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The Ubyssey Mar 25, 2010

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Array WEATHER @ UBC
.ca
YOUR STUDENT NEWSPAPER IS PUBLISHED EVERY MONDAY AND THURSDAY . VOLUME 91, NUMBER LII . ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING . FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
TUITION INCREASE ON THE HORIZON 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2010.03.2 5
MARCH 25,2010
VOLUME XCI,  N° LII
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@uhyaey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samanthajung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Kathy Yan Li:
culture@ubyssey. ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy: sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Gerald Deo:photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz:graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubyaey.ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic : copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubyaey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans: awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubyssey.ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey.ca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubyssey.ca
AD TRAFFIC
Sabrina Marchand: advertising@ubyssey.ca
AD DESIGN
Chibwe Mweene: cmweene@ubyssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
Ahem. My name is Kai Green, and, like, this is my
speech on Why All Anna Zoria Should Be Allowed
into Kathy Yan Li Land. So like, right now for example
The Jonny Wakefields need to come to Jon Dehou-
wer and Virginie Menard. But some Justin McElroys
are all, "What about the strain on our Trevor Becord?"
Well it's like when Ana Bernerd had this garden party for Kasha Chang and Austin Holm's birthday, right?
Gerald Deo put B.S.V.P 'cause itwas a sit-down dinner. But some people, like Keegan Bursaw and Geoff
Lister, came that, like, did not B.S.V.P. Tara Martellaro was like totaily buggin'. Katarina Grgic has nothing going on today. Bebeka Byvola had to haul ass to
the kitchen, redistribute the food, and squish in extra
place settings. But by the end of the day itwas, like,
the more the merrier. And so if Boel Moeurs and Paul
Bucci could just get to the kitchen, rearrange some
things, Samantha Jung and Larisa Karr could certainly party with Sarah Chung and Ashley Whillans. And
in conclusion may I please remind you it does not say
Fi.S.VP on the Statue of Liberty. Thankyou very much
University
Press
Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
pnintgq onj[0.0%
reeycterLpaDer
EVENTS
CLASSIFIED
The Power of Gnostic Meditation: A FREE Workshop Thursday, April 8, 2010, 7:00 -8:00 pm.
Location: YWCA Fitness Centre 535 Hornby Street, Downtown Vancouver. Registration/information contact: 1-877-GNOSIS-l or go to gnosticawaken-
ings.com/vancouver. Timeless
techniques to acquire wisdom
and inner peace.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every Sunday
and Wednesday, 2pm, SUB 24.
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY
MUSIC & MEAL • Like to play
music? Just want to listen?
Looking for a sense of community? This is for all members of the UBC community who want to have a good
meal and great conversation. All meals are home-
cooked and are vegetarian-
friendly. • Every Monday,
6:30pm-8:30pm, Chapel of
the Epiphany (6030 Chancellor Blvd), for more info e-mail
revnathanwright@mac.com.
NOON "FUN" RUN • Get healthy
and come run or walk. Meeting outside the Student Recreation Centre, the UBC REC
Noon Fun Run, hosted by the
UBC REC & Health Promotions Department takes participants throughout many of
UBC's most scenic areas on
a course ranging from 3 to
5km. It is free and open to
all students, faculty and staff.
• 12:30pm-1:30pm, Student
Rec Centre.
STORM THE WALL 2010 • North
America's largest campus intramural event. Be a part of
the event that defines UBC.
Men's, women's and CoRec
teams of five will compete in a
swim, sprint, cycle and run relay before storming over one of
two 12-foot walls in the heart
of campus. Individuals may
also complete the entire relay
themselves in the Iron Person
categories. • All day until Apr.
1, $40 team, $10 Iron person,
for more info go to rec.ubc.ca/
events/storm.
THURSDAY, MAR. 25
MASKED OPERA BALL FUNDRAISER* Tasty cuisine plus entertainment by the Dal Richards
Orchestra and the UBC Opera Ensemble put the "fun"
in fundraising. Each ticket includes a delicious dinner on
the stage of the Chan Centre and entertainment by one
of Vancouver's best-loved
bandleaders. Tickets are limited so don't delay! • 7pm,
Chan Centre, $150 (includes
$100 tax receipt).
BAND WARS FINALS • The best
band at UBC will emerge victorious Thursday night. A panel of industry judges will be on
hand to score the event and
deliver the verdict. Top Runner Up at 9 pm, Week 1 Winner at 10 pm, Week 2 Winner at 11 pm. • 9pm-12am,
The Pit, free.
SPARTACUS YOUTH CLUB CLASS
SERIES* Presenting theirthird
class in the series, The Vanguard Party and the Fight
for Socialist Revolution. •
6:30pm, SUB 224, for more
info contact trotskyist_van-
couver@shawcable.com or
call (604) 687-0353.
THE DANCE CENTRE PRESENTS:
DISCOVER DANCE! • Discover
Dance! is a series showcasing diverse province-based
companies, presented by The
Dance Centre, BC's resource
centre for dance. The series
will be showcasing the brilliant footwork and breathtaking virtuosity of flamenco, along with an exhilarating performance by Flamenco Rosario. • 12pm, Scotiabank Dance Centre, 677 Davie
St, $7 students, $10 adults,
tickets can be purchased at
ticketstonight.ca.
FRIDAY, MAR. 26
INTERNATIONAL NIGHT* Are you
ready for a night of cultural immersion, music, performance,
and a riotous dance party?
Then join us for the English
Language Institute's International Night. There will be cultural displays, an international
food fair, performances and
demonstrations of unique talents, and to top it all off, a DJ
will spin tunes to guarantee
groovy moves on the dance
floor. • 7pm, SUB Ballroom,
$3, bring two pieces of ID to
purchase alcohol.
ASIAN CANADIAN INDIE MUSIC
FESTIVAL* On behalf of the
Asian Canadian Cultural Organization, we are pleased to announce that we will be holding
an Asian Canadian Indie Music Festival, in which we bring
in a diverse range of talented local Asian Canadian performers to showcase their talents! All proceeds support the
Downtown Eastside Worn-
ens' Centre. • 6:30pm-9pm,
Thea's Lounge, Koerner Graduate Student Building, $11.
CFI VANCOUVER PRESENTS: A
TALK WITH PAT O'BRIEN • Pat
has been involved in virtually every production aspect of film, television and
live theatre. He is a former
President of the British Columbia Humanist Association and is now an Ambassador for Atheist Alliance
International. • 7:30pm-
9pm, room 182, IKBLC, $4
students, $5 regular, free
for CFI members.
SATURDAY, MAR. 27
EWB UBC PRESENTS: BRIDGING
THEGAP* Bridging the Gap is
an upcoming conference put
on by the Engineers Without Borders Vancouver chapter. Discussion topics will
include Aid vs Trade, Agriculture Value Chains, Micro-
finance, Connecting to African Culture and Climate
Change and Development.
The conference will close
with a keynote address from
Dr Hans Rosling, professor
of International Health in
Stockholm, Sweden. • 8am-
5pm, Life Sciences Institute, $35 students, $70 professionals, lunch included.
Come to our *
Hiring Fair       /
on May 4*
from 12-4pm at
Minoru Cultural Centre,
Richmond     ^k
Find Work You Love!
Connections Youth Resource Centre is a FREE employment centre for people under 30.
Free services for job seekers include:
iData Research Hiring
Market Research Analysts
Resume and cover letter writing
Interview strategies
Career planning
Referrals to skills training programs
Current job postings and more!
100-7900 Alderbridge Way, Richmond
604.271.7600
www.rysa.bc.ca
Follow us on Twitter! (SRichmondYouth
d
CONNECTIONS
RESOURCE
2
Want to use your science degree in a
challenging and rewarding
environment?
Apply at:
careers@idataresearch.net
www.idataresearch.net I m
(604) 266-6933
Got any events you want to advertise?
Need a quick way to tell the rest of campus
what's going on?
Send us info about your events!
virginie menard | events@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc
LSAT MCAT
GMAT GRE
Preparation Seminars
• Complete 30-Hour Seminars
• Convenient Weekend Schedule
• Proven Test-Taking Strategies
• Experienced Course Instructors
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• Limited Class Size
• Free Repeat Policy
• Personal Tutoring Available
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430
1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
INDIAN DANCE WITH SUDNYA
MULYE • Sudnya Mulye tells
stories of India through the
classical dance style Bharata
Natyam. Join her at the Art-
Starts Gallery, where kids
and families will explore culture and tradition through
dance, movement and expression. • 11am & 1pm, Art-
Starts gallery, 808 Richards
St (at Robson), free.
TUESDAY, MAR. 30
AMS VOLUNTEER CONNECT FAIR •
Come to the fair at the SUB
South Concourse to check out
volunteer opportunities. Over
30 organizations and on-campus clubs are participating in
this fair. • 11am-3:30pm, SUB
South Concourse.
BIKETO SCHOOL DAY* Grab your
trusty steed and cruise up
to campus for a big, warm,
friendly Bike Co-op greeting.
The weather is turning from
great to greater so how better to celebrate spring than
on two wheels? Bike checks
will be available at our commuter station tent to make
sure you're riding safe, along
with free coffee and breakfast goodies! • 7:30am-11am,
University Blvd.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 31
US  HEALTH  CARE  REFORM  •
The UBC School of Population and Public Health presents L'S Health Reform (This
Time for Real?): Prospects
and Lessons for Canada. Students, staff, faculty and the
community are welcome to
attend this free public lecture by Dr Elliott Fisher, Director of Population Health
and Policy at the Dartmouth
Institute for Health Policy
and Clinical Practice. • 5pm-
6:30pm, room LSC2, Life Sciences Centre, with a wine
and cheese reception 4pm-
5pm at the atrium, RSVP to
the reception at sylvia.fro-
ese@ubc.ca, for more info
go to spph.ubc.ca.
THURSDAY, APR. 1
THE FATE OF URDU: MUSLIMS,
LANGUAGE POLITICS, AND COLONIAL HYDERABAD • This talk examines the work of Muslim
writers, literary critics and
intellectuals in the southern
city of Hyderabad. There
they founded the first vernacular university of modern
India, Osmania University,
using Urdu as the medium
of instruction in all subjects
from History and the Humanities to Medicine and the Sciences. The work of these intellectuals allows us to rethink the place of Muslims
within the history of Indian
nationalism and the trajectory of the national language
question in modern India.
• 4pm-6pm, Asian Centre
604,  1871 West Mall.
FRIDAY, APR. 2
BLOOD BASH • What happens
when you cross Tarantino,
vampires and Shakespeare?
You get Taranampspeared in
the most GORIFYING Halloween Party of April. So
dress up as your favourite
bloody characters (i.e. Buffy
the Vampire Slayer, Hannibal Lecter, Freddy Kreuger,
etc.) • 19+ event, 8pm-
12am, SUB Party Room, $5
in advance, $7 at the door,
to purchase tickets call Andrew Lynch at (604) 839-
4316 or Genevieve Bolduc
at (604) 338-2805. 2010.0 3.2 5/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
l\
EWS
RESULTS OF UBC'S TUITION PROPOSAL SURVEY
55% of domestic undergraduate students said that the     41% of international undergraduate students said that the
proposed 2% tuition increase would create some finan-    proposed 4% increase would create some financial pres-
cial pressure, but they could manage.                                   sure, but they could manage.
32.6% said it would seriously impact them, and they    48.4% said that it would seriously impact them,
would have to consider delaying their studies or not re-    84.9% of international undergraduate students polled said
turning to UBC.                                                                        that tuition at UBC was too high.
84.9% of domestic undergraduate students said tuition
at UBC was too high.
EDITOR SAMANTHAJUNG»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SARAH CHUNG »schung@ubyssey.ca
Tuition increase
pushes forward
Board to finalize April 8
ROEL MOEURS
rmoeurs@ubyssey.ca
On Tuesday, the UBC Board of
Governors' (BoG) finance committee unanimously voted in favour of a two per cent increase
in tuition fees for domestic students and a four per cent increase for international students
despite opposition.
The tuition proposal still
has to be approved at the full
board meeting on April 8, but
there was little criticism from
BoG members at the meeting
on Tuesday.
Students who are taking a full
courseload in Arts or Science
will pay $89 more in total tuition fees in 2010/2011 under
the current proposal. This $3
increase per credit is, according to UBC VP Students Brian
Sullivan, a normal adjustment
to the increased cost of living
and current inflation.
The proposal has encountered
strong opposition from students.
Students from UBC Okanagan
(UBC-O) came to Tuesday's meeting to voice their concerns.
In a survey conducted by UBC,
half of undergraduate students
indicated that the current tuition levels were already too
high, and one-third said that
this increase would mean postponing their degree or not returning to UBC. 7142 students
responded to the survey.
Those [survey]
levels are five to
ten times greater
than usual, which
is appalling
and extremely
concerning.
MICHAEL DUNCAN
BOARD0FG0VERN0RS
REPRESENTATIVE
Among international students
these numbers were even higher, and at UBC-O, which would
have the same increases, 90 per
cent of students polled were opposed to the current proposal.
These numbers came as a surprise to members ofthe BoG. "I
have a hard time understanding
this," said Sullivan.
Michael Duncan, AMS BoG
representative, said he was
"shocked" by the results. "Those
[survey] levels are five to ten
times greater than usual, which
is appalling and extremely concerning," he told The Ubyssey in
an e-mail interview.
"I would like the administration to present possible reasons
why these results are so and
have a detailed plan to deal with
the potential student financial
difficulties."
Newly elected AMS President
Bijan Ahmadian, who is currently serving out the remainder of
his term as BoG representative,
argued that the results were due
to campaigning by advocates of
lower tuition.
I don't believe that,
for $89, anyone
will postpone their
degree.
BIJAN AHMADIAN
BOARD0FG0VERN0RS
REPRESENTATIVE
"This time around, there was
serious campaigning," he told
The Ubyssey. "[Former AMS VP
External] Tim Chu...was telling
people thatifyou don'twantyour
tuition to increase, you should
go and respond to the survey
in a certain way. I don't believe
that, for $89, anyone will postpone their degree—I don't think
anyone buys that."
"The position of the AMS
has been that as long as it corresponds to the cost of living,
we're OK with it," Ahmadian explained. "In the past 16 years,
we've never had a formal policy to either reduce tuition or to
support a tuition freeze."
Nevertheless, other students
indicated that this increase
might be too much. "$89 dollars might not seem much for
some people, but to a student,
that is a week's worth of groceries," said Carolyn Cody from
the UBC-O Students Union (UBCSUO), "I think it's irresponsible."
One thing all parties did
agree on was the need for increased and cooperated lobbying of the provincial government. UBC, the AMS and UBCSUO have all indicated a willingness to work together and make
sure that students can benefit
fully from Policy 72, which is
in place to make sure that students with financial problems
are still able to attend UBC.
Cody said that the student representative from UBC-O will vote
against the proposal when it
comes to the full BoG in a few
weeks.
Ahmadian, despite voting in
favour ofthe increase lastyear,
abstained on Tuesday due to a
conflict of interest, as he is currently serving as both AMS president and BoG representative.
He indicated he will most likely abstain from the next vote
as well, til
—with files from
Samanthajung
Throw up your hands and raise your voice.... Monorail! Monorail! ANTHONY GOERTZ ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
How do you want to get to school?
Students weigh in on transportation consultation
LARISA KARR
karr@ubyssey.ca
You may have seen the open-ended signs that read "If it were up
to me buses would be located..."
These signs are part of a month-
long transporation consultation
organized by UBC Campus and
Community Planning (C+CP) in
order to determine the most desirable location for a new bus
loop at UBC, and students are
weighing in.
The consultation will consist
of an Ideas Fair, in which students and faculty are encouraged to create and present ten-
minute proposals for how to improve transportation around
campus. There will be two $1000
and two $500 prizes for the most
creative presentations at the
Ideas Fair.
After plans to complete an
underground bus loop were
scrapped last fall,  due to
We are going to
talk the ideas
through with
the campus
community and
present different
ideas. We have to
start somewhere."
JOE STOTT
DIRECT0R0FPLANNING FOR C+CP
=TransLink's inability to fund
transportation projects, Campus
and Community Planning decided to consult the UBC community in order to determine how
public transit on the UBC campus could be improved.
"We needed an open consultation plan. With the Ideas Fair
we're going to ensure that there
is a high level of participation
ranging from faculty to staff,"
said Tracy Bains, C+CP's Manager of Communications and
Consultation.
Joe Stott, Director of Planning
for C+CP explained the steps to
be taken following the completion of the consultation. "Over
the summer, campus planning
will pick the best ideas out of the
submissions and go through it
with some technical analysis,"
Stott said.
Later in October, the top ideas
from the Fair will be reviewed
and considered along with feedback from Translink.
"The prize money is just to
generate interest. We are going to talk the ideas through
with the campus community
and present different ideas,"
said Stott. "We have to start
somewhere."
The AMS will not participate
in the Ideas Fair, but will be
involved in the Public Transportation Council on April 15,
said AMS VP External Jeremy
McElroy.
The Council will be a collaboration between the UBC Community and TransLink. It will discuss the constraints and tradeoffs of installing different transit methods including bus rapid
transit, light rail rapid transit,
rail rapid transit and combined
technologies.
Two ofthe factors TransLink will
take into consideration when planning the line will be peak-hour demand and latent demand. UBC
transit consultants determined that
while the regional peak hour generally is around 7:30am to 8:30am,
UBC Vancouver'speak hour occurs
from 8:30am to 9:30am. The new
transit system would have to accommodate those different peak
times.
While the regional
peak hour is
around 7:30am
to 8:30am, UBC
Vancouver's peak
hour occurs from
8:30am to 9:30am.
Students are excited to be
given the opportunity to have
a voice in the process. "Even
though I lived on campus for
four years, I am participating
in the consultation because I
know how difficult it can be to
commute back and forth," said
fourth-year Commerce student
Abhi Ramlugan. "I did a project similar to this in one of my
classes and I'm looking forward
to working on the project." tl
UBC's Ideas Fair will take place
on Tuesday, March 30from 6pm
to 9pm in SUB 207. 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2010.03.25
Your new undergrad presidents
This year marred with controversy, late announcements
SARAH CHUNG
schung@ubyssey.ca
LI WINS BY LARGE MARGIN
Amanda Li won the Engineering Undergraduate Society (EUS) presidential race by
a large margin over competitors Julian Ritchie and Sina
Sahami.
"I was completely ecstatic. It
was pretty unbelievable hearing that I had won, and then
more unbelievable hearing the
number of voters and the margins," said Li.
Li hopes to "work off the momentum" the EUS has seen
through outgoing president Lin
Watt's term.
But she also sees a need for
change. "Internal organization...
needs a bit of work on its efficiency and effectiveness before it has
the capacity to do more," she said.
She plans to increase space
in the soon-to-be-built Engineering Student Centre, which is set
to replace the current Cheeze.
MORE PEOPLE SHOULD HAVE
VOTED: SHARMA
After the incomplete ballot
count announcement last Friday the Science Undergraduate
Society (SUS) Elections Committee announced the final results
via Twitter on Monday.
Sumedha Sharma, running
unopposed, was acclaimed president by a huge margin of 241
voters voting 'Yes' and 48 voting 'No.'
Despite her win, Sharma said
she was disappointed by the voter turnout.
"I am really disheartened about
the poor voter turnout...and this
Students wait for results—which were supposed to be released on Friday. GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
is exactly the kind of apathy I
want to address because it does
speak volumes about how connected students feel to their
undergraduate society among
many other things."
Sharma said she plans to
reform the SUS by connecting
the society more with the UBC
administration and faculties
"to build a cohesive executive
team." She also wants to create more executive jobs within the SUS to "create more avenues for student involvement."
Another one of her goals is
to install lockers and computers at the Adula Ladha Centre.
PLATT WINS BY MARGIN
The Arts Undergraduate Society
(AUS) election results were the
most controversial of all: Brian Piatt beat Ryan Trasolini by
a single vote cast by the Elections Adminstrator in order to
break the tie. The remaining
candidate, Mike Silley came
in third, but was only 13 votes
away from Piatt.
However, a letter from Trasolini, later published on the Radical Beer Faction website, claimed
that the ballot count was inaccurate and thus, he should be
the president elect.
According to Naylor, a recount
was conducted and no error was
found, and Piatt remains president.
Piatt will focus on creating an
"Arts community," which he aims
to achieve by creating or supporting events set up by Arts clubs.
"I think we should put on a
few keystone events a year and
they should be packed. There
should be a lineup to get into
an AUS event," he said.
Piatt said that the AUS has
done a poor job at making UBC
a "lively campus" and he thinks
that creating a fun environment
will make people feel more connected to their university.
FORYOUR INFO
Brian Piatt beat
Ryan Trasolini by
a single vote cast
by the Elections
Adminstrator in
order to break the
tie.
VICTORY FOR KIM FOR HKIN
Ellen Kim was elected as the new
Human Kinetics Undergraduate
Society (HKUS) president.
Results for HKUS were extremely delayed. "I actually only
found out at around 3pm [on
Tuesday] that I won," Kim said.
Kim served as HKUS VP Admin
for two years and pushed for the
need to connect with commuter students and running non-drinking
targeted events during that time.
Next year her goal is to make
HKIN to become a greater "presence on campus." She plans to do
this by running more interfaculty
events and increasing volunteer
outreach, tl
TRANSPORTATION    L
CONSULTATION
I
(verb)
around campus. If it were up
to me, the buses would be located at
(pi^e)   so that I could       (p^
We're holding an Ideas Fair to hear what you have to say about where to put the buses and
better ways to get around campus—on foot, by bike or whatever. This is a chance for the
whole community to come together to discuss this important issue.
Present your idea on your own or as part of a team in under ten minutes to the UBC community
and a panel of judges. Or you can simply attend and join in the group discussions after the
presentations are made.
The most creative and innovative presentations will win prizes of $1,000 and $500.
ATTEND OR PRESENT
>
a place of mind
Campus
Community
Planning
IDEAS FAIR
Tuesday, March 30,2010
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in SUB 207
Dinner provided.
To attend or present, please register online before
Wednesday, March 24,2010 at planning.ubc.ca
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IMlIIII WORKS!
Project of the Canadian Wood Council
Come to toatrf)
furling at
tlje sitege!
Wood Design Competition
This Saturday, March 27
Competition trials begin at
12:45! Whit-Matthews
Field, UBC campus
4 UBC student teams have
created original designs
for lightweight wood siege
engines to hit targets
using 2 lb. projectiles.
Come cheer them as they
compete with teams from
around the province for
prizes!
Canadian
Wood
Council
Conseil
canadien
du bois
/
Got what it takes to be an intrepid
journalist? Prove it by coming to
write for The Ubyssey news team. 2010.0 3.2 5/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/5
University of Ottawa rejects Ann Coulter
Students protest against the conservative US pundit
LEN SMIRNOV
The Fulcrum
OTTAWA (CUP)-Chaos erupted
on the night of March 23 as hundreds of protesters clashed with
police to prevent Ann Coulter,
the radically conservative US
pundit, from speaking on the
University of Ottawa campus.
The dozens of spectators
who had been admitted into
the school's Marion Hall auditorium were eventually told
that it was "physically dangerous" to proceed with the event
and were evacuated from the
building.
"It is an embarrassing day
for the University of Ottawa and
their student body that couldn't
debate Ann Coulter and chose to
silence her," said Ezra Levant, a
Canadian conservative activist
who was to introduce Coulter at
the event. "Never in my whole
life [have] I thought I would have
to tell people how to get out of a
university safely."
The speaking event was part
of Coulter's three-city Canadian tour, organized by the International Free Press Society and
the Claire Boothe Luce Policy
Institute, an American organization supporting conservative women in politics. Coulter
was scheduled to speak on political correctness, media bias
and freedom of speech.
She is perhaps best known
for making controversial comments including calling for Islamic countries to be invaded
and all Muslims to be converted
to Christianity shortly after 9/11.
Students and local residents began lining up in front
of Marion Hall several hours
before the event. Shortly before the scheduled speaking
time, though, the building's
fire alarm was pulled and the
speech was delayed.
Spectators await the arrival of US conservative pundit Ann Coulter. COURTSEY OF MATT STAROSTE
After groups of people began
to chant lines such as, "No more
hate speech on our campus" and
"Coulter go home," and crowded the doors to the building, Levant announced to those present in the auditorium that the
event was canceled, citing security concerns.
I'm upset that a
bunch of punks...
that obviously aren't
from this country
they're Arabic or
whatever—they
ruined it for
everyone else.
FRANCESLADOUCEUR
OTTAWA RESIDENT
While Levant indicated it was
protesters who pressed against
the doors to the building, witnesses outside claimed that police blocked the entrance to Marion Hall. A group of activists, including several members ofthe
Student Federation of the University of Ottawa (SFUO), took
credit for the protest.
"We support a positive space
on campus. We don't tolerate
hate speech," said Social Sciences student Taiva Tegler, one
ofthe organizers ofthe protest.
The audience inside the auditorium consisted largely of
Coulter's supporters, but several protesters were able to get inside by registering earlier with
event organizers.
"I think it is very disgraceful
that there are so many people
here that support a woman who
has made very homophobic, racist (and) sexist comments," said
graduate student Samantha Pon-
ting, one ofthe protesters who
gained entry to the event.
"By allowing her here on campus, it has created an unsafe
space. That's why we closed the
event," she said.
Coulter's supporters were upset with the cancelation of the
event. Ottawa resident Bob Ward
has followed Coulter's work—
which has included several New
York Times bestsellers and numerous television appearances—for five years and had registered for her speech weeks in
advance.
"I think the University of Ottawa really should be quite embarrassed by what's happened
here tonight," he said, suggesting that the university should
apologize to Coulter and invite
her back to campus.
Frances Ladouceur, another
Ottawa resident, was unable to
get into the event after the protesters pulled the fire alarm.
"I'm upset that a bunch of
punks...that obviously aren't
from this country they're Arabic or whatever—they ruined
it for everyone else," she said.
"It is a communist university
and I will never send my children [here]."
Francois Houle, the University of Ottawa's Provost, sent a
letter to Coulter on March 19 in
which he warned her of Canadian hate speech laws and encouraged her to "educate (her)
self, if need be, as to what is acceptable in Canada." Houle also
noted that "promoting hatred
against any identifiable group
would not only be considered
inappropriate, but could in fact
lead to criminal charges."
The letter was leaked to The
National Post and newsmax.
com, a conservative American
news site. Coulter responded to
the administrator's comments
in an e-mail to the Ottawa Citizen on March 22.
"I see that [Houle] is guilty
of promoting hatred against
an identifiable group: conservatives," she wrote. "Not
only does this promote hatred
against conservatives, but it
promotes violence against
conservatives."
Coulter drew criticism a day
earlier at the University of Western Ontario where she told one
Muslim student to "take a camel" if he didn't have a magic
carpet, a reference to an past
comment she has made. Levant
praised the speech, which drew
800 people.
"Itwas a tremendous civil debate," he said. "It was a great
night for democracy. A great
night for freedom."
Levant also classified Coulter's trip to Ottawa as a success for exposing the importance placed on Canadian values of free speech and characterized the night's outcome as
a "teaching moment for the entire country."
Lars Hedegaard, president
of the International Free Press
Society has promised to bring
Coulter back to the U of 0 campus in the future. Coulter is
scheduled to speak at the University of Calgary on March 25. tl
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U THEUBYSSEYc  2010.03. 25/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/7
GAMES & COMICS
SUSC0MIC.COM, BY MICHAEL BROUND
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EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
Further compounding the amazing closeness
of the vote, Mike Silley, in last place, was only
behind Ryan and Brian by 13 votes.
—Kyle Warwick [March 23]
How much money did the AUS
spend on promoting and running
this election?
—Blake Frederick [March 24}
I'm with blake. Down with
democracy!
—Pea loop [March 24}
BI/?05
01
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r\\<t>}
TREVOR RECORD GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
STUDENTS: IT'S TIME TO STAND UP FOR YOURSELVES ON TUITION
On Tuesday, the Board of Governors (BoG) finance committee voted in favour of a two per cent tuition increase for students, pushing the the increases for next year closer to reality.
Students from UBC-O came all the way to our campus to voice
their concerns. UBC VP Students Brian Sullivan announced the results ofthe tuition survey, which showed massive student opposition to the increases, particularly from international and UBC-O
students—many claiming they would be unable to complete their
degrees due to these increases.
While we're doubtful that a $89 increase will really stop students
from attending UBC, the message was clear that students are tired
of tuition increases. To them we say: turn this into a real movement.
Those UBC-O students make it obvious that there are more than
enough people who are devoted enough that it's a realistic aim.
Politicians ranging from NDP MP hopefuls to AMS executives
are going to offer to fight the good fight on your behalf. But those
ideologically opposed to them are not going to care about tuition
if you only focus on voting. You need a powerful group to work for
you at all times. If you begin large letter-writing campaigns, rallies and most importantly remain vigilant—not just when tuition
increases are about to occur—you'll be able to accomplish far more
than waiting for a few politicians to come knocking while on the
campaign trail.
AMS VP External Jeremy McElroy has talked about creating a
province-wide tuition lobbying group. Why don't students do this
without relying on their student governments? The AMS will continue to go along with tuition increases that fall under 2.5 per cent
for now—this could change in the future or it could not, but if you
believe in lower tuition, it would be foolish to wait around for a
more sympathetic executive.
Honestly, students don't really need them. They just need to get educated about the issue, then make their voices heard. For those who
truly can't complete their degrees if tuition continues to increase,
waiting around for a well-funded middle-man isn't an option, vl
HEALTH CARE HERE AND THERE
Watch out Americans, you just got socialized! With the passing of
the Medicare bill, you're now locked into a mandatory payment system wherein you have to buy insurance or pay a progressive fee to
maximum of just over $2000 annually. And who do you have to buy
this insurance from? That's right, private insurers!
Did we say socialized? You skipped right over that pesky middle
step of socialized medicine. That's right, you just got privatized.
Aw, America, we're just joshing. Baby steps. The health care reforms enacted by the US government earlier this week are, to quote
Vice-President Joe Biden, "a big fucking deal." It's not public health
care, but it does make it so every American, regardless of health
or wealth, can afford to go to the hospital.
Here in Canada we've been raging socialists for a long time. According to the Canada Health Act, all Canadian citizens are entitled to fee-less medically necessary services. Of course, most of us
pay monthly premiums, but those are just glorified taxes.
Still, our health care system is deeply flawed. There is no perfect fix. It's so flawed that we're exploring partial privatization in
BC. Which would ensure that those who can pay for better health
care would get it, and still get a little government support. Which
would mean the government would be paying to assist people who
can afford to buy better health care.
Aw, BC, we're just joshing. That would be ludicrous. Right? tl
TOO SEXY
KASHA CHANG
& AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
DEAR TOO SEXY,
I'll cut right to the chase. I've
been seeing this guy for the
past month and a half or so.
Everything's great—he makes
me laugh, gets along well with
my friends and the sex is fantastic (for me). There's just one
problem: about 50 per cent of
the times we have sex, maybe
slightly less, he doesn't cum. I've
asked him about it, and he says
it's normal for him and that he
isn't bothered by it. But especially since it's so good for me (and
I mean sooooo good; like, multi-
orgasmic), I feel kind of guilty.
Also, this is a relatively new development. When we first started dating, he never seemed to
have trouble cumming.
So my question is: Is this
something I need to be concerned about? Is this a symptom of him losing interest in
me? Are there any medical problems that could be contributing
to this situation? And should I
take him at his word that he
really doesn't care whether he
cums or not?
—Boyfriend's Lack of
Cum Keeps Her
Enquiring And Doubtful
HEY BLOCKHEAD,
As we've addressed in previous issues, communication is
extremely important in relationships, with particular pertinence to sexual matters. So
hopefully, if your boyfriend really did feel like this was a problem, he would tell you so openly and unambiguously.
Unfortunately, good communication isn't always the norm.
But especially since you two
seem to have a solid, healthy relationship, it's a good idea to assume he's communicating in
good faith—since we don't have
any significant evidence to the
contrary. In other words, if he
says he's not upset and doesn't
seem upset, you should probably believe that he isn't upset.
Along the same lines, this issue likely isn't a sign that he's
losing interest. If that's what's
keeping you up at night, you
should discuss that with him
and give him a chance to allay
your fears.
In the meantime, ask yourself if you are having sex more
frequently than you were at
the beginning of the relationship. Have you stopped using
condoms since that time? If so,
this may not be a new development in your sex life, but one
thatyou have only recently noticed for statistical and pragmatic reasons.
Moreover, your boyfriend has
probably grown more comfortable with you over the past few
weeks, perhaps leading him to
feel less pressured to make himself cum every time you have
sex.
In terms of medical explanations, male anorgasmia, delayed
ejaculation and male orgasmic
disorder are all technical terms
for an absence of subjective orgasm and ejaculation in men.
Various statistical reports indicate that anywhere from 4 to
13.5 per cent of menhave this
condition. Given that your boyfriend orgasms 50 per cent or
more ofthe time, and doesn't
report any distress associated
with this condition, he does
not fit the criteria for diagnosis. However, the causes of
this disorder may shed some
useful light on your question.
...practices such
as circumcision
and overly rough,
driving sex may
sometimes dull
sensory nerves in
the penis.
First of all, it should be noted that all kinds of drugs, prescription or otherwise, can have
a dampening effect on ejaculation in men. Antipsychotics, antidepressants and anticonvulsants are all common culprits,
as well as the gamut of recreational drugs from alcohol to
cocaine.
Psychological factors may
also have an effect—feelings of
pressure to perform are particularly culturally engrained in
men, which is strongly linked
to absent orgasm. Some sufferers report a sense that they must
maintain control, and associated anxiety, as contributing
to their inability to orgasm. Finally, practices such as circumcision and overly rough, driving
sex may sometimes dull sensory nerves in the penis.
But if your boy is cool with
not cumming 100 per cent of
the time, you shouldn't worry
about it either. The words 'orgasm' and 'ejaculation' are often used interchangeably for
men, but they're not actually the
same thing. Like love and marriage, you can have one without
the other. So even if your man
doesn't ejaculate during sex, he
may still be experiencing the
subjective, pleasurable feelings
associated with orgasm (the reverse is also true).
We're culturally conditioned
to view sex as a linear activity
with discrete, necessary and sequential stages, but often sex is
more free-form than that. It's entirely possible to enjoy sex without orgasm, and how individuals want to express themselves
sexually is entirely up to them.
Your partner's orgasm isn't a
videogame achievement for you.
It's something that's personal to
them, and they get to decide if
it's important to their definition
of good sex or not. tl
Well, we're afraid that's it for
this week. Questions sent to
toosexy@ubyssey.ca or the form
at ubyssey.ca/ideas will be answered in column form, email
response, or, ifyou're lucky, a
series of haiku.
STREETERS
WHAT ARE YOU DOING
FOR EARTH HOUR?
SPENCER RASMUSSEN
Econ/Poli-Sci 3
I'm going to be hanging out with
some friends. I'll see if they're
into turning off the lights for
a little bit. Obviously it's not an
initiative that is going to seriously reduce energy consumption, but it's an awareness initiative that I'm fully supportive of.
BRENDAN GUY
Forestry 4
I will actually be at a Forestry
graduation ring ceremony, but
there are talks of plans to turn
off the lights for a little symbolo-
gy. Just to make sure all the Forestry students know that we like
to be sustainable.
TIFFANY KHUU
Enviro Science 2
I'm going to make sure that at
home the appliances that aren't
being used are off and the lights
are turned off when we don't
need them...I'm going to take
shorter showers...cook a more
vegetable-based meal...and tell
all my my friends about it because I feel they need to know
about it as well.
CHELSEA ENSL0W
Enviro Science 2
I actually don't have any plans. I
guess I'm just going to sit in the
dark for an hour. Maybe I'll read
by candlelight...there are those
clean burning ones, tl
Coordinated by Rebeka Ryvola
and Tara Martellaro LETTERS
2010.03.25/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/9
RE: CLOTHES? MADE OUT OF
GARBAGE? YAWN.
Hi Ms Kathy Yan Li,
I would like to start by making
note that I find it doubtful that
you have ever been to a fashion
show in Vancouver before. That
said, I wanted to comment on
your "article" detailing the International Relations Students
Association (IRSA) fashion show
on March 20, 2010.
My name is Brent Matthies, I
am a third-year Forestry Operations and Commerce student:
the architect of the IRSA Fashion show runway and boyfriend
of the director. I will try and be
less of a bitch in my rebuttal
than you were in your article,
but that shouldn't be too hard.
First of all, this was poor journalism. There were no interviews with the director, any of
the "70" volunteers, IRSA, the
designers or any of the people
who attended the show. YAWN,
sloppy journalism I say. One person's opinion does not a good article make, unless of course you
are a fashion critic who has attended a prestigious arts program and has a lot of fashion industry know-how. I will go out
on a limb here and bet that this
is not very likely. I can safely
say this, as I have been to both
BC Fashion Week (it closed half
way through the shows due to
funding issues) and Vancouver
Fashion Week.
Vancouver Fashion Week was
held in a carpet store, the waits
between shows were a minimum
of 20 minutes and it cost designers upwards around $1000 to
enter the show. My boyfriend's
efforts were pure and simple,
to create a forum where people
can express themselves for under $1000 (the whole show cost
less than this and designers paid
nothing), where young makeup artists and hairstylists can
gain some positive experience
for their resume, where people
can try their hand at clothing design and where he can give back
to UBC something that it doesn't
usually get—creativity spawned
from the mind of someone who
is willing to take a chance and
try something new. Something
not often found in an institution filled with people trying to
take easy classes to boost their
GPA and students who run to become president of some meaningless club.
On the other hand, let me analyze your contribution to the
greater community, to human
endevour, to new ideas and positive feedback. If you have taken
any classes on how to manage
people in organizations, you will
already understand that these
are important job skills. Instead,
you ripped apart this event by attacking without getting sources
or alternative opinions and by
pointing out problems without
looking for the causes.
For example, the UBC Style
show (of course a well-versed
fashion critic like yourself would
have known this already so I
apologize for informing you)
was based on the style of show
performance often put on by Canadian designer brothers Dean
and Dan Caten of DSquared. If
you have YouTube on your computer I encourage you to look it
up. They rely on performance art
and acting as an integral part
of their shows. Given that the
show was giving non-models,
a chance to walk a runway I believe this was a very valiant effort. The show was meant to inspire some UBC pride and showcase a local campus store.
Overall, yes the event did
have some bumps, I will admit. There were things to improve and had my boyfriend not
had a full course load and work
on top of volunteering to give
people this platform to express
themselves, he might have put
on the Milan fashion show you
were expecting. That being said,
I doubt that any of the people
who put their hearts and souls
into making this event come together deserved your cutthroat
and rather unwarranted opinion piece.
For the record, the dress was
made out of plastic bags not ties.
Something a real fashion critic
would have noticed, or at least
taken the time and effort to have
found out by interviewing the
designer.
Cheers,
—Brent Matthies
THERE IS NO PLACE ON UBC
CAMPUS FOR HATE SPEECH
On Tuesday, March 9, UBC
Lifeline brought the Genocide
Awareness Project (GAP) to UBC
campus. This is a graphic display juxtaposing contrived images of supposedly aborted fetuses with images of real genocide,
such as the holocaust, Rwanda and the Kmer Rouge killing
fields in Cambodia.
To begin, this is inaccurate.
Abortion is a common medical
procedure and having one is the
choice ofthe woman. Genocide
is the selective killing of a large
group of people of a particular
ethnic group or race. Abortion is
simply not genocide. It's ironic,
in fact, since studies throughout
Europe and North America have
shown a decrease in crime following the legalization of abortion. Thus, legalizing abortion
reduces crime, and genocide is a
crime in its most sinister form.
Secondly, the GAP display is
offensive. It is disrespectful towards the survivors and victims
of real genocide. It also greatly disrespectful towards women and their right to safe abortion. It is well documented that
criminalization of abortion does
not decrease the likelihood of a
woman to seek an abortion. The
result is illegal abortions, which
can cause great harm and death
to the women who seek them.
Women and families are ruined
as a result. The GAP display completely ignores the pain and suffering of women when abortion
is illegal and instead exploits the
pain and suffering experienced
by victims of atrocities such as
the holocaust.
Last, but certainly not least,
the GAP display is disturbing.
I have always felt safe on UBC's
Vancouver campus, but nothing
about those images made me
feel safe. Even prepared with
knowledge ofthe display and its
inaccuracies, I felt emotionally
harassed by the visuals and
sentiments. In my experience,
the pro-choice movement never uses tactics like this. For example, graphic images of women dying from botched abortions are not forced upon the
UBC community.
It is true that everyone has a
right to free speech, but I feel
it is my right at UBC to be protected from hate speech. The
GAP message is that women
who have abortions are criminals comparable to the Nazis.
As a Jew and as a woman, I am
deeply offended by this. I trust
UBC to protect me from these
types of messages on campus.
If the administration insists on
allowing the GAP display to return to campus, there should
be strict limitations. Viewing
the display—just like whether and when to reproduce—
should be each person's individual choice.
If you would like to get involved in the movement to
stop this hate speech from being forced on us in the future,
or to get involved in with other
current reproductive rights issues, you can contact Students
for Reproductive Rights at srr.
ubc@gmail.com.
—Justine Spencer
AU student Marc in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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om  •  www.santuarioglobal.com 10/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2010.03.2 5
Ancient forests and new advocates
Old-growth advocates plan new protests as Earth Day passes
ANA BEDARD
Contributor
Canada is among the last ofthe
developed nations that logs its
old-growth forests. In the US, the
vast majority of logging takes
place in second-growth stands,
while Europeans log second- and
third-growth forests. Southwestern Australia halted the logging
of its old-growth forests sixyears
ago, as did New Zealand in the
year 2000.
Enter the Ancient Forest Alliance (AFA), a recently launched
lobby group that works to change
this.
THE HANDCUFFS COME OFF
The AFA advocates for the protection of old growth forests and
ban raw log exports. They held
their launch event this January
in front of Greater Victoria's largest douglas fir, where they outlined their approach to environmental advocacy.
Unlike similar organizations,
the AFA announced that they
will not seek charitable status.
This hurts the group's ability to
fundraise, but relieves them of
what co-founder Ken Wu calls
"the handcuffs of charitable
status."
Organizations with charitable status cannot support or
oppose any political candidate
running for public office. Charities are also limited by what is
called the "ten per cent rule":
only ten per cent of the charity's resources can be spent explicitly calling for law or policy
changes. Without these limitations the AFA can exert as much
of their resources as they see
fit to call for governmental policy changes.
The AFA will also be able to
publish which politicians support policies to protect old-
growth forests, and which politicians maintain that old-growth
forests in BC are not endangered. The handcuffs are off
and the gloves are on.
The AFA wants the BC Liberals
to pursue policies that protect remaining old-growth stands. Wu
maintains that BC's policies surrounding company rights to log
old-growth forests will have to
change soon. He said that the
supply of large and readily accessible old-growth trees in southern BC is almost exhausted.
THE UBC CONNECTION
Several of the core members of
the AFA—Ken Wu, Tara Sawatsky
and T.J. Watt—previously worked
for the Western Canada Wilderness Committee (WCWC), an organization that was instrumental
in getting UBC's Ancient Forest
Committee (AFC) up and running.
Monika Dean, the current
head of the UBC AFC, said the
WCWC helped them create
strategies to inform the public about the urgency to protect
old-growth trees and train AFC
members for campaigning. They
also helped fund trips to Torino
so that students could see firsthand the wilderness that the
UBC AFC wants to protect.
It's a high priority for the UBC
AFC to keep them going on the
Torino trips, but they are expensive. Students not only get to see
what an old-growth forest looks
like, but also learn about how to
run a political campaign and
talk to the media.
The AFA intends to do much of
its lobbying very near UBC at the
TOP An old-growth tree stump in the Walbrand Valley.
BOTTOM AFA co-founder Ken Wu beside a giant spruce. COURTESY OF T.J. WATT
Vancouver-Point Grey, which is
also Premier Gordon Campbell's
riding. "The AFA plans to work
very closely with the students
and community old-growth protection groups—including the
UBC and Point Grey Ancient Forest Committees. We also want to
start new [Ancient Forest Committees] on other campuses and
swing ridings," said Wu.
LOGGING, OLD GROWTH
& CLEAR-CUTTING
The AFA has formulated several specific calls for the BC Liberal government. Their first call
is not all that surprising given
their name—they're calling for
the immediate protection of at
risk old-growth forests. Their
second call is for the BC Liberal government to ensure a sustainable rate of second growth
logging.
When asked if the AFA had
formulated a concrete definition for 'sustainable rate of cut,'
Ken Wu says.
"A sustainable rate of cut involves reduced rate of cut. You
slow down. It means thatyou're
not going to run out of mature
trees and be left with young
trees that are not ready to harvest. It means a longer rotation
of 200 or 400 years in coastal
forests. It would mean a loss
of conventional clear-cutting
jobs, but it doesn't necessarily
mean a loss of jobs in the logging industry. We advocate more
labour-intensive selective logging combined with value added manufacturing."
They will face some oppon-
nents. "Clear cutting is done for
a reason," says Wayne Lintott of
the Interior Logging Association,
who claims that clear-cutting is
not solely a profit-driven practice.
He gives clear-cutting in the interior of BC as an example because,
like in Hope by Manning Park, the
mountain pine beetle is devastating wood crops. The trees which
he was referring to are second
growth trees. Lintott likened the
logging industry to farming. "We
can replant. It regrows. It's a sustainable industry."
Dave Lewis of the Truck Loggers Association challenges the
unthinking use ofthe word "old-
growth." The definition of "a previously untouched tree" is an unrealistic one, he explains, given the first nation's use of trees
and the forest-thinning effects
of large fires.
"The forests typically referred to as 'old-growth' are
600 to 700 years old and are at
the end of their lives," he said.
"They have decaying and falling over trees. Naturally these
forests typically revert from
large Douglas firs to a hemlock and cedar mix."
"The way to regenerate the
douglas firs that people so
prize is for there to be a burn-
but burns are unsafe and not
publicly tolerated. Harvesting
mimics the effect ofthe burn."
According to Lewis, old
Douglas firs typically regenerate in full sunlight and in
mineral soil, which are the
typical conditions to be found
after a large forest fire.
Lewis believes that a longer
rotation period could be good.
He says a longer rotation time,
particularly for trees in isolated locations such as cliff faces,
make logging more economical,
because the lumber per square
meter becomes more valuable.
Also, more land is protected
in reserves than is available
for harvesting this way. Lewis feels that it is in everyone's
best interests—environmental
activists and logging interests
alike—to work together.
"We need to identify a reasonable amount of forest types in
specific areas that we want to
preserve and how we can best
manage that," he said. "Imagine
if we started to actively manage our parks. If people are
saying that 'we love old douglas firs'—how cool would it be
if when a park [like Cathedral
grove] turns 400 years old and
starts to decay we could replace
it with a 200 year old park [in
the same area with the same
types of trees] and let that park
grow for 200 years."
BEYOND LOGGING
How trees are logged isn't the
only issue. The AFA is also concerned about BC's policies regarding raw log exports. They
would like to see the BC Liberals shift the focus of the logging industry away from raw
log exports and towards BC-
based milling and value-added manufacturing.
To this end, the AFA wants
the BC Liberal government to
halt the export of raw logs to
countries like the USA and Japan in order to promote log
supplies for BC industries.
Moreover, the AFA wants to see
the BC Liberals assist in the retooling of local mills to handle
second-growth logs rather than
old-growth logs, and the building of value-added wood processing facilities in BC.
Finally, the AFA wants the
provincial government to undertake new land-use planning
initiatives based on First Nations land-use plans, scientific
assessments and climate mitigation strategies. Wu believes
that "old-growth forests should
be animportantpartof BC's climate change mitigation strategy
because old-growth forests can
store as much as two to three
times more carbon per hectare
than second-growth forests."
"Our goals are doable," Ken
Wu says confidently. "We're following a strategy that works.
We're continually building
grassroots support and educating the public. An educated public exerts the greatest lobby pressure on government."
The AFA will be in the neighbourhood very soon. On March
27, they're holding an Avatar-
themed protest at noon starting
at Canada Place. There will be
speeches to follow in front ofthe
Vancouver Art Gallery at 1pm.
It's going to be a busy week
for environmental protestors,
as the UBC AFC is also having
a protest on Friday, March 26,
on campus. They will be doing an "aerial art piece" where
protesters will arrange themselves at noon in front of Koerner's Library in a configuration
to be photographed from above.
In the past, UBC AFC members
arranged themselves into the
shape of a pine tree, tl 2010.03.25/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/ll
1
1
1
m
1
R
Li>
HAPPENING
THIS WEEK:
ACCO'S ASIAN
CANADIAN
INDIE MUSIC
FESTIVAL
Most people don't associate indie music with Asian culture. The UBC Asian
Canadian Cultural Association hopes
to turn that idea on its head this Friday with its annual Indie Fest.
"We hope to debunk some common stereotypes that still exist regarding Asians," says Tina Kong, a member
of the ACCO on the group's mission.
The event features seven acts, showcasing Asian-Canadian talent across
genres. It will be held atThea's Lounge
in the Koerner Graduate building, with
all proceeds going to the Downtown
Eastside Women's Centre.
—Jonny Wakefield
ASSOCIATES JONNY WAKEFIELD &
KATHY YAN LI»culture@ubyssey.ca
Interview with Boogie Monster
ANNA ZORIA
Contributor
With a debut CD coming out this
summer and a follow-up tour
across the West Coast, it seems
like things are really looking up
for Boogie Monster's duo of Ben
Fussel and Tony Dallas. While
Fussel provides ambient guitar and complicated riffs, Dallas backs him up with hyper-
energetic drumming, resulting in one massive, crazed ride.
Whatever they're doing, the kids
around town are liking it. The
Ubyssey caught up with them
at the Antisocial Skate Shop on
Monday to talk about their current state of affairs.
UBYSSEY: How would you define
Boogie Monster's style of music?
Post-rock?
BEN: It has elements of that but
I would say its more like, noise-
rock and thrash. It's a noisy aesthetic but there's still a lot of riffs
and hooks.
U: What are your influences?
TONY: We could be here for days.
I virtually listen to everything I
can, but I guess in terms of Boogie Monster, our influences lie in
more progressive stuff, like "Fall
Of Troy," for instance, or "Mars
Volta."
Meet Tony Dallas, surprised PHOTO COURTESY OF BOOGIE MONSTER
U: How did you initially get into
music?
BEN: I played violin as a kid I
played in the orchestra and
stuff. Then I started playing guitar in high school, and learning the music that I actually
liked. I remember I was into
Rage Against the Machine and
At The Drive In. We're still into
those bands, actually...it's why
I do the stuff that I do.
TONY: Yeah, my dad was a drummer so I was always around music growing up. When he'd drive
me around, he'd play his reggae
tapes in the car so it kinda grew
from there for me until I slowly just picked it up on my own.
U: What are the challenges of
having only two band members?
How do you work around that?
BEN: Getting the equipment up to
speck is a big challenge, because
a lot of stuff will just fail on us
while we play. Also, I guess when
you have two people there's overcompensation. We want to sound
like there's more of us, so we
play really loud. Other than that,
I think it works.
U: Do you ever have trouble with
unenthusiastic audiences?
TONY: I make an effort to get
people going. With my friend's
band, Fake Shark Real Zombie,
I've gone to every show they've
done since pretty much 2006
and have learnt how to get people hyped up. The idea is to get
everyone loose, so its kind of
like the sheep jumping off the
cliff—if one does it, the rest of
them follow.
U: What is the craziest show
you played?
BEN: There was one time when
I was playing and I felt someone grab on to my guitar and
I couldn't see what was going
on cause it was dark. I was trying to free my guitar and so
I eventually pulled, and this
girl comes flying by her hair,
attached to my guitar. It was
still stuck, and we were still
trying to untangle it as I was
trying to play. That was by far
the craziest show we played.
U: Do you feel like things are
picking up for you guys?
BEN: Yeah, our first official record is coming out and I feel
like we've made a small name
for ourselves in this city.
TONY: Hopefully it strings on
to the future and bigger things
come out of it. tl
SPROUTS RECIPE |
LEEK, ONION AND POTATO SOUP
JON DEHOUWER
Sprouts
(Serves Two)
Ingredients:
2 large leeks
1 medium potato, peeled and
diced
2 5g butter
450 mL water/vegetable stock
140 mL milk
Available from Sprouts: butter,
milk, potatoes, leeks
1. Trim the leeks, discarding the
tough outer layer.
2. Split them in half lengthways
and slice them quite finely, then
wash them thoroughly in two or
three changes of water.
3. Drain well. In a large, thick-
based saucepan gently melt the
butter, then add the leeks, onions and potatoes, stirring them
all around with a wooden spoon
so they get a nice coating of butter. Season with salt and pepper,
then cover and let the vegetables sweat over a very low heat
for about 15 minutes.
4. After that, add the stock and
milk, bring to simmering point,
cover and let the soup simmer
very gently for a further 20 minutes or until the vegetables are
soft.
5. Now you can put the whole lot
into a blender—leave it to cool
a little first—and blend to a puree. If you have to blend the soup
in batches, make sure you have
a bowl at hand to put the first
batch into, tl
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