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The Ubyssey Apr 12, 2012

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Block Party sells out to wild applause  ■* %_W Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
>1
Congratulations
to the 2012-2013
editorial board of
TheUbyssey!
Coordinating Editor
Jonny Wakefield
Managing Editor, Print
Managing Editor, Web
Art Director
Kai Jacobson
News Editors
Culture Editor
Features Editor
Sports and Recreation
Editor
Video Editor » 4 I NeWS   04.12.2012
MOA»
UBC beefs up MOA security
Museum invests in improved safety
measures for new pieces
GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Twelve works by famed Haida artist Bill Reid were stolen from the Museum of Anthropology in 2008. UBC has made investments to its
security in the wake of several new acquisitions.
Colin Chia
StaffWriter
UBC is confident that new security measures will protect valuable additions to the Museum of
Anthropology (M0A)'s collection
and leave the thefts of 2008 a distant memory.
Works by famed Haida artist
Bill Reid were donated to MOA in
early March, including gold and
silver brooches valued at over
$500,000.
The museum also recently acquired a Nuu-chah-nulth ceremonial club valued at $1.2 million
which was presented to Captain
James Cook in 1778.
Twelve of Bill Reid's works were
stolen from the MOA in 2008 and
although all the pieces were later
recovered, a carved pipe was damaged, as were pieces of Mexican
jewelry from Oaxaca.
"As part of our renovation and
expansion project which launched
in January 2010, we did beef up all
of our security measures then and
we are continuing to do so all the
time," said MOA communications
manager Jennifer Webb.
The university invested
in additional electronic
and security personnel
resources following the
Bill Reid theft.
Paul Wong
Acting Director, UBC Security
While Webb said the museum
isn't able to divulge the details
of their security system, acting
director of UBC Security, Paul
Wong, said the investments were
both in technology and resources
for security workers.
"The university invested in additional electronic and security
personnel resources followingthe
Bill Reid theft," said Wong in an
email to The Ubyssey.
"MOA has also recently received
a grant that will provide further
enhancements to our current security systems."
Protecting the new additions to
the MOA's collection is important
to the museum's mandate.
In the case ofthe Nuu-chah-
nulth club, having the item on
public display in Canada was very
important for the donator, Michael
Audain.
If the MOA couldn't display it,
it likely would have gone into a
private collection elsewhere in the
world, said Webb.
"For the museum and the Nuu-
chah-nulth as well, it's very important that objects like this with historical and cultural significance
stay in the country. If objects like
this can't actually be returned to
the original owners, this is pretty
close to getting it home." tH
AMS SECURITY))
AMS appeals to LRB,
stalling security strike
Andrew Bates
Senior Web Writer
The AMS and its security staff, represented by COPE 378, are waiting
to hear from the Labour Relations
Board (LRB) on whether or not
there will be a strike—but the answer might not come until the end
of exams.
"I think there's the potential
for two very different outcomes to
come about," said AMS President
Matt Parson. "It's real tough to have
any concrete feelings to it, because
right now is still very much in the
air."
The mediator in the dispute has
decided that the two sides should be
allowed to start a work stoppage—
and while they could have imposed
a contract, the AMS and COPE 378
say the mediator found their proposals were too far apart.
While COPE 378 supported the
mediator's decision, AMS has appealed, asking for mediated talks to
continue, or for an arbitator to step
in who would close a deal.
The LRB has 20 days to make a
decision on the AMS's appeal.
Parson said that explaining the
complex financial structure ofthe
AMS requires more time at the
bargaining table. More discussions,
he argued, would provide a "more
nuanced understanding ofthe AMS
and how our finances flow, [and]
we'd be able to come to a more amicable resolution."
The union said they aren't worried about the AMS's appeal. "We
feel that we have a strong case for
a fair deal and fair wages here,
so we'll work with whatever they
throw at us," said Jarrah Hodge,
COPE 378 spokesperson.
But the union isn't happy that
there hasn't been any progress on
wages.
"We were hopeful, given the
strength of our arguments and
fundamental fairness issues, that
there would be some movement
in mediation, but we haven't seen
that," Hodge said. "The next step is
to say enough's enough and it's time
to take some action."
The union is proposing a wage
increase from $11.50 per hour to
$16 for this year, and then $21.13 per
hour for guards next year. The AMS
is proposing a sliding scale from
$11.50 to $13.00 for current employees, with a reduction to $10.50 for
new employees.
The union is also asking for a
number of benefits including more
paid sick leave, medical benefits for
those working over 24 hours a week
and an extra $3 per hour in lieu of
benefits for part-time staff.
"It would be fairly difficult to
burden that without a fairly drastic
reduction of services elsewhere in
the AMS," said Parson, who said the
AMS has calculated the increase
would be 70 per cent, or $161,529,
over the current cost ofthe contract.
But accordingto Hodge, the
increases are reasonable. "From
our position, that's what we have to
do because our members are being
treated unfairly compared to people
in similar occupations and other
people on campus," she said.
Classifying some employees as
"temporary" has also been a sticking point in negotiations, and triggered an unfair labour practices
complaint in January. Hodge said
temporary workers are used for
short periods of time and undermine regular workers' job security.
Parson said the reclassification
was necessary. "Regardless how
we go forward, the AMS is always
goingto be a seasonal employer,
and I think there needs to be an
understanding of that," Parson
said. "For us to lose that flexibility
would be not what's best for the
organization."
It is now possible for work stoppage to be pushed back to April 24,
three days before the end of exams.
UBC has also ensured that CUPE
116 workers at the SUB's Pacific
Spirit Place cafeteria won't be prevented from goingto work if picket
lines are set up. The university
already obtained relief permission
from the LRB to allow their workers
inside the SUB.
The AMS doesn't necessarily think this was a positive move,
however.
"A good result is coming to a first
collective agreement. [But] I don't
think that pushing back a potential
disruption of service could be necessarily classified as a good result,"
Parson said.
The union hopes for a quick
resolution from the LRB. "What
we're hoping is that it doesn't allow
the AMS to escape the pressure we
think they should be feeling from
students, just because the term will
almost be over," Hodge said.
"We think that [security workers
have] really strong grounds and they
deserve a fair deal, but it has been
really taxing," she said. 13
Koerner Library's Level 3 renovations
are now complete. Visit the newly
refurbished space which features new
computer look-up stations, a bright
open space for group and individual
studying and our popular reading
collection next to a cozy fireplace.
Tell us what you think of the new
space at Koerner Library! Share your
feedback with us on our Facebook
page from April 12 - April 17 and
enter to win a $25 iTunes gift card.
www.library.ubc.ca »
> to the MLS£ZL—
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Editor: Ginny Monaco
04.122012 | 6
UNDIERUN»
Half-naked
students
storm
exam-addled
campus
Third annual Undie Run is a
titillating campus marathon
Andrew Bates
Senior Web Writer
Just weeks after Storm the Wall
brought a team pentathalon to
campus, hundreds of students took
to the streets again for an athletic
endeavour—but this time with
fewer clothes.
The third annual Undie Run,
organized bythe UBC Ski and
Board Club, took students on a wild
ride Tuesday night. Two hundred
students gathered on the Knoll and
then stripped down to their skivvies—with the discarded clothing
going to charity to boot. Then they
sped to all corners of campus in a
run through libraries and residences alike.
"[I feel] pretty amazing right
now," said a male student running
up the Irving K. Barber library
staircase. "I feel naked!" interrupted a female student running past,
who identified her program only as
"UBC."
Winding along a four-kilome-
tere route beginning at 10:30pm,
students first completed a running
leg through the library, then down
Main Mall to the Sauder School of
Business. The procession went next
to Place Vanier residence before
cutting back up East Mall around
the MacMillan building to Totem,
then ran to the outdoor pool at War
Memorial Gym.
Unlike last year, there was
no major obstacle from Campus
Security, who were seen at various points ofthe run but didn't
move in until about 20 minutes
after students had jumped into the
pool. "What can you do?" asked a
security guard outside the Henry
Angus building. "Stay warm."
Some were in itjustforthe
break before exams. "Yeah, I have
an exam at 8:30. It's in integral
calculus," said Jeff Roth, a first-
year Science student. "It's a good
study break. It'll be a lot of fun...I
think I'm prepared for the exam
anyway."
Some people took the run's
length in stride. "Oh you know,
a nice casual night run, no big
deal. Pretty good, pretty good,"
said AMS President Matt Parson.
"Lovely trees we have here around
us."
Two female students in fourth
year were chatting about how
Undie Run compared to their favourite running routes. "It definitely is [longer], especially this add-on
[route] to Totem," said Lauren
Sagadore, gesturing to the building
she was running around.
Some had more trouble. "This
run? Died. My lungs are not
equipped to do this kind of running, especially in...not-made-for-
running clothing," said Lindsay
Lukovitch, a first-year Arts
student.
"Oh yeah, we had to take a couple
breaks," said a student named Ellie.
When she said she hadn't done
that kind of run for a long time, a
student she was walking with, Taj,
corrected her.
"When did I run recently?"
Ellie asked. "To the Pit, on a
Wednesday," said Taj.
The next leg ofthe casual triathlon was climbing over the fence
outside the outdoor pool; although
some got over easily, some had a
more difficult time, hauling themselves up and trying to swing a leg
over without dipping too low onto
the top ofthe fence.
There was a moment of terror
when a student caught her briefs
on the fence while climbing down,
but she was helped free by fellow
runners. "I broke my underwear
doing it! The elastic's broken," the
student, Alex, said. "I'll help her
with it, stitch it up," said another
student who had just climbed over
the fence.
A gate was unlocked and opened
up quickly as students piled into
tne pool, generally splashing
around and jumping off the low
steps at the foot of each swimming
lane. Despite the lack of a ladder
to the five-metre diving board, a
student was able to shimmy up the
structure's frame. After hesitating as he tried to figure out how to
avoid the lane markers still in the
pool, he executed abackflip that
drew applause.
"I could have had a little tighter
pull on the back there, but you
know, overall in the circumstance,
I think I did alright," said the diver,
rating his jump as "3.5 on a6-point
scale."
The event was a changing ofthe
guard from last year's organizer to
current Ski and Board President
Charlott Johansen, but it was
hailed as a success, with hundreds
of items of clothing donated to
charity. "I think people are stoked
about it," Johansen said. "First-
years last year know about it and
first-years this year know about it,
so it's gonna be tradition."
"It's pretty fucking dope," said
Dylan Green, who helped organize
the event last year. "It's really awesome, actually." tH
—With files from Laura Rodgers
Photos by Geoff Lister ©Show us your UBC ID   ® We'll show your car some love
All UBC students, faculty and staff receive a 10% discount on all
products and services at any Mr. Lube in the Lower Mainland.
Not valid with any other offer or discount. Prices may vary. Code: UBC10. Expiry: August 31, 2013
No appointment necessary.
mrlube.com 81 Culture 04.122012
A sold-out Maclnnes Field was home to
good weather, good music and a year-
end concert to remember
Everything seemed to come together
for the fifth annual AMS Block Party.
More than 5500 students attended
the sold-out concert—which benefited
from beautiful weather and big-name bands
like MSTRKRFT and Mother Mother.
This celebration ofthe last day of class
hasn't sold out since its second year, when
The Roots headlined. Only 2900 students attended in 2010 to see the Barenaked Ladies,
and the AMS lost $103,000 on the concert
that year.
EUS President Ian Campbell, who sits on
the Student Life Committee (SLC), said the
AMS made a bigger push on promotion for
Block Party this year. The SLC is in charge of
coordinating inter-constituency events.
"Every time I talked to somebody in the
lead up to Block Party, they were excited
about it. I think it was because we had artists that people really cared about," said
Campbell. "Because there were two headliners, it brought out a bigger cross section of
campus. Itwas nice to see more of a diversity
of artists."
In the past, the two-person AMS Events
department was in charge of promoting the
event. Campbell said the SLC worked with
that department to make sure more students
attended.
"The AMS has a new events coordinator, so it was nice to have someone new who
wanted to shake things up a little bit," he said.
"We tried to appeal to all the undergraduate
societies and get everybody on the SLC really
interested in grassroots promotion."
Of course, the sunshine and double-digit
temperatures didn't hurt either. tH
—Jonny Wakefield
BY THE NUMBERS
ckparty
@lacheeeks head: pounding, eardrums: hurting, fingers: freezing, and yet. an amazing day!!
#amsblockparty #lastdayofclasses
@stellar_kee MSTRKRFT breaks out the crown
royal. Well played. #amsblockparty
@devinobrien UBC is a dangerous place today
#amsblockparty
@ceedavee Beer cans littering #UBC campus.
Yes. folks, it's that time again. #amsblockparty
@tpardi It's looking to be the perfect day for
#amsblockparty. Let's hope this weather holds
up.
@balisally Psst! Now would be a good time
to buy stocks/shares in asprin & Redbull!
#amsblockparty
tacos
5500+
# A kegs of beer
attendees
900
^9\M\M burgers
14,037
drink tickets sold
M,\J kegs of cider
^9 Canadian acts
ij3JiW doughnuts
m3\#\# pieces of gum on the field
#3 #AMSblockparty tweets
GEOFF LISTER AND KAI JACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY  r     %
eiqf  \%   "-" 04122012 Features 111
political change," says Evans.
Park urged The Ubyssey to hold
back from terms like "opening up,"
"reform" and "capitalism," words
that have been preached to the
North Koreans for centuries. Park
is also careful not to lump the two
Koreas together; that's why the KPP
is not run through UBC's Centre for
Korean Research, which she directs.
Not everyone thinks the KPP is a
good idea. Right-wing blogs such as
Blazing Cat Fur have attacked the
program, accusing UBC of "hosting
monsters from a prison nation that
jails and murders entire families."
They also refer to CanKor, an online
journal on North Korean affairs that
Evans and other UBC professors
contribute to, as a "propaganda site"
for the North Korean regime.
This negative pushback is one
reason why it is hard to get information on the KPP's donors. Park says
they donate on condition of anonymity, though she confirmed that
neither the Canadian government
nor UBC has funded it.
UBCs special role
The KPP has also caused some disagreement within UBC's administration. Park says she took pains
to achieve "consensus" between
UBC Public Affairs, the Office of
the President and the Sauder School
of Business. It is still unclear what
Sauder's exact role in the program
was. Park says that Sauder withdrew participation after the Asahi
article. Daniel Muzyka, the Sauder
dean, was travelling and unavailable for comment, but did confirm
by email that "Sauder was involved
in providing learning opportunities
along with other UBC entities." He
said there was never any connection
between the KPP and Sauder's MBA
program.
Stephen Owen, who was UBC's
VP External when the program
was initiated, told The Ubyssey in
September that he welcomed the
KPP, but was not necessarily committed to it.
"It's a very tentative program,"
said Owen at the time. "It's the first
time it's been done. We're not sure
where it's going. Even at the very
worst, we're goingto learn things.
There doesn't seem to be any downside to it."
"It has been part ofthe ethos
of UBC for a generation that we
can play a special role with North
Korea," says Evans. "We have
language facilities. We have more
Korean specialists than any other
university in Canada by a long shot."
Many ofthe experts involved in
the 1990s negotiations to establish
diplomatic relations were later hired
by UBC, including Joseph Caron,
a former Canadian ambassador to
North Korea who briefly taught at
the Liu Institute for Global Issues.
In 1996,then-UBC president
David Strangway courted a North
Korean delegation at his private
residence, accordingto Park. After
that meeting, Park and senior university executives were invited back
to North Korea to discuss "possible links between UBC and North
Korea."
But in 2002, after former US
President George W Bush gave his
famous "Axis of Evil" speech, the
increasing pressure on North Korea
over its nuclear program made it
practically impossible to maintain
those links. The KPP is an attempt to
re-establish some level of dialogue.
Building trust
Park's personal skill in negotiating
with the North Koreans played a
large role in the UBC administration's acceptance of her proposal for
the KPP, after many such proposals
had been turned down. Evans says
that Park displays a deep understanding of North Korea's Confucian
culture, a culture even more hardened than China's.
"In Korea, both North and South,
personal networks, personal trust
are very important," says Park.
Diplomacy and trading can't happen
without that trust.
"We can't say that's the only
reason [for keeping links], but it's an
important aspect."
Despite the ever-present international tension over North Korea's
nuclear program and missile tests,
there are economic factors that have
made it possible to maintain some
level of partnership. North Korea
experienced a harrowing period of
In 1996, then-UBC president David Strangway
courted a North Korean
delegation at his
private residence. After
that meeting, Park and
senior university executives were invited back
to North Korea to discuss
"possible links between
UBC and North Korea."
famine and flood in the 1990s after
the collapse ofthe Soviet Union,
which had provided it extensive food
and fuel aid. "Whether they like it
or not," says Park, "[North Koreans]
have to starttradingwith capitalist
countries."
Evans likened North Korea's situation to China in the early 1980s,
after the dark days ofthe Cultural
Revolution, when controls were
slowly and experimentally being relaxed on the economy. North Korea
has setup specialtradingtowns
alongthe Chinese border where traders are regulated less harshly. Some
joint ventures have been opened up
with South Korean companies like
Hyundai. There was even a resort for
South Korean tourists built, although
it ended in disaster when a tourist
was shot by a North Korean guard.
Park specifically asked to work
with the North Korean professors
because she wants to affect the next
generation.
"Professors can incorporate whatever they learned here in their teaching and even create new courses,"
she says. And because the professors
are often consulted by bureaucrats,
they can have policy implications.
Evans was more skeptical in his
assessment. "We're still at a stage
where each of these visits is carefully
managed," he says. "There are strong
efforts to learn about what is going
on in the outside, but not necessarily
[to] come back and recommend it or
apply it to their situation."
Nevertheless, both were optimistic about the future. Park is already
negotiating for a new round of professors, this time from more North
Korean universities, and hopes that
the KPP can serve as a model for other Canadian universities who want to
set up similar programs.
Evans hopes to eventually include
students in the exchanges.
"I have this vision that, wouldn't
it be great if in five years we had a
hundred North Korean students here
studying on exchange in our regular
courses, and 25 UBC students studying in North Korea?" 13
{ sitka }
Bring in your student card to get 15% off Sitka clothing
1864West4thAve.
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6- Commoner
10- Horrors!
14- Choreographer de Mille
15- Accent
16- Make-up artist?
17- Chimes
18- Entr'	
19-Bigdo
20- Conical native American tent
21- Causing horror
23- Actress Peeples
25- Author Rand
26- A Hard Road to Glory author
29- Invitation letters
32- Biblical mount
37- USN rank
38- Chip in
39-Optimally
40- Cause light to pass through
43- Add fizz
44- Caspian Sea feeder
45- Edge
46- Passover feast
47- Old Dodge model
48-IRS IDs
49- Attorney's org.
51-Writer Hentoff
53- Highly productive
58- Started
62- Bunches
63-Sup
64- Eat away
65- Decant
66- Cornerstone abbr.
67- Negatively charged particle
68- Bluesy James
69- Foot covering
70- The house of a parson
Down
1-All ears
2- Arch type
3- Break, card game
4- Greek goddess of the moon
5- Japanese immigrant
6- Egyptian deity
7- Bananas
8- Snare
9- Drunken
10- Minnesota's St College
11- LP player
12- Bust maker
13-Acapulcogold
22- Infuse
24- L.A. Law lawyer
26- Take the role of
27- Carousal
28-Accumulate
30- Letters on a Cardinal's cap
31-Soft palate
33- Son of. in Arabic names
34- Approaches
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36- Units
38- Stellar
39-At full speed
41- Not for a Scot
42-Coffee container
47- Uncouth
48- Breastbones
50-Waits
52- At right angles to a ships length
53- Scheme
54- Defeat decisively
55- Other, in Oaxaca
56- A big fan of
57- Give up
59- Enter
60- Brouhahas
61- Branta sandvicensis
62- Big brute
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Real Experience. Real Results. 04122012 Games 113
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by KrazyDad.com Printed with permission
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m% RHitnr- Rrian Piatt
04.122012 | 14
INDIANAJOEL/THE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Give students time to celebrate
New Year's at home
UBC is planning to start the second
term on January 2 this year, which
will be a major inconvenience for
many students who prefer to ring in
the New Year at home with friends
and family. For any students who
live outside ofthe Lower Mainland,
the only choice will be to come home
before New Year's Eve, or try to book
travel on the holiday itself.
Is this the worst thing in the
world? Obviously not, but it does
seem to be a needless restriction on
the winter break for students. We
know scheduling is always a difficult
task, but can UBC really not bump
back the start by even a single day,
just to give students time to celebrate
the holiday at home and travel back
without missingtheir classes? Surely
that's not too much to ask.
The AMS pulls off a kick-ass
Block Party
The sun was shining, the beer was
flowing and by all accounts, everyone was having a fantastic time
at Block Party. The AMS can pat
themselves on the back—particularly
those working in the events department—as they pulled off a very successful end-of-term party.
The carnival setting ofthe all-ages
area was a fantastic idea, as people
were actually hanging out there and
having a good time, unlike previous years when it was a depressing
tract of open field populated by a few
first-years.
Most of our editors would still
prefer to see live music as the final
act, but we can't argue with the thousands of students who were having a
great time dancing to the DJs. A mix
of live music and DJs is probably the
best strategy for future Block Parties.
As we said in our last issue, we'd
still like to see the AMS aim a little
higher with their capacity (though
apparently the fire department has
capped Maclnnes Field at just under
7000 people). This is a campus, after
all, that had 15,000 attendees for
Arts County Fair only a decade ago.
But having over 5000 students partying on Maclnnes Field is no small
accomplishment, and we salute the
AMS for throwing one hell of a bash.
The UNA's dubious Gage South
complaint
The University Neighbourhoods
Association (UNA) is sending a letter
to UBC to let them know they are
disappointed that Gage South will
be designated "Academic"—meaning
only student housing will be built.
The UNA would apparently like to
see more below-market-rate housing
for faculty and staff there.
This is an interesting move for
an organization full of very wealthy
homeowners—and by interesting,
we mean they have no credibility on
the issue. We have never seen the
UNA make a point of advocating
for below-market-rate housing in
their own neighbourhoods. If they
ever do, then perhaps we'll be more
willing to hear their complaints. For
now, their disappointment about
Gage South is, if you'll pardon the
pun, a bit rich.
Undie Run an unexpected
source of school pride
There is only one time a year when
students will start chanting "UBC"
loud and proud.
No, it's not a football game. No, it's
not the Imagine Day pep rally, where
students are only chanting their faculty's name.
We're talking about the Undie
Run, where a few hundred students
strip down and run around campus,
bringing some levity and life to the
dreary scenes of exam-cramming
sessions. The festivities are organized bythe UBC Ski and Board
Club.
For whatever reason, the Undie
Run brings out an excited burst
of school spirit in its participants,
which is why we make sure our
cameras are there to capture the
spectacle. The resulting video we
produce for our website is always
very popular, and not only due to
crude voyeurism. It makes our campus seem like a place where students
occasionally let loose and make the
university experience a little more
wild and unpredicatable.
Finally, we'd be remiss to not
mention the excellent manner in
which Campus Security dealt with
this year's Undie Run. Last year they
attempted to bar the doors to the
library, threatened one of our photographers with arrest and called the
RCMP to the outdoor pool. This year,
they held back, only keeping an eye
on the event to make sure nobody got
hurt. The result? All the participants
had a great time, there was no property damage, there were no incidents
of ugly confrontations with security
officers, and UBC, for once, seemed
to live up to its chilled-out West
Coast reputation.
Construction will be a central
experience for years to come
During our March Madness bracket
to find the quintessential UBC experience, "Construction" made it to the
Final Four round, confirmingwhat
we already suspected: students see
neverending construction as an integral feature of their time on campus.
Well, that feature is about to get
a lot more prominent, even if that
seems impossible. The Bookstore is
preparing for a $5 million renovation
to begin in October. That means that
over the next few years, there will be
Bookstore construction, a new SUB,
a new Alumni Centre, a new bus loop
and likely a new Maclnnes Field and
Aquatic Centre. The centre of campus will be practically impassable.
Yes, this is the necessary price
we pay in order to have new facilities. And don't get us wrong, we are
looking forward to the new SUB
more than almost anyone else—we'll
finally be out ofthe basement!
But if we hold another March
Madness bracket in another year or
two, it's a very real possibility that
construction will be the defining
experience of campus for most students. 13
How UBC should
connect with alumni
Editor's
Notebook
Justin
Ik^.     McElroy
After seven years of work and study,
I'll be leaving UBC and Ubyssey alike
for The Province next week.
It will certainly be bittersweet.
This university has given me an education, a lifetime of memories and
the chance at a career I love. In return, I've given it plenty of chewed-
down pencils and snark.
Oh yeah, and tens of thousands of
dollars. I also gave them that. Money
for tuition, money for books, money
for four years of housing, money for
burgers at White Spot...I gave them
a lot.
This was on my mind when UBC
phoned me for money.
You see, I'm an alumnus now,
which means that Alumni Affairs
would like to speak with me. They're
in the midst of a $1.5 billion fundraising campaign, a campaign that will
create lots of buildings and scholarships and educational experiences
for students.
Still, like most 20-somethings, I
have little to no money to spare. So I
said no.
I don't blame the nice lady who
had the misfortune of phoning up
someone who was sliiiightly more informed about UBC than your average
alum—she was going off her script.
And I don't blame UBC for trying
to engage me right now. Universities
should talk with their young alumni
before they grow old and disconnected from their college days.
Yet politely decliningto give
UBC more money (twice), I began
thinkingthere had to be a better way.
It's true that Millennials are less
likely to donate and that when you've
just graduated with thousands of
dollars in debt, the first reaction to
being solicited by UBC to give them
MORE money is one of bemusement,
if not scorn.
So why is that the first time
Alumni Affairs called me up was to
ask for money?
Mostly, it's a time-honoured way
of connecting with alumni. Whether
political or charitable, basic cold-
calling has its place in any campaign.
But it's 2012, and you would think
a modern university would have
smarter attempts at first contact.
Yes, there will always be wealthy
alumni in their 40s and 50s who, full
of money and thinking philanthropi-
cally, will give plenty to UBC.
Yet what now separates UBC from
other elite institutions is its lack of
a large endowment—which means
it needs to connect better with
alumni. If UBC wants to truly create
a culture of giving back, they need to
engage recent graduates in a multi-
layered, dynamic way.
They need to target those that
were involved while in school, find
them ways to feel involved after
graduation and make donations a
natural thing for them to do once
they pay off all those loans.
Oh, and they also have to make
people feel better upon graduating
here. Which means improving the
teaching done at the undergraduate
level, making more affordable housing spaces on campus and reducing
the stifling bureaucracy that spins
students in circles.
But I'm leaving, so that's a rant
for another column, by a different
writer. 13
On graduate tuition
Letters
Re: "Why your tuition rises every
year," Aprils
Sean Heisler's column on tuition
raises gave a lot of excellent information, but we wanted to raise a few
more points about what tuition raises
mean for graduate students.
The Graduate Student Society
(GSS), like the AMS, has accepted
the lesser evil of gradual tuition
increases over the boom and bust of
tuition freezes coupled with periods
of skyrocketingtuition increases.
However, for graduate students, the
issue has never simply been one of
tuition increases. Graduate students
are rather deeply integrated into any
research intensive university. We
study here. We work here. We teach
here. And, while tuition rises every
year to deal with the inflationary
pressures the university faces, grad
students are painfully aware that our
wages do not go up with inflation.
In 2002-03, domestic doctoral
tuition was $2657 and fees were
$455; in 2011-12, domestic doctoral
tuition is $4264 and fees are $987. In
contrast, funding for major graduate
scholarships remained frozen during
this time and TA wages have only
gone up marginally.
The average completion time for a
doctoral degree at UBC is 6.5 years.
If we assume that the 2 per cent policy stays in effect, then we know that
a doctoral student entering UBC next
year will pay about 12 per cent more
for tuition in year 6 than they pay in
year 1. In contrast, there is nobody on
this campus who believes that graduate student wages and awards will
increase by 12 per cent duringthe
next 6 years.
The official GSS policy is that
tuition increases are fine as long as
they come with wage and award
increases. Since they do not, it seems
that students are simply being forced
to spend more and more to go to
school each year to earn less and less.
This seems both unfair to students
and a long term threat to the sustainability of graduate education at UBC.
As a university community, we
must ask if students who are wage
insecure still provide world-class
teaching, research, and scholarship.
We must ask if being economically
sustainable is part of what it means
to have a sustainable campus and
learning environment. In essence,
the questions tuition debates address, from a graduate student point
of view, are much larger questions of
what it would mean for us to have the
kind of funding packages necessary
for us to come to school, do world
class teaching and research, and to
leave UBC on time as well-trained,
emerging experts in our chosen
fields.
—Connie Lin, GSS President and
Jamie Paris, GSS VP Academic and
External Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
04122012 | 15
TELEVISION »
Navigating the murky morality of TV spoilers
I might spoil some of your favourite shows, but trust me-it's not a bad thing
I Melodramatic
Musings
Will
Johnson
I'll admit it: I'm a spoiler.
It's a symptom of being such an
avid television fan, but that's no
excuse. Repeatedly I find myself
excitedly recounting scenes and
detailing plot points from my favourite movies and shows, only to
be met with rage and bitterness.
Really, I should know better—maybe you were a few episodes behind
on the show being discussed, or
you were waiting for the season
to end so you could watch it all at
once. Or maybe you've just been
busy.
When The Sixth Sense first came
out, a friend of mine told me about
the twist endingthe moment he
got back from the theatre. For the
first three seasons of The Sopranos,
I knew about every single character that was going to get whacked
before it happened. And recently
I was told which character's head
was on the chopping block before
I even started watching Game of
Thrones.
Spoilers are everywhere. Chances
are, there will even be some in this
column. Consider yourself warned.
Recently, Funny or Die put out a
video outlining spoiler etiquette. A
friend of mine sent me the link on
Twitter, just to make sure I got the
message. Though tongue-in-cheek,
the video had useful guidelines,
which I'll list here:
Length of time before you can
talk about a standard episode:
Two weeks.
Length of time before you can
talk about a season finale: Two
months.
Length of time before you can
talk about a series finale: One
year.
Which means I can comfortably, in good conscience, tell you
the following: Silvio kills Adriana
in the fifth season of The Sopranos,
Omar gets popped by a little kid
in the last season of The Wire,
Lafayette gets possessed by an evil
spirit and murders his boyfriend
in the most recent season of True
Blood and Rita was eviscerated by
John Lithgow and left in a bloody
"Any good piece of art, or any television show,
bathtub at the end of season four
of Dexter. Oh yeah, and nothing
makes sense at the end of Lost.
Man, that felt good.
I can't tell you about the season finale of The Walking Dead yet
and it will be a little while before
INDIANAJOE^HE UBYSSEY
should get better upon repeated viewing."
;  I can discuss the shocking end of
I Boardwalk Empire's second season
I  or the explosive conclusion to
; Breaking Bad's fourth. But I can
; wait.
•      While I was writing this column,
; I came across a study by Nicholas
Christenfeld and Jonathan Leavitt
of UC San Diego's psychology
department. Accordingto their research, spoilers actually enrich the
viewing experience.
Leavitt, while discussing his
findings, put it this way: "It could be
that once you know how [the story]
turns out, it's cognitively easier—
you're more comfortable processing
the information—and can focus on a
deeper understanding ofthe story."
You can read about their findings yourself, but the researchers
summed up their conclusion like
this: "Monet's paintings aren't really
about water lilies."
That's why a Monet enthusiast can spend hours looking at the
same painting, and why I've probably watched Fight Club 20 times,
even though I already know Brad
Pitt is a figment ofthe narrator's
imagination.
Though people rant and rave
about spoilers, really they're beside
the point. Because any good piece
of art, or any episode of a television
show, should only get better upon
repeated viewings.
And if it relies on shock value or
cheap twists, then there's really
nothing there to spoil, because it's
already rotten. tH
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
UBC Land Use Plan Amendments
The University of British Columbia's Public Hearing Committee will hold a Public Hearing respecting proposed amendments to the Land
Use Plan for UBC's Vancouver Campus. The Public Hearing is being held in accordance with Part 10-2010 of the Municipalities Enabling and
Validating Act (No. 3), S.B.C. 2001, c. 44 and Ministerial Order No. M229.
The proposed Land Use Plan amendments are as follows:
• Re-designate, and adjust labeling for the "Area Under
Review" on maps Schedules A, B, and C of the Land Use Plan,
to reflect "Academic" use.
• Delete Section 4.1.7 "Area Under Review".
• Insert the following new wording after Section 5.1.3:
"Section 5.1.4 Neighbourhood Distribution
The UBC Board of Governors adopted residential floor space
allocations for neighbourhoods on campus to ensure a future
population that would support a sustainable community and
to transfer the floor space that would have been accommodated
on the UBC Farm and other areas to new neighbourhoods
(see Land Use Plan Next Steps: Neighbourhood Distribution
Report, April 2011 to Board of Governors). Achieving these
floor space allocations is essential to UBC's academic mission,
student housing goals, faculty and staff housing goals,
endowment value and sustainable community goals. All
residential floor space not achieved in these neighbourhoods
will be located to different parts of campus in future."
The proposed amendments to the Land Use Plan affect
the UBC Vancouver campus lands, as shown in Map A,
as attached to this Notice of Public Hearing.
All persons who believe they may be affected by the above
proposed amendments to the Land Use Plan will be afforded
a reasonable opportunity to be heard in person and/or by
written submission.
A speakers list will be available for the public to sign at the
entrance of the Public Hearing venue approximately 30
minutes prior to the start of the Public Hearing.
Speakers will be asked to come forward in the order of
the speakers list and will be allowed up to five minutes to
address the Public Hearing Committee regarding the
proposed amendments.
Should you have any concerns or comments you wish
to communicate to the Committee in advance of the
Public Hearing, you can write to: Committee Clerk for
the Public Hearing, c/o Campus and Community
Planning, 2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z4 or
public.hearing.clerk@ubc.ca. To be considered, advanced
submissions must be received by noon on Wednesday, Apri
25. After this deadline, any written submissions must be
made, in person only, directly to the Committee Clerk until the
end of the Public Hearing.
Written submissions received prior to or submitted during
the Public Hearing will be included as part of the official
public record by the Committee Clerk. Submissions
received after the conclusion of the Public Hearing will not
be considered by the Public Hearing Committee or the
UBC Board of Governors.
The proposed amendments and relevant background material
may be inspected at the offices of Campus and Community
Planning, 2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, from 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m., Monday to Friday, except
statutory holidays, from April 12 to April 25, 2012.
The Procedural Rules for the Public Hearing are available
for inspection at the offices of Campus and Community
Planning or by contacting the office as noted to the right,
below the map.
Please note, no refreshments or food will be provided at the hearing.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
Date:
dnesday, April 25, 201
irine Drive Residence Ballroom,
05 Lower Mall, Vancouver, BC
MAP A: LANDS SUBJECT TO LAND USE PLAN AMENDMENTS
AND PUBLIC HEARING LOCATION
<£)
Student Union Blvd
Agricultural Rd
Redesignated from _
"Area Under Review"
to "Academic"
Public Hearing
\       Location
For further information, contact:
Campus and Community Planning
2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z4
604-827-3465    stefani.Iu@ubc.ca
www.planning.ubc.ca
hen ai^L-i^. _■__■^m n. ?a_ a^si-t *-mm-£2i°w?i unm^-. Making UBC
A BETTER PLACE
2278
Teaching Assistants
at The University of British Columbia
#fairnessfromhere

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