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Array This is why we need an equity officer SINCE 1918
SEPTEMBER 13,2010
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER IV
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING
• PUBLISHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
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ARSHY MANN
^ news@ubyssey.ca
( A back to school party turned ugly Saturday as multiple police officers were
I   assaulted while attempting to break
. 'i up a large altercation that took place-
at the fraternity village.
Police were called in around
11:30pm to handle a disturbance in
the village, which is home to seven fra-'
ternities and the Panhellenic House.
■ for Sororities. According to the RCMP,
the two local officers who arrived orr
scene were confronted by a fifteen-
person brawl. When they attempt-
M ed to break up the fight, they were
I | "swarmed" in the courtyard, result-
'f. ing in minor injuries.
They then called for reinforcements
from outside RCMP and police forces.
Two people were detained for violating the Liquor Control Act, but have
since been released without charge.
No one was arrested for assaulting
the officers.
In addition, according to an RCMP
. media release, officers were approached by a male and informed
that someone with a gun was present. Police searched the area but no
,   gun was located.
The party was called "Golf Pros and
Tennis Hoes," and was thrown by the
Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity (DEKE),
who declined to comment on the incident. Members of that fraternity
have also been ordered not to speak
to the media.
The altercation threatens the relatively harmonious relationship that
has existed between the fraternities,
police and the university over the
past years.
"I've been here five years and I don't
recall anything to that degree, where
we have fifteen people in an all out
brawl," said Staff Seargent Kevin Kenna, who heads the University RCMP
Detachment.
He also said that this is the third violent incident this week in which the
RCMP has gotten involved in the fraternity village.
"We had to break up a fight there on
early Saturday morning and there was
another incident earlier in the week
where an individual got a broken jaw,
broken bones and [went] in the hospital," he said.
' In a statement regarding the incident, UBC VP Students Brian Sul-
l livan chastised the fraternities for
what occurred.'.
"The numbers were far beyond
what could be managed," he said. "The
[fraternities must take responsibility
for all individuals they host at their
parties and in their houses. Many
clearly failed in this duty."
He went on to say that "UBC will work
with the RCMP, student and alumni fra- ►
ternity leadership, international fraternity headquarters and all those involved
to address the illegal behavior displayed
and ensure it is not repeated."
Inter-Fraternity Council (IFC) President Matt Parson said that he was uncertain about the actual events that occurred on Saturday.
"It's very cloudy what happened last
.night," said Parson. "Of course our
first priority is the safety and security of all of our members."
• He claimed that the people who
caused the incident itself were non-
fraternity members.
"It was people who were not really welcome here, asked to leave, and
were causing trouble. And honestly,
■ that could happen anywhere," he said.
"It's unfortunate that the fraternity
systems are being taken advantage of
by people outside of the UBC system
for the social activities that we offer."
According to Parson, the IFC will be
conducting its own investigation into
what happened and is also considering implementing an identification system in order to keep non-students out.    ',
He also pointed out that no gun had
been found by authorities!
"Itwas almost hearsay," he said. "It's
unfortunate that rumours are being published really when it's just one drunk  f
person's clouded recollection that's being reported." tl
PRIVATE
PROPERTY 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2010.09.13
SEPTEMBER 13,2010
VOLUME XCII,  N°IV
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sally Crampton : associate.news@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Anna Zoria: associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Jan Turner: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
Matt Wetzler: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
AD TRAFFIC
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
AD DESIGN
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Kenji Hayakawa Paul Bucci
Kathy Yan Li Yooji Cummings
Ginette Monaco Michael Thibault
Clare Van Norden Jon Chiang
Katarina Grgic Gerald Deo
Ashley Whillans Karina Palmitesta
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
SI
University
Press
Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
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EVENTS
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 15
FILM SOCIETY SCREENING: GET HIM TO THE
GREEK
From September 15th-19th the UBC Film
Society will be showing Get Him to the
Greek, a comedy from the director of
Forgetting Sarah Marshall and starring
Jonah Hill • 7pm, Norm Theatre, $2.50
for Film Soc. members, $5 for non-
members.
UBC FARM WEDNESDAY MARKET
Visit the UBC Farm's weekly on-campus
market, every Wednesday from outside
the UBC Bookstore, featuring an assortment of fresh, organic UBC Farm produce. Cash only; bring your own bags. •
11:30am-1:30pm, outside the UBC Bookstore.
CREATIVITY KILLS HER
UBC BFA Karen Tennant presents
Creativity Kills Her. an exploration of
death and the female body using large-
scale installations of paint, fabric and
resin. • 10am-4pm, runs until Sept.
17, AMS Art Gallery, contact Kate
Barbaria at sacart@ams.ubc.ca for more
information.
WALTER GAGE T0ASTMASTERS SPEECH CONTEST
This club is dedicated to helping people
improve their communication and leadership skills. This evening, they will be having a humorous speech and table topics
contest. Come by to watch club members
deliver fun and entertaining speeches. •
7pm-9pm, Room 155, IKBLC.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 16
SHIAMAK'S BOLLYWOOD DANCE
The Dance Centre's popular Discover
Dance! Noon series leaps into a new
season with Shiamak's Bollywood
Jazz. India's top choreographer, Shia-
mak Davar, has revolutionized modern
Indian dance through his choreography
for Bollywood blockbusters and his
international teaching institute. The
Shiamak's Bollywood Jazz Team, Vancouver will showcase Davar's dynamic
fusion of Western jazz and hip hop with
Indian dance techniques, in a performance bursting with energy and fun.
• Noon, Scotiabank Dance Centre, 677
Davie St., $10 regular, $8 for students
and seniors.
DIGITAL TATTOO: WHAT'S YOURS?
Are you actively, safely managing your
online presence? If someone searches
for you, what will they find? Can you
translate your social media skills beyond your personal life to an academic
or professional setting? Are you concerned about your privacy and the way
your online activity is monitored? Find
out more ways to manage your digital
rights and responsibilities at this one
hour workshop. • 12pm-1pm, Lillooet
Room 301, IKBLC, register at events.
tag.ubc.ca/events/view/1069.
Teach English
Abroad
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
• Intensive 60-Hour Program
■ Classroom Management Techniques
■ Detailed Lesson Planning
• ESL Skills Development
1 Comprehensive Teaching Materials
• Interactive Teaching Practicum
• Internationally Recognized Certificate
1 Teacher Placement Service
• Money-Back Guarantee Included
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordsemiiiars.ca
Send us your
events and get the
word out to the
rest of campus.
e vents@ubyssey ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca
CAMPUS & COMMUNITY PLANNING
www.planning.ubc.ca
Public Open House
USB Child Care Project
You are invited to attend an open house to view and comment on a proposal for a
children's day care in the University Services Building (USB) for 37 child service care
spaces. Staff from Child Care Services and C&CP will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about this project.
Date:Tuesday, September 28, 2010 4:00 - 6:00 PM
Location: Lunch Room, USB, 2329 West Mall
For directions visit: www.maps.ubc.ca. For more information on
this project, please visit the C&CP website: www.planning.ubc.ca
Main Mall
Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services, karen.russell@ubc.ca
This event is wheelchair accessible. For more information about assistance for persons
with disabilities, e-mail rachel.wiersma@ubc.ca 2010.09.13/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
Onlookers wonder whether the cube will be a benevolent dictator as they explore its mystical interior. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
A different kind of cubicle
PAUL BUCCI
pbucci@ubyssey.ca
The new Student Union Building (SUB) architects, HBBH +
BH, have erected a field station in the current SUB's south
wing, called the SUB Project
Design Cube. It's built exactly
as it sounds: four sleek glass
walls encasing working architects. And yes, they will be
watching us.
According to architect J.
Bruce Haden, the Cube exists
to immerse and integrate the architects in the life ofthe campus
during the design phase of the
project.
"It is our intention that we
will be doing work out here...
Site offices are common during
the design phase," said Haden.
The new SUB is expected to
be completed in 2014, after
which the current SUB will be
renovated.
"This building, which was
built in 1968, at a time when
the student population was
20,000, no longer fits with the
mission of the student society," said AMS President Bijan
Ahmadian.
The Cube was built by Dirtt
Environmental Solutions for
roughly $30,000 and will stay
up for at least one year. The cost
of building came out of the architect fees, according to AMS
VP Administration Ekaterina
Dovjenko.
The architects hope that students will come in and share their
ideas on the design as it progresses. There will bea team inside the
Cube, a screen displaying the current progress of the project, and
eventually a model.
"Just come in to tell us what
you think and have a chat," said
New SUB Project Coordinator
Andreanne Doyon.
"We wanted to make sure
that student input and student engagement is assessed
from across the board," said
Dovjenko.
"You have the workshops
and you have the design char-
rettes, and then you have the
blog, you have the Facebook
page, and the Twitter—that's all
great—but then you have the face
to face contact...If they have any
feedback that they want to give
to the architects, they can do
that here," she said *u
Bigger is better: Arts's Averill aces Deans' Debate
YOOJI CUMMINGS &
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey,ca
A crush of students dressed in
capes and bearing faculty colours poured into a small corner
of the SUB on Friday, in anticipation of UBC's annual deans'
debate.
The debate was moderated by The Ubyssey's coordinating editor, Justin McElroy, who quizzed the deans on
topics ranging from job prospects to how useful each faculty would be in the event of a
zombie apocalypse.
The new dean of Arts, Gage
Averill, set the tone of the debate with a quick quip about the
perception that Arts students
can't get jobs and the audience
responded with cheers.
Dean of Human Kinetics Bob
Sparks regaled the crowd with
a decidedly cringe-worthy yet
charming slam poetry presentation on the inter-disciplinary
value of a Human Kinetics degree and the need for a healthy
body.
The new Forestry Dean John
Innes, who had the most enthusiastic supporters at the beginning ofthe debate, declared
that his faculty was the best of
its kind in the world. "We are
the crown jewel in the crown
of UBC."
Dean Tyseer Aboulnasr of Applied Sciences responded to a
question about gender inequity in engineering by arguing
that although there may never
be an equal gender split in engineering, the women who are
in the program are as qualified
as the men.
"The only woman sitting here
at this table is an engineer," she
pointed out.
When asked what animal his
faculty would be, Land and Food
Systems Dean Murray Isman responded without a beat.
"We're a cow. Cows produce
milk. Cows produce meat. Cows
plow land. Cows do work. Cows
do it all," he said.
But the debate was ultimately decided by Averill's response
to a question on why Arts students would be best prepared
against the inevitable zombie
apocalypse, despite their lack
of tangible skills, in the head-
to-head portion of the debate.
Averill, a specialist on Car-
ribean musical anthropology,
where the concept of the zombie originates, wowed the crowd
with his intimate knowledge of
all things undead.
Whereas all ofthe other deans
argued for cooperation amongst
the faculties when it came to a
zombie attack, itwas Averill who
made the case that Arts students
alone were prepared to defy the
zombies.
"Who better to resist the zom-
bification process, the removal
of will and soul and mind than
students who possess the mind,"
argued Averill.
Averill won the debate, which
was decided by audience applause, with Forestry and Engineering coming in as close seconds. AMS VP Administration
Ekaterina Dovjenko presented
a beaming Averill with a plaque.
Sauder Dean Daniel Muzyka
was unavailable and sent Senior
Associate Dean Brian Demmels
in his stead. Simon Peacock, the
dean of science, decided not to
participate in the debate.
"While I appreciate that this
event could be viewed simply
as fun, I feel strongly that we
are delivering the wrong message to our students, particularly new students, that we feel
(even in jest) that one Faculty is
better than another," he said in
an email to the AMS. tl
NEWS BRIEFS
METAL ROD ENSNARES TRANSIT
SYSTEM FRIDAY MORNING
Last Friday's morning rush became
a headache for TransLink, as commuters faced up to five hours of delays for the SkyTrain. A metal rod
on the tracks near Main Street Station brought an Expo Line train to
a halt at 7am, forcing passengers
to cram on already crowded buses. Signs told passengers at Waterfront Station that trains weren't
traveling eastbound and everyone
should "expect lengthy delays." It's
estimated that one million people
use public transit in Metro Vancouver and 240,000 people take the
Expo and Millennium Lines
STUDENTS WHO CHEAT DON'T
CARE ABOUT THE CONSEQUENCES
According to a study led by U BC
Professor Del Paulhus, students
who cheat more likely suffer
from a personality disorder
than academic woes. A series
of three studies published by
the American Psychological Association looked at the connection between students who had
cheated and students whose
personality tests revealed narcissism, machiavellianism and
psychopathy, traits collectively
known as the Dark Triad.
The studies showed students
who weren't worried about punishment were not morally inhibited or felt that cheating was
a perfectly acceptable way to
achieve their goals. "Incentives
such as high grades and scholarships seem to activate dishonesty in these individuals,"
the paper stated. "The achievement goals shared by most college students trigger cheating in
psychopaths alone."
GOVERNMENT PUTS TWO BILLION
DOLLARS INTO LOAN PROGRAM
The federal government had to
move quickly to ensure students
would receive student loans, as
the pre-legislated federal limit of
$15 billion meant approximately 50,000 students would have
been without financing for this
academic year.
Human Resources and Skills
Development Minister Diane Fin-
ley pushed through a $2 billion
extension to the student loan
program when it appeard the
limit was going to be breached.
"The economic downturn resulted in a 10 per cent increase
in student loan demand, from
2008-09 to 2009-10, as more
students decided to begin or
continue post-secondary education," an HRSDC spokesperson told the Canadian University Press. The HRSDC hadn't expected to reach their $15 billion
limit until 2014-15. Finley's order-
in-council recognized the problem and that a long-term solution would need to be reached.
"What this shows us is that
there will have to be, sooner
than we thought, actual legislative changes made to the Student Financial Assistance Act
—and it will have to be made
in Parliament if we are to continue to rely on a loans-based financial assistance system," Canadian Federation of Students
National Chairperson Dave Molenhuis said. 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2010.09.13
New dean set to en-Gage arts
Ethnomusicologist to orchestrate UBC's largest faculty
ASHLEY WHILLANS
awhillans@ubyssey.ca
On September 7, Gage Averill
shared his first day at the UBC
Vancouver campus with thousands of fresh-faced undergraduate students, as the recently appointed dean of Arts.
When The Ubyssey caught up
with Averill on his second day,
he was busy settling into his
spacious, still half-empty office,
and into the role he will hold for
the next six years as the dean of
UBC's largest faculty.
As an ethnomusicologist, an
anthropologist of music, orchestrating one ofthe most diverse
student populations on campus
is an "ideal fit" for Averill, who
thrives off of the challenges of
working with different cultures,
different sounds and different
kinds of people.
Averill's list of unique and
constantly evolving skills include playing the Trinidadi-
an steel pan, Afro-Cuban percussion and the Irish concertina, among other things. But
despite his obvious auditory
interests, music was not Averill's first career choice after
graduating from high school.
Instead, he began studying
Forestry at the University of
Washington. However, Averill
soon dropped out, thanks to,
amongst other things, his second year calculus final.
"One of the things that motivated me to drop out was that
I wanted to do things that I
couldn't do in my studies....I
was thinking of gearing up
for the Olympics in kayak slalom and I wanted to play music and involve and relate music to community organizing,"
he explained.
After leaving university, Averill kept busy. He started the
On the Horizon, the first world
*
Arts students: your new Dean. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
music radio program in Northwest America, played in an Irish
band and organized local music
festivals, including the Northwest Folklore Festival, one ofthe
largest folk festivals in the United States.
While these talents did not always pay the bills, he took on jobs
outside of his field of interest to
continue pursuing whathe loved:
music and community work.
"I found my life gravitated
to music performance, music
production, radio and a bit of
study of the music I was presenting in these contexts," he
explained. "I was a lay ethnomusicologist without the degree
and supporting myself in other
ways—from tractor driving to
school bus driving to community organizing."
Due to an injury, these odd
jobs quickly came to an end.
Wondering what to do with
himself, he spotted an ad for
the University of Washington,
which at that time was in desperate need of students. Wasting no time, he jumped at the
opportunity to return to university to complete his BA in
ethnomusicology and has never looked back.
Going on to graduate with a
PhD, he has since chaired the music department at New York University, worked at the University
of Toronto and Columbia University, and has taught at Princeton
as a visiting professor.
Regardless of his experiences
working at other noteworthy institutions, Averill was honoured
to be offered a position at UBC.
"Having gone to school in
Washington state, this was always the region thathad the greatest call for me. The dynamism of
UBC, its progressive nature, student body and location were all
attractors," Averill said.
As far as his goals within the
position, Averill says his focus
is on the university experience.
"A dean can help set a tone, and
I would like to help set that tone
and make sure that this is a place
where magic can happen for students, staff and faculty—that the
university is a place where we
are really free to innovate, play
and interact with the community," he added.
Averill is excited to embark
on a learning tour of UBC, take
his first kayak trip and push
off into the uncharted territory that comes along with organizing the faculty.
"I am looking forward to creating an educational experience
that is dynamic, in sync with
how students learn and that is
the best we can do in the classroom. There is an inspiration
role that can happen as dean,
and if I am lucky it will happen and I will be able to work
on important areas we want to
develop." tl
I found my life
gravitated to music
performance, music
production, radio...
GAGE AVERILL
NEWLY APPOINTED DEAN OF ARTS
Bookstore to rent
to students
KATARINA GRGIC
kgrgic@ubyssey.ca
At UBC, you can rent a dorm, a
bike and a locker—now you can
also rent your textbook.
A new program by UBC's bookstore allows students to rent their
textbook instead of purchasing
it. The program has been widely
implemented in the US. UBC is
the second Canadian university
to try renting textbooks.
The new option saves students 55 per cent from the new
price ofthe textbook. For example, Essential Cell Biology rents
for $90. The same book's purchase price is $200.
There are 25 titles to choose
from for renting, most of which
are used in Science courses. A
textbook is intended to be rented
out for a term, and due back two
days after the final exam of the
course the textbook corresponds
to. "The textbook is expected to
be returned in the same condition it was rented, though it may
have some markings," explained
Rebecca Irani, the bookstore's
marketing and communications
manager. She went on to say the
markings could not be excessive.
The only catch is that a student has to be nineteen years of
age and own a valid credit card.
If the book is not returned on
time, the student will be charged
(on their credit card) a non-return
fee for the full price of a replacement and a processing fee.
If the pilot program is successful, the bookstore will add more
titles to the list of rentals. "So far,"
said Irani, "the interest has been
siginificant. We hope to expand on
it and increase the rentals for the
next rush period in January." tl
TECHNICAL & COMMERCIAL STUDENTS
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MEDICAL
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Got what it takes to be an intrepid j oumalist? Prove
it by coming to write for The Ubyssey news team.
arshy mann | news@ubyssey.ca \| X      EUBYSSEYc 2010.09.13/UBYSSEY.CA/NATIONAL/5
NATIONAL
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
RCMP threaten to cut Criminology
funds to Simon Fraser University
DAVID PROCTOR
The Peak(SFU]
BURNABY, BC (CUP)-After receiving harsh criticism from a
Simon Fraser University criminologist over their handling of
the Robert Pickton investigation,
the RCMP's deputy commissioner threatened to stop funding the
department.
SFU Criminology Department
Director Robert Gordon told the
media that the RCMP's "arrogance" slowed the investigation
of serial killer Robert Pickton's
case. On August 22, RCMP Deputy Commissioner Gary Bass responded in a lengthy e-mail that
was later obtained by the Victoria Times Colonist.
"I would like to suggest that
you should be more careful in
speaking on issues where you
have no direct personal knowledge or where you may not be
getting accurate information fed
to you," Bass stated in the email.
However, the RCMP recently
renewed their contribution of
$4 million for the next five years
to fund the Canadian Urban Research Studies program at SFU,
the status of which was called
into question in the email.
"The ongoing bias you display
against the RCMP in [issues]
such as this have caused many
of us to ask why we would want
to continue to be in thatpartner-
ship given this apparent lack of
supp ort f rom the head of the department," threatened Bass, who
originally had a hand in creating the program five years ago.
The email was also copied to
approximately 25 high authority figures, including top RCMP
brass, municipal police chiefs
and the president of SFU.
The email came in response
to a 400-page report released
by the Vancouver Police Department on August 20 places significant blame on the Mount-
ies over the past 10 years, further echoing Gordon's assertions
about the bungled missing-women investigation.
"It was clear that the RCMP
were caught flat-footed. They
were not prepared for the release of that report at that time,"
Gordon told The Peak
"It's one thing to send me a
personal email chastising me,"
explained Gordon. "But the
thinly-veiled threat to [pull]
funding from the [criminology department] touched a raw
nerve with a lot of people."
Despite the intimidating tone
of the email, both Gordon and
Bass have insisted his comments
were not intended as a threat to
pull funding from the institute.
"I figured this was a knee-jerk
reaction and he would ultimately regret doing it," stated Gordon
about his first impression of the
email, although he noted that he
responded to Bass' comments
privately.
"It was something that needed to be responded to because it
touches on the very core of critical inquiry, which is what a university is usually all about. We're
not servants ofthe state."
During a public interview two
weeks ago, Bass restated that his
comments were not serious. "It
was a comment I made based
on concerns that had been addressed to me," Bass reiterated
in an interview on September 3.
"We have no intention of pulling
away from that contract. We have
a great relationship with SFU."
Since the email was made public, Gordon has received numerous phone calls and emails from
academics across Canada praising him for not backing down.
"I have no intention of sitting
in a corner and cowering because
of what Gary Bass wrote to me. I
will continue to advocate for what
I see as important in this province—police reform. I don't intend
to stop or slow down in anyway."
Holy street corner busking, Batman!
The Dark Knight demands your respect. ELI GARLIN PHOTO/THE CHORD
LINDA GIVETASH
The Cord (Waterloo]
WATERLOO, Ont. (CUP)- "I know
[busking] is not... popular and
most people, especially people
in university, look down upon
it," said Toronto's Batman.
After a weekend of cheering
crowds across Waterloo, Ontario
as part of the 22nd annual Busker Carnival, Batman revealed
the challenges and benefits of
working as a street performer.
Batman declined to provide his
real name.
Only starting in 2006, he is
fairly new to the game of busking.
He didn't officially assume
his role as Toronto's Caped Crusader until May 2009. "I never planned on being a busker-
it kind of fell into my lap," he
explained.
The job is not as simple as it
appears, with social repercussions associated with it.
"I see on the internet that people think buskers are stupid and
homeless," he said.
"Yeah, I realize I'm dressed
up as Batman, but I'm still a
human being, that would go a
long way."
Batman noted that street performances are a tradition that
has endured the ages.
"Busking is one of the oldest
jobs in the world, right up there
with drug dealing and prostitution and tax collectors and yet
people think that [only] tax collectors are very traditional," he
commented.
While street performances
can result in negative backlash,
festivals like the Busker Carnival provide a more welcoming
atmosphere.
"We don't have to worry about
getting kicked out and we're
treated like actual performers
as opposed to scum."
Despite the job's difficulties,
Batman says it's the only life
imaginable for those inclined.
"Most [buskers] would agree
they wouldn't want to spend
their energy doing anything
else," he said.
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ALL AGES WELCOME!
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AT THE UBC FARM
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 17
3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
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thi umvekiiy or urns™ wiun
DRINKS WITH THE
DESIGN TEAM
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 16th
IN THE GALLERY LOUNGE 5:30-7:30PM
CH27SUB
PROJECT
Thursday September 16th in The Gallery Lounge 5:30-7:30pm
We are starting the design process for the new SUB! We are celebrating this
with 'SUB jam' drinks with the design team in The Gallery Lounge after our
design and sustainability charrettes on Thursday
September 16th from 5:30-7:30pm.
This will be a unique and exciting opportunity to be actively involved in the
design evolution of this pivotal UBC landmark, and we hope that you can
join us for the creative dialogue. So come have a drink, or two, and come talk
to us about the New SUB Project!
SEPTEMBER
1 7th & 24th
OCTOBER 1st
SOUTH PLAZA
OUTDOORS —SUB
10:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
.V 2010.09.13/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/7
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE ANNA ZORIA»associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
On the road and on your plate
Students make 3000 mile trek to see small farms first-hand
KENJI HAYAKAWA
Contributor
When a group of seven UBC students and alumni wanted to learn
more about the conditions faced by
local farmers across North America, they got on their bikes and started pedaling.
They biked 3000 miles across
North America in defence of global
food sovereignty. Food sovereignty
is defined on the group's website as
"the right and ability of an individual or community to grow or raise
an ample quantity of healthy ecologically sustainable food." This
is a right that many believe is still
not widely respected due to government and corporate policies
and practices.
By biking across North America,
11 riders aimed to raise awareness
as well as a sum of $ 10,000 US to donate to farmers in Bolivia. Among
the riders were UBC students Dylan
S.J. Rawlyk (Science), liana Fonar-
iov (Arts), Natalie Carver (Arts) and
Rodrigo Samayoa (Arts), as well as
UBC alumni Amelia Lukic-Kegel,
Barrett Swinhart and Benjamin
Amundson. The daunting 3000
mile route started in Pordand, Oregon, continued through Washington, Idaho, Montana, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan and New York, until finally
arriving in Boston. The journey
was completed in 57 days. The average riding distance per day was
approximately 70 miles.
Riders on the Food Tour, somewhere in the American midwest. PHOTO COURTESY OF RODRIGO SAMAYOA
Each night during the trip, a differ entlocal farm, NPO or NGO provided food and shelter for the riders. It also showed them the situation on the ground. Meeting with
local farmers revealed the difficulties of getting locally grown options
into large chain stores. For instance,
Fonariov reports via the group's official blog how a Save-On-Foods
branch in Clarkston, Washington
supplied their cherries, apples and
peaches from California, despite
the staff's wish to source produce
locally. Some major obstacles for
change, according to Fonariov, are
company policies upheld by grocery stores against buying directly from producers.
Farmers across the continent
are having difficulty finding places
where they can sell their produce,
said Carver. She tells the story of
two organic farmers in South Dakota: "Though Bill and Julie have
astounding productivity with their
produce and animals, they do not
have a market oudet. Bill told us that
there is no demand for their organic products and so no connection
exists between them and would-be
consumers."
The spiritual side of local farming also made a deep impression
upon the riders. FromHeavenly Hills
Harvest farm, located in Grandview,
Washington, Rawlyk tells the story
of afarmer named Ben who started
working the land just four years ago
without anyprevious experience, as a
way of addressing the issue of food
security. Rawlyk writes that Ben's
"reasons for farming have since diverged from the former, buthave fo-
cusedon the beauty ofwatching [his]
efforts grow into wonderful plants."
Samayoa recounts one particularly rich evening he spent at a
ranch in Twodot, Montana: Attheir
beautiful ranch we had some conversations about many topics including the history of the land,
nearby Indian reservations, beef
production, all while eating some
delicious burgers they had prepared for us." vl
To find out more on how to contribute, as well as for detailed,
day-to-day reports ofthe trip, visit the Farm Tour of America's official website at bikeacrossameri-
ca.wordpress.com.
Belkin Gallery hosts modern MFA works
Sydney Hermant's "After Second Nature," dripping at the Belkin. JON CHIANG PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
CLARE VAN N0RDEN
Contributor
The Belkin Art Gallery's latest
showing, Here Today, Gone Today, is a weird and wonderful
display featuring the work of
five UBC Fine Arts grads. But
like most worthwhile art, it's
recommended to view it with
the insight and assistance of
the guide booklet.
Here Today features statues,
photos, chalkboards, collages of library cards and movies. A film by Keesic Douglas,
projected onto a Hudson's Bay
Company blanket, follows two
men on a journey to trade the
blanket back for the pelts the
First Nations originally bought
it with. The catch? They're making the trip by canoe. It's about
half an hour long, though, so
be prepared for a lot of hardcore standing still.
If film isn't your thing, you
can wander off and check out
some of the sculptural works
on display, like the fourteen-
foot-tall, bright orange "Teeter-
Slaughter," a combination guillotine and teeter-totter. And if
the name isn't awesome enough,
this is artyou can actually ride,
adjustable seat and all. It even
has a mini-sandbox underneath
ifyou somehow manage to fall
off. The "Teeter-Slaughter" was
designed by Fan-Ling Suen.
You'll also want to check out
"After Second Nature," a sculpture so new it's still dripping. Essentially, it's a bunch of everyday vessels with holes poked in
the bottom suspended by colourful ropes over some newspaper
stalagmites. The containers—an
assortment of everything from
Starbucks cups to cat food tins-
are filled with paint, which leaks
out and splatters everything in
bright colours. It's sort of like if
a giant, rainbow-coloured spider raided a painter's garbage
can and spun it all into one massive web.
"The disposability ofthe single serving to-go vessel has to
do with time, production and
atomization, which generates a
lack of care," said artist Sydney
Hermant. "Or maybe it's not that
we don't care, it's that we don't
have time, just at this moment,
to care. Through a kind of creative repurposing, I am attempting to care for these objects. By
giving them a second life, I can
stretch their moment out a bit,
carve out some time where initially there wasn't any."
Hermant said the concept has
been kicking around in her head
since 2006. She has represented
this idea with plaster maquette
and a video installation, before it
took on its current incarnation.
"My work happens through alot
of trial and error," she said. "And
by allowing the ideas and materials to take long strolls before it
gets to a place where it's more at
home with what it's trying to do."
Whether you're in the mood
for deep thought or just trying
to kill some time between class,
the Belkin is definitely worth a
look. U
Here Today, Gone Today features the work of Keesic Douglas, Sydney Hermant, Fan-Ling
Suen, Zoe Tissandier and Clare
Yow. It runs September 3—19
at the Morris and Helen Belkin
Art Gallery.
NEWS BRIEFS
A DAY IN THE LIFE OF MISS
HICCUP
"We just watched a woman sing
to her foot," pretty much sums
up A Day in the Life of Miss Hiccup. Set on a bare stage with minimal props and set, the audience
is forced to stare at the only animated object on the stage—an
Asian lady named Shoshinz, garishly clad in warm bright colours
and many, many flowers. Her performance lives up to her outfit.
There is very little
speech, but a lot of
garbled sing-alongs.
Shoshinz singing to her rebellious sock puppet foot to sleep was
one of the best things I have seen
for a while, and one of the many
ridiculous pieces of Miss Hiccup's
life. There is very litde speech in
the one-woman show, but a lot of
garbled sing-a-longs to epic orchestra music. Her entire day is
a mesh of daily regular chores,
which break into kooky, enthusiastic dance routines. I was enthralled by the sheer ridiculousness of Shoshinz, who left me utterly in stitches.
Ifyou need a brighter perspective on life, go check this out. It
might make you feel better.
—Kathy Yan Li
WHAT YOU WANT
In writer/director Andrew Tem-
pleton's Vancouver, people are
fucking. They're either fucking
or they're heartbroken, and sometimes the two overlap. The city
depicted in the minimalist What
You Want is represented by the
lives of Dave, who has returned
to Vancouver after a near death
experience, and a trio of characters connected by their sexual histories. Given the subject matter,
it's an accomplishment that the
play never feels crude.
Templeton is the ever-present
puppet master, speaking to the
audience in the guise of the actors about his own homecoming
and struggles to finish the play.
In places, it feels like What You
Want is less the story of its characters, and more Templeton's
attempt to understand Vancouver's changes in his absence. The
resulting script is postmodern
without being self-indulgent,
and Templeton's use of narration shows incredible restraint.
The play attempts to cover
too much thematic territory in a
short time. Ideas of home, truth
and obligation are hinted at but
never fully realized. However,
the dialogue is genuinely funny and the actors give sincere
and enthusiastic performances.
What You Want is a thoroughly engaging, modern exploration of desire, authenticity and
the philosophical differences
between ass men and tit men.
—Ginette Monaco
The Vancouver International
Fringe Festival runs on and around
Granville Island through September 19. The Ubyssey will run more
reviews of select shows in upcoming issues. 8/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.09.13
YOUR TERM ONE ROCK SHOW
For roughly 30 students, Welcome Back BBQ kicked ass
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
I left the Welcome Back Barbeque
bruised, battered and seriously
entertaining the possibility that
my nose was broken. To the 30 or
so people who were in the thick
of it—thanks for knocking some
ideas around in my head.
As I was bandied about the pit,
I tried to find some big critical
statement I could make about
Gaslight Anthem's set. After
all, it is my job to try and ascribe meaning and significance
to mundane stuff like people
drinking in a field. This was
somewhat difficult at the time-
all that was registering was that
there was a rock band and people were doing silly things and
I was enjoying it.
I was knocked down a lot, but
every time there was a friendly stranger there to haul me
back into the fray. Maybe this
could be a larger metaphor about
the importance of helping people up when life knocks them
down. Maybe rock and roll can
save lives. Or maybe I was just a
drunk fool and people were nice
enough to try and avoid stepping on my head. At the time it
seemed like a beautiful statement, but now I can't help but
remember the four dollar beer
and the 2000 people who didn't
give a shit. And the cynicism
kicks in.
At the end ofthe day, there is
no grand statement. I danced
a lot and I had a lot of fun, and
that's what these things are supposed to be for. Some times it's
as simple as that. Most of the
time, actually.
We'll spend a lot of the next
eight months over-thinking a lot
of things. Sometimes, though,
we just need a kick to the f ace. tl
The Menzingers and Gaslight Anthem played Welcome Back BBQ under overcast skies last Friday. GEOFF LISTER PH0T0S/THE UBYSSEY
SUSTAINABLE REGION INITIATIVE . . . TURNING IDEAS INTO ACTION
Metro Vancouver Invites Comments
about Electoral Area A Election Administration
Metro Vancouver is reviewing the way it administers its elections in
Electoral Area A, with the aim of making improvements in time for the next local elections in
November 2011.
Metro Vancouver is interested in hearing whether the electors of Electoral Area A have enough
information before, during and after the election, whether they believe they have a good opportunity to
participate in the process, and where they think improvements could be made.
We invite you to write to Metro Vancouver with your comments and suggestions by October 1, 2010.
Please forward to:
Mail:      Chris Plagnol, Deputy Corporate Secretary
Metro Vancouver
4330 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC
V5H 4G8
Email:   chris.plagnol@metrovancouver.org
A response form that outlines key topics in the election process is available, if you wish to use it. Visit
www.metrovancouver.org and go to "elections" to access it in electronic form.
Your responses will be summarized and a public report will be considered by
Metro Vancouver's Electoral Area Committee.
Metro Vancouver elections are administered in accordance with the requirements of the Local
Government Act. The Act defines many aspects of the election process, including schedules, official
notices and the way voting places operate. It also determines who is eligible to vote and how they
register to vote.
Electoral Area A comprises University Endowment Lands, University of British Columbia lands, Bowyer
Island, Grebe Islets, Passage Island, Barnston Island, and those areas of Howe Sound, Indian Arm and
West Pitt Lake in the GVRD not within a municipal corporation.
metro
Vancouver
UBC researchers are conducting it study to learn
about student experience
taking first year economics
courses at Ji(, universities.
If you are a student who
completed a first ya/r economics course witfrin the
last 9 months we invite you
to participate in our study.
TJte study involves a I hour
interview* Tins study is to
explore students 'perceptions
ofinttvductory economics
Further information;
tgreen<g*res. ubc. ca
Agenda for Tuesdays staff meeting
1. Introductions
2. New members
3. Discussion ofWPNCUP
4. September outreach ideas
5. NASH fundraising
Staff meetings are every Tuesday at noon in
our offices. All students who have contributed
to The Ubyssey three times in a semester are
eligible to become staff members.
www.metrovancouver.org
Justin mcelroy | coordinating@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc 2010.09.13/U BYSSEY. CA/S PORTS/9
SPORTS
EDITOR IAN TURNER»sports@ubyssey.ca
Courtside Comment: Two UBC teams get big upsets
IAN TURNER
sports@ubyssey.ca
Heading out to Friday's men's
soccer match, I hesitantly
checked online to find out by
how much the football team was
behind. UBC, who lost their first
game of the year and out-scored
their opponents in one game last
year, were playing the nation's
No. 2 ranked team, the Saskatchewan Huskies, who the week before defeated the No. 1 ranked
Calgary Dinos.
7-1 for UBC. I reloaded the
page immediately. 7-1 for UBC.
Wishing I had a phone with
internet capabilities, I ran off to
watch men's soccer—in this case,
the ninth-ranked UBC versus
third-ranked Trinity Western.
Early on, you could sense the
game was taking a South African World Cup final turn with
the amount of whistles.
Five minutes in, a Trinity
Western player appeared to suffer a concussion. The stands —
about half filled by Trinity supporters — roared. They wanted
the alleged villain, UBC defence-
man Jack Cubbon, tossed out of
the game. During the next play,
a Spartan appeared to kick UBC
goaltender Zach Kalthoff in the
face. A small kerfuffle broke out.
It wasn't the only way the
game mirrored Netherlands-
Spain, as Spartan Rhys Volke-
nant picked up a yellow card
in the worst possible spot: the
UBC's Victor Marshall had one catch for 44 yards. PETE YEE/THE SHEAF
penalty box. With 45 minutes
played, midfielder Marco Visintin lined up to the penalty shot.
"I usually go left. He was trash
talking us from two years ago because one of our players missed.
So I had to switch it up," Visintin said after the game. Visintin
went top right and got the goal,
putting UBC up 1-0.
On the sideline, Associate Athletic Director Theresa Hansen
was ecstatic. UBC football was
up 20-5. Hunting for a bathroom,
UBC's athletic director Bob Philip popped up behind me. He,
too, was noticeably excited by
the football lead.
I, too, was happy: Philip would
know where the restrooms were.
"You think we're going to hold
on against Saskatchewan?" Philip asked.
We bantered amiably about
football. At the end, I asked
where the restrooms were. Philip gave directions.
But the doors were locked.
How this problem was resolved
will not be addressed.
Back at my corner ofthe pitch,
one regular at many varsity
games asked a man for the score
three times. The first time he
was told, the regular told the
man not to bullshit him. The
score was repeated with a smile.
Up two goals, UBC soccer got
another boost in the thigh: for
pulling a UBC's player's shirt,
Volkenant got a yellow card.
Strutting over to the TWU bench,
red-carded Volkenant blamed
the referee; TWU's head coach
Pat Rohla told his player to keep
his chops shutbecause he'd just
put the team under enormous
"duress."
But Trinity kept the fight
up. Knocking the ball out of
Kalthoff's hands, a Spartan
pounded the ball into the net.
Again, a scrum of sorts broke
out. A snide comment from the
Trinity bench pierced the air.
A sharp glance at TWU's bench
by UBC men's soccer head coach
Mike Mosher was the retort. The
goal was waved off.
A few plays later, UBC seemingly bulldozed Spartan goaltender Andrew Kowan in the process of scoring their third goal.
There too, a ruckus between UBC
and TWU happened, but the goal
counted. The final score was 3-0.
By the end, the ref had handed out 12 yellows and 2 reds,
as the fierce rivalry continued
unabated.
With the game concluded, I
went back to headquarters — The
Ubyssey offices — where the final
football score was viewed: 31-12.
Excitedly, I texted The Ubyssey's coordinating editor, Justin
McElroy: "UBC beat Sask app.
30-12. Frontpage?"
"Not front. But tease. And also:
holy shit," McElroy responded.
As I headed out, I made a mental note to bring my voice recorder into the office tomorrow. I expected that the three players I'd
call—running back David Boyd,
quarterback Billy Greene, and a
defensive line Serge Kaminsky—
would be yelling and swearing
profusely on the other line when
discussing their victory.
Sadly, that never happened.
Kaminsky sounded like he
was napping. Not much emotion, just a friendly "Thank you
for calling me" at the end. Boyd
had his two feet firmly planted
on the ground. No plans for a
rowdy party. Greene gave an energetic summary of the game,
but didn't have a limo tour party organized.
Boyd: "When we finished the
Alberta game,"—a 36-28 loss—
"we were kinda nervous because
we had heard what they did to
Calgary. And we all know how
good Calgary is."
Kaminsky: "6000 fans screaming at us, chirping at us. We all felt
great. I said, these guys are not
going to be talking in five minutes. We justmarched down their
throats. It just felt great."
Greene: "We just shocked
them."
Not the expected Friday, tl
Season Preview: Men's soccer team aims high
IAN TURNER
sports@ubyssey.ca
Mostyears, it's an optimistic cliche, but this year for the men's
soccer team at UBC, it's true:
nothing less than a CIS Championship will do.
"It should be to win absolutely
everything. I've never been on
a team as stacked essentially as
this. Nothing short of almost a
perfect season. Our team is looking very strong," fifth-year midfielder Ryan Reynold said.
That goal comes from last
year's early finish in the playoffs.
After a 10-3-1 regular season, marked by a win late in
the season against Alberta to
gain home-field advantage, they
lost in the first round ofthe playoffs to Alberta, 1-0.
"We didn't play to our capabilities on the day...I think it
really sticks with and haunts
the group of which almost everybody is back. And that becomes a real focal point...This
is ayear about national championships," said UBC soccer head
coach Mike Mosher.
To that end, Mosher has an enviable problem: a team that is
too stacked, largely because of
the Vancouver Whitecaps' new
residency program.
"We've been real benefactors
of some ofthe stuff they've done
over the last couple of years.
That being, starting up a youth
program—ayouth residency program for really some ofthe elite
players in Canada. We're going
!•
UBC's goaltender Zach Kalthoff earned a shutout on Friday night. MICHAEL THIBAULT/THE UBYSSEY
to field, like, six or seven of those
players. We've had three or four
over the last couple years, and
now, we've just added, in the last
couple of months, two or three
more," Mosher said.
"To crack the starting 11 is
no joke. Ifyou're in the starting
11 that's an accomplishment.
Even being number one or two
off the bench is very hard to
do—we were saying you could
field two teams and still have
a legitimate chance of doing
very well. It's very competitive,"
Reynolds said.
The players Mosher gets are
often those who are unable or
unwilling to continue playing
in the MLS or Europe.
All these additions make it
tough for others to climb up the
ranks.
"What's tough is that we've
seen some kids skyrocket,
who've just taken off and gotten so much better, but the quality ofthe team this year—it's really hard to break in. It's a good
problem to have as a coach,"
Mosher said.
One position Mosher doesn't
have to worry about is his last
man on the pitch, the goalkeeper.
Injured last year, Zach
Kalthoff, who played in Europe
professionally, was unsure if he
wanted to play abroad again.
Now he's the starting keeper.
His presence lead to a fierce
fight for the backup spot. Five
are fighting it out, but even with
all the competition, there's no
apparent resentment.
"The team has gelled really
well. Most of the guys are really tight already," said Kalthoff.
"The older guys seem to take
the younger guys and the new
players in pretty easily. It's a really tight bunch of guys. There's
really no egos on the team,
which is much different from
what I'm used to playing in." tl
SCOREBOARD
2-0
UBC women's soccer team won
their first regular season game
against the Calgary Dinos in
Alberta.
1
UBC varsity team, women's
field hockey, starts their regular
season this upcoming Saturday.
44
yards former SFU wide receiver
Victor Marshall ran for UBC
against Saskatchewan on his
only catch of the game.
5
hours varsity teams trained in
the Student Recreational Centre
last week, a place they prefer
to avoid because the floor is
slippery.
12&2
yellow cards and red cards,
respectively, given to players
in Friday night's match between
UBC and Trinity Western. 10/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2010.09.13
Thunderbird football players' newfound trust shows
IAN TURNER
sports@ubyssey.ca
Short a man for a drill, a student-coach loudly asked for a
defensive player on the sideline to jump into the play. But
it took a few more pleas until a
player hustled into the practice.
A snap later, head coach
Shawn Olson marched over to
the players on the sideline. He
sternly told them they had to
hop into practice if asked to.
This disciplined coaching approach is central to the new culture Olson is seeking to instill
at UBC football.
"We as a staff are all positive
coaches. Saying that, we also
are a very demanding staff,"
said defensive coordinator Jerome Erdman.
Seven months into his new
gig, Olson is pleased with his
crew. "Our guys have bought
into [the new system]," he said.
After getting hired, Olson had
a simple, clear message for his
players: "Every position is wide
open. As a coaching staff, we
are going in with an open mind
and will evaluate the talent we
have at every position."
Last year's starting quarterback Billy Greene got the
message.
"I had to show I was willing to
work for it, put in the time and
effort... He didn't want anyone
to take anything for granted
and then not breed a competitive environment," Greene said.
In training camp, he again secured the starting job.
It's at the backup spot where
Olson's open-mind philosophy
is apparent. Rookie Carson Williams, an Abbotsford native,
appears to have secured the
number two spot amid tough
UBC head coach Shawn Olson during Training Camp. COURTESY OF RICHARD LAM/UBC ATHLETICS
competition from a former
NCAA red-shirt and five others.
"Ideally, I wouldn't have an
18-year-old as our backup, but
every day we preach that we
judge what we see, and in that
case, he's the front runner for
the backup at this point," Olson
said in training camp. This past
weekend, Williams was the second-string quarterback.
It is not the only less-than-
perfect situation Olson has
found himself in since getting
hired.
In August, Olson found himself slapping paint on an unused
office at Thunderbird Arena,
which he then converted into an
assistant coaches' office.
"Nothing can be beneath you
ifyou expectyour guys to do it.
I will never ask someone to do
something I wouldn't do myself. I have to walk the walk,"
Olson said.
"I think it's important that
you feel a sense of pride being at
this university. I mean, this university is one of the best in the
world academically. To be a football player at the University of
British Columbia should mean
something to these guys. And in
order to make that happen, you
can't be living in a crap hole."
To instill pride into the program, he spent dozens of hours
over the summer upgrading the
"Heritage Room" at the Stadium.
Prominently written on the wall
at the front ofthe room are the
dates when UBC won a national
championship: 1892, 1986 and
1997, the year Olson was the
starting quarterback for UBC.
With the makeover mostly
done, starting running back
David Boyd feels like a rookie.
"It's been a complete overhaul and I feel like I'm in my
first year," Boyd said. "When
I came in to get my gear fitted
the Monday before camp started, my locker was gone."
Then there's the new turf
field: "It's massive," said Olson.
"Absolutely massive on so many
fronts. From a recruiting perspective, it's one thing to watch
a recruit on the field and they
see a pothole, or they see a nice
turf field with a huge Thunderbird logo in the middle."
As for recruiting, he's been
very active. Last term, itwas almost a weekly occurrence to see
Olson speed-walking with a potential recruit around campus.
Recruiting is exhausting and
time consuming. By his own admission, Olson rarely sees his
family, particularly his four-
year-old son, these days.
To ease his burden, Olson
lured Vancouver native Jerome
Erdman from McGill University
to be the defensive coordinator.
Erdman, you could say, is the
perfect assistant coach. He was
a standout at SFU as a defensive
back. He won a Grey Cup with
with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers in 1984. For five years, he
coached the linebackers or special teams for the Hamilton Tiger Cats, a CFL franchise.
And this iiber-experienced
football coach doesn't want to
be a head coach.
"I have absolutely no intention to ever be a head coach
'cause I love coaching too much.
My passion is for coaching the
game, and for dealing with the
players. When you get to be a
head coach you're dealing with
a lot of other issues," Erdman
said.
In fact, after leading a nomadic life—Erdman has
coached in six different cities in
Europe and Canada in the last
20 years—he's looking to settle
down. "I'm just at the stage now
where I just want to teach and
stay hopefully somewhere for
a while," Erdman said.
And just such a mentality
will help Olson lay the foundation for a successful program. "My goal is not just to
win games this year. Any team
can win games in a season. A
lucky break. A lucky bounce...I
want to have a great program."
So with a new field, lockers,
offices and a plethora of recruits, what's holding the team
back from success this year?
"Getting guys to become a
team, having everyone gel as
a team. That's usually what determines the great teams from
the good teams," Olson said.
"It's one thing for me to keep
guys accountable, it's another
thing for our captains or our
rookies to say, 'Hey man, that's
not good enough, that's not how
we do things... I think we're getting there."
They may already be there.
Following Friday's upset over
the No. 2 ranked Saskatchewan
Huskies, defensive line Serge
Kaminsky credited the win to
team unity: "We just did our assignments. We trusted the person next to us to do their job.
And we executed." tl
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fellowship awards are available, each of which is valued from $50,000 - $80,000 per year, depending on
fellowship track and experience, over one or two years. Funding is available through the Canadian Breast
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research in BC. It is intended for qualified health care professionals, MD graduates or recent PhD graduates
to provide assistance in launching a career as independent, social, clinical or basic science investigators in
breast cancer research. Candidates from all research disciplines are encouraged to apply. The deadline for
online submissions is before noon PST on Monday, November 15,2010.
For more information, please contact the Director of Health Promotion at 1.800.561.6111 ext 231 or email at ewebb@cbcf.org 2010.09.13/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/ll
The Ubyssey proudly presents:
OUR OPEN HOUSE.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 16
1-5PM
Interested in being part of our team? Want to see how we put the paper together?
Like punch and pie? You're in luck! Come by our offices in room 24 ofthe SUB,
and learn how you can get involved with the vilest rag west of Blanca.
We make it easier for you.
UBC Student
Discount
Now Available!
Marketplace IGA @ 3515 West 4th and Colling wood
location is now offering a 10% discount off your total
order when a valid student I.D. card is presented at the till
(Discount does not apply towards tobacco, transit passes, lottery and sale items)
Thank you for shopping at Marketplace IGA
West 4th and Collingwood.
604.732.3950
Tomorrow's Professionals Apply Today!
Apply Online!
OMSAS      www.ouac.on.ca/omsas/
Ontario Medical School Application Service
September 15, 2010: Last day to create an account for the online application
October 1, 2010: Application deadline
0LSAS     www.ouac.on.ca/olsas/
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November 1, 2010: Application deadline for first-year English programs
May 1, 2011: Application deadline for upper-year programs
TEAS       www.ouac.on.ca/teas/
Teacher Education Application Service
December 1, 2010: Application deadline for English programs
March 1,2011: Application deadline for French programs
0RPAS       www.ouac.on.ca/orpas/
Ontario Rehabilitation Sciences Programs Application Service
(Audiology, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy/Physiotherapy, Speech-Language Pathology)
January 7, 2011: Application deadline
ONTARIO UNIVERSITIES'APPLICATION CENTRE
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JONNY WAKEFIELD
& bryce warnes | culture@ubysseyca
tlT lEUBYSSEYca 12/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2010.09.13
It's that time of the year again.
Apply for our $3000 community
contribution award online at
ubyssey.ca/endowment
The award is open to any current
UBC student.
?£*smc£. 2010.09.13/UBYSSEY.CA/LETTERS/13
LETTERS
Increased fees a necessity for the AMS
ELIN TAYYAR &
JEREMY MCELROY
Perspective
You might have heard that the
Alma Mater Society (AMS) is
in the process of planning a
referendum on student fees
to take place in October. You
also might have heard that they
are proposing $24 in increases. And you are probably wondering why a group that lobbies against rising tuition and
ancillary fees at the university is now turning around and
asking you for more money.
The answer is quite simple:
we don't have enough money
to keep doing what we do for
students much longer.
The last general fee increase
happened in 1982. The value of
that fee is worth less than half
of its original amount due to
inflation. Most commitments
held by the AMS are tied to either the Canadian Consumer Price Index, or a higher increase. On top of these increases, there is a need for an increased number of staff, as the
complexity and size of the organization increases. Our revenues are worth less everyyear.
In 2008 we asked
you to help us
build a new SUB,
and now we are
asking for your
help in ensuring
the AMS's future.
The AMS executives this year
have committed themselves to
ensuring the financial sustainability of our 95-year-old organization, and we are coming to
you today with hat in hand asking foryour help. We have each
put our extended health and
dental coverage, worth $6000
total, towards this cause. This
referendum is one of the most
necessary in AMS history, compensating for fees that haven't
changed in 28 years, and introducing new project fees that
are long past due. In 2008 we
asked you to help us build a
new SUB, and now we are asking for your help in ensuring
the AMS's future.
But we need everyone's help.
Through this referendum we are
striving to increase engagement
on campus, to provide more tangible services for students and
to help make our campus as inclusive and accessible as possible. The AMS execs are willing
to give 120 per cent, but we are
only a handful of students—we
need your undergrad societies,
clubs, resource groups, service
staff, frats, sororities and athletic teams to make this happen.
But most of all, we need your
AMS Student Council to commit the time and energy necessary to accomplish this overwhelmingly difficult feat. Without the support and dedication ofyour student representatives, the AMS will have to
rely on its stagnant fees to provide increasingly expensive
services to students. We have
amongst the lowest fees in the
country and are struggling immensely It's time for us to plan
for the future, and start doing
more for the students of UBC.
—Elin Tayyar and Jeremy McElroy are the VP Finance and VP External ofthe Alma Mater Society.
UBC should fully disclose
information about animal
ANNE BIRTHISTLE
Perspective
Few Vancouver residents and
students know UBC has an extensive animal research program. Every year, the university conducts thousands of research projects involving animals, some of which employ
painful and ultimately lethal
procedures. Nearly all of the
research is conducted behind
closed doors with little public
scrutiny.
According to a January 25,
2008 article published in the
UBC student newspaper, The
Ubyssey, "UBC is one of the
largest bio-medical campuses
in the country. The ACC [Animal
Care Center] distributes some
100,000 creatures, both large
and small, to dozens of UBC-af-
filiated research projects." The
paper also reported the universi-
Much of UBC's
animal research is
funded with public
money
ty experiments on a wide variety
of animals, such as mice, pigs,
sheep, non-human primates,
rats and rabbits.
Despite the questionable merit of animal experimentation, a
growing unease with such research and breakthroughs in
non-animal alternatives, the
use of animals in "science" has
steadily increased in Canada.
Data from the Canadian Council
on Animal Care (CCAC), which
oversees animal research,
shows the numbers of animals
used in research have risen
from less than 1.8 million in
1998 to nearly 2.3 million animals in 2008.
In February, Stop UBC Animal Research was formed by local citizens—including UBC students, alumni, and faculty—out
of concern for animals at the
university. Our months-long investigation of UBC reveals some
ofthe university's animal experiments are highly invasive. One
UBC researcher, for example,
has experimented on cats for
30 years. In 2008 he received a
five-year, federally-funded grant
for continued animal research.
It is revealing and troubling
what the university has sanctioned. In his papers, including
one published in 2008, the researcher described how he had:
—Implanted electrodes into
cats' foreheads, brains, bones
behind the eyes, and neck muscles. Electrode wires were attached to a plug on a restraining device permanently fixed to
the cats' skulls.
—Cut open the backs of cats
to expose their vertebrae. Titanium screws were inserted
into the cats' spinal columns to
inhibit movement. A restraint
chamber was built around the
cats' exposed vertebra to give researchers access to the cats' spinal columns and to fix the animals in a sitting position for recording sessions.
—Implanted the devices so
measurements could then be
taken of spinal cord neurons
without having to use anesthetic.
Unfortunately, the university has been less than forthcoming about its research. UBC
has yet to provide us with protocols used in animal experiments and has twice denied
our request for information under provincial freedom of information law. While published
studies can be found on sites
such as PubMed, information
about UBC's research—such as
data, veterinary and necropsy reports, non-compliance records, photos and video—is not
available.
The US, on the other hand,
has a far more transparent system. The National Institutes of
Health and the US Department
of Agriculture post comprehensive information about animal
experiments online, allowing
for public review of research.
To make matters worse, animal research in Canada is not
well regulated. Contrary to UBC
officials' assertions, CCAC guidelines are voluntary. The CCAC
can release reports of non-compliance to funding agencies but
those agencies have the discretion to deny funding. From its
website, the CCAC notes the creation of "a voluntary control program exercised by scientists in
each institution." In addition,
non-compliance records are not
made available and CCAC assessments of UBC's research are confidential, which means the public has no way of knowing if the
university has violated animal
care standards.
Much of UBC's animal research is funded with public
money. At the very least, UBC
should disclose the numbers
and species of animals used in
experiments and protocols used
in university research. Thatway
students, donors, alumni and
the public can make informed
decisions about supporting a
university that engages in activities many find objectionable
and of marginal scientific utility.
—Anne Birthistle is a member of
Stop UBC Animal Research, sto-
pubcanimalresearch.org.
GRAND
OPENING!
UBC RUNNING ROOM
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 15th
Doors open at 9:30 a.m.
Honour Our Troops and First Responders 5K run & 2.5K walk
to support The Honour House Society
To follow the ribbon-cutting at 6:00 p.m.
Meet John Stanton
John Stanton knows how to get people moving. As the founder and
president of Running Room, North America's largest chain of specialty
stores for walkers and runners, he has inspired people across the nation
to develop healthier lifestyles one step at a time. Most recently John
was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada. John will be signing
books and answering any questions you may have on running or
walking while attending the grand opening.
DOOR CRASHER!
UBC Running Room Location Only:
PR0GRID RIDE 2
MEN'S/WOMEN'S
Cushioning
basics $79"'
GEL-CUMULUS 11
MEN'S/WOMEN'S
All Shoes/Products not exactly as shown. Prices in effect until Saturday until Sept 26thr 2010.
Some models available in other colors. Suing may be limited. All sales final.
TRAINING
PROGRAMS!    $699?
10K RUNNING
SEPTEMBER 23
"Viflflizuno.
5K RUNNING
SEPTEMBER 27
basics
LEARN TO RUN
SEPTEMBER 27
Mf
WALK (FITNESS)
OCTOBER 2
Mf
HALF MARATHON
OCTOBER 26
saucony"—
Come and join us for our weekly practice runs/walks - it's FREE!
Wednesdays at 6:00p.m. and Sundays at 8:30 a.m. All fitness levels welcome!
UBC Running Room
Wesbrook village 3308 Wesbrook Mall
Vancouver, BC | V6S 0A8
Ph: (604) 221-1685
ubc@runningroom.com 14/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/2010.09.13
GAMES & COMICS
SUSC0MIC.COM, BY MICHAEL BROUND
SUDOKU (MEDIUM)
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our website at ubyssey.
ca /volunteer/submit-
a-comic.
VIRGINIE MENARD
production@ubyssey.ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca
We're at the SUB!
From 10AM to 4PM this Tuesday through Thursday, we'll be in the SUB to take your questions and let you
know about key projects on the go this fall. Stop by the booth to meet staff from Campus and Community
Planning, the Campus Sustainability Office and TREK (Transportation Planning Office).
Time
SEPTEMBER 14TH, TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 15TH, WEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 16TH, THURSDAY
10am
Kera McArthur
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR. COMMUNICATIONS. CCP
Michael Peterson,
MANAGER   TREK
Adam Cooper
PROGRAM COORDINATOR, TREK
Amanda Fetterly
MANAGER, DESIGN ft MARKETING CSO
Waleed Giratalla,
WATER & ZERO WASTE ENGINEER CSO
11am
Joe Stott
DIRECTOR OF PLANNING, CCP
Gerry McGeough
UMVf RS(TY ARCHITECT. CCP
12pm
Orion Henderson
DIRECTOR, OPERATIONAL SUSTAINABILITY, CSO
Joe Stott
DIRECTOR Of PLANNING, CCP
Gerry McGeough
UNIVERSITY ARCHITECT, CCP
Michael Peterson,
MANAGER, TRIK
Adam Cooper
PROGRAM COORDINATOR, TREK
1pm
Alison Aloisio
MAHACER, GREEN BUILDING & ENGAGEMENT. CSO
Lisa Colby
ASSOOATE DIRECTOR, POLICY PLANNING, CCP
2pm
Michael Peterson, manager, trek
Kara Bowen
COORDfNATOR, CAMPUS ENGAGEMENT, CSO
Joe Stott
DIRECTOR OP PLANNING, CCP
Gerry McGeough
UNIVERSITY ARCHITECT, CCP
3pm
Jeca G lor-Bell
COORDINATOR, RESEARCH & REPORTING, CSO
Dean Gregory
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT, CCP
TRANSPORTATION^
CONSULTATION o
we nstonoo ntinrto, rn3sc 1 now wo ro oacK to
present three options for your feedback (Phase 2)
in person or online planning.ubc.ca
CAMPUS EXPERTISE
CAMPUS & COMMUNUTY PLANNING - CCP
• Development Permits
• Green and public spaces
• PoLcy Planning
y management
e Action Plan
• Transportation
Consultation
■ Land Use Plan
»Vancouver Campus Plan
• Long range planning
in Residences,
consultation and icpoitlng
2. Workplace
• Green building
Sustainability
• Solid waste audit
Coordinators
»«"»•««,•■ »u,
NINO OFFICI   • TREK
Programs
• Transportation Planning
• Transportation Demand
• Partnerships
Management
FIND  OUT ABOUT  EVENTS AND SI6N  UP TO  RECEIVE  UPDATES  A     planning.ubC.Ca
a place of mind
CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY PLANNING 2010.09.13/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/15
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
FRATERNITIES SHOULDN'T HAVE ANYTHING TO HIDE
Let us play a game. Suppose there was one group,
universal to all campuses, that was seen by some
as boorish, misogynistic, drunk, violent and generally lacking in basic faculties. Now pretend that
there was a giant party on their property which
led to a fight, which led to an attempted assault
on police officers, which led to a national story—
except only the police were talking, and the situation was probably more complex than it seemed.
Would coverage be fair? Would people resort to
baseless assumptions?
Laboured analogies aside, this is our main
fear following Saturday night's fracas: that stereotypes and biases shape people's response,
and the divide between fraternities and police
continues to grow. RCMP members say they had
to break up a 15-person fight. It appears officers
themselves were assaulted. Things got out of
hand, and the only people to blame are the fraternities themselves.
But there are other facts. Each of the fraternities is a separate organization, with a separate
building, so saying there was one party "with
500 to 1000 people attending" isn't just an exaggeration, it's downright impossible. In addition,
it was UBC's decision over a decade ago to cram
all ofthe fraternities into one spot next to market housing and the RCMP, creating the no-win
situation that currently exists. Finally fraternities have evolved over the years. Today they are
more of a conservative networking brotherhood
rather than an Animal House boozepit—Friday
nights excepted.
The fraternities aren't 100% to blame here. But
we don't know both sides of the story yet.
The first weekend of the year, when thousands
of students are looking for a place to drink, and
you didn't have better security? A bonehead move.
But after the incident occurs, not giving any
comment, allowing police to shape the narrative and give everyone reign to make negative
assumptions? That is foolish.
We would have loved to let students know the
frats' side ofthe story. Sadly they refuse to talk, tl
INTO THE WOODS
Over the past 30 months, there have been three
deaths in Pacific Spirit Park. One of them—that
of Wendy Ladner-Beaudry whose body was discovered on April 5, 2009—is being investigated
as a homicide. No news regarding possible suspects or motives has surfaced since then. Police
have ruled out foul play in the deaths of two other women.
The latter two can be attributed to one of three
causes: accidental, 'natural,' or suicide.
These deaths are tragic and shocking enough
on their own. And the silence following them offers no comfort. Unless murder is involved, the
RCMP are not obliged to release the identity of deceased persons, or the cause of death. And from
the public's perspective, the investigation into the
homicide in Pacific Spirit Park has born no fruit.
In June, after the discovery ofthe third body,
The Province ran a headline that read, "Has the
Pacific Spirit Park killer struck again?" It's tempting to indulge in this sort of sensationalism, but
not useful. No phantom killer on the loose is to
blame for the tragedies of the past two years.
Pacific Spirit Park is not remote, but it is isolated. Narrow trails cutting through thick forest, poor light, few nearby residents—these factors all play a role in making the park a potentially dangerous place to frequent. Someone who
seriously injures themselves in such surroundings would have difficulty finding aid. And the
sense of separation from the outside world the
Park offers could make it an attractive place for
a suicidal person to end their life.
There are plenty of fairy tales where bad things
happen in dark woods. Pacific Spirit Park isn't the
Grimms' Black Forest, but the same lessons apply. There are no wolves or witches in the Park,
but the darkness and the trees breed their own
predators. During the daytime, it's a fine place
to jog. Recent morbid events haven't detracted
from Pacific Spirit's beauty. Yet it serves as a reminder that just because an area looks peaceful
doesn't mean we should forget about our safety, tl
INTRODUCING THE  NEW
lAZrs hascot
L£NIN   THE   SHAKING
MARIA CIRSTEA GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
COLUMNISTS
Three things I want in an AUS politician
MICHAEL HAACK
Columnist & AUS Councillor
As The Ubyssey reported last week, the
financial accounts of the Arts Undergraduate Society (AUS) were frozen. Sadly this is just one of the many issues
plaguing the largest undergraduate
society at UBC. But with elections taking place later this month, here's three
things I'm looking for in candidates:
1) BUILD A REAL BUDGET
Remember the AMS budget? The one
with blank cheques, free-flowing cash,
and no accountability? The only thing
worse than that is the AUS budget—or
lack of one. This cannot happen ever.
Ifyou stood outside the SUB and asked
students for $5, they would say no.
Why? Because students have a plan.
That $5 is an extra sushi plate from
Honour Roll, or a latte between classes. $13 from every Arts student gets
transferred to the AUS because we have
a plan—sometimes.
2) START SUPPORTING CLUBS
Clubs are integral to the university
experience and need to be leveraged
to effectively engage students. The
AUS needs to invest more in clubs, by
spreading out the wealth and the responsibilities inherent with managing money. The gap between Council
and clubs needs to be bridged. The AUS
election has a five percent turnout because a council of 32 people can't effectively engage 12,000 Arts students.
However, we have 26 clubs. If each one
engages 50-60 students, we're on our
way to fulfilling our mandate.
3) BUILD INTEGRITY INTO AUS COUNCIL
The AUS has no regulation on proxies. In fact, anyone can show up to
a meeting and say they're a proxy.
That's a formula for unadulterated,
illegitimate power wielded by individuals without accountability. If the
AUS was looking for interim executives, what's to stop a candidate from
stacking the meeting with his frat
buddies as proxies to get appointed?
The bottom line is: take responsibility and keep each other accountable. Be
councillors. We're all friends, but when
you're at an AUS meeting, you can't vote
on motions because your friend proposes it. You literally can't—not without seeing the back of my hand. Treat
them like councillors with all the rights
and responsibilities. If that means telling people "Stop fucking around and
make a budget," then do it.
At the end of the day the AUS swims
or floats as a unit. Someone might have
failed, but everyone else failed to supervise. Apologize, accept responsibility, expect to be held accountable and move on.
That's how you should earn your place
in the AUS. tJ
CUS mascot selection was a load of bull
TREVOR RECORD
features@ubyssey.ca
Let's face it: the embarrassingly incompetent Arts Undergraduate Society (AUS) is a pretty slow-moving target these days. So we'd like to take a
break from them to make fun of the
supposedly iiber-elite Commerce Undergraduate Society (CUS).
Over the summer, the CUS asked
for mascot submissions, planning to
hold an election to select the one they
would adopt. Perhaps they should have
left this to Arts—when the mascots that
they received weren't a shocking example of how woefully out of touch and un-
self-aware commerce students are, they
were a campaign designed to make fun
of Sauder. How else would you explain
a llama wearing a tie?
Naturally several campus media tycoons and I combined forces to craft a
well-received series on local blog AMS
Confidential poking fun at them. Little
did we know that the lol-train had yet to
leave the station.
In the "round one" election results,
the winner was 'Mr Corn-Earth,' a
grotesque anthropomorphic globe masquerading as a businessman. Despite
his message of global sustainability,
'Mr Corn-Earth' was obviously based
on two pieces of clip art. In a rare moment of good taste, third and fourth
place went to "none of the above."
The winner ofthe final round of voting was "Okima," a business lion from
a "faraway country" (Japan) who comes
to Vancouver to appropriate First Nations art. Okima's strong resemblance
to internet superstar Pedobear went
unacknowledged by Sauder. "None of
the above" tied for third.
Okima's glory would be short-lived.
In a July CUS Board of Directors meeting, the CUS decided that their second finalist wouldn't do. Discussions
revealed that they required "a mascot
that represents Commerce and CUS in
a stereotypical way." So they narrowed
their non-democratic choices down to
BeeCom, whose emphasis on the hive
mind represents Commerce students'
insect-like conformity and Wally Street,
a business bull with a dislocated jaw.
Ultimately they decided that Wally best
represented them, and by Imagine Day
he could be found wandering amongst
the booths, terrifyingyounger firstyears.
We'd like to congratulate you, Sauder:
you picked an apt mascot.
The bull, which represents Wall
Street and is named accordingly was
bailed out by a governing body despite
his unpopularity with the electorate.
A self-described "big deal," he walks
around with a big cow-turd eating grin
and smug sense of undeserved entitlement. No doubt Wally spends his days
logisticizing away secure in his belief
that the invisible hand of the market
propelled him into the top spot.
So to recap: the CUS twice held and
failed to accept the results of an election. After rejecting their second attempt at the democratic process, their
Board of Directors then appointed a
mascot they felt more strongly reinforced stereotypes about business students. Then they actually spent money on a mascot suit which seems designed specifically to frighten children
and drive the average Joe far, far away
from this faculty.
Well, that's one way to make yourselves look elite, tl 16/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2010.09.13
Your shoes
Your call
Talk to your doctor
fill

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