried and it was futile. I received no
answers."
According to Rohringer, the residence
councils aire in charge of discipline,
entertainment, and education within the
residences.
"Four students have been removed
from residence by the standards committee
so far this year," he said.
Seven were removed last year.
Other issues raised by students
included the question of whether or not
the dons and resident fellows had the right
to inspect students' rooms for liquor or
drugs.
If drugs are found in a resident's room,
he is advised to go to the health services for
counselling.
Girls in residence complained that
they were discriminated against.
"Burglar alarms in the girls' houses go
off loudly at night whenever a locked door
at the entrance of the buildings are
opened," said Elaine Tarzwell, Arts 2, of
Totem Park.
"The girls do not have keys like the
boys and must be admitted by a woman
stationed at the outside door."
Waterman summed up the feelings of
many students living in residence when he
said: "It's realy just a place to live, you
can't expect pleasant company and a nice
atmosphere."
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS-
THE
POPPY FAMILY
IN CONCERT!
SUB BALLROOM - THURS., FEB. 5-8 P.M.
Advance Tickets Now On Sale at AMS Business Office
Students $1.75   —   Non-Students $3.00
Get Yours Early to Avoid Disappointment
CONCERNED
ABOUT
HOUSING?
Meeting
BU 212
Jan. 30
12:30 Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27,   1970
ENGINEERS and
CABLE CAR BUFFS
You   could'  toqr   the   San   Francisco
Cable   Car   Power House     ^^^^
and Car Barn courtesy of   HOME
For Details - See Page 11
WANTED
A Tuum Est Editor
THE JOB: To work with various groups; to plan, control and co-ordinate
the   copy   and   lay-out   of   Tuum   Est   (student   handbook).
TO APPLY: Send a written application to Tony Hodge, AMS vice-president. He's found in the AMS executive offices. This application
should   contain:
(1) name  of applicant;
(2) applicant's   university  experience;
(3) applicant's   view   on   the   general   outline   that  Tuum   Est   should
take;
(4) View  on  what  the  specific  purpose  of Tuum  Est  should  be.
WHY: A payment of honoraria upon completion of a satisfactory issue
of Tuum Est. This is an important position so please submit all
applications  to  Tony  Hodge,  SUB 258  by  5:00  p.m.,  Feb.  3rd.
EDMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
ATTENTION
Industrial Arts and
Vocational Teachers
Due to expansion the Edmonton Public School Board will
require a nuimber of qualified Industrial Arts* teachers in
the multi-phase program at the Junior and Senior High
School  level.
Vocational teachers in Beauty Culture, Food Preparation
& Services, Graphic Arts-Lithography, Commercial Art,
Merchandising, Institutional Services, and Horticulture
will also be needed.
For application forms and employment information contact:
PLACEMENT OFFICE
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER, B.C.
EUROPE
ON A MINI BUDGET
OPERATED BY YOUNG PEOPLE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS — SMALL GROUPS
3 Weeks-England-Scotland-Wales $99.00
5 Weeks-N. Africa-Spain-Portugal $179.00
5 Weeks-Scandinavia-Russia $205.00
9 Weeks-Grand European Tour    $367.00
Visiting 16 Different Countries
FOOD  KITTY KEEPS FOOD COSTS TO A MINIMUM
ALL COOKING EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED
We also assist with Charter Flights
For  Full   Information  &  Dates.   Etc.,  Call
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744 Cambie at 41st
327-1162
Architect's sketch of proposed 1,000-unit residence.
Ifs one solution to an old problem—student housing. Co-o,
been tried in the past—and failed. The latest—a 1000-uni
like it has a better chance. By LESLIE PLOMMER.
Proposed co-op site covers 22 acres bounded by Acadia Road on west. University Boulevard on east, Universit Tuesday, January 27,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
X,U\
■'■ ' IH\V\ USWT     ■ v - uVu*«*V V
i v* •:.'.*»■-
; y* *
1 'I .' f   ■'     ■,
fill!
schemes have
project—looks
TUDENT housing is a big problem at UBC.
Next year, it will be even bigger. And the year
after that.
So what's being done? Here's one answer.
In the summer of 1969, a group of concerned
students set out to work on a co-op housing
scheme for UBC. They are now incorporated as
the Acadia Co-operative Housing Association.
Association president Andrew Quarry, a
political science grad student, calls their scheme "a
student-initiated project to work on the type of
housing that a certain segment of students wants."
The co-op group is ambitious. This is a big
project aimed at constructing 1000 units of
housing on 22 acres of heavily wooded
endowment land at a cost of $8 million.
With this in mind, project designer Roger
Hughes approached CMHC early last year to talk
informally about money. He was told the co-op
group would have to get the land before financing
could be arranged.
So the Co-op members went to Victoria, once
in the spring and again in summer to talk with
lands and forests minister Ray Williston and
education minister Donald Brothers about getting
a land grant.
The two ministers said they couldn't commit
themselves about land until financing was assured.
No land, no money; no money, no land.
Talking about the reaction of the two
ministers Quarry said; "Their response both times
was rather open-ended. They didn't say no to the
idea, but seemed rather nervous about saying yes."
Co-op members are preparing to talk again to
government officials about a land grant, but they
feel they are more likely to get only a lease on the
22 acres.
Meanwhile, the co-op group is proceeding
with its plans.
The land has been surveyed, and Hughes has
divided it into two areas. One will contain 600
units of housing for singles and married couples,
while the remaining units on the other half of the
site will be for married couples with children.
"The design is radical, but it has to be radical
to be cheap," said Hughes.
He has taken the first part of his co-op design
to architects at CMHC where the plans received
"an enthusiastic and positive response."
The co-op is made up of prefabricated units
hung in a concrete framework and broken by
interior courtyards.
These units will not be sterile boxes. They
have been designed to allow for self-expression and
can be re-arranged according to individual tastes.
"Our purpose is more to provide the structure
than to define how students will live within it,"
said economics grad student John Dickenson.
Hughes' design tries to relate to the idea of
communal living while at the same time allowing
for privacy.
The co-op group knows that its style of
housing isn't for everyone. Co-operatives, by their
nature, mean acceptance of some responsibilities if
they are to succeed. So it has been necessary to set
up some general plans for co-op membership and
initial operation.
All registered students, faculty and staff of
UBC, plus grad students from all British Columbia
universities are eligible to become members by
purchasing a share in the co-op. The shares sell for
$10 and can be sold at any time.
All shareholders may make use of co-op
services and vote in the election of a board of
directors to oversee the running of the site even if
they aren't living in the housing community.
The co-op group is carefully evaluating the
project in an effort to escape the pitfalls which led
to the recent demise of Rochdale, a co-op project
inToronto. Good management is seen as essential
to the success of the scheme.
The planners also want the housing to be
cheap. Most of the units are designed to
accommodate two people at a cost of about $50
each.
Even in the larger units for married couples
with children, no rent would be over $100.
Services such as a day care centre, gas station,
general store and recreation facilities will be
offered to co-op members.
The present members of the co-op are
optimistic about the advantages of community
living close to campus. They see the project as
adding another dimension to the social aspect of
attending a university.
Some students choose residences as the
answer to their needs, but with the current tight
money situation in CMHC things look as grim for
the administration's housing service as they do
for the co-op group. So don't expect any new
residence buildings for a while either.
If co-op housiing is your bag, one of the
things you can do is work with the Acadia group.
A lot of groundwork has been done, but much still
needs doing.
school, Toronto Road.
The co-op association is having an open meeting in
Buchanan 212 Friday at 12:30. Everyone who wants to help,
or just find out what's going on, or just observe, will be greeted
with open arms.
Maybe you should be there.
CAMPUS LAUDR0MAT
1968
Coin-Op   Wash   <S    Dry   Cleaning
Cozy   Lounge
Inviting   Atmosphere
Attendant  Service
"Clean As A New Pin"
4354  W.   10th 224-9809
EAT IN •TAKEOUT* DELIVERY*
•3261 W. Broadway     736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
There's a fire, people sitting around talkingabout
the ski runs, somebody
laughing about a fall she
had. But you aren't part
of it. Why? Because
you're having one of
those "difficult" days.
Tampax tampons could
change all that. Tampax
tampons can give you the
total freedom and comfort you want to really
enjoy yourself. Because
with Tampax tampons
you don't need things
like bulky belts and pads
that cause chafing. You
can wear those clinging
ski clothes without e
worry. Because Tampa>
tampons are worn intern
ally, you can be as active
asyou like. And feel completely secure.
Join in the fun. Let
Tampax tampons change
your life. You don't have
to be "frozen out" any
weekend.
DEVELOPED  BY   A   DCC ; OR
NOW  USED BY  MILLIONS  OF  W0WL.N
TAMPAX  TAMPONS ARE   MADE ONLY   BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION  LTD.,
BARRIE,   ONTARIO Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27,  1970
Atlantic union
slowly starting
FREDERICTON (CUP) - The nascent federation of Atlantic
student councils appears crippled and dying before it ever really got
started.
Student councils at both universities here Sunday turned down
membership in the new Maritimes Student Union.
The votes at St. Thomas University and the University of New
Brunswick brought to four the number of Atlantic campuses hedging
on FASC membership.
Memorial University (Newfoundland) turned down membership
earlier and the Dalhousie delegation left the second founding
conference in Fredericton December 29 to January 4, on the second
day.
The UNB student council voted 8 to 4 against membership over
the recommendation of student president Mike Start. Councillors
said it would be inadvisable to put out the UNB's $600 membership
fee while the "feasibility of FASC and its success were remote."
At both UNB and STU, where the anti-FASC vote was
unanimous, councillors were upset by the system of priorities set up
at the Fredericton conference.
The priorities system divides the dozen Maritime campuses into
'A' and 'B' categories — according to size and the "level of
emergence" of student organizations.
UNB was placed as low priority because of its more developed
organizational structures, while STU councillors felt they would be a
low priority because STU is a small campus — and FASC would
operate to help the largest number of students.
FASC is the third attempt by Maritimes students to establish
some form of regional union. It was preceded by the Atlantic
Students Association and the Atlantic Association of Students.
Both ASA and AAS failed because they did little to help
member campuses.
The FAS>C concept was raised in May, 1969, as the national
Canadian Union of Students showed signs of falling apart in the face
of membership withdrawals, the proposal was made by then-CUS
fieldworker, Barry McPeake, now a student at Dalhousie.
Greatest opposition came from McPeake's own campus where
Dalhousie student president Bruce Gillis, one of four student
executives who have been working to set up a national 'non-political'
federation, led his delegation out of the Christmas conference on the
second day.
Formalities prolong hassle
LOS ANGELES (CUP-CPS) - Angela Davis, the black lecturer
barred from teaching at the University of California earlier this year,
has begun teaching winter session classes at U of Cs Los Angeles
campus. But she may not finish them.
Davis, fired by U of C regents because of her membership in the
Communist party, regained her teaching post through a court order
which declared the regents' action unconstitutional. But the court
order was recently set aside by an appelate court on a technicality.
Hearings into her case were held at Los Angeles, rather than
Berkeley, the university's headquarters.
Unless the state supreme court steps in, the judgment of the
appelate court will become final February 20, more than a month
before the winter session ends. The regents would then be free to bar
Davis again from teaching while a faculty committee holds hearings in
her case.
Such hearings are only a formality, since they will merely offer
advice to the regents. Most of the regents want to fire Davis.
UCLA administration chancellor Charles Young says he is
"confident" students taking courses entitled "Kant and Idealism" and
"Dialectical Materialism," will get credit for them, although Davis
may not finish teaching them.
ANGLICAN - UNITED CHURCH
CHAPLAINCY MEETING
Discussion of New Joint Chaplaincy
All   Interested  Students  and   Faculty
Fri., Jan. 30 — 12:30 -1:30 - SUB 215
Sat., Jan. 31 — 1:30 - 5:00
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTRE
CONTEMPLATION, MEDITATION,
RELAXATION
WORRY BEADS
For Details - See Page 11
UBC FILM SOCIETY which in 1967 brought you the uncut "HIGH7'now presents
LARRY
KENT'S
FACADE
HO ADMIIUNCI TO r-lftSONS UNDft II
Warning:    VERY    FRANK    TREATMENT   OF   SEX
R.   W.   McDonald,   B.C.   Censor
SUB AUDITORIUM
Friday, Jan. 30, Saturday, Jan. 31
7:00 & 9:00
Sunday, Feb. 1 - 7:00
- HELD OVER -
™ M Special admission price tor this presentation only M
B.C.'s NEW LOW-COST
CAR INSURANCE
Is your auto insurance priced too high?
Shop for a better rate.
DEAL DIRECTLY WITH WESTCO AND SAVE $20, $30,
$40, $50 OR MORE THIS YEAR ON CAR INSURANCE.
A phone call may save you hundreds of dollars
over the years on auto insurance Compared to
the rates of most other insurance companies, you
can expect a saving of $20 $30, $40. $50 or
more  .   for the same protection you have now!
This is not so-called   good driver" insurance. You
need not be accident free or over 25 years of age
to qualify Even if you are currently on a preferred
risk type of insurance, WESTCO may still save
you a substantial amount of money
HOW CAN WESTCO OFFER
LOWER RATES?
Under the new car insurance legislation just
proclaimed and soon to be implemented by the
B.C, government, all motorists in this province
must carry auto insurance The driver who fails to
do so will face a fine of not less than $250 or
imprisonment of not less than three months or
both fine and imprisonment On January 1, 1970.
car insurance will be compulsory in B.C — it no
longer needs to be sold
So. WESTCO is a direct sales company with head
office in B.C. and without salesmen or agents
In this way, WESTCO does not have to pay sales
commissions, one of the most expensive operating costs of typical insurance companies This
saving is passed directly to you in the form of
lower rates
These lower rates are available to you now.
WHAT ABOUT CLAIM SERVICE?
Should you be involved in an accident, again you
avoid the middle man You don't contact a sales
person, you speak directty to a specially trained
WESTCO claims adjuster.
WESTCO has reorganized the entire claim
service system, including their own Claim
Adjuster Training Program, to eliminate delays
and excessive paperwork which are the major
causes of the increasing costs of claim
adjustments which in turn cause higher insurance
rates.
WESTCO s approach is to settle claims quickly,
fairly, without red tape. You'll appreciate the
service as well as the savings
CAN YOU QUALIFY FOR
WESTCO S LOW RATES?
If you are presently without auto insurance, if
you need additional insurance to meet the new
government requirements just  proclaimed,
or if you plan to change or renew your present
coverage in the next few months, phone
WESTCO today and find out how much you can
save
There is no obligation and, of course, no
salesmen will call because WESTCO doesn't
have any
ACT NOW!
MAIL THE COUPON OR PHONE TODAY.
NO SALESMEN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
COMPLETE AND RETURN TODAY FOR WESTCO RATES.
No obligation-No salesman will call.
Name
Residence
Address
City       _
Occupations
Phone: Home
Age _   _
(Please Print)
Prov
Office-
Single   G
Female   P]
Married
Male
Number of years licensed to drive ._
Give number and dates of accidents in last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your fault).
In the last five years
Has your license been suspended? - —
Are you now insured?       Date it expires —
Year of automobile	
Make of automobile	
No. of cylinders  —
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-Sdn, s/w, h/t, conv.  _
Days per week driven to work, train
or bus depot, or fringe parking area
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business (except to
and from work)?	
Car No 1
Car No 2
Yes r  No [j
Yes lJ  No r
Give number and dates of traffic convictions in last 5 years.
This coupon is designed solely to enable non-policy-holders to obtain
an application and rates for their cars.
LIST ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
»1       »2
%
%
%l
/D
%
._l
^mm
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA
BCLC 4 Tuesday, January  27,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
'AMS executives are Uncle Toms
Law student Sheldon Goldberg charges AMS role has become confused with administration.
Goldberg prepared a brief in the fall accusing the
AMS of illegality.
Open letter to John Cherrington:
I noted in Friday's Ubyssey that you propose a
referendum re-making membership in the AMS
voluntary.
As you are well aware, numerous students on this
campus both sympathize with and will support your
referendum. I am certain that you will not be
influenced by such remarks as "as far as I'm
concerned Cherrington is just a right wing shit
disturber" — this is the price one pays for daring to
question or to think.
But perhaps I should offer some unsolicited
advice, in view of my experiences in this matter.
• The report of the lawyers for the AMS stated:
"In our opinion, a student is entitled to refuse
membership in the Society . .. The question of
whether a student may register without payment of
the fees collected by the Board of Governors (or the
Society) is a different matter and the answer to that
question lies with the Board of Governors."
• But in the General Information Bulletin of the
university p. A57 in reference to Student
Organization it is stated: "Every student
automatically becomes a member of the AMS when
he enrolls in the university ...
"The Society levies a compulsory fee . . . "
Well Mr. Cherrington, the problem should be
apparent. A referendum re-making the AMS
voluntary will have no effect. It is the university
administration which compels all student;; to
"automatically become a member of the AMS".
Therefore, I am certain, if all students on this campus
voted to make membership in the AMS voluntary
such a referendum would be irrelevant (at any rate
students would still be forced to pay "a compulsory
fee"). Perhaps the above gives on great insigjit into
the true function of the AMS.
The AMS exists on this campus only as a matter
of policy (not student policy but administration
policy) or at least that is what the Bulletin seems to
indicate. The AMS executive is not independent but
are, in fact, Uncle Toms for the administration.
Just look at the purposes to which the AMS uses
its funds.
$15.00 goes to the SUB. Ask yourselves, is it the
AMS's responsibility to provide cafeteria facilities,
bowling alleys, pool tables and club facilities for the
students or is it the administration's responsibility?
$5.00 to support the various athletic teams' trips.
Again why does the AMS do this?
The remainder goes to subsidize the various
clubs, administrative expenses and political escapades
ofthe AMS.
The political escapades of the AMS are I am sure
the sore point with you, Mr. Cherrington. By what
right does the AMS express collective views and in
fact any views on matters of politics? Why should a
student be forced to support a view on Vietnam,
pollution, birth-control or any other topic that the
AMS selects as a priority? We as individuals have the
right to be disinterested and furthermore the right
' not to be forced to support the views of others if that
is our wish.
Just as an individual is not forced to choose
between being a Protestant, a Catholic or a Jew — i.e.
an atheist holds no view on this priority - so matters
of politics run parallel to this position
It is clear to me that the AMS represents an
infringement on human rights.
There are already enough strains upon the human
mind without the addition of another.
One often gets the feeling of being a rat in a
maze getting electric shocks for not selecting the
"proper path".
Of course our freedom as a student body to
select whatever priority we choose is not interfered
with by the administration. Yet this too is a matter of
policy.
Why should they interfere? The AMS manages to
so dispose itself that it in fact negates any effective
student opinion especially in matters that really
effect students.
Somehow, I get the impression that students are
viewed as adolescents. And traditionally as we well
know, they were. Students were and still are forced
to contribute to the various'political and religious
clubs on campus through the AMS. Have you ever
asked yourself why?
Are any of our parents forced to support a
particular political party or for that matter any
political party? Are they forced to subsidize any
religious views?
Just think of the cry that would be raised if our
professors were forced to support the AMS. There
would be such a sound raised of infringement of
intellectual freedom that the SUB would come down
and crush the Bank of Montreal.
Well we are merely students, and we are so naive!
So Mr. Cherrington, before your attempted
referendum goes on much further, you should inquire
as to your rights in this matter. Ask those who will
decide this matter — not the AMS or the students but
the administration.
If they will not answer you directly in this
matter, I suggest that you make a second referendum
i.e. to abolish the AMS. Then those students who
wish to form an organization can do so, perhaps on
their own.
I will gladly sign such a petition as I am sure
numerous other students will.
Win a Week-End
for two in
San Francisco
6 trips for two will be won by UBC students
between January 30th and March 13th.
Trip includes return air fare, meal and
hotel allowance for 2 days for winner
and friend.
PLUS EXCITING EXTRA PRIZES
EVERY WEEK: Dinner for two at
Hy's Steak House — Canucks Hockey tickets
for two — Evening for two at Oil Can Harry's
Evening for two at the Daisy — Dinner for two
at the Grouse Nest.
Easy to enter! Fill in coupon and get your special Home I Credit Card
We'll mail your special Credit Card to you as soon
as we get the coupon. Every time you use your
Home Credit Card at any of the 298 Home Stations
you are automatically entered in the contest. The
more often you use it the more often you enter.
And the better your chances to win
GET YOUR   FREE WORRY BEADS TOO!
We'll mail you your Worry Beads as soon as we
get your coupon, along with full contest details,
your special Home Credit Card and fascinating
Worry  Bead  story.
# If you now have a regular Home Credit Card phone our Credit Dept., 685-9131  — we will make
arrangements to make it eligible.
WORRY BEADS ARE BIG ON CAMPUS.
Fourteen wooden beads on a
leather thong  .  .  . anti-uptight
baubles to get you  through daily
disasters. And they're yours free
in the mail when you apply for
your special UBC Home Credit Card.
TO: Home Oil Distributors Ltd., 505 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Complete this application form  (please print) and  mail  it to Home Oil. We'll  rush your special
Credit Card to you, plus your FREE Worry Beads!
SURNAME
Christian Names
VANCOUVER ADDRESS (Show Apt. No., Zone No.)
PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS, if different from above. (Street No., Town, etc.)
REGISTRATION No.
Faculty Year
m       HOME   OIL   DISTRIBUTORS   LIMITED
400  ONE BENTALL CENTRE,  505  BURRARD STREET.  VANCOUVER 1.  B.C. Page  12
ADVERTISEMENT
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27,  1970
MARDI GRAS TO HELP FUND
Canadian Paraplegic Association
to Build Halfway House
The Canadian Paraplegic Association's proposed
Hostel House would alleviate two distinct and
presently insurmountable problems in the
rehabilitation of paraplegics and quadriplegics.
The first problem which could be solved
through the benefits of the Hostel House is the
premature discharge of paraplegics who are still in
"mourning" and therefore have not made any
mental adjustment towards accepting their
disability. Although these individuals may have ■
attended the G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre for
a period of six months to one year. Their
mal-adjusted attitude has prevented them from
taking advantage of the physical retraining program.
These individuals need extensive counselling,
involvement in recreation, social involvement and
vocational training, which are difficult, if not
impossible to obtain outside of the Greater
Vancouver Area. The Hostel House or "Half-Way"
House would allow the rehabilitation counsellors of
the Canadian Paraplegic Association to concentrate
on a group of ten to twenty such individuals and
allow them time to find, not only the previously
mentioned counselling, recreation, social
involvement and vocational training but find
suitable housing in their community, and most
important of all, employment. The British Columbia
Division does not expect to keep any individuals in
the Hostel House for periods longer than one year.
The Hostel House, as envisioned by the B.C.
Division would also eliminate the most serious road
block to rehabilitation of Quadriplegics, which is
the lack of accommodation for these severely
disabled individuals who require small amounts of
care and assistance in order to function outside of
institutions, rest homes, etc. At present, we know of
more than thirty quadriplegics living in institutions,
who with suitable accommodation, could not only
live away from the confines and restrictions of
private hospitals, etc., but could find full time
employment, drive their own automobiles and live
full and worthwhile lives rather than merely
"existing" as is their lot today.
The Hostel House, in order to accommodate up
to fifty paraplegics and quadriplegics, would
necessitate the possibility of a fairly large unit with
suites for able-bodied persons as well, thereby
eliminating "colonization". In Europe, where there
are units occupied only by paraplegics and
quadriplegics, the individuals tend to become
introverted and withdraw from the community.
Whereas the aim of the B.C. Division is to integrate
paraplegics and quadriplegics into the community as
normal, physically and financially independent
citizens.
'Games People Pluy"-Theme for Mardi Gras
Mardi Gras 70 presents THE
GAMES PEOPLE PLAY, a
costume ball featuring the all new
Mardi Gras Floorshow, and the
fantastic SPRING. Group
reservations are available. Get
your group together and phone
Peter Phillips at 224-3293. There
will be prizes for best costumes,
consisting of 50 record albums. 20
albums for first prize, 10 albums
for second and third prize, 5
albums for fourth and fifth prize.
Tickets are available at the SUB:
Information Booth, the AMS
office and any fraternity or
sorority member.
RAFFLE PRIZES:
Admiral Home Entertainment Unit: Colour T.V., Stereo Radio and
Record Player. Donated by Woodwards. Ladiess' Diamond Wrist
Watch donated by Birks. 2 night stay for a couple at Harrison Hot
Springs. Grouse Mountain Ski Pass. AM/FM Radio. Binoculars.
Electric Floor Polisher.
AUCTION PRIZES:
Dinner for 12 at Jon's Pizzarama. 6 dinners for 2 at Jon's. Double
pass to the Cave Theatre Restaurant. Air Tour of Vancouver. Gift
certificate from Runge's. Sweater from Margetson & Lee.
Don't Miss
THE
HIGH
FLYING
BIRD
WEDNESDAY
SUB
Auditorium
12:30
Only 25*
ADVERTISEMENT
C KW X
TOP TEN SURVEY
1. MARIJUANA
2. CAMPUS UNREST
3. TAXES
4. POLLUTION
5. GOVERNMENT
6. INFLATION
7. VIETNAM
8. SEX EDUCATION
9. DRUG ADDICTION
10. THE GENERATION GAP
These and other topics of current interest are a  big  part
of "the sound of a Greater Vancouver" — CKWX
Hosts Ed Murphy, Barrie Clark and Don Porter discuss what
you're concerned about.
9 a.m. to noon 12:30 to 3:00 p.m.
6:30 to 9:00 p.m.
COSTUMES
MARDI GRAS SUPPORTERS
CORDIALLY INVITE YOU
TO  COME  UP  AND
CHOOSE A COSTUME
876-5611
Upstairs
400 A W. 5th
at Yukon
1 Blk. Off Cambie
WATTS & CO.
Compliments
to Mardi Gras
1970
MAHON PARK
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
LTD.
987-3911
351 W. 19th  -   North Van
GOOD LUCK
ON
YOUR
GOOD WORK
A Friend ot
MARDI GRAS
MARDI GRAS RAFFLE TICKETS
- BUY YOURS TODAY
AND HELP THE PARAPLEGICS Tuesday, January 27,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
ADVERTISEMENT
Page  13
GOING TO
MARDI
GRAS?
SHOW UP IN A
SELECTION   FROM
OUR VAST ARRAY
OF MARDI GRAS
COSTUMES -
DELUXE
RENTALS
874-6116
1267 Kingsway at Clark
BEST
WISHES
MARDI
GRAS
COMPLIMENTS
from
GEORGIA
HOTEL
Why was I born so handsome ?"
the bad
boys
ragge-shoppe
315 seymour   Vancouver, b.c.
683-3734
This is B. C.
PARAPLEGIC  WEEK
Jan. 16-30 - MADRI GRAS 70
Games People Play
Jan. 27
Jan. 28
Jan. 29
WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL GAME between Paraplegic Olympic Team
and U.B.C. Thunderbirds.
Place: War Memorial Gym
Time: 12:30
Admission: by donation
NOON HOUR CONCERT with the HIGH FLYING BIRD
Place: SUB Auditorium
Time: 12:30
Admission: 25c
PARAPLEGIC BAZAAR. Script money given with admission to gamble
in games of chance and bid for prizes at auction.
Mardi Gras Floorshow with theme of Games People Play.
Admission: $1.50 Adults, $1.00 Students
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Place: Pacific Showmart Building at P.N.E.
MARDI GRAS COSTUME BALL featuring SPRING
Place: Showmart Building at P.N.E.
Time: 9:00 to 1:00
Admission: $5.00 per couple.  Tickets at SUB Information Booth or any
fraternity member.
50 record albums will be awarded for the best costumes.
Mardi Gras Floorshow will be staged again.
ALL PROCEEDS FROM MARDI GRAS '70 WILL BE DONATED TO B.C. PARAPLEGIC HOSTEL HOUSE FUND. THIS FUND IS FINANCING THE CONSTRUCTION
OF A HALFWAY HOUSE BETWEEN HOSPITAL AND COMMUNITY FOR PARAPLEGICS.
ADVERTISEMENT
Jan. 30 Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January  27,   1970
TUESDAY
AIESEC
Meeting,   noon,   SUB   211.
LEGAL   AID
Campus Legal Aid Panels , noon, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, SUB 237
and  237A.
GERMAN   CLUB
Talk by German Settler in B.C. Interior,   noon,   International  House.
UBC   FLYING   CLUB
Ground School, 7:30 p.m., Wilson Air
Service,  Old  Airport.
GREEK   CLUB
Greek dancing, 7:30 p.m., Interna-
tional House.
'tween
classes
DEPARTMENT  OF   MUSIC
Student Beethoven piano retical, Recital Hall,  Music Bldg.,  noon.
FORESTRY    UNDERGRAD   SOCIETY
Blood   drive,   8:30-4:30,   SUB   111,   113,
115,   117.
SPEAKEASY
Student Information Centre, Monday
to  Friday,  noon to  9 p.m.,  SUB 218.
ALPHA   OMEGA,   UKRAINIAN
VARSITY   CLUB
Meeting,   12:30,   SUB   113.
VIETNAM MORATORIUM COMMITTEE
Bill Willmott speaks, 12:30, Henry
Angus   104.
CHESS   CLUB
Registration for UBC championship
chess tournament, 12:30, Tuesday to
Friday,   SUB 216.
WEDNESDAY
THUNDERBIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting,   12:30,   SUB  211.
SOUTHERN   AFRICAN   SUPPORT
COMMITTEE
Open   executive   meeting,   12:30,   SUB
224.
NEWMAN   CENTER
General   meeting,   12:30,   SUB   213.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Derek   Hampton   piano   recital,   12:30,
Recital   Hall,   Music  Bldg.
SCM
Meeting,   noon,   SUB   216F.
HISPANIC   AND   ITALIAN   STUDIES
Lecture    by    Prof.    Eugenio  "Battisti,
noon,  Lasserre  104.   	
pollution
tljursi.iioon
at i.I).
U.S. use of D.D.T.
in AFRICA
. . .  the first in a
Thurs. noon series
Kqh-1-Noou
RESTA
URANT
SUPERB
INDIAN
CURRIES
& CUISINE
TUES - SAT FROM 6
:00 P.M.
796 MAIN STREET
688-5236
SWING  IN
PSYCHEDELIC
SOPHISTICATION
Back   By   Popular  Demand
The Fabulous
Good Fortune
Wed. fo Fri.
8:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Sat. - 8 p.m. to 1 am.
5th Ave. at Fir - 736-4304
THIS COUPON GOOD FOR
$1.00
OFF REGULAR ADMISSION
WITH STUDENT CARD
MONDAY THRU THURSDAY
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE   ORGANIZATION
Testimony    meeting,    noon,    Bu.    2301.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Student recital. 3:30 p.m,, Recital
Hall,   Music  Bldg
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK   CLUB
Meet Mr. Davis of the John Howard
Society, 7:30 p.m., 3255 W. King Edward
SKYDIVING   CLUB
Packing lessons, 7:30 p.m., Clubs
Workroom,   SUB.
THURSDAY
SCIENCE   FICTION   CLUB
Sec    Raquel   Welch   in   "One    Million
B.C.",   noon,   Henry  Angus  104.
PRELAW  SOCIETY
Stewart McMorran, City Prosecutor,
12:30,  Henry Angus 110.
LIBERAL    CLUB
Meet   Russell   Brink,   12:30,   SUB   212
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Pollution Series,  12:30.
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Dancing,   12:30-2:30,   SUB   207-209.
DEPARTMENT  OF   MUSIC
Faculty    viola    recital,    12:30,    Recital
Hall.   Music  Bldg.
FOLK   SONG   SOCIETY
General meeting,   1:30,   SUB  125.
FLYING   CLUB
Lecture   on   C-F104's   by   Capt.   Horn,
12:30,   SUB  213.
FRIDAY
ANGLICAN   AND   UNITED
STUDENTS   COMMITTEE
Meeting to  choose  Campus Chaplains,
noon, SUB 216F.
HAMSOC
General meeting,   noon.   SUB  105B.
SKYDIVING   CLUB
General meeting,  noon,  SUB 105A.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Meeting, noon, SUB 207-209.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
University orchestra recital, 12:30, Rfc
cital Hall,  Music Bldg.
DEBATING   SOCIETY
UBC   vs.   UVic,   3:30 p.m.,   SUB  Auditorium.
CLASSICS'   CLUB
Talk   by   E.   D.    Bozman,   8:00   p.m.,
penthouse  of Buchanan Bldg.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
University orchestra recital, 8:00 p.m.,
Recital Hall,   Music Bldg.
ZOOLOGICAL LOVERS-.
E & B   RESTAURANT
DELUXE WESTERN  CUISINE
7 a.m. - liOO a.m.
4423 W.  10th 224-6322
PATIO.
EAT IN'TAKE OUT. DELIVERY*
3261 W. Broadway
736-7788
Weekdays to 1
a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
	
FEEDING HOURS AT THE SAN FRANCISCO ZOO
(Sloat Blvd. & Ocean Beach):
Lions  2  p.m.   except  Mondays
Leopards & Small Cats 2:35  p.m.
Elephants 3:30 p.m. daily
home Could send you there FREE!
For Details - See Page 11
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3 lines, 1 day 75<P, 3 days $2.00
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
MARDI GRAS COSTI'JIK HALL —
.fan. ::n. Tickets A.M.S — SIM"! info
desk.
Greetings
12
GOT   A   QUESTION?
GOT  A  HANG-UP?
SPEAK   EASY,   SUB   Rm.   218,   228-
XImi*   M"n* - I'-ri.,   12-!)   p.m.
I >< > VOU WANT A HETTER PLACE
to  lay   your  head?  Observers   welcome     at      general      meeting:     ot
Acadia   Co-op   Housing   Assoc.
VOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
to hear Rick and June Stanley
sin**; about Transcendental Meditation   on   Tues..   Jan.   27,   Hu.   104.
THIO FOLKS AT THE YALE UNI-
versity Film Festival said: "Wow!
This film wins first prize!" What
will you say when you see "The
Rose" on Feb. 25? Watch here for
more  details.
Wanted Information
13
SHOULD STUDENTS BUILD
their own housing? Observers
welcome, meeting of Acadia Coop Housing Assoc, Buch. 212, at
12ISO,   Friday,   Jan.   30.
Lost & Found
14
LOST BROWN WALLET IN SUB
cafe phone Duncan 277-6716 or
leave  at   SUB   info,	
LOST: MEN'S ELECTRIC TIM EX
watch. Silver with black cloth
strap: In Brockhall 12 Jan. Phone
Lloyd   224-9248.   Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
15
Special Notices
16
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.	
AQUA SOC GENERAL MEETING
Thurs., Jan. 29, Brock room 303.
Discussion   of   election.	
FREE CKNW SKI BUSES TO
Whistler every Monday & Wed-
nesilay.   Details   on   CKNW   98.
WHISTLER    MOUNTAIN    YOUTH
HOSTEL OPENS
Special weekend packages available
for ONLY $8.00 — Includes two
nights accommodation and a 1 1
meals. Open 7 days a week, beautiful location on Alta Lake—skiing,
snow shoeing, ice skating, fishing,
etc.
Reservations and further information can be obtained at the Canadian Ye 'th Hostels Association,
1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9,
738-3128.	
GOOD FOLK - ROCK SINGER
wants to join band. Has original
material.   Phone   253-1241	
FLEA MARKET, SUN., 3 - 5 P.M.,
Feb. 1, 2054 Trafalgar Petite
Wearables by Evelyn Roth Antiques by Ivan.	
DON'T MISS "AFTER THE FOX"
on Thurs., Jan. 29, 12:30, in Hebb
Th.   Admission   50c _^_
FREE FOLK INTRODUCTION TO
Transcendental Meditation, Tues.,
at  12:30,   Bu.  104.	
POLLUTION — POLLUTION . . .
Thursday noon at Int. House,
"U.S. Use of DDT in Africa" —
the first in a Thursday noon
series.	
THE B. C. CENSOR SAYS . . .
"Warning: Adult Documentary -
Graphic Scenes of Childbirth." An
astute observer claims he also
mumbled: " Great flick ! " One
showing only, Feb. 25. "The
Rose."  Watch   for  more  details.
Travel  Opportunities
17
TRAVELLING   OVERSEAS   ON  A
Budget ?
Then   visit   your   Youth   Hostels   information  desk  which  is open  every
Wedwesday  from  12:30-1:30   p.m.   opposite   the   information   desk   in   the
Students   Union   Building.
Canadian  Youth  Hostels  Association
1406   West   Broadway
Vancouver il, B.C. Tel.  738-3128
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobile For Sale
21
'58     PONTIAC.     RELIABLE    RUN-
ning   condt'n.   Only   $120.   Call  224-
9662,   Philip.
1962     VOLVO     GOOD     CONDITION,
city   tested.   Phone   224-7443.
1961      RENAULT.     GOOD     CONDI-
tion.    $290.    Very   economical   and
reliable. Phone 224-9720. Paul room
No.   428.
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS-SPECIAL-
ists in Graphs, Maps, Text-Book
Illustrations, Complex Formulae.
Scientific Displays, Advertising.
Phone   733-4506.
Miscellaneous
33
TRANSCENDENTIAL M E D 1 TA-
tion presented folk music style,
Tues.   at   12:30,   Bu.   104.
Photography
34
FOR SALE — PENTAX SPOT-
matic, 50 F1.4 lens — like new —
onlv $150: lists for $250. Telephone
228-8380 after  7  p.m.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
GET DRUNK AND LAY YOUR
broad at Mardi Gras '70 Costume
Ball.  A  game  people play.
THE   GREEN   DOOR.
PUBLIC FOLK PRESENTATION
of Transcendental Meditation,
Tues..   Jan.   27th,   12:30,   Bu   104,
GIRLS, PLACE A LIGHT PINK
circle around Feb. 25 on your
calendar. Guys, scribe a heavy
blue line around Feb. 25. Watch
here for more details.
Sewing & Alterations
38
MARDI GRAS '70 COSTUME BALL
Floorshow "The Games People
Play". Tickets: AMS, SUB info
desk.	
Typewriters & Repairs 39
Typing 40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794 — 35c page, 5c
copy.
"EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST]
Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. 321-3838.
Forestry Term Papers.
TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
Please  call  224-6129
ESSAY    TYPING,    35
Ave.   733-5922.
West   19th
EFFICIENT TYPING — MY HOME
20" carriage desk model typewriter.  Phone Ruth — 731-8578.
•'EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC
home typing. Essays, theses, etc.
Neat accurate work, reasonable
rates.  Phone  321-2102.	
I WILL TYPE FOR YOU. CALL
Lorraine 688-2826. 9-12 and 1-6
weekly.
Typing (Cont.)
40
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work: reas. rates; 738-0829
after   nine   a.m.   to   nine   p.m.	
TYPING, PHONE 731-7511, 9:00 -
5:00;   after   6:00   phone   266-6662
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
PART-TIME TELLERS "WANTED
by Bank of Montreal, S.U.B. Mondays and Fridays. Prev. exp. is
required. Phone Mr. Fisher 228-
9021   or  call   at   the  office.	
COOK REQUIRED SATURDAYS,
10-7, $10 day. Call 224-9667 (Ernie
or   Dave).
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —-    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
PART TIME HELP WANTED. NO
soliciting. Please phone Al Tarbet
521-7731.
DO YOU HAVE A CAR? CAN YOU
use an extra $100.00? Can you
spare 5 hours a week? Phone
522-3011 betweeen 3 p.m. and 5
p.m.    for   interview.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Language  Instruction
61A
Music
62
Tutoring
64
CLASSES   IN   EAST   INDTAN
International     Cooking.     731
AND
-4861.
FOURTH   YEAR  ENGLISH
will    tutor    English    100
Phone   263-8090,   $2.50   hr.
MAJOR
and    200.
TUTORING   IN   MATH   -   PHTS.   -
Stat   bv   instructor   (Ph.D.)   $5   per
hour.   Ph.   733-6037.   Eve.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student   Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
al tha Bookstore,
AMS  Publications  Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
1 PAIR 215 CM KNEISSL RED
Stars, never used. What offers?
$179.00  new.   263-4390.	
SKI BOOTS, LANGE PRO 8%
worn twice. Save $25. Head and
Knessil skis % original price.
Phone   263-9188.	
DESK FORMICA TOPPED. 78%
inches x 42 inches, 30 inches
height. TV set 26% ins. x 19 ins.
36 ins. height. 19 inch screen.
"Philco" 3713 Blenheim Street,
Van.   8.   Tel.   731-1749.	
FOR SALE, 72" VOGG SKIS, SIZE
8 Sirelli boots and Poles. Excellent condition. Phone Joan at
266-6669	
8-TRACK CAR STEREO PLUS 4
tapes, 2 speakers, $95.00, or best
offer.   Rm.   328.    224-9755	
MUST SELL ! 1968 PROOF COIN
sets (lc - $1.00) from the Mint.
Call  263-5975  after seven.
Misc. For Sale (Cont.) 71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ON CAMPUS ROOMS, STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe cupboards,
large bunks. Sigma Chi House,
5725   Agronomy,   224-96JJ0.	
LHK ROOMS, MALE STUDENT,
private entrance, kitchen privileges, near bus. Phone after 5
p.m.   733-5255.	
LARGE FURNISHED ROOM FOR 1
student. $34 month rent. Share
kitchen, T.V., etc. Immed. occu-
pancy.   733-7358   eves.	
AVAILABLE JAN. 31st. PRIVATE
room, bathroom. Other facilities,
shared One Other Student. Stu-
dent   landlord.   733-3126.   *	
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
bsmt. ste. near gates on W. 13th
Avail,   imed.   228-9277.
LIBERAL-MINDED GIRL WISHES
to share 4-bedroom house with
rec. room, 7th & Dunbar. Furn-
ished.   732-7774	
COMMUNAL HOUSE HAS ROOM
for male student, senior or grad-
uate,   261-3234	
GREAT ROOM _ ONE MALE —
L.H.K. Private entrance. Real
close. Aval. Feb. 1, 4650 W. 11th.
228-8749
Room & Board
82
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
rooms on campus; two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV,
good food. Come out and see us.
5725  Agronomy,   224-9620,   224-6374.
PHI KAPPA SIGMA. COLOR T.V.
Sauna. Good food, 5785 Agronomy
Road.    224-9684   or   224-7843.	
FREE ROOM BOARD EXCHANGE
for sitting and light duties faculty home. Transport to UBC. Ph.
RE 8-8205
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
FURNISHED SUITE, FULL BATH,
Sep. entrance, near gates. 224-3494.
SENIOR MALE ROOM M, ,AT E
wanted for modern semi-furnished
Reach Ave. Apt. rent $75/mo. Call
Rod   688-9683.	
WANTED FOURTH FEMALE TO
share three bedroom apt. above
campus travel agency. 37.50/mo.
Ph.   224-9159.	
2 BEDROOM BASMT. SUITE,
furn., wash. Kitchen, sep. ent.
Call 228-9858 aft. 5:30 p.m. 3781
W.   20th Ave.	
GIRL TO SHARE FURN. APT. ON
campus. $45 monthly. Call 224-
6356. Sat., Sun. or after 11 week
nights.	
BASEMENT BED SITTING ROOM
fully furnished; fridge, hotplate,
private bath, entrance, $75 month.
Tel. 738-4090 or Math 209. Male
student  only.	
GIRL TO SHARE LGE FURNISH-
ed apartment with same in Kitsilano.    733-0519
Unf. Houses  & Apts.
84
WHAT SHOULD CO-OP HOUSING
mean at UBC? Come and tell us
at general meeting, Acadia Co-op
Housing Assoc, Buch. 212, 12:30,
Fri., Jan. 30.
USE
YOUR  UBC
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, January 27,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
ifeO**'
-dick button photo
TOM WILLIAMSON of the UBC Thunderbirds circles in front of the net to gain position for a shot in
Friday's game against the University of Calgary as Steve Fera (4) waits for a rebound. Not too many
went in for the Birds as they lost the game 3-2, but they made up for it Saturday as they downed
University of Alberta 4-1 and took the Hamber Cup on the two game series by 14-7.
Basket Birds bomb Alberta
schools for wins 9, 10, 11
Reconstructing basketball
games that you didn't see is at the
best of times ludicrous, and with
this in mind, I will proceed .
The Basketball Birds picked up
wins 9 through 11 on the
weekend as they devastated their
Alberta opponents on the three
game road tour.
Friday night was a typical
mis-match as UBC blitzed the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
85-60. The scoring leaders for the
Birds were the two first string
guards Ron Thorsen and captain
Alex Brayden as they each
finished with 19 points.
"We didn't shoot as well as we
Skiers separate and win
UBC's skiers split up this weekend in order to compete in
several open competitions throughout the Northwest.
The Class 'A' men raced in giant slalom races at Stevens Pass,
Washington. Michael Delich placed sixth and Gary Denton was a close
seventh in a field of 75. Al Vittery managed 12th place in the event
that was marred by poor visibilty and an excess of snow.
Meanwhile, at Snoqualmie Pass, Washington, UBC's
cross-country skiers chugged to a third placing in the 3x10 kilometer
relay. Jan Atlung, Per Amlie and Truals Omtvedt were the racers.
In women's skiing, Joy Ward travelled to Penticton's Apex
Alpine where she skied to a second place finish in the 'B' class giant
slalom.
Intramurals
SCHEDULE
BASKETBALL—Jan. 28, 10:00: Dekes
vs. Grad; SAM vs. Sigma Chi.
—Jan. 30, 12:30: Pharm II vs. Grad
St; Eng II vs. For n; Eng VHI vs,
Kappa Sigma.
Playoffs for leagues already completed start Jan. 28. Please check with
Intramural  Office for record of games.
HOCKEY—Jan. 27, 6:20: Eng H vs.
Aggies; 7:35: Beta vs. Dekes; 8:50: Arts
vs. Phi Delta.
—Jan. 28, 6:40: Union vs. Law; 7:55:
Grad 'B* vs. St. Andrew; 9:10: Comm
"A* vs.  Arch.
—Jan. 2?, 6:20: Grad 'A' vs. Alpha
Delta; 7:35: Figi vs. Eng I; 8:50: Kappa
Sigma  vs.   Ed.
WOMEN'S   INTRAMURALS
PE FLOOR HOCKEY, Tuesday: PE II
vs Ed V. Wednesday, Ed II vs. PE IV
and Ed V vs. PE III in semi-finals
Friday: Final game.
Tennis and curling entries due Wednesday. Basketball entries due Feb. 16.
University basketball starts Feb   9.
BRIDGE—Feb. 5, 7 p.m., SUB Rm.
211-2-3: Mixed partner play. Preregister
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday at Men's
Intramural office,  Memorial Gym.
could but we were never in
trouble," said a pleased Bird
Coach Peter Mullins over the
phone from Calgary.
UBC however did manage to
shoot 40 per cent from the field
while the pathetic Dinos shot a
meagre 31 per cent.
The tenth win of the season
came Saturday evening in
Edmonton against the Alberta
Golden Bears as the Birds
administered another clubbing,
91-63.
Before over 2000 partisans the
Birds were able to dominate the
Bears and storm to a 49-30 lead at
the half time break. Mister
Dependable, Bob Molinski, led the
scoring charge with 25 points and
Ron Thorsen was close behind
with 21. The remainder of the
starters all chipped in their share
as Alex Brayden had 17, centre
Terry MacKay 14 and Derek
Sankey took the night off,
bagging only 10. For the Bears,
Larry Nowakk, Al Melnychuk and
Dick De Klerk were all good for 14
points.
Last night the Birds holidayed
in Alberta, bombing the
University of Lethbridge 11 2-49
for their eleventh victory without
a loss.
SP0R TS
Birds take Hamber
Cup, fourth place
If you want to play Foster
Birds' weekend hockey action, you
To start with, you have to toss
out Friday night's game. The
Birds played a tremendous game,
but lost in a heartbreaking finish
to University of Calgary.
Calgary scored with 1:32 left,
to win the the game 3-2.
So that leaves Saturday night —
the game against the University of
Alberta's Golden Bears with the
Hamber Cup at stake. The Birds
triumphed in this one, 4-1, and
took the trophy.
You pick Rick Bardal, the
Birds' veteran goaltender for the
first star. Bardal played by far his
best game to date, provided
inspiration to the team, and
tossed in a few superhuman saves
to keep the Birds on top.
The low score in both games,
not characteristic of the Western
Intercollegiate League, is a tribute
to the play of Bardal and the
Birds' defensive work.
For the second star, you have
to go with captain Jack Moores.
You could get corny and say you
were giving it to him as a
representative of the whole team,
since they played so well that all
deserve a star, but you can also
give it to him for the terrific game
that he played.
He played as solid a game on
the blueline as has been seen here
this year, dishing out bone jarring
checks that the Bears will
remember every time they move
for the next few weeks.
He bounced two bullet-like
drives off the goalpost that are
still echoing in the rink.
A number of times, Moores
found himself leading the
forwards up the ice on end to end
rushes, but was right back to stop
Alberta if they felt the urge to
score.
For the third star, you have a
real problem.
Hewitt and pick three stars of the
have a formidable task.
Barry Wilcox proved to be one
of the fastest men on the ice, and
let go a hard, perfectly placed
screen shot from 15 feet out to
lead off the Birds' scoring.
Mike Darnborough's cannon
shot from the point made it 3-1.
Later he admitted it was a
lucky shot. "I knew it was going
in, but it was just luck that it
picked the top corner."
Dwayne Biagoni and Roy
Sakaki killed penalties so
effectively that Edmonton never
got the upper hand. Wayne
Schaab played his most solid game
this season, and was robbed on
two excellent chances in the third
period. Ken Lemmen checked
fiercely in both games.
You can go through the whole
roster that way, because that was
the kind of game the Birds played.
The play was almost a repeat
of Friday night, but more things
went right for UBC. The Birds
controlled the majority of the
play in both games, but two junk
goals by Calgary made the
difference Friday night.
As a last ditch effort Friday
coach Bob Hindmarch pulled
Bardal with a minute remaining in
favor of the extra attacker, and it
almost worked. With five seconds
left, Calgary goaltender Dave
Margach chopped a hard shot and
the puck lay in the crease inches
from the goal line while players
swung wildly at it until the bell
sounded.
The Birds were outshot in both
games, 37-33 by Calgary and
41-33 by Alberta. However most
of the oppositions' shots were
long ones as a result of the stiff
defence at the blueline.
It now appears likely that the
Birds will play Calgary in the
semi-finals, assuming the Birds
make a playoff berth.
Worry Beads:
HOME CALLS THEM
Anti-Up-Tight Baubles!
For Details - See Page 11
u
PHYSICS SOCIETY PRESENTS
PETER SELLERS
BR ITT EKLAND
in
AFTER THE FOX
THURS., JAN. 29 - HEBB TH.
12:30 Noon - 50c
-  COLOR  AND CINEMASCOPE  -
ft
ADVANCED LEARNING PROGRAMS
iCATIONS      .
• 3A/| IM IVH i-
TRAIN YOUR MIND TO STUDY
685-7929
(FOR FREE INFORMATION) Page   16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27,   1970
Blood
The Red Cross blood drive had
a steady turnout Monday, said E.
A. Jonah, one of the registrars.
The blood drive will be in SUB
from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
This year the drive will be on
until February 6 to reach a goal of
3500 pints.
Free coffee, coke, and cookies
will be served.
—dave enns photos
****V :*.:■
Grad studies against teaching courses for profs
The faculty of graduate studies' executive committee
has expressed disapproval of a recommendation to set up
a board of university instruction.
Recommendation 10 of the Senate Committee
Report on Long Range Objectives proposes that a board
of university instruction be created consisting of
acknowledged good teachers to arrange instruction in
university teaching in each department.
Educational psychology and classroom and
laboratory instruction will be emphasized.
The recommendation also suggests this instruction
should be compulsory for all PhD students who intend to
teach in the university.
At the faculty of graduate studies meeting Jan. 22 the
executive moved to take a strong stand against the
recommendation on the grounds that teaching
improvement is best carried informally and that there is
no evidence of improved teaching because of instruction
in educational psychology or in classroom and laboratory
techniques.
The executive also moved such instruction should not
be made compulsory, but freely available to students who
intend to teach.
Graduate student association president Art
Smolensky said these motions did not pass unanimously
through the executive.
"Recommendation 10 hasn't been discussed in a
general meeting in the faculty of graduate studies yet. It
goes before the membership next Thursday."
Smolensky said there are two grad students who
attend grad studies meetings, but their offical roles are as
participant observers only."
They have no votes.
"We have written to the dean requesting votes for
them and we used fairly strong language in our request,"
he said.
Smolensky doesn't agree with the executive's
rejection of recommendation 10.
"Grad students should be given some form of
teaching instruction as part of their curriculum," he said.
"When they get their PhDs they'll be the next people to
teach."
"We should arrange to have better teaching and this is
one way of doing it."
Smolensky suggested that one or two grad students
could share with profs responsibilities for courses.
They could be put in charge of some of the lectures
under the guidance of the prof.
"The grad student association is very concerned with
the whole idea of teaching with grad students. We would
like to improve the quality of instruction given by grad
students, by giving them more instruction on how to
teach," Smolensky said.
Last 2 jurors finally picked in Sir George trial
MONTREAL (CUP) - Lawyers for the first 10
defendants on trial over the Sir George Williams
University computer-burning acceded to the final two
jurors Thursday.
Acceptance of jurors 11 and 12 followed the
appearance of more than 210 prospective jurors and an
unusual press gang tactic by the court.
When the first 160 prospects yielded only 10 jurors
acceptable to the defence trial Judge Kenneth Mackay
sent police out Wednesday to round up 100
English-speaking prospective jurors from Montreal streets.
Before the final concession by the defence, Mackay
said another 100 could be made available, if defence
lawyers were discussing "numbers."
"We're just concerned with making the right
decision," said one of the defence lawyers.
The defence used most of the 120 peremptory
challenges — disallowing prospective jurors outright
without questioning — in choosing the jury, and
questioned all other prospects closely about prejudice
arising from racism and sensationalist press coverage of
the SGWU incident.
Although no prospective jurors admitted to racial
prejudice, many said sensationalized reports they read of
the incident last Feb. 11 had prejudiced them against the
defendants.
Judge Mackay disallowed defence challenges that
whites might be affected by "latent and unconscious
prejudices... with regard to black people."
All 10 defendants are black citizens of Trinidad and
Tobago.
The remainder of the 89 defendants charged with
various counts of conspiracy in the Sir George case will
have trial dates set March 2.
The computer-burning incident occurred after
Montreal riot police were called into the occupied
computer centre, where students were demanding a
balanced inquiry into charges of racism brought against a
Sir George professor.
The defendants insist that the original cause for the
protest — alleged racism at Sir George — has been buried
under the sensationalism aroused by the
computer-burning.
HOW -ANEW SERVICE
EUROPE BY CAR
Buying tax-free cars
Leasing (repurchase)
Renting—lowest   rates
(sample: Volkswagen from
Amsterdam $168 for 30 days,
3000   K.M.   included).
A complete service, including
delivery,   insurance,
shipping,  trip  planning.
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744  Cambie   St.
Vancouver   15,  B.C.
Phone:   327-1162
"LONELY
SEVENTEEN"
in  Mandarin  with
English   and   Chinese
subtitle
Shown on
Jan. 27 and 28
7:30 p.m.
at
OLYMPIA THEATRE
2381 E. Hastings
Student: $1.00
QUESTIOM?
HRNG-UP?
STUDENT-RUN - STUDENT- ORGAN I ZED!
SUB 218      /Aon.- Fri. 12 to 9        PH. 228-3706
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Elections for A.M.S. Executive will be held as
follows:—
FIRST SLATE:
President,   Secretary,   Ombudsman,   Co-ordinator   of
Activities
Nominations Open - Jan. 28
Nominations  Close  -  12:00 Noon Feb.  5
Election - Feb. 11
SECOND  SLATE:
Vice-President,  Treasurer,  Internal Affairs  Officer,
External Affairs Officer
Nominations Open - Feb. 4
Nominations Close - 12:00 Noon Feb. 12
Election - Feb.  18
Tomorrow
And all week
GALLIMAUFRY THEATRE
SUB BALLROOM - 12:30 - 1:30
WED. - FRI. - JAN. 28 - 30
Admission 50c
SPECIAL EVENTS   CONTEMPORARY ARTS

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126176/manifest

Comment

Related Items