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The Ubyssey Nov 7, 1968

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 Some winsome
losers
Vol. L, No. 25
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1968
228-2305
— powell hargrave photo
CASEY ANDERSON, folk-singer extraordinaire, sang in the SUB art gallery. Photographer Powell
Hargrave caught the halo effect by centering the image cast by the light seen below Anderson.
Council votes
against senate
—'faith broken1
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Ubyssey Council Reporter
"If Senate rejects us, we should reject senate."
That was the final decision of students' council Monday in
reaction to a report to senate from a senate ad hoc committee
set up to discuss the student brief.
The disappointment came from the Oct. 30 senate meeting
where by a vote of 29 to 22, with 10 abstentions, senators rejected
the idea of a joint student-senate conference.
The general feeling of council was expressed by forestry
representative Frank Gregory when he said, "Nothing on campus,
including the faculty club incident, has distressed me as much
as this faith totally broken by senate."
"Senate has very definitely let our student population down."
But although councillors agreed on the need for a joint
conference, they were split on the method of attaining it.
A large number wanted to keep holding meetings between
the AMS ad hoc committee, and that of senate, but the idea was
voted down 10 to eight.
One member of this minority, medicine representative Bud
Abbott, said council should have one more try with senate.
"Many of the senators didn't really know what the issues
were, especially those from downtown," said Abbott.
"After learning of our reaction and furthering their knowledge of the issue, I'm sure we can get those 10 abstentions on
our side."
As Gregory said, "Councillors should try through a personal
relationship with their own deans and other forms of lobbying
to get that joint conference.
"Senators had better get off their high horse and come down
to where the problems are," he said.
Another argument of the minority was put forth by AMS
treasurer Donn Aven.
"We issued the student brief for academic reform in July,"
he said. "It is now November." (Deadline for senate action on
the brief was set by the AMS at Nov. 25.)
"Let's stop wrangling about an open committee and get onto
the main issues at hand. There has been too much wrangling on
procedure, and not enough discussion on the substance of the
brief."
But AMS vice-president Carey Linde was in complete
disagreement.
"The idea of openness is not only a procedural matter, but
inherent in the main issues of the brief," he said.
"Moreover, the manner in which we bring about the reforms
is more important than the reforms themselves."
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt agreed with Linde, saying,
"We must lay the ground rules first."
"When senate rejected the idea of a joint conference, my
gut reaction was I had been kicked in the head," Zirnhelt said.
Tobin Robbins, external affairs officer, relayed to councillors President Kenneth Hare's comment he would come down on
the students' side in this issue.
Linde said when a president of this university "could stand
up and be shot down by his own senate, it shows something's
bad with the system."
Continued Page 3
See: COUNCIL
SFU students vote 1123-685 to stay in CUS
BURNABY  (UNS) — Simon Fraser  University       eluded four other questions. (Students   for   a   democratic   university   is   the
students have  voted  by  a  2-1   margin to  stay in             The following three were affirmed: largest political club at SFU.)
Canadian Union of Students.                                                        •  rto you favor the presentation of major stu- "i'm Very happy to see the CUS referendum has
The vote, announced Tuesday, was 1,123 to 685       dent society policies to mall meetings, thus giving passed," said science president Scott Primrose. Per-
in favor of continuing membership in the union.              the final say over important issues to the student haps  now council  will  give  up its witchhunt for
Only one-third of SFU's 5,400 students voted.             body as a whole* radicals  and  get down  to  the serious business  at
The referendum, held Monday and Tuesday, in-              * Do  y°u favor  the Presentation  to  senate of hand."
student senator Stan Wong's proposal to make all "it's good to see the students are coming back
»--, --w-^wi-v-     *-,   --,     .   ■■                    .                      v,:       lower level courses (redesigned and broadened ac- to their senses," said former CUS staffer SDU leader
cordingly)   worth   five   credits,   thus   lowering   the John Cleveland.
XA/HAT'C     |K|-*slDF                            course load to three courses — per semester? „_,   .    _    ,                   it_        ■■__-_          ..    _
TYtlMI   J      IIXJIL/t                                                                                            v "Students  have  seen  through  student  president
u          .                                                            __   «                   • Do you favor council action, such as a brief to Rob Walsh*s moderate rhetoric bullshit. They are no
Humphrey Wins     p. L            the federal and provincial* government, concerning longer making a false choice by voting for some-
Hr,..«-.inn eurvev                                        D    3            the nCW l03n restriction> which makes loans avail" thing just because Walsh says so."
riOUSing survey      p.   J able only t0 those taking 15 credits or over?
_                                                                              _                   „,         .   .                        .....    ..         t-             . Walsh, who initiated the referendum and wanted
7an                                                                n    5                   Turned  down was  a fifth item:  Do you favor „„„ ,      '      ,         ,         _TT„         ,.      . .            ,    ,
AOP        P*   **               ii      •   „      v.-    i    -i  -u   *        i-4.*                  i _     *.   j SFU to withdraw from CUS, could not be reached
allowing political clubs to petition council for funds '
Debate      p.   9             based   on   an   estimate   of   the   club   membership, for comment*
number of activities and equipment fees, without any CUS president-elect Martin Loney also could not
Sports       p. 10             present fixed ceiling on the possible grant, within be reached. He is presently on a speaking tour of
w.   --.,-.„.-*,■ *..         .,*         ,.    -v     i       the limit set by the club's total budget? eastern Canadian universities. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 7, 1968
— dick button photo
THREE WORKMEN wallow in the SUB mud laying drainage
pipes. God knows the area around SUB needs drainage,
right now it's one big quagmire.
German
students
back lawyer
WEST BERLIN (CUPI) —
Some 60 people were injured
Monday in bloody clashes
between protesting students and
riot police.
The demonstrators, some
1,500, hit the streets to protest
government disbarment proceedings against lawyer Horst
Mahler for his active work with
the students in their spring
protests in Germany.
More than 1,000 riot police
moved in on the crowd to prevent them from storming the
Charlottenburg district courthouse, scene of the disbarment
trial.
The clash lasted for over two
'hours and resulted in injuries
to 20 police and 40 students.
Protestors countered police
billy clubs with paving stones.
Most of the students wore helmets to protect themselves.
UVic homecoming
invitations  sent
VICTORIA (UNS) — University of Victoria officials are
urging all alumni to return to
the old Alma Mater for a slam-
bang homecoming weekend,
Nov. 16-17.
The invitation includes promises of a gastronomical orgy,
dancing at the new SUB cabaret, and gambling at a rugby-
club sponsored casino night.
Hump sweeps pig, Nixon
in colonial U.S. election
By JOHN TWIGG
Ubyssey Election Reporter
Richard M. Nixon's victory in the American
elections Wednesday was unpopular with Canadians if a mock-vote taken at various places in
Vancouver is any indication.
Nixon tied for fifth place with George Wallace in a poll conducted in SUB, outside the
U.S. consulate, at Vancouver City College and
at SFU Tuesday.
The poll showed Hubert Humphrey first,
with 261 votes, followed by W. A. C. Pigasus,
189; Pat Paulsen, 123; Eldridge Cleaver, 111;
then Nixon and Wallace with only 89 votes
apiece.
W. A. C. Pigasus was the mock candidate
supported by the American Yippie party, of
which Jerry Rubin is a leading figure.
UBC voters appeared to take the vote seriously, according to organizer John Mate. Some
asked if the vote was official, to which Mate
replied by showing ballots which read "official
colonial American ballot."
Other voters said, "Do we have to show our
AMS cards?"
Despite the serious tone of UBC students,
the write-in votes showed some people have a
sense of humor.
Among the write-ins were Dick Gregory,
(who was on the ballot in some states), Andy
Warhol, Benedict Arnold, Shaun Sullivan and
A. E. Neuman.
When Ubyssey propaganda editor Irving
Fetish heard his hero, Sullivan, had been beaten
by Neuman, he said, "This is all very maddening."
Nixon, when contacted by The Ubyssey,
didn't appear too worried about losing to Humphrey. But he was upset about losing to the
pig. "It looks like I've been oinked out," he
said.
Mate said the votes were given to the U.S.
consul Haron Coleman. When Coleman and the
organizers ,of the event met, the organizers,
about 70 strong, stood at attention and sang O
Canada.
The consul took the event as a good joke.
He said the votes would be sent to Washington.
Lakehead  U  students  hold out
demand open senate  meetings
PORT ARTHUR <CUP)—Lakehead University has offered students three seats on its 29-
member senate, but students may reject the
offer because the senate holds closd meetings.
Student council president Peter McCormack
said council has a policy of refusing seats on
any closed body, but said the offer of senate
seats would be "carefully considered."
Students were also offered four of 20 seats
on the admissions and scholarship committee,
three of six seats on the judicial committee
(which   interprets   academic   regulations)   and
two of 13 seats on the library committee. McCormack said these offers would probably be
accepted.
Lakehead asked for seats on the committees
in a recent brief to the senate but had not asked
for seats on senate itself.
Senate set conditions regarding selection of
students for the three senate seats: student
members of senate must have completed at
least two years and only students who have
completed one year are eligible to take part
in the elections.
I*""**"''*"* *^W2_TV_T21''*"
pm
> EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DELIVERY*
The grin bin
• -card*
         »fW* * par* «#ti»
M^*w«riKK»*™*r      mm*
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
Michael Caine in:
FUNERAL
BERLIN
Today: 12:30,3:30,6:00,8:30
Friday: 6:00, 8:30
OLD AUDITORIUM - 50c
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
Men's Athletic  Committee
Applications are now being received for a fifth member
to the Men's Athletic Committee. This person will be
responsible for making decisions on the administration
of the athletic budget. Please hand in written applications to the A.M.S. Secretary, Room 248, S.U.B., before
4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November  12th.
International Affairs Conference
Applications now being received for those interested in
attending the Ninth Annual Conference on International
Affairs from January 21 to 24, 1969 at the University
of Manitoba. This year's conference will center on the
theme —Latin America! Progress or Revolution in our
Hemisphere. Apply in writing to A.M.S. Secretary,
Room 248, S.U.B.
What you see today in London, Paris, Rome, and New York,
is also in style right here in Vancouver, the
new swinging city of the world.
You Find All These Latest Outfits At:
©
*•**
Vancouver's Largest Boutique Type Store
With Fashions For Today and Tomorrow
3499 Cambie St.
at 19th Ave.
and
1015 Robson St.
Off Burrard Thursday, November 7, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— dick button photo
STICK IT OUT and you're sure to get a  ride at UBC.  But sometimes the bus comes, and then there's no one to clean up
what's left on the corner. If you drive, give 'em a ride.
Housing obsolete'-Munton survey
By ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
University residences now in use are obsolete, says student
senator Don Munton.
He was using as evidence the first results from the AMS
housing survey conducted last spring.
The results show that 31 per cent of the 1,144 single students over 20 years of age who responded to the survey prefer
a bachelor suite or one-bedroom apartment compared to only
11 per cent who want the present residence room and board
arrangement, and 26 per cent who prefer to live at home with
parents.
Munton compiled the results into a report to the wireless
site residence clients committee, entitled "Do they . . . ? or
Don't they . . . ? Only the survey knows for sure!"
The wireless site residence is a project to be built in the
area of the traffic office north of SUB for senior single students.
Original plans called for 1,000 single rooms in three 17-
storey high-rises and 98 housekeeping suites for two in low
cluster dwellings.
Munton is concerned that only 2.62 per cent of the students
surveyed want room and board in a private home or boarding
house.
"There must be at least 6,000 students who have been forced
to take this kind of accommodation," he said.
Three quarters of the surveyed students felt that a reasonable rent for the present residence type accommodation would
be less than $90 but about 50 per cent said they could pay more
in view of their financial condition.
Munton said the price ceilings set for the wireless site residence were in line with the prices students said they were prepared to pay for the accommodation to be provided.
Rent for the new residence has been set at $60 for a single
room and $130 for a housekeeping suite for two students.
The plan to have separate facilities in the high-rise for each
group of twelve residents agreed with student opinion.
The report said that low rent, facilities provided, and lack
of restrictions were the factors which most influenced students
in their choice of accommodation.
About 66 per cent of the men and 43 per cent of the women
were in favour of an arrangement whereby male and female
students would be living on alternate floors of a single residence
building.
Of the students surveyed about 50 per cent said that if the
conditions they desired were provided on campus, they would
move on campus from their present accommodation.
Anthropology, sociology cancel classes
All anthropology and sociology classes
have been cancelled this afternoon for a
marathon discussion and workshop on the
department's student union and social
science in general.
All students taking any sociology or
anthropology course, especially those majoring   in   either   subject   are   invited   to
attend, starting at noon in SUB art gallery:
12:30-1:00 — Open discussion.
1:00-2:00 — Presentation of arguments
on participation and membership in the
union. All present are invited to present.
2:00-4:00 — Small group discussions
on topics raised in the preceding hour.
4:00-5:00 — Reconvene as a whole for
reports from small groups.
5:00 — Break it up.
5:30-? — "An organic experience in
social organization."
"What's happening now and in the
future of sociology and anthropology at
UBC is happening here," said one organizer who refused to be identified.
COUNCIL
From Page 1
Robbins said there are too
many people "unwilling or unable" to see why students want
a joint conference.
"Council should publish its
reasons for wanting this," he
said.
"If more of the faculty knew
what we want, we would get
much better support from
senate."
Zirnhelt wanted to emphasize the idea that students are
"equal but different" members
of  the  university  community.
"Sure we are transient," he
said, "but we have as much
right as anyone else to decide
what we want here."
Student senator Mark Waldman remarked that implicit in
the structure senate has set
up, senate has the last say.
"If we want to get anywhere,
we must have a joint conference," he said.
"To get this, and if faculty
members are as put off by
senate's decision as we are, we
can only continue to lobby."
"Senate wants to maintain
a balance of power," he said.
"The members don't want to
be put in the spot of opposing
recommendations that would
likely come from a joint conference."
One of the other student
senators, Don Munton, summed
up the tone of the discussion
by saying, "Senate is not showing any measure of faith in
students by refusing to a joint
conference.
"Their decision was not only
a damper, but a hatchet job on
the whole question of student
participation."
Admin hasn't
prosecuted
in break-in
The university has taken no
action concerning the recent
break-in of the bell tower.
On Oct. 26 the university
patrol caught several UBC students who had forced the lock
and sprayed paint and plaster
in the interior of the tower.
Following the incident, Leon
Ladner, who donated $160,000
to have the tower built, sent a
letter to Dean Gage requesting
prosecution of the students
involved.
If no action is taken Ladner
said he would see to the matter
personally.
J. H. Kelly, superintendent
of the university patrol, could
give no reason for the university's lack of action.
He refused to release the
names of students involved. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 7, 1968
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Pago
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
NOVEMBER 7, 1968
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Socred to 'em
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) — Senior editorial blorgs on the
nation's influential rag The Daily Blatt have expressed shock
and disbelief at rumors lowly scum reporters on the paper plan
a pigsty revolt.
Blue-nosed dissidents on the staff are reported incensed at
The Blatt's crimson editor, Seize-'er Gently, for his yellow
journalism.
Mutterings of mutiny arose when certain undeserving individuals were elevated to positions of relative power due to
unfortunate circumstances.
"Et tu, Curt Brutus," Sieze-'er cried when he learned of
the foul plot. "But I believe the plot will peter out—we'll have
only democracy here, and that means I make all the decisions.
Law and order will prevail."
EDITOR: Al Birnie
News   John Twigg
Ass't News   John Gibbs
City      Peter  Ladner
Ass't   City       Alex   Volkoff
Managing    Bruce Curtis
Associate    Mike   Finlay
Photo ....  Dick Button, Powell Hargrave
Sports   Jim Maddin
Without   Portfolio       Paul   Knox
Page  Friday    Andrew  Horvat
Ann Arky tore all her hair out in
protest after hearing her reputation
had been slurred in public debate.
Irving Fetish again denied all responsibility, claiming he did it all as a joke.
"Very funny," muttered Muriel Musco-
vitch. Frank Flynn fumed at the thought
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Perhaps, in a brief flirtation with objectivity
you will permit me to inform your readers that
an executive meeting of the UBC Social Credit
club was held at which it was agreed that since
this law-and-order-at-university resolution has
never been presented to the club:
(1) There has been no official debate within
the club on the matter. Therefore the club
has not, through its president or otherwise,
made a statement of policy. For the same reason a theory of division within the club cannot
be substantiated.
(2) Any member of the club is completely
free to say what he pleases about the resolution, but in doing this he is speaking as an individual, not on behalf of the club.
(3) Since the resolution was passed by the
B.C. Young Social Creditors, and approved unanimously by the B.C. Social Credit League,
it is the stated policy of the movement.
MICHAEL MARTINOFF
tions a week. Quantity is obviously more important to you than quality.
The absence of any adverse criticism of the
recent faculty club sit-in seems to imply you
exercise strong censorship. This has always
been a feature of totalitarian institutions.
Pravda has yet to publish letters critical of the
invasion of Czechoslovakia.
anne Mcelroy
Evaluation
Platitudes
and John Gibbs made jokes. Hanson Lau
got his picture in, while Norman Gidney quietly stirred up dirt and scandal,
forsooth. Erik Brynjolfsson ran screaming off to the printers when General
Disaster, Corporal Punishment and
Major Catastrophe came marching in
sucking each other's thumbs and asking
for the latest on Curt Lemay. Dick Button and Jimmy Maddin sported nervously, so Norbert Reubsaat broke
the ice, for Ruthie to jump in to investigate. "What did I do to deserve
Cawsey?" moaned Lawrence Woodd as
he fondled his feelthies. John Frizell
was shocked and outraged. Irving reveals the caption winner at Friday*s
meeting, noon for all newspeople.
Saturday we cavort at a night-long
extravanganza.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Never have I been subjected to such platitudinous claptrap as I have when reading your
"newspaper". You assume a cloak of virtue
wihch doesn't hide your soap box. Do you purport to publish a newspaper or a propaganda
sheet? If "newspaper" is the answer, where
are your reporters? Editors you have in abundance. Your publication is one long editorial.
You whine about not having the funds
which the UBC Report (sic) can command. You
have a good deal more money than you deserve.
If you had to depend on students buying your
newspaper your advertising would evaporate
with your captive audience (sic). Of course the
financial remedy is partly in your hands for
there is absolutely no need for three publica-
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
Noted with glee and happiness Jill Cameron's observation that more profs are questioning value of mandatory exams. Have lovely
prof in Bio 321 who knows what democracy is:
we have individual choice of evaluation. We
may opt for take-home, final written exam,
mid-term and final (both written) or an oral
final. Prof. Haze deserves some thanks for this
student-oriented approach because this is a
large class and it means a helluva lot of extra
work.
But as far as automatic Bs are concerned
— bull! I want an evaluation to see how I'm
progressing. If I want a completely non-competitive course I can take all my courses as a
sit-in. That way I can truly have a free education — complete choice of courses, no exams,
no pressure, no fees.
However, like most students, I must admit
that I want that Jittle bit of paper at the end,
because it impresses many idiots out there in
the big wide, and I'm a mercenary bastard at
heart.
If we could all simply line up and get handout Bs, a degree would have even less value
than it has now. So, Jill, if you want ungraded
courses, simply audit your own choice of
courses. If you want a final assessment and a
degree, then go for the whole bit — but still
fight for greater relevance, freedom of selection, and meaningful evaluation.
ROBERT WHITE
arts 3
EDITORIAL:
American election caps year of manipulation
To analyze the meaning of Tuesday's American
presidential election it is necessary first to review
the events leading up to it and the mood of the
country.
In the first place, America is a sick country—
there is a substantial minority of blatant rascists,
there are many more people simply worried about
their security and afraid of their lives because of
the violence of the black city rebellions and the
alleged violence of the vanguard of the black liberation movement, the Black Panther-type militants.
(Their 'violence' is entirely a journalistic creation,
for their basic motivation is love for their fellow
blacks, but they see the necessity of picking up a
gun to defend their race against the violence perpetrated against them by the white capitalist society
—economically and by the police.)
Also a great deal of the population is sick and
afraid of the Vietnam war—the young who have
to fight it and their parents who see their sons
being killed without any military victory in sight.
But at the same time, most Americans don't see
the need for basic change of their society—although
they see many problems which need new and
radical solutions to overcome, and which the Johnson
administration was not providing.
We saw a great groundswell of support for Robert
Kennedy's 'new vision' of American society (however
barren of concrete proposals) transferred by his assassination to Gene McCarthy.
Throughout the early part of the year in primaries, we saw overwhelming rejection of the Johnson
administration vision of America and overwhelming
support for the allegedly anti-war, civil-rights-
conscious candidates Kennedy and McCarthy.
Nixon handily won the Republican primaries and
nomination with a generally colorless appeal for a
continuation of the America the middle class and
upper class know and love—the corporate-military
society they have now, with some emphasis on another grand old tradition, 'law and order'.
That the Republican party is even more undemocratic and manipulative than the Democratic
party (which became obvious to all in Chicago) was
not really apparent during their convention because
most of worried America was concentrating on what
the Democratic party was doing—only those generally satisfied with the status quo were voting for and
applauding Nixon.
Then came Chicago, and the obvious brutality
and lack of democracy of the Democrats shocked and
dismayed this large minority of worried America,
and plunged them into deep despair.
Democratic popularity fell drastically, and the
commanding lead by Nixon in the popularity polls
was simply because of a lack of committment by this
same worried minority.
Wallace's appeal to the basic fascism of the country gained much support among the racist minority
and some of the worried minority, but most were
unwilling to go as far as he suggested, and simply
despaired.
Nixon's colorless campaign did not arouse any
excitement among the population hot committed to
his ideals because of its lack of imaginative remedies
—he offered nothing but a continuation of the present
state of affairs.
Into this vacuum only a few days before the
election jumped Johnson's Democrats with their
bombing halt and four-sided peace negotiations—
a 'new and radical solution' to the war.
The hypocrisy of this war-oriented administration in suggesting 'peace' as a political manoeuvre
just before election day, after four years of war, was
consciously ignored by this large worried minority,
willing to grasp at any straw of new solutions to
their problems.
Unfortunately for the Democrats, the move didn't
quite work, for Humphrey fell just short of victory,
as the despairing minority came out to the polls to
clutch at their straw and push Humphrey's vote to
within a fraction of Nixon's.
Some say that if the Democrats had made then-
move a week before they did, the groundswell
Humphrey support would have had longer to mushroom and would have pushed him over the top, but
this fails to take into consideration the basic unreality of the bombing halt and negotiations as a
serious political move towards peace.
As  became   apparent   almost   immediately,   and
would have become even more apparent with another
week to develop, neither the Saigon government nor
the National Liberation Front would accept any peace
proposals the Americans would offer.
The Saigon government realizes that any fair and
democratic political settlement, or withdrawal of
American troops, would result in the establishment
of an NLF government in South Vietnam, for the
Front is supported by the vast majority of the population and the Saigon government exists only because of the American presence.
The NFL, on the other hand, as is obvious by
their very hard-line demands at the Paris negotiations, realize that they are in fact the democratic
government of Vietnam, have defeated the Americans
militarily, and will realistically settle for nothing
less than complete control of South Vietnam, which
the Americans have never indicated they will allow.
(The NLF, though, has always said they are ready
to talk openly and honestly, for with moral and
military truth on their side they cannot fail to gain
complete victory in honest negotiations. It is the
Americans and their Saigon government which have
refused to allow the scheduled nation-wide elections
provided under the Geneva agreement or any free
and nation-wide elections since.)
The NLF has already brought this truth home in
their Paris statements, and would have done so even
more strongly given another week — thus showing
the American public the dishonesty and unreality of
the Democratic 'conditions for peace'.
Where to go from here? Nixon has only promised
harder, more unrealistic negotiations or more of the
same type of war, which with conventional weapons
and methods cannot be won, and with nuclear -weapons is more blatantly genocidal and will set off uncontrollable anti-American reactions around all the
third world.
That is the dilemma, which can only drive the
American public deeper into despair when they become fully aware of it — leading to more blatant
fascistic suppression of dissent at home, and making
many more Americans realize that a revolutionary
change of government is the only means that peace,
order, and justic can ever be established in America
and the world. Thursday, November 7, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
ZAP:
a column of
general irreverence
Campus Liberals are reportedly angry about a statement
the party's provincial leader,
Dr. Pat McGeer, made in Calgary last weekend.
Student unrest, McGeer told
the Alberta Liberal Association
(a force to be reckoned with
in Canada's neanderthal belt),
is caused by "a tiny, international anarchist minority"....
He said unrest will "peter out"
as soon as everybody realizes
universities are being selected
because their tolerance makes
them vulnerable.
Oh yes. McGeer, who mouthed off a year ago, to add fuel
to the local LSD scare manufactured by Pacific Press, said
most students are sensible and
only want to study, get their
degrees and march out, clear
headed, to make their mark in
the exciting world of business
and industry.
But, then again, UBC Whigs,
although mad at McGeer, supported mealymouth lawyer
Garde Gardom for the Grit
leadership last month in Pen-
ticton.
The whole gang of dietitians
DAY,   4TH NOVEMBER,   1968,   all posters must bear   the  following
to that effect at a Nov. 15 meeting of the Grad Student Association. Reason: GSA doesn't
want to sound hypocritical
when it asks that grad students
be admitted to the faculty club.
Who says the sit-in didn't accomplish anything? . . . Council observers say novice coordinator Rod (his friends call
him Ramrod) Ramage deserves
the latest Regressive of the
Week citation for his spirited
opposition to veep Carey
Linde's constitutional revisions.
Ramage typifies the blue-
blazer mentality which harbors
a deathly fear of decentralization, something to which political systems the world over—including Canada's—are turning
to lessen massive communications gaps . . .
When, wo wonder, will the
SUB committee (which now includes former AMS president
and latent power broker Shaun
Sujlivan—did you know?) get
around to issuing keys for the
doors leading ou to those im
pressive balconies? Are they
afraid of suicides? Defenestration, perhaps? . . . Medical stu-
APPROVED FOR POSTXJG ]rj S.U.B
u«v.i Ha cou/5 c^e, i^a^
CY- ,>...Q*\*n_.
Oui^.
AN BE APPROVED AT THE GAMES AREA DESK,  AND THE  INFORMATION
STERS NOT STAMPED WILL BE REMOVED.
SUB POSTERSTAMP ... do it yourself
responsible for the crud you
« pay exorbitant prices to eat at
four UBC cafeterias met for
lunch Tuesday in the SUB
eatery. Much of the food lay
untouched on their plates. . . .
Ladner Bell Tower Memorial
Architectural Award for 1969
will undoubtedly go to the
new hideous administration
building at Wesbrook and University Blvd.
Squat, ugly and forbiddingly
grey, it cost $1.8 million to
erect and will forever be a
subtle reminder to the plantation hands who holds the whip.
CONCRETE . . . John Boylan, electrician-brother of former AMS ' vice-president
Charlie Boylan is helping to
wire the administration's monstrosity.
Great white leader Dave
Zirnhelt has ordered an investigation into the whys and
wherefores of The Ubyssey,
that tri-weekly emission of fertile journalistic sperm. Seems
Uncle Dave has had numerous
complaints about the rag which
he's referred to the editors, although chief blorg Big AI
Birnie says he hasn't seen one
of them. Chairman of the investigation is none other than
Ruth Dworkin, the AMS's considerably disillusioned internal
affairs officer. First on the
agenda, says Ruth, is an open
meeting where students can
put it in the editors' ears. Date
and time to be announced . . .
. . . Look for the grad student centre to open to all students (who can pay the annual
■*, fee) in the very near future
after students ratify a motion
dents, responsible for producing a monthly display just inside the Woodward library
door, have come up with some
goodies the past two months.
October saw a detailed exhibit
of divers contraceptives,
and this month's theme is
mind-expanding drugs. There
are representations of LSD,
grass, hash and other, more
esoteric substances.
Med students are wary, however, of saying whether or not
they're showing real stuff,
mindful of what happened
when Vancouver cops staged a
similar exhibit in Oakridge
auditorium and managed to lay
some free trips on someone
who smashed the display case.
Latest pitch for despondent
students who flunked their
mid-terms seems to be a blue
and white brochure from Logo
Dynamics Ltd. "Knowledge expands every minute . . . why
then do students fail?" asks
the bold blue type.
"Neglecting Congenital Defect — you are basically equipped to digest any subject. In
fact, many authorities state
categorically that the human
brain is 'infinite' in its capacity
to absorb knowledge."
Attributing the success of
Edison, Einstein, Ford and
Churchill to "inspiration",
Logo Dynamics says today it's
called "guidance — behavioral
science — psycho-cybernetics."
This technique is the first
step to knowledge, claims LD.
"Without it, is it any wonder
that students have failure attitudes instead of success attitudes? Of course not!"
What is the answer?
"First. Realize that it is direction from others that has
made  you  whatever you  are.
"Second. Your total effectiveness depends on your ability to release it.
"Third. The technique for releasing it is not taught in
schools or universities.
"Fourth. Much of the direction you have received is just
bad programming." (We see
now, just change the channel,
tune out, as it were.)
Etc. etc.. .The clincher:
The Logo Dynamic
Seminar
"Its purpose?
"1. To teach you how you
got to be whatever you are.
"2. To give you a technique
for changing whateve-r you are
to whatever you want to be.
"3. To acquaint you with
the penalties you now endure,
if you do not apply the technique.''
In '66 it was Reading Dynamics (you too can read 32,-
000 words a minute, just like
Robin) and last year, the Ma-
harishi transcendental meditation will save the world (for a
trifling sum).
Whatthehell, Logo Dynamics
probably has as much on the
ball as Evelyn Wood or the
guru of Rishikesh. . .
We knew SUB'd come of age
when we saw someone roller-
skating through the lobby Wednesday night . . .
On this page" is the aforementioned SUB committee's
latest piece of fatuousness.
It's the stamp which you're
now required to have a bureaucrat affix to your poster if you
want it to be legally posted in
SUB. "Posters can be approved
at the games area desk, and the
information   desk,"    reads    a
notice affixed to kiosks. "Posters not stamped will be removed." We wonder who approves them.
This could become an issue
... it did in Brock Hall three
or four years ago. Greybeards
remember the asinine spectacle
of anti-fight-the-fee-hike march
AMS bureaucrats tearing down
pro-march posters because
they weren't authorized. The
rationalization for all this is
that it keeps off-campus advertisers from scalping free publicity. Unfortunately it's just a
little too conducive to abuse.
So, you're invited to affix
The Ubyssey's own stamp at
the left of this page to your
poster.
FRIDAY, NOON
"PRE-FAB MAN
IN THE YR. 2,000"
— Dr. Margaret Corey,
Medical  Geneticist,
U.B.C.
ANGUS 110
Lutheran  Student Movement
SUNDAY, 10:30 A.M.
^•^•^^**+**^^*^**+**^*^^ ^^ ^ ****■•••■■ ^--p-.--**--*
CELEBRATION IN
WORSHIP
— Mr. Gene Baade,
Vicar, luth. Ch. - Mo.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
5885 University Blvd.
Across from  the  New
Administration  Bldg.
PAULS
EAT-IN, PICK-UP
FREE DELIVERY over $2.50
3623 W.
BROADWAY
Phone 733-1617
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This coupon entitles the bearer to
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Good for delivery, take-out or in our
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3 a.m. Week-ends
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40c
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
XS
MAN IS MAN
Bertolt Brechfs farce-parable about the
transformation of a porter into a human
war machine
with
PETER JAENICKE-ALAN SCARFE-GREGORY REID
and an outstanding student cast
Directed by DONALD SOULE
Designed by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Music by JOHN CHAPPELL
NOVEMBER 8 -16
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00 (Available for all performances)
- SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES -
Monday, November 11 — 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 14 — 12:30 NOON
Tickets: The Frederic Wood Theatre Room 207
3_v
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
iW Page 6
— John frizell photo
HERE'S MUD in your eye.
Portrait of a dung-covered
charioteer* wiping his face
after chariot race last week.
VANCOUVER
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Friday,   Nov.  8,   1968 — 8:00  p.m.
TICKETS  S1.00 and  $1.60
Vancouver Ticket Centre, 683-3255
And   All   Eaton's  Stores
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752 THURLOW ST.
VANCOUVER,  B.C.     683-7306
THE      UBYSSEY Thursday, November 7, 196
'Damn pea soups' want economic control;
rebel against WASP cultural domination
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT bee is not only the two cultures but that      parity  between  the  Quebec  worker  and
"TAT'I-i »*_•_-    r\r\    •fl*-./-**.****'*•**•*    /lonrtvi     nonOAii-no    *ITT•^1T^4■9■,•, "ntlo   1 C?    /Jnrv«lW<»ri+    o*n rt    lha   *■*-. 4* I**. _**•-•■•-■■    r\ir\-nvcteic*C±A '* Vi l c     T?*n r-fli**>'U_i-iv\n«li'*!*n rt     n-*~.i iv. l-Annnur
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT
'What do those damn peasoups want?"
"What do those damn students want?"
Canadian Marxist Stan Ryerson spoke
on those two questions to about 40 students  Wednesday noon in  SUB  ballroom.
Ryerson is director of the Institute for
Marxist Research in Montreal, editor of
the Marxist quarterly "Horizons", and is
currently involved in a "counter course"
in Canadian history at the University of
Toronto.
He said that in Quebec, students and
French-Canadian workers suffer the same
oppression by English-speaking capitalists,
and that the oft-heard cry is arising for
workers and students to unite.
He  added  that  the  problem  in  Que
bec is not only the two cultures but that
'one is dominant and the other oppressed".
He described how, after the fall of the
Duplessis government, with its heavy commitment to American industry, a challenge to the "English-oriented status quo"
arose—both on the picket lines and in the
schools.
Ryerson outlined three results among
English Canadians of the "challenge"
from Quebec. Some showed a reactionary
backlash, some a readiness for change
which resulted in the royal commission on
bilingualism and biculturalism", and
others expressed concern over English-
Canada's own identity.
He pointed out the bi-and-bi commission had shown the large economic dis
parity between the Quebec worker and
his English-speaking counterpart.
"The problem is, therefore, not only a
cultural, but also a political one," Ryerson
said.
He added that what unified students
and workers in Quebec was a common
"development of awareness of their suppression" and an increased desire for self-
determination.
What "those damn students" want is
more control in their universities, and
what those "peasoups" want is a greater
control of their own economic existence,
he said.
He concluded that any restructuring of
society cannot occur without a union of
students and workers.
Ran Harris spent last summer
fishing far water.
Mad? Not really; Ron is a marine biologist with the Department of Energy, Mines and
Resources. The water he fished for and the sediments in it contained vital information
about depths, tides, navigational hazards and the nature of the seabed. After three
months at sea, Ron produced a report that will make our coastal waters safer for
navigation and help in the development of harbour facilities.
Ron Harris is one of the new breed of people in public service . . . young, college
educated, ambitious and dedicated. In Government service he has found a rewarding
and responsible future in the mainstream of Canadian development. The Public
Service of Canada has career opportunities for young men and women like Ron. If
you'd like to know about them, write to:
Career Info.,
Public Service
Commission of Canada,
Tower "A",
Place deVille,
Ottawa, Ontario. Thursday, November 7, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Mtth.       **
FALL FAIR . . . five nationalities advertise IH event
— a. I. zachin photo
fair has wine, judo
Flowers & Gifts
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Three  Short  Blocks  From   U8C  Gates
4427 W. 10th Ave.   224-1341
Under  New  Management
"•Kaleidoscope 68" is the
name.
It's the theme of the International House's annual fall
fair this year. Variety and harmony will be reflected in a
colorful program featuring displays and booths from 13
countries around the world.
Great Britain, U.S.A. and
Pango-Pango are notable exceptions.
An international restaurant
will be set up in the party
room, specializing in delicious
delicacies of 18 different countries and lands. An international wine tasting booth promises
variety and fun.
The Caribbean Moonlighters'
Steel Band will play at a Saturday dance from 9 p.m. to 1
# a.m. Tickets are $1 each and
are available at the door.
Japanese students will present the traditional tea ceremony at the ballroom extension. A professional Indian
'dancer will perform in a floor
show and there will be a judo
and karate demonstration.
The fair will be held Friday,
7 p.m.-midnight, and Saturday,
2 p.m.-l a.m. in SUB. Admission
to the fair is $1 for adults and
• 50 cents for students and children. Wine and food are extras.
"There is an amazing number of students who don't know
that International House
exists," said IH director Jack
Thomas.
"Of those who do, the majority of students and faculty still
think it is 'a place for foreign
students'. As a matter of fact,
Canadian students stand to gain
more from IH than foreign
students," Thomas said.
The invitation sent out lo
students reads: Come hungry,
thirsty and full of questions.
Puce blorgs celebrate
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Green, hairy, and puce blorgs
showed at this island capital to
celebrate the election of nobody in particular.
Colored blorgs in general,
except for the red, white, and
blue blorgs, were pleased to
learn that no walls were
erected.
am *5
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TUXEDOS  - DINNER   JACKETS
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JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
u
Tremendous"
says Barrie Field-Dyte
Barrie is a 3rd year psychology
major. He can read over 2500
words per minute.
Before taking the course in Effective Rapid Reading offered by
Reading Dynamics, Barrie read 400 words per minute (slightly
faster than average) with a comprehension of 73%. He now
reads over 2,500 words per minute and his comprehension has
increased to 82%.
"The entire course has given me a complete change of attitude
in regards ' to effective studying and pleasure reading," says
Barrie.
WHO HAS TAKEN THIS COURSE:
Over 400,000 throughout North America . . . over
3,000 in the lower mainland alone. This is the course
President Kennedy asked his joint chiefs of staff to
take . . . the same course taken by thousands of students, workers, businessmen and housewives from
coast  to  coast.
WARRANTY
We guarantee to refund the entire
tuition to any student who fails to
at least triple his reading efficiency.
GRADUATES PRAISE TECHNIQUE
Lynn Moffat — student — "read over 3 times faster —
actually  find   my  courses  more  interesting."
Ju'ie   Norton  *—  student  —  "will  help  at   University."
Gordon  Chow — Consulting  Engineer  — "I've  enrolled
my own children it's helped that much."
Arthur  Lee  —  student  — "helps  me  in  my  studies  by
going faster and gathering more information."
Clyde   Hertzman   —  student  — "much   better   comprehension   .   .   .  gained   concentration."
ABOUT READING DYNAMICS
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS has been established in Canada for over 4 years.
New institutes recently opened in Victoria, Calgary,
Edmonton and Winnipeg. Students should note that
Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics course is a life time
membership: further or refresher courses may be taken
at any time in any institute at NO ADDITIONAL COST!
Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics is recognized and
licensed by the Minister of Labour as an educational
trade school and is tax deductable.
r
i_
Attend A Free Mini-Lesson Today on Campus
in one hour you can learn how to double your reading speed.
U.B.C. CAMPUS, Buchanan Building, Room 102
VILLA MOTOR INN (Salon D)
FRANK BAKER'S (Copper Room)
1900 W. BROADWAY (Reading Dynamics)
1900 W. BROADWAY (Reading Dynamics)
190*0 W. BROADWAY (Reading Dynamics)
1900 W. BROADWAY (Reading Dynamics)
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THURS.
12:30
NOV.    7
— 7 P.M.
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SAT.
7 P.M.
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FRI.
7 P.M.
NOV. 15
— 9 P.M.
J
Sveljm  mod READING DYNAMICS OF B.C. LTD.
60C-I075 MELVILLE STREET. VANCOUVER S, ».C       PHONE 6B5-2374 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 7, 1968
CHAIRS, and more chairs, for SUBureaucrats to rest their fannies on.
Strike suspended, students to organize
BERKELEY, Calif. (CUP-
CPS) — Hoping to either win
their demands or "close this
place down," University of
California students suspended
their strike for a week to work
at campus organizing.
The strike, officially voted at
a rally of about 3,000 people
on Oct. 28, was in effect only
a day and a half.
Estimates of the effectiveness of the strike varied. Mosi
strike leaders estimated that 25
to 30 per cent of 28,000 students stayed away from classes,
but checks by the Daily Cali-
fornian and other newsmen indicated support was probably
not greater than 10 per cent.
Rick Brown, the main spokesman for the students, called the
strike "fairly successful" and
said it had given "unity and
organization" to the movement
which began over the denial of
credit for an experimental
course in racism taught in part
by Black Panther leader
Eldridge Cleaver.
Although they still want
credit for the course, the striking students have expanded
their demands. When they called the strike last week, they
demanded no university or
court action against the 197
persons arrested in sit-ins at
Sproul and Moses halls and the
hiring of more members of
minority groups by the university.
Last week at the request of
the Afro-American student
union, they added further demands for the establishment of
a black studies curricula already designed and proposed
by  the black   students,   and
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hiring of more non-white professors, counsellors and other
staff members, including chancellors.
Black students had remained
aloof from the student effort
earlier. "This is your university
and you (whites) are the ones
who have to liberate it," explained Don Davis, a spokesman for the blacks. "We also
know   that   getting   credit   for
Eldridge Cleaver's course won't
end university racism."
But he added that black students would support the strike
if the white students showed
they were sincere in their opposition to racism by adopting the
additional  demands.
Support for the strike was
even lower among the faculty
than among the students. Strike
leaders   had   hoped   that   the
American Federation of Teachers would vote to go on strike.
Carl Heiles, professor of
astronomy, told a rally that as
much as 20 or 30 per cent of
the faculty might eventually go
on strike but not until after
negotiations over the Cleaver
course now going on between
the faculty and the regents are
completed. He said that might
take until January.
The administration has come
down hard against the strike.
William Bouwsma, the vice
chancellor for academic affairs,
warned that any faculty members or teaching assistants who
strike may be fired, denied reemployment, or face "other
appropriate sanctions," according to a resolution passed by
the regents to deal with an
earlier strike in 1966.
Graduates
and Post Graduates
in Science
MASTERS   AND   DOCTORATES   ONLY
RESEARCH
Biological,   Physical   and   Chemical   Sciences
INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS
November  18-20,  1968
BACHELOR GRADUATES,  (Majors  and  Honours)
ALL   SCIENCES   for   NON-RESEARCH
INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS
November  12-15.  1968
Public
I Service
of
I Canada
DETAILS  AND  ADDITIONAL   INFORMATION   ARE
AVAILABLE AT YOUR   PLACEMENT  OFFICE
THE BIO-PHYSICAL SCIENCES PROGRAM
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF CANADA Thursday, November 7, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
—. John frizell photo
' 'SOUND AND FURY' debater, city alderman Harry Rankin
in familiar stance at SUB conversation pit. Debate on
anarchy was "sound and fury, signifying nothing."
Rankin, Alsbury
orate in SUB pit
By JOHN GIBBS
"A tale, told by idiots, full of sound and fury, signifying
nothing."
That was city alderman Harry Rankin's description of Wednesday noon's Oxford-style debate in the SUB conversation pit.
The debate, attended by about 350 students, pitted Rankin
with fellow alderman and former mayor, Tom Alsbury,  in a
.   verbal duel with UBC. students  Ed  Hamel-Schey, law  1,  and
Jim Leavy, on the topic "Freedom and not servitude is the cure
for anarchy."
Rankin summed up the whole idea with his definition of a
debate as a "forum to talk about nothing."
His fellow debaters apparently agreed as their arguments
tended to be theatrical rather than intellectual.
Alsbury tried his hand at the art of the stand up comedian
"'(politician) as he directed humorous shafts at the city council
and the press.
He claimed that for calling a local Sun reporter "an s.o.b.,
I got my name in his column 17 times . . . When election time
comes I'll just swear and get my publicity for free."
Alsbury alleged the reporter had called his seven letter
name unprintable. "The Ubyssey won't print it either," he said.
"They never use a seven letter word when a four letter one
will do." He was met with enthusiastic applause.
After calling for intelligent, directed rebellion, he turned
•the podium over to Leavy.
Speaking in his native Irish brogue, he worked his way
through a series of jokes, to a call for anarchy as the ultimate
condition of man.
"Man wants something more noble than the petty matters
'the system' offers," he said.
Rankin then spent most of his time mocking the Irish and
alluding to his opponent's brogue. "Ireland is ruled by anarchy,"
he said, "and look what it is; a bunch of peasants scratching
the soil . . . why it got so bad, all the Irish anarchists came
over here."
He endorsed anarchy in a limited context however. "It's
all right in bits and pieces, for a little fun," he said, "like the
takeover of The Vancouver Club of UBC." Then seriously he
» added that this type of action didn't solve any problems.
He drew a distinction between the words "revolutionary"
and "radical", calling the latter a meaningless word.
"If you're serious, you pick an issue and fight. Then you
_are a revolutionary." Referring again to the faculty club takeover he said: "To leave the next morning was servitude."
Rankin finished by calling for the scrapping of the Oxford
debate. "The next time I come out here I want a real issue."
The last speaker for the negative, Hamel-Schey, used the
podium for attacks on the "bible-punching" Socred government
and various other "evils of society."
He launched into definitions of the words in the resolution
using numerous and obscure quotations which he claimed were
- "conclusive."
He confined his discussion of anarchy to a few comments
about a campus personality he claimed resided in Brock base-
, ment. (Ubyssey staffer Ann Arky now works out of the new
SUB office.)
"Ann Arky is too sordid to discuss," he concluded.
The chairman then called for discussion from the floor which
was met with silence and students leaving for class.
-••t       A vote was then called and the aldermen's affirmative position gained the majority of the few votes cast.
Manitoba U.
capitulates
to demands
WINNIPEG (CUP)—The University of Manitoba administration has virtually capitulated
to student demands in an effort
to break through a massive
procedural tangle in the government of the university.
Students have refused to fill
six senate seats for two months
as part of a demand for open
board and senate meetings,
board representation and student control of senatorial selection.
The administration has complied with three of the conditions. It has pledged to open
the senate, allow election of
student representatives to the
board, and leave selection of
student senators in the hands
of the student council.
The ^students have held the
upper hand. The provincial
legislature last year restructured university government
bu t the new bodies cannot
meet until students sit on the
senate. After two months of
desperate bargaining and
threatening, the administration
gave in.
Council has, as yet, not indicated it will finally send students to the senate. Apparently, it will wait to see what the
board says about open meetings.
Concessions weer made Friday at a lengthy senate meeting which approved the student
demands, providing for in
camera sessions to deal -with
items such as awarding of honorary degrees, personnel appointments and real estate
transactions.
diappiQoatA
GINZA
JAPAN ARTS
1045 Robson 684-6629
Wine from Grapes and Other
Fruit    Concentrates    can    be
LOVER'S SPECIAL
made now . . .
SPAGHETTI
Supplies,   equipment   and    know-how
MEAT SAUCE
available at
and
GARLIC  BREAD
WINE ART
3417 West Broadway
FRIDAY ONLY $1
Vancouver                                     731-4726
1108 Lonsdale
THE FRIAR
North  Vancouver                      987-8713
4525 East Hastings
224-0833  for  Delivery
North Burnaby                          299-9737
4423 W. 10th Ave.
1548 Fairfield
Victoria                                       384-1741
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
•KERRISDALE   41st at YEW
Mcdonald, currie & co.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Representatives from our Firm will be on campus on the
following dates to interview students for positions available
in offices of our Firm throughout Canada.
Monday, November 25: Tuesday, November 26
and Wednesday, November 27,1968
These positions are available for the graduates in
Commerce, Arts, Science, Engineering and Law.
Further information and arrangements for interviews
are available through the Placement Office.
Join the
Commerce Grads
at Great-West Life
Some are investment
specialists. Others have
become marketing experts. Many are with the
computer crowd. Where
would you like to be? The
no matter what area of business
you wish to enter, you can find
the opportunity you're looking
for at Great-West Life.
You'll be working for one of the
fastest growing companies in the
country, in a job that is stimulating and demanding. The future?
It's just as big and bright as you
want it to be.
Now is the time to get more facts.
Start by picking up a copy of
Great-West Life's career booklet
from your Placement Officer. At
the same time make an appointment to talk to the Great-West
Life Career Counsellor who will
be on your campus:
NOVEMBER
13, 14, and 15
Great-West Life
ASSURANCE   COMPANY
G~ra Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 7, 1968
FALL FAIR DANCE
TRINIDAD MOONLIGHTERS
STEEL   BAND
SATURDAY, NOV. 9
9:00  P.M.
SUB.  BALLROOM
ADMISSION ONE DOLLAR
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN
Have you considered the advantages of
joining the ROTP? While attending University members receive the following
benefits:—
-FULL TUITION FEES PAID
-$187.00 PER MONTH PAY
-BOOK AND INSTRUMENT ALLOWANCE
-MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE
-30 DAYS ANNUAL LEAVE (PLUS TRAVELLING TIME)
-ALL OTHER BENEFITS THAT MEMBERS OF
THE FORCES RECEIVE
On graduation you step into a position
of responsibility as a leader and manager of  men.
FOR FULL DETAILS CONTACT THE
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre
545 Seymour St.—684-7341
The Most Useful Book
on Campus
cBiniGalls
19681969
<ecUnivergity gfftritisll Qplun]bia iduder\takiepl)pi]ecUU€ctory
Your Student Telephone Directory
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY
Only 75c
On Sale At
U.B.C. Bookstore
Publications Office, S.U.B.
— dick button photo
FROZEN IN ACTION, UBC frosh rugby team grapples with Victorians in hard-fighting lineout.
UBC won 24-6. Says coach Bob McGill: "We don't play stupid rugby like some of the teams
we have to beat." Team has averaged 30 points a game, allowing only three.
Frosh ruggahs victorious,
juniors down Victoria 24-6
UBC's frosh rugby team
rolled to another impressive
victory last weekend, defeating
University of Victoria 24-6 in
a junior intercollegiate league
game.
This year's frosh team, one
of the strongest in years, is
forming a solid base for the
Thunderbird teams of a few
years from now. Head rugby
coach  Donn   Spence is  very
Plane makers bombed,
dove group suspected
MONTREAL (CUP) — It just isn't safe being an executive
on an aircraft manufacturer's payroll.
Small time-bombs were placed near the homes of four Montreal executives of the aircraft industry Sunday but only one exploded, causing little damage.
Three of the men are executives of United Aircraft of Canada Ltd. and the fourth is a vice-president of Canadair.
According to police, the bombs were similar in construction
to the ones planted in September at the homes of Hawker Sidde-
ley executives in Toronto. Police suspect a connection between
the two incidents and a Toronto cop is in Montreal to study the
home-made explosives.
Toronto police credit the September bombings to "radical,
anti-war" groups.
United Aircraft produces helicopter parts for the U.S. defense department. Its PT6 turbine engine powers the U21A U.S.
army aircraft in service in Vietnam.
pleased with the calibre of the
team, and frosh coach Bob
McGill is elated with his
charges.
The frosh team is far ahead
in their league, as yet undefeated in regular play. They
have averaged over 30 points
while allowing only threo
points against, per game.
The frosh team shows an excellent balance of speed and*
weight. McGill feels a large
part of the team's success is
due to the ability of the backs
to think in tight situations.
He claims: "We don't play
stupid rugby like some of the
teams we beat."
This team will insure UBC
rugby supremacy for the next
few years.
CROME SYRCUS
PREVIOUS VANCOUVER APPEARANCES
* Retinal Circus - Jan. '68
* Q.E.  Theatre with  the  Joffrey   Ballet
V.I.F. '68
* Coliseum with The Doors, July, '68
NOW
AT THE RETINAL CIRCUS
FRI., SAT. AND ALL NIGHT SUNDAY
ALSO THE SEEDS OF TIME! Thursday, November 7, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
Army invades UBC
for wrestling meet
The UBC wrestling team starts their competitive season at
1   p.m. this   Saturday,  at  the   Thunderbird stadium  wrestling
- room.
They will be competing against a team from Royal Roads
and the Canadian Forces base at Esquimalt.
Seeing action for the Birds will be three-time Western Canadian intercollegiate athletic association champions Can Chris-
'   , tensen, who is  fighting in the heavyweight division  and  also
Gunnar Gansen who will be in the 191 pound class.
Coach Paul Nemeth is optimistic, but he points still to his
dire heed of men in the lighter categories if the Birds are to do
- very well.
Any experienced wrestlers in the 123, 130, 137 or 145 class
are asked to contact the coach or come to the meet.
The coach is especially interested in the former high school
wrestlers and hopes to see them up at the stadium.
For all those who don't know, the wrestling room is on the
south concourse of the main corridor at the Thunderbird stadium
and since seating is limited, the earlier you get there the better
your chance of getting a seat is.
Track and field
training starts
There will be a meeting for all those men interested
in turning out for the UBC track and field team on Tuesday Nov. 12 at 12:30 p.m. in room 211 of the War Memorial
gym.
Practises will be held every Tuesday and Wednesday
at 4:30 p.m. in the armouries as well as on Thursday noon
at the John Owen Pavilion.
UBC judokans winners
in New West, tourney
The UBC judo club saw the first results of Olympic silver
medalist Doug Rogers' training program last Saturday.
As expected, the club did very well, with Art Adams and
Charles Maingnon winning division titles.
Adams won the brown belt heavyweight competition after
five bouts, ending with his knockout. He displayed a new style
which is accredited to his coach, and obviously works.
Maingnon was the lightweight black belt victor, and again
his training helped him win.
The other three team members acquitted themselves nobly
as they won more bouts than they lost.
The club hopes to raise enough funds to send a team to the
Canadian intercollegiate championships this year, as results
already indicate they will have a good chance of finishing well.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1968-69
Effective September 28, 1968 to April 13, 1969
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS —
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 pan.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 pan.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 pan.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
♦Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 1, 2, 15, 16, 29, 30
January 10, 11, 24, 25
February 14, 15
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. - Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
Ski girls need money
This year promises to be an interesting one
for the UBC women's ski team.
Thirty women are vying for a place on the
eight member team.
The eight girls returning from last year's
team are by no means guaranteed places this
year as pre-season training has everyone in
shape for a six day training camp at Rossland
over Christmas.
To enable the team to finance their season
they will be showing two ski films on Tuesday
at noon in the SUB auditorium. Charge will be
50 cents for the two exciting films.
Join the
Arts and Science Grads
at Great-West Life
Some have become marketing
experts. Others have joined the
computer crowd. Many are in
administration. Where would you
like to be? The fact is, no matter
what area of business you wish
to enter, you can find the opportunity you're looking for at
Great-West Life.
You'll be working for one of the
fastest growing companies in the
country, in a job that is stimulating and demanding. The future?
It's just as big and bright as you
want it to be.
Now is the time to get more facts.
Start by picking up* a copy of
Great-West Life's career booklet
from your Placement Officer. At
the same time make an appointment to talk to the Great-West
Life Career Counsellor who will
be on your campus:
NOVEMBER
13, 14, and  15
THE
Great-West Life
ASSURANCE   COMPANY
G-D0 Page  12
THE      UBY-iSEY
Thursday, November 7, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES ..
Teach-in spirit
still breathing
Meeting 8 p.m., tonight, SUB
art gallery, to maintain
teach-in spirit.
EdUS
Ed. General meet today
noon, ed. lounge. Boycott
in.
YOUTH RESOURCES
Papa Bear's Medicine Show
in SUB ballroom noon to
2:30 p.m. today, admission
50 cents.
FILM SOC
"Funeral in Berlin" — Old
Aud. today, 12:30, 3:30, 6,
8:30*; Friday 6 and 8:30 p.m.
50 cents.
LEGAL ADVISORY
COMMITTEE
Fre© legal advice in vp's
office, SUB, every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.
GRAD STUDENT CENTRE
Annual general meet, grad
center assoc, Friday, Nov.
15; to open centre to all
members of academic community.
VOC
Tuesday's notice wrong —
last day for membership
qualifications is Nov. 17, not
Nov. 10.
MUSOC DANCE AUDITION
Today, 7:30 p.m., Grace MacDonald  Dance   Studio,   2182
West 12th.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square dancing today, noon
2:30, club lounge.
WOMEN'S SKI TEAM
Two color films of the '67
Dumaurier and skiing in
U.S. resorts will be shown
Nov. 12 noon, SUB auditorium.
ASIA SOC
Dr. Shuichi Kato discusses
background and issues in
current Japanese student unrest, 8 p.m. Friday, 4655
Langara. BYO refreshments.
PRESOCIAL WORK
Field trip to New Haven,
meet Buchanan entrance on
East Mall, noon today.
UBC NDP
Exec, meeting SUB 213, today noon.
SDS
Joint     steering     committee
meets tonight 7:30, club
room SUB.
COMMERCE  US
Applications for seven offices
in society must be in to
Comm. US office, 7th floor
Ang.  by Friday 5 p.m.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
Ron   Conerdale   in   Ed.   201,
today noon.
SUS
Science general meet today
noon, Hen. 200.
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
Biologist Lome Russell talks
on Ducks and the B.C. Wildlife Federation on the lower
mainland, today noon, SUB
K.
MARKETING CLUB
"The media is the message"
today noon, Ang. 215 'with
reps from several media.
Free.
MUSIC  RECITAL
Recital of organ, choral and
brass music Sunday afternoon, 3:30 p.m. at West Point
Grey United church, 8th and
Tolmie. A collection will be
taken for the choir fund.
SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
General meeting noon today
chem. 250.
GERMAN  CLUB
German  faculty-student   coffee party noo  ntoday,  SUB
207 and 209.
INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOCIETY
Meditators, come and share
the good vibrations 7:30 tonight in SUB 125.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines. 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication  Office: 241   STUDENT  UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
willy van yperen
4410 w.10th avenue
Vancouver 8, b.c.
224-5412
contemporary
jewelry
design
potential
chartered accountants..
who will be 1969 graduates of any faculty are invited to discuss opportunities, in the Chartered
Accountancy profession. Our representatives will
be on campus November 18, 19, 20, 1968.
Please contact the Placement Office for further
information and to arrange an interview.
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co.
Chartered Accountants
St. John's • Gander • Halifax • Montreal • Ottawa • Toronto
Hamilton • London • Windsor • Sault Ste Marie • Winnipeg
Regina   •   Saskatoon   •   Kindersley   •   Edmonton   •   Calgary
Penticton •  Prince George • Vancouver • Victoria
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
THE UNKNOWN
SUBTLETIES OF
'68 - INVITATION - '69
1. SKIING—Mt.   Baker  ski  pass  is
valid  on  any   holiday.
2. MOVIES—12   movie   passes   are
valid during 3 week
Christmas holiday except   3   legal  holidays.
3. RESTAURANTS-Valid as many
times   as   you
want.
BUY NOW
Lost & Found
13
HALIFAX GIRL WHO LEFT UM-
brella in red sportscar phone G-erry,
325-0055  after  5  p.m.	
LOST? T - BIRD CHANGE - ROOM
Thurs., noon brown wallet need I.D.
Reward! Phone 325-3122 or Ubyssey
Doug   Bernon.       	
DON'T FORGET SUB LOST AND
Found is at the Information Desk.
We have many keys, text books,
notebooks, umbrellas, etc. waiting
ta  be claimed.
LOST GREEN VINYL RING BINDER
in the Bokstore Oct. 28. Contains
all my course notes. Phone Frank
266-6574.   Reward   offered.
LOST LADY'S GLASSES BETWEEN
Oak and campus last week. 733-
8542,
LOST OCT. 25 NEAR ANGUS. ONE
Teak and Silver tie pin, sentimental
value.   Please  phone  224-1578.	
BROWN PURSE TAKEN FROM
Library. Please return ID to Linda
Suchow,   224-1084.
Rides fc Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
THK GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gift* and a Post
Office. You'll find It across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.	
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by aa much as 20%. All
risks Insured and no cancellations.
Motor blkea also. Phone Ted Elliott,
299-9421.         .
'68 — INVITATION — '69
A student-oriented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over 150.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She Clothing (The Village) Canteens In the
Residences and the Information
desk at S.U.B. $2.50.
CANADA'S RESERVE ARMY
OFFICER TRAINING PROGRAM
Students are being enrolled now for
Officer Training in the Militia. Join
the British Columbia Regiment and
receive part-time paid training
throughout the school year and excellent paid summer employment. 1 May
to 31 Aug. For more information phone
681-3834 (recruiting officer) or apply
620   Beatty  St.  Tues.  evening.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY MALE
student volunteers to supervise Teen
Drop-in Centre, Wednesdays 7:30-
10:00  p.m.   Phone   John  224-3619.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to
kno"\**.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
$5 REWARD TO ANYONE WHO
can give relevent info, concerning
the minor accident involving an
M.G.A. and a late model blue sedan
on Marine Dr. between 5:30-6:00
p.m. Friday. — No obligations 266-
6300 anytime.	
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED ONE WIFE ANY CONDI-
tion. Only females need apply. Phone
Nick  S. 	
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale.
21
a t t
and
SPITFIRES
at
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
Special Consideration To Students
Ph.   Lee  682-7185  or WE   6-2057
YEAR END DISCOUNT SALE ON
new Peugeot —■ all models. Call at
1162  Seymour St.
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
SALE: RAMBLER 1962, GOOD COND.
Low  mileage.   Phone  228-9256	
1962 VOLVO P-1800, ONH OWNER.
Low mileage, overdrive, new plrel-
lies.  Private  sale.  Phone  299-2762.
'61 RED MGA, 1600. 1 OWNER. 65,000
miles. $650.00. Phone 738-8037 after
6 p.m.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
1960 VOLKSWAGEN. RADIO, HEAT-
er. New tires, seatcovers, new battery.   $500.   Call  224-1201.
SKIING? CAMPING? LARGE '60
Plymouth Wagon. Very clean. Perfect condition. Family car. Pushbutton drive. Good mileage. 6 cylinder.   228-8341.
1956 DODGE SEDAN, 4 DOOR, MO-
tor, finish good. Phone days MU 4-
3941,   Eves.   WA   2-9249.
61 FIAT-TUDOR GOOD COND. EX.
clutch, brakes $400 or best offer.
Ph.  224-1677,  7-8 p.m.   	
64 VOLKS, GOOD COND. WHITE..
Low mi., w/w. 2 new tires., n.
brakes.  $695.  985-7382.   	
60 METEOR AUTOMATIC. NEWLY
relined brakes. New battery. 4-door.
Good condition, radio. $375. 263-7327
evenings.
1961 AUSTIN 850. GOOD CONDITION.
Private  sale $200.   Phone  261-5840.
1964 CORVAIR MONZA, RADIO. IN
excellent condition. Call 299-9273 after  6:00 p.m.
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
1964     SUZUKI     80.     GOOD     SHAPE.
$120.00   or   best   offer.   Phone   Fred
738-2217  —  3258 W.   13th Ave.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
NO     APPOINTMENT     NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon.   "It pays to look your best."
5736 University Blvd. 228-8942.
Home Entertainment
35
Guaranteed Expert & Efficient Repairs
Color TV — Black and White TV
Record Players — Radios
Stereo Equipment — Tape Recorders
ALEXANDER  AND AXELSON  LTD.
4512 W. 10th — 228-9088
Complete  Record  Department
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
Scandals
37
AQUA SOC—TWO-DAY BOAT DIVE
Nov. 9-10. Sign list on Club notice
board.
JOHNNY'S BARBECUE WAS A
hanic mais in Iou of corn wishky
donner  us  this  weak  for  couth.
YOUR   STILL   MY   FAVORITE   GIRL
friend,   Alice Long.   S.  Rabbit.	
GASTOWN SOUL
I WISH TO PUBLICLY DISASSOCI-
ate myself from the UBC Liberal
Club condemnation of the Faculty
Club take-over. Roy Derrick, First
Vice-president,  UBC Liberals.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typing
40
ESSAYS AND SEMINAR PAPERS
all expertly typed, 25c per page, 5c
copy. Fast efficient service. Phone
325-0545.
EXPERIENCED    TYPIST.     ESSAYS,
etc.   Reasonable rates.  Ph.  738-7881.
TYPING.   PHONE   731-7511.   9:00   TO
5:00. After 6:00 — 266-6662.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
phone 277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
taken for the Pizza Patio Pizza
tossing program. Training course
will be held at the Milano Pizza
Training Institute — Italy. For further information contact:
Personnel Director — Pizza Patio
The Home of Perfect Pizza, $18-2311
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
GROUP FOLK LESSONS
10 Evenings $9.88 — Starting Soon
BILL   LEWIS   MUSIC
3645 W.  Broadway RE 8-0033
futoring
64
FIRST YEAR MATHS, CHEMISTRY,
physics lessons given by excellent
tutors.  736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY LES-
sons given by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
Other languages offered. Phone 736-
692S.
FRENCH LESSON. BY MATURE
Frenchman. Reasonable rates. 738-
8400 evenings.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUNK BEDS, SET, $29.50. 2*x4' TOP,
unpainted double pedestal desks.
each $29.50. New 252 coil single-
Hollywood beds, complete, from
$49.50. Unpainted book cases, from
$8.95.
KLASSEN'S
3207  West   Broadway RE  6-0712 '
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
YES, WE STILL HAVE COCONUT
oil best for your hair and skin. Plus
appointment service. Upper Tenth
Barber, 4574 West 10th Avenue, 224-
6622.
IMMEDIATE SALE. JAPANESE NA-
tional   3-speed   tape-recorder,  model '
706S.   Just   imported.   874-9530   after
5 p.m.	
COMPONENT STEREO SET. Excellent quality. Forced to sell. Phone
Nigel   at   224-9986	
PHILIPS PORTABLE STEREO RE-
cord player has many extra features.  Good shape.  $65.  224-9110.
ROBERTS 1630 STEREO TAPE RE-
corder. 3 speed, 4 track. Excellent
machine. Like new $225. 224-9110.
CASSETTE TAPE RECORDER.
Barely used. Sony TC-100. Phone
Jeff  224-3014.
HEAD SKIS, TYROL BOOTS, STEP-
ins, poles. All for $90. Call 688-7484
between 5-7 p.m.	
POOL TABLE $150.00. PORTABLE
stereo R.C.A. $40.00. Phone 733-6929.
Sacrifice!
The Han
diest Book on Campus
BIRD
UBC's STUDENT
CALLS
TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
Only 75c at
Bookstore * Publication Office, SUB
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
TWO SEPARATE ROOMS FOR TWO
male students $40 per month. 3275
W.   13th.   Phone   733-5436.
ROOM FOR RENT - SINGLE - MALE
student. Desk breakfast, laundry.
$50  mo.  Phone 733-7485.	
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT,
kitchen facilities, girl preferred.
Phone 879-8736 after 5:00 p.m.
Room & Board
84
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE.
Male student over 21 years. Apply
4493   West   8th.  Phone  228-9258.
ROOM TO RENT, BOARD OPTION-
al. 224-6035.	
ON CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD IN
professional home for mature female
student or married couple without
children in exchange for light house-
hold  duties.  Phone 524-1857.	
WHY EAT CRAP? ENJOY GOOD
food, comfortable furnishings, and
social privileges in modern fraternity house. Phone mgr. 224-9667. $95
month.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
89
MALE SENIOR OR GRAD STUDENT
to share house vie. 16th and Dun-
bar.   Phone   738-8400.  ■
TWO GIRLS TO SHARE FURNISH-
ed house near U.B.C. gates. Phone
738-8076.
BUY — SELL — RENT
VSB
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
UBYSSEY ADVERTISING
OFFICE -
Now Located In
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