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Array  // Page 2
TUESDAY ' 3
CLOSINGtheGAP
Poverty Action Conference
.emarl in coliobration with i FT'S find UBC A
DATE + TIME: Tuesday, February 3, 2015 5-8pm
LOCATON: Abdul Ladha Centre
ADMISSION: FREE
RSVP: http://bit.ly/1x6u0qR
Light refreshments will be provided
^CLOSINGtheGAP
http://fb.me/bosubc
http://povertyactionconfererice.weeb ly.com
CLOSINGTHEGAP
5:00-7:30 P.M. ©ABDUL LADHA SCIENCE STUDENTCENTRE
In collaboration with several other local organizations, Beneath One Sky UBC
is hosting their Poverty Action Conference. Learn about ways you can combat
poverty and connect with like-minded peers. Free
WEDNESDAY ' 4
UBC'S
FC PSSA SSA PSA  ES/
^4% ^
WE'RE MAKING
TCh"   HAPPEN
r^<^
3 ™ t'tSv rnn <3 rvw^*5
%^j§ jli 1|J3^
NESDAY FEBRUARY UTH
MEAN GIRLS SCREENINGS DISCUSSION ▼
5:00 P.M. @ MASS BUCHANAN D
UBC student associations and clubs are teaming up to host a Mean Girls movie night, followed by an in-depth academic analysis ofthe power dynamics
between adolescent girls displayed in the film. $2; free popcorn and drinks.
WEDNESDAY ' 4
UBCSLAM
7:30 P.M.® BENNY'S BAGELS2505 WEST BROADWAY
UBC Poetry Slam is boasting the return of their founder to perform on Wednesday. Enjoy an evening of heartfelt and hilarious poetry from your peers
and present your own. Free
ON
THE
COVER
I don't know if that makes any
sense, but there it is.
- Illustration Nick Adams
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*v
■*^^f*A  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
■*-                                  FEBRUARY2,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXXVII
EDITORIAL
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OUR CAMPUS//
ONEONONE1
=HOTOWILLMCDONALD^HE UBYSSEY
Adjunct computer science prof Robert Bridson has won an Academy Award for technical achievement.
Oscar winner Robert Bridson is coding the natural world
Alex Lenz
Contributor
If you've seen a major Hollywood blockbuster film within
the past decade, there's a high
chance that you've encountered
the work of Robert Bridson. The
UBC adjunct computer science
prof has had a hand, directly
and indirectly, in the visual
effects productions on many
well-known films, such as Avatar and Life of Pi. Bridson is now
being awarded with a Technical
Oscar for his outstanding work.
You can use that
information to
generate the image of
the smoke cloud or you
can use it to solve for
how the smoke cloud
should move according
to the laws of nature."
Robert Bridson
Adjunct computer science prof
and Sci-Tech Oscar winner
Bridson is taking home a
Technical Achievement Award
for his innovations in storing
volume data, which he designed
13 years ago while working on
his PhD at Stanford University.
"If you're doing an explosion,
then you might need to track,
at every point in space, digitally, how much smoke is there,
what's the temperature. And
you can use that information to
generate the image ofthe smoke
cloud or you can use it to solve
for how the smoke cloud should
move accordingto the laws
of nature," Bridson said. "But
underlying all that, you need an
efficient way to store that data.
So this really has to do with
good compact representations
of data."
A clear example of Bridson's
work can be found in 2013 science fiction thriller, Gravity.
"There's a bit I was involved with where there's a
fire onboard the spaceship. So
they wanted the flames to look
really realistic, but at the same
time, it's supposed to be in zero
gravity. So there's no way that
you can do that down on earth,"
Bridson said. "One ofthe best
ways to do that is find out what the
physics equations are and get the
computer to solve those equations
for you. And then whatever pipes
out, presumably, should look a lot
like it would in real life, because
you're actually simulating."
I was always
interested [by the
question,] 'how can
we simulate the real
world on a computer?
How can we create
what's happening
around you digitally
and understand it that
■.
The Academy's Scientific
and Technical Awards merit
innovations in film-making that
have significantly impacted the
industry and the course of film
production. The ceremony is
generally held a few weeks prior
to the mainstream Academy
Awards ceremony in Los Angeles,
California. This year, the Sci-
Tech Awards ceremony will be
hosted by actors Miles Teller and
Margot Robbie.
If you get interested in
something, really dig
deep into it. Don't trust
that the experts have
already figured it all
out."
A Newfoundland native, Bridson completed his undergraduate
and master's degrees at Waterloo University, then went on to
Stanford to work on his PhD. In
2003, Bridson began working
as a professor at UBC, teaching
computer graphics and scientific
computing. He now works primarily with software engineers
as a mathematician-researcher.
"Generally everything I work
on has to do with either the
geometry or the mathematics
behind the physics that we can
use to make tools that artists can
then make these amazing effects
up with... I was always interested in, 'how can we simulate the
real world on a computer? How can
we create what's happening around
you digitally and understand it that
way?'"
Bridson's career path came
about somewhat spontaneously.
Initially, his interests lay in pure
mathematics, but while completing
his PhD, Bridson ended up working
with a professor who was interested in computer science.
"If you get interested in
something, really dig deep into it.
Don't trust that the experts have
already figured it all out... I don't
think it's that you need to soak up
everything. Just be prepared for
your interests and your plans to
change."
Humility is definitely a defining feature of Bridson. When
asked about his success and what
advice he could give to students,
his immediate response (with
a smile) was: "I'm just one data
point."
Needless to say, Bridson's
impact on the world of contemporary film-making has been
substantial. "If you can dream it,
artists can make it now, because
ofthe computer." Xi
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• PIMM KMMt Valid SMMt ID tO IWMW dlKOUt // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
ACTIVISM »
IAmAStudent holds protest against housing fee increases
Dozens of students participated in a march and sit-in against UBC's proposed housing fee hikes on January 29.
=HOTOJOVANAVRANICfTHE UBYSSEY
Eliot Escalona
Contributor
IAmAStudent protesters came
together on Thursday, January 29 to
march against UBC's proposed 20
per cent increase to housing fees.
Students met at 12:30 p.m. at the
Flagpole Plaza on the North end
of Main Mall. While participants
made posters, representatives
from the AMS, Residence Hall
Association (RHA) and IAmAStudent spoke to the crowd.
The RHA Executive VP,
Christina Tromp, believes that the
university has been inconsiderate of student housing needs and
financial concerns.
When addressing the protesters,
she said, "The RHA has come to
the very informed conclusion that
this increase is not necessary and
will not be beneficial to residents."
She mentioned that in UBC's
Vancouver Housing Action Plan,
which focuses on the long-term
development of faculty, staff and
student housing, and touches on
goals for maintaining the afford-
i   ability of housing, the university
I   claims that a UBC dorm room
;  is equivalent to a one-bedroom
;  or studio apartment off campus.
!  According to Tromp, UBC came
;  to this conclusion by factoring in
I  the experience and community
I  atmosphere that residents can't
;   get outside of rez.
!       With this, Tromp posed a
I   question: "what kinds of com-
;   munities will exist if we limit the
!   diversity of who can live here?"
i       Accordingto AMS VPAca-
I   demic, Anne Kessler, this
i  proposed increase means that
:   "even within their own logic,
;   [the Board of Governors] are
!   not meeting the requirements
j  they themselves have set," in the
;   Housing Action Plan.
I       At its Annual General Meeting
I  (AGM) last October, the society
;  vowed to formally oppose UBC's
;  proposed fee increases. Though
!  the international tuition fee in-
I  crease of 10 per cent has already
I   passed, the AMS is still commit-
j ted to supporting student groups
in opposition to the housing
fee increases.
"I want to make sure that there
is no point in the future that an administrator can say "well I didn't
know that affordability was an
issue for students," said Kessler.
Once the dozens-strong group
of students began to move, they
made themselves seen and heard
all along Main Mall with the help
of banners and chants.
Most ofthe students in the
march were fully devoted to the
cause, and the few who seemed
timid were soon wrapped up in the
activist mentality.
Fifth-year English literature
major Samuel Kruzeno said "for me
this 20 per cent increase is really,
really shocking, especially considering that under the B.C. Tenancy
Act, something like this would
never be allowed."
Under the Tenancy Act, landlords
in B.C. cannot raise rent by any more
than the inflation rate plus two per
cent. As a private institution, UBC is
not governed by this legislation.
At the AMS AGM, the society
vowed to advocate for the protection
of UBC residents under the Act.
After last term's international
tuition increase passed, I AmAStu-
dent's main goal this time around
was to do more to sway the university's decisions; the protesters
wanted their message to be clear.
"I don't think everyone needs to
have a fundamental understanding
of economics to express when they
feel like they are being taken advantage of and even if they don't understand the economics, consultation
in of itself is valuable," said Natalya
Kautz, a fourth-year double major in
political science and economics.
As promised on their event
Facebook page, IAmAStudent
delivered a surprise to UBC president Arvind Gupta by ending their
march with a sit-in in front of his
office on the top floor of Koerner
Library, where many then participated in his Twitter Town Hall.
During this sit-in, one ofthe
protesters in the group asked for
the microphone, wanting to have
his dissenting views heard.
"I know you are all very
passionate about your ideas but
I regret to inform you that you
will probably fail," said Matthew
Chernoff when he took the microphone. "The university does not
care about what you have to say."
After his brief speech, Chernoff
told The Ubyssey "there are a lot of
voices for the IAmAStudent movement and I noticed there weren't
a lot against the movement; I felt
someone had to do it. I believe that
it's all just a bunch of self-interested people."
Chernoff sympathized with
IAmAStudent, but was unafraid to
hold back his criticism. "I understand that some people can't afford
student housing, but there just isn't
as much housing to go around at
these prices and I think that the
IAmAStudent movement severely
underestimates the economic forces
behind these increases," he said.
Chernoff walked away from the
protest and the sit-in continued,
but with numbers depleting as
time passed.
After the Twitter Town Hall,
Gupta walked out of his office with
VP Students, Louise Cowin. They
addressed the protesters and spent
some time answering questions.
Once Gupta and Cowin left, the
rest of the protesters did, too. H
RANKINGS »
Sauder makes Financial Times' top 100 MBA programs in the world
Bill Situ
Contributor
In a recent report released by the
Financial Times, Sauder placed
81st overall among the world's
top 100 academic institutions
for MBA programs and second
among Canadian institutions.
One ofthe criteria on which
the Financial Times based their
rankings of these universities
was employment data. They
looked at the average salary as
well as the average salary percentage increase of alumni three
years after graduation. According
to this year's statistics, Sauder
MBA graduates earn $95,427
on average and see a 67 per cent
salary increase three years after
completing their degree.
The average alumni salary of
a Sauder MBA grad saw a $6,546
increase when compared to
last year's ranking. By contrast,
the average 67 per cent salary
increase among the alumni
dropped by 14 per cent this year.
Graeme Menzies, director of
prospective student marketing,
communications, and social
media at UBC, said that, despite
some variations in the different
categories ofthe data, Sauder's
current ranking for MBA programs is still very impressive.
"It's good considering that
there are 17,000 universities in
the world — to be in the double
digits is impressive," said Menzies. "Everyone would agree that
UBC is in the top of the top, the
top one per cent category."
In terms of how these statistics will potentially influence
student attendance at the university, Menzies said that since
every ranking institution relies
on different methodologies and
categories, they will all produce
different biases in their data.
Therefore, the degree to which
these statistics affect student
attendance will primarily depend
on the student's personal preferences and educational needs.
"I think [Financial Times'] bias is
a little bit more on money. They're
looking to see how much [students]
could make," said Menzies.
Menzies also said that the
statistics released by the Financial Times would likely have
more important implications for
international students.
"The main difference is for the
international students. Obviously,
they're paying the higher fee and
many of them are moving a long
distance from home," said Menzies. "When they look at the rankings information, they look at it
a lot harder because the decision
and the commitment that they're
making is a lot more intense."
This year, Sauder's placement
among Canadian universities was
second only to the University
of Toronto's Rotman School of
Management, which placed 53rd
on the list. Other Canadian institutions that also entered this list
included the University of Alberta
(86), Queen's School of Business
(86), Western University's Ivey
Business School (97) and McGill
University's Desautels Faculty of
Management (100).
Menzies said that while UBC's
general ranking among Canadian institutions has usually
always been fairly approximate
to McGill's in the top tier, he does
not find the Financial Times'
placement of Desautels to be
particularly surprising.
"UofT is fairly consistently the
number one ranked Canadian
institution," said Menzies. "In
Canada, UBC and McGill are
usually second place or third
place on there, [but] when you
break it down by program, it
begins to change." Xi
FUNDING »
UBC Farm receives
$i million grant
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
The UBC Farm has received funding to
expand its programs.
Joshua Azizi
StaffWriter
The Centre for Sustainable Food
Systems (CSFS) at UBC Farm has
received a $1 million dollar grant
from the Real Estate Foundation of
British Columbia (REFBC).
The grant will go towards
expanding UBC Farm's programs
and facilities, with funding going towards new research on crop yields,
land use policies and the development of a new eco-f riendly building.
"It signals that our community
is ready to work towards really
important sustainability and land
use goals collectively," said Shannon
Lambie of UBC Farm. "It opens up a
lot of doors for us."
The REFBC, which has been
partnering with CSFS for 10 years,
grants donations to organizations
aimed at sustainable progressive
land use in B.C.
As a result ofthe grant, the UBC
Farm Practicum in Sustainable
Agriculture will also expand its
program from 12 to 24 students.
The practicum is an eight-month
program that teaches students
with an interest in agriculture
about the farming industry. It
gives students experimental
training in the field as well as the
resources they need after graduation to work in the field of farming.
Accordingto Lambie, UBC Farm
hopes to get a new, younger generation of farmers to lead the way for
agriculture in B.C.. The average age
for a farmer in British Columbia is
56 — an average that's very close
to retirement and that UBC Farm
hopes to bring down by getting more
young people interested in farming.
"It will help tell practicum
students that this work that they're
doing is so valued and so important," said Lambie. "I think it'll really
inspire them to work hard."
Since much ofthe farm's infrastructure is relatively old, UBC
Farm hopes to build a new farm
centre and renovate some ofthe
existing facilities with the grant
money. They also hope to expand
the farm to include more space for
classrooms and visiting scholars.
Lambie also said that, with the
renovations, they hope to create a
welcoming, interactive environment
similar to that ofthe Beaty Biodiversity Museum or the Botanical
gardens, where visitors can have an
interactive insight into the work that
occurs at the farm.
"The farm is for everybody,"
said Lambie. "People will be able
to learn a little bit more about what
we're doing." Xi
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Shoot
Edit
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COMEBYTHEUBYS
SUB 24, FOLLOW TH
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s
1
i
► NEWS    I    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2015
CLASSROOMS »
Flexible, more technologically advanced learning spaces coming to UBC
UBC is working toward providing more flexible learning spaces that are conducive to group work across campus.
Mariam Baldeh
Contributor
This year's renovation budget
includes upgrades to several
classrooms, learning spaces and
technological systems at UBC.
On Wednesday, January 21,
Vice Provost and Associate Vice
President, Enrolment, Angela
Redish, and Vice President
and Senior Planner, Jodi Scott,
gave a presentation to the UBC
Senate that outlined the current
usage of and future priorities
for classrooms, teaching labs
and informal learning spaces on
campus.
Accordingto Redish and Scott,
three reports have recently been
conducted regarding the use
of general and restricted classrooms, as well as the physical
condition of those spaces. They
found that large lecture theatres
are used more frequently than
smaller classrooms, and they
employed a Work/Learn student
in the summer of 2014 to do an
audit to determine the condition
ofthe various rooms.
Leanne Feichtinger, one of
the students who worked on the
classroom audit, went into all of
the general use classrooms and
did a check for basic equipment
and maintenance issues in the
rooms. Some ofthe items on
her checklist included whether
each room had whiteboards or
blackboards, tripping hazards,
broken furniture that needed
repair and functioning clocks, to
name a few.
"Most ofthe [general use]
classrooms were in pretty good
condition and there was nothing
to impede learning," said Feichtinger. "But it was really eye-opening to see that some ofthe rooms
really needed work done."
She used a classroom rating
system of 1-5, with rooms rated
one and two having higher maintenance issues such as cracked
seats, missing stair treads or
large stains, and thus in greater
need for renovation.
"We look at what are one and
two rooms and what we can do
to move those up [to a higher
rating]," said Scott. "Four and
five rooms tend to be the newer
buildings that have either been
renewed or are brand new, and
the majority [over 80 per cent]
of classrooms are in that middle
category with a three rating,"
said Feichtinger.
Some of these newer buildings
with highest-rated classrooms
include the Earth and Ocean
Sciences building, Pharmacy
building, Allard Hall, Sauder
building and the Centre for
Interactive Research on Sus-
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
tainability. There have also been
revamped classrooms in the
School of Population and Public
Health, Woodward, CEME
and ongoing renovations in
Buchanan building.
Still, not every classroom
at UBC is equally conducive
to student learning. Gul Gun-
sen, a fourth-year Arts student
double-majoring in political science and sociology said that she
would give a three on this rating
scale to the Buchanan lecture
halls.
"I would give it a three because
ofthe cramped spaces and small
tables, but definitely top-notch in
terms of its cleanliness and clear
sight ofthe instructor," said Gunsen.
Another audit done this year
revealed that several classrooms
that have been revamped have much
better ratings than they had in
previous years.
Accordingto Redish, the university is working on three different renovation projects in the
upcoming months, one of which
includes Hebb Theatre.
"The larger classrooms are most
heavily used, and it's hard to upgrade them because it's expensive,
but it's necessary," said Redish.
Redish also said that an ongoing effort that is less expensive than revamping every large
theatre is to change some ofthe
smaller classrooms to include furniture that can be moved around
to suit both group learning and a
lecture hall layout.
She pointed to some upgraded
classrooms in Leonard S. Klinck
as an example, where the tables
have different heights to accommodate different learning styles.
This way, students can stand if
they learn better that way, and
have optimum sight lines ofthe
front ofthe classroom no matter
where they sit. The rooms are also
brighter, with more colour and
have had a lot of positive feedback
from instructors and students,
she said.
Although smaller classrooms
often go unscheduled, they often
serve as great study spaces for
students. For some students, the
layout ofthe study space can influence their study behaviours.
Chamberlain Chen, a third-
year Sauder student, said that the
professional layout ofthe rooms
in Sauder motivate him to study
and work hard.
"The rooms are well-equipped,
very clean, bright and [generally]
a very pleasant environment to
work in and the [flexibility] to
book study rooms 24 hours a day
is great," said Chen.
Accordingto Scott, most ofthe
renovation budget still goes to
technological upgrades as part of
a third and ongoing project that
is expected to finish around 2019.
"The biggest push right now is
moving from analog to digital,"
said Scott. "Most ofthe modern
equipment can't plug into the
classrooms unless the switching
is changed." tJ
GARBAGE WE SENT TO LANDFILL IN 2013:
3000 TONNES
OR19BLUE
WHALES
You can make a difference
Use recycling stations
to sort your food scraps
and recyclables into
the proper bins.
'325
UBYSSEY
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
Nominations close February 13,2015 and voting runs Mar 9-13,
2015. Nomination forms are available at SUB 23. This is not an
editorial position. Members of The Ubyssey Publications Society
Board of Directors are responsible for overseeing the finances
and administrative operations ofthe newspaper. Responsibilities
include attending board meetings, tending to business as it ajl^£ pubt
and overseeing personal projects.
UBC SUS
For further details please email fpereira@ubysseyca
Sort it Out. // Opinions
Veronika
Jenica
Jovana
OFFICE OPINIONS
on student fee increases
While I tend to take a pessimistic, education-
costs-in-this-country-will-keeping-going-up-
no-matter-what-we-do view on the tuition
hikes, it is especially upsetting to see the university reuse the same old 'we're-just-doing-
this-to-meet-market-rates" excuse over and
over again when it comes to housing prices on
campus. Even if we put aside the fact that the
university's goal should be to provide more
affordable housing to students so that they
can focus their energy on their studies, we all
know that it's not that difficult to find a better
place for less money in Vancouver.
If UBC intends on being the best in research
and knowledge, they need to make the decision to pave the road for accessible education
and set a new global standard. This means
lower fees so students can continue to receive
the best education from the best university.
When calculating the value of its average
dorm room, UBC seemed to skip factoring in
such details as decrepit shared bathrooms,
near-fascist rules against decorating and the
temporary nature of it all — because who
really knows for sure if they'll get into rez
again the next year? What trumps all that is
the community and atmosphere that rez life
offers, which apparently is so inherently precious that it makes dorm rooms equatable to
one-bedroom or studio apartments off-campus. Last term we decided to start charging
international students more money to cover
the cost ofthe prestige of a UBC degree. What,
now we're charging students for the community they themselves foster, too?
Calling Arvind a racist won't change Christy's
mind.
Jack
Peter
Austen
In defence ofthe housingfee increase, UBC
argues that the new rates are below or at par
with "market value" in the residential areas
near campus. This simply isn't true. While a 15
per cent increase might match up with what the
average Vancouverite pays for rent, it certainly isn't reflective of what students are paying
off-campus. The vast majority of students pay
rates that are far cheaper than the average cost
of rent in Vancouver. Judging from their calculations, UBC seems to believe that a typical UBC
student is somebody who can afford to live alone
in a studio apartment. UBC administrators are
either out of touch with the demographics ofthe
student body, lying to us, or both.
While it's understandable that UBC wants
more money, there doesn't seem to be good
justification behind the actual amount ofthe
increases. 20 per cent is such a round number.
I find it hard to believe a 19 per cent increase
wouldn't be enough and a 21 per cent increase
would be excessive.
I can't say that I'm a fan of how UBC went
about the housing (and tuition) increases, but
it's too early to say whether or not their "market rates" argument is valid. If there's still a
multi-thousand person wait list come March,
the increases obviously weren't enough to
drive away the market's demand and didn't
change the (potential) fact that people are
willing to pay a premium to live on campus. If
there isn't, then UBC has some explaining to
do. Either way, although student fee increases
of any sort are an unwelcome move away from
accessible education, it's important to not
place the blame squarely on UBC's shoulders.
Protest decreasing government funding as
much or more than the decisions UBC has
made to cope with it.
LAST WORDS »
UBC continues to consider classrooms outside their regular use to be "informal" learning spaces.
_LUSTRATIONJULIANYUfTHE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
THE UNIVERSITY IS
BEING SILLY WHEN IT
COMES TO SYLLABI
As it turns out, UBC seems to
have no policy governing syllabi.
Right now, you could be sitting
at home, preparing yourself to do
readings for one of your classes
when suddenly, all your readings
have been reshuffled, and your
course is going in a whole other
direction.
As nightmarish as it sounds, it
could happen anytime, because
technically, professors have the
right to change their syllabi whenever they please. And really, they
don't have to give you one to begin
with. UBC should really consider
laying down the law and making
syllabi more concrete and mandatory. Just imagine, they could even
be shared during course registration period.
That said, if you know where to
look you can usually find a syllabus
from previous years with the same
prof which will give you a decent
idea of what the course will be like.
It would just be nice to not have
to spend hours searching long-forgotten UBC pages to find something that could be dispersed with
a quick email. Wouldn't that help
us all sleep a little sounder?
UBC HAS A LOT TO LEARN
ABOUT INFORMAL
LEARNING SPACES
UBC has done an audit of all of
its "learning spaces," including
classrooms, lecture halls, wet
labs, studios and anywhere else
instruction takes place. However,
as some members ofthe UBC
Senate suggested at the January
21 meeting, not enough has been
done to emphasize the importance
of group learning spaces — particularly, unscheduled classrooms.
During exam time, for example,
most rooms in the Buchanan block
are open to use for studying, as
student senator and AMS VP academic, Anne Kessler, pointed out.
In fact, those rooms are almost
never locked, so students are even
welcome to use them outside of
peak scheduling times.
Spaces such as these have been
labelled as "informal" learning
spaces, which begs the simple
question: why "informal"? There is
no doubt that the most significant
learning takes place in flexible
spaces where students are allowed
to self-organize and soak up all
their class materials without direct supervision.
We're just hoping this misnomer was unwitting and UBC
truly does realize how crucial
these flexible spaces are. Xi FEATURE    |    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2015
Vf BRATION AL
bv Jovana Vranic
Researchers at the TRIUMF
institute have confirmed the
chemical bond.
Donald Fleming, a UBC professor emeritus, theorized the
existence of vibrational bonds in
a paper published in 1989.
"We had an experimental
result that really demanded a sophisticated theory calculation,"
he said.
The experiment was a reaction
between a bromine molecule and
an atom of a very specific hydrogen isotope called muonium.
"Normally chemistry doesn't
depend on the isotope," said
Fleming, but this experiment
bonding, isotopes play a
significant role.
As the muonium
interacted with the
bromine, the energy of
the reaction slowed as
temperatures rose.
"Normally,
chemical reactions,
when you heat them
up, they speed up,"
said Fleming, but because this one slowed
down, it meant
that the reaction
went through an
intermediate complex. This is observed
when chemical react-
ants go through a
temporary bond
tually leads to the
end products.
"I was intrigued,"
aid Fleming. "We did
again many years
later, and we found
evidence for this kind of
complex."
This January, Fleming,
along with a team of international researchers, observed a vibrational bond
in action — something that
could not have been done with
the technology of the time when
the phenomenon was predicted.
ing used an interesting analogy,
complete with fictional elephants
and loveable cartoon characters.
"To trap a Heffalump, what
Winnie the Pooh did was he dug
a big hole in the ground," said
Fleming. "And then the Heffalump — this big, lumbering
beast — was supposed to come
running along. If the hole was
wide enough and deep enough,
the Heffalump wouldn't get to
the other side — he'd run in."
ct that you
cu.. ^.xx^xxge chemical
bondir^Dy changing
the mass — that's
pretty remarkable."
Donald Fleming
The Heffalump in Fleming's
analogy represents the hydrogen isotope used in the bond.
Either end ofthe pit can be seen
as the spot where the bromine
atoms lie. If its energy were high
enough — or it were running fast
enough — the hydrogen could
jump across and bond with either
atom. However, in the case of
muonium, its energy decreases,
and the Heffalump gets trapped
in the pit, between the bromine
atoms, in a vibrational bond.
What happens in this temporary bond is quite simple: the
muonium atom reaches a stable
point where it is equally attracted
to both bromine atoms, and ends
up stuck, vibrating between them.
Why this happens is a matter
ofthe muonium's mass, which is
roughly one ninth of a hydrogen
atom's mass.
alogy, Fleming suggested that the
pit entrapping the creature has a
ladder lowered into it, making the
capture temporary, just like the
vibrational bond. Fleming used the
"Most ladders would have
equal spacing [between rungs],"
said Fleming. "That's a little bit
like the energy levels you can get
in a molecule."
By the laws of quantum
mechanics, particles must jump
between discrete energy levels
— just as the Heffalump must set
its foot down on each rung ofthe
ladder. There is no way to stop
between rungs.
"The first rung is not right at
the bottom," said Fleming.
Accordingto Fleming, in a
quantum world, there is no such
thing as zero energy. Instead,
there exists a lowest energy,
called the zero-point energy,
which is represented by the
first rung ofthe ladder.
"Even if you're at zero
degrees kelvin — the
lowest temperature you
can get — the molecules
have to be moving, because
otherwise, you'd
know where they
were... [and] that
violates a fundamental principle in
quantum mechanics
called the uncer
tainty principle,
said Fleming.
The zero-point energy of
an atom happens to
depend on its mass.
Muonium's light
mass gives it
a high zero-point energy.
With this, the first
rung of the Hef-
falump's ladder is
higher, making the
climb back up the
quantum mechanics.
bond a difficult one
— explaining why it's stuck
the way it is.
The simple detail of
the muonium's mass
was "the money figure,"
said Fleming. "The fact
that you can change chemical
bonding by changing the mass ■
that's pretty remarkable." ti II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
MONDAY, FEBRUARY
THEATRE»
NETFLIX »
Apres Moi and The
List transcend space,
time and character
Bottom of the Queue:
American Muscle
PHOTO COURTESY IVAN YASTREBOV
Apres Moi replays a sequence of events six times, each with heightened intimacy.
Keagan Perlette
Contributor
Vulnerability, in a society which
chooses stoicism and emotional
detachment in the face of intimacy,
is often misunderstood and misdirected. Apres Moi and The List
are absolutely necessary stories
about the ways in which people
experience the distance between
each other and the stumbling of
communication, interpretation
and perception.
Performed in translation from
January 28 - February 1 by Ruby
Slippers Theatre, the two plays
are emotionally linked by their
themes of utter human-ness, and
their juxtaposition is seamless
and unifying — transcending
space, time and character. Diane
Brown, director of Apres Moi,
calls the plays taken together
"spectacles of intimacy."
UBC alumna Mishelle Cuttler
brilliantly designed the sound-
scapes for both shows, and alumna
Dawn Petten plays the role of
Stephanie, the sexy, altruistic,
hairdresser opposite Chirag Naik's
talkative, socially inept Simon in
Apres Moi.
Alongside Brown, alumna Pippa
Johnstone was the assistant director of Apres Moi and watched the
play take shape firsthand.
The show is the story of six
people stranded in a roadside
motel as a blizzard rages outside.
Alongside Stephanie and Simon,
the plot follows middle-aged
spouses Simone and Stephen, and
suicidal retiree Matthew, who is
sandwiched in the room between
the two couples. Over the course of
the play, the characters relive their
scenes six times, each played with
increasing intimacy and honesty.
"It sort of makes you realize
how there's certain times in life
where there's something you could
say or you could chose not to say
and how it can affect everything,"
said Johnstone.
The motel is part pressure
cooker and part time machine
where the audience watches as
the characters relive their scenes
until the truth is told. The plot
is an unpredictable tapestry, the
three stories tangle and intersect
throughout the play as the scenes
gain emotional momentum. This
unpredictability was hard won but
worth it.
"That was one ofthe biggest
challenges," said Johnstone.
"Diane says you have to be 10
steps ahead ofthe audience."
With each new replay, the layers of each character's trajectory
are revealed as if the audience is
riff ling through a chose-your-
own-adventure book. The closer
the characters become to one
another, the closer the audience
becomes to the characters.
The List, the second show
on the bill, is a one woman play
about a mother who moves her
family from the city to a rural
village in the hopes of finding
the domestic bliss she desperately seeks. We find her amongst
toys and scarves and dishes
suspended from the ceiling as
she recounts the events of her
relationship with Caroline, her
new neighbour, in the form of a
list which includes her household
duties, her dreams, her fears and
her guilts.
The set makes it clear that the
woman is imprisoned by her lists
and by her domestic life. The
hanging items exist like floating
dreams around her. At one point,
she wishes desperately that she
could hide from her life inside
the hall closet and to thereby be
transported to a beach, a European adventure. And here she is,
finally inside the closet amongst
all her family's junk.
But the space isn't the freedom
she imagined. Curtain or cage,
the hanging paraphernalia of domestic life slowly spinning under
the lights is eerie. This show
is, as the program proclaims,
"crucial."
France Perras' portrayal ofthe
woman offers blunt insights that
hit like a cold knife and shiver
around you like the snow that
falls over the woman, the closing
curtain ofthe show.
Though very different from
Apres Moi, The List carries a
thread from its predecessor and
the emotion ofthe language is
never lost. These plays are not
to be missed, they are the sort
of stories that will echo inside
of you long after the lights come
up. tJ
Sam Fruitman
StaffWriter
At its heart, American Muscle is
an exploitation film. Not a good
exploitation film, mind you, it's
actually quite terrible. This being a
review column for terrible cinema,
you'd think this film would be perfect for it, right? Unfortunately not.
The problem is that it's bad for all of
the wrong reasons.
Disguised by pretty camerawork
(and a heck of a lot of slow-motion),
the film primarily lacks a good
story. American Muscle follows John
Falcon, a man who's fresh out ofthe
slammer and looking to exact sweet
revenge on all of those who put him
there. As to why he's in prison, that
doesn't get explained until the tail
end ofthe film, so hold your breath.
Meanwhile, John's got to find out
where the love of his life, Darling
(yes, roll your eyes), has ended up
during his 10 long years behind
bars. We'll give you a hint: she isn't
running for office.
We waited and waited for the plot
to really kick into gear, but were left
with unexplained flashbacks, convenient coincidences and a general
lack of stakes for the characters. Not
to get all film-buff-y on you, but even
bad movies need an interesting plot.
It is abundantly clear that director
Ravi Dhar (we've never heard of him
either) is a cinematographer first,
and director last.
Another glaring problem we had
with this film was the characters.
We know that, generally, female
character development can be
rudimentary when it comes to bad
cinema (no Oscar-worthy performances here), but this film takes it to
a new low. The women are there for
you to look at, and not much else.
There was not one female character
wearing pants throughout the entire
film. Worst of all is Darling, who we
are never given the chance to care
GRAPHIC MING WONGfTHE UBYSSEY
about because she's strung out in
virtually every single scene. By the
end of it all, the audience doesn't
care whether John got to her or not
(spoiler: there's a twist).
The bottom line: Save for some
laughably bad acting, American
Muscle just ain't worth it. Seriously. Xi
THAN READY
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BCIT
50
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 8    |    CULTURE    |    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2015
BOOKS »
Fine arts prof weighs
in on Bauhaus weaving
in design theory
Bauhaus weaving has had an impact on design theory.
Gabriel Germaix
Senior StaffWriter
=HOTO LIZ WEST/FLICKR
"Typically, weaving doesn't have
theory. Weaving is crafting, just
something that is done, manual,
technical... it doesn't have a venerated history."
Painting has Leonardo Da
Vinci's A Treatise on Painting,
architects of all ages referred to
Roman treatises, but the craft of
textile used to lack a theoretical
base. If the reflection on this
thousand-year old craft still lacks
material, artists ofthe German
school ofthe Bauhaus affirmed
the unique identity of weaving
through a series of theoretical
and practical writings.
These writings have now been
reviewed and analyzed in depth
in T'ai Smith's book "Bauhaus
Weaving Theory. From Feminine
Craft to Mode of Design."
Smith, who is a UBC associate
professor of art history and visual arts theory, expanded a dissertation into a full-length book
about the very specific Bauhaus
weaving workshop. The Staat-
liches Bauhaus — from the German for "house of construction,"
to be understood as "School of
Building" — was a prominent
German school of arts and crafts
that put practicality in the heart
of their teachings.
"The whole objective was, you
know, to 'build a house,' so there
was interior design and exterior,
architectural work," said Smith.
Ofthe different workshops that
existed from 1919 to 1933, the
weaving workshop was one ofthe
most productive.
The Bauhaus weavers bridged
a gap between art and craft and
paved the way to modern design
through their artistic and technical innovations.
"They were actually designing
stuff through the process of making," said Smith. "They would experiment with the use of different material, like cellophane, or
various new kind of proto-plastic
threads ... they were experimenting with the way that those
could be woven, and the structures that they would make."
The craftsmen and crafts-
women referenced this prog
ress, but the nature of their
craft — textile making — is such
that it has been almost entirely disregarded by art history.
For Smith, talking about the
theory and practice of weaving
could even "force art history to
reexamine its assumptions and
foundations."
"We are looking at material that might visually be very
similar, but actually structurally,
the materials are actually quite
unique or special," said Smith. If
she stands clear from the claim of
industrial weaving as being art,
Smith asserts the importance, for
design theory, ofthe discourse
around it.
"The weavers were publishing
in magazines and in journals,
speaking to the wider public,"
said Smith. "They used the
language of other media, for
instance architecture.... They
really started to frame their
practice through the language
of functionalism, which was
the discourse at that time ofthe
Neues Bauen, the New Architecture."
Smith took the example of a
famous cloth made of cellophane
and chenille, that was used to
cover a wall in a theatre. The fabric had both a soundproof effect
and light-reflecting one.
"It had sort of a dual functionality, in addition to it being a kind
of tactile textile surface. It was
very unique," she said. The use of
woven cloth was detailed in the
weavers' writings, and in patents
that the women who formed the
bulk ofthe workshop submitted
to the German authorities.
Architects ofthe Bauhaus
articulated their discourse on
the affordability of their design,
a criterion of importance in the
post-war national economic
crisis and weavers took a similar
approach. In the words of Smith,
"they started to kind of frame it
as a utility, as a utility fabric,"
contrasting with a preconception
of a wall hanging and weaving as
a "feminine craft."
As such, weavers ofthe
Bauhaus laid a milestone in the
history of design. That deserved
a full-length book. Xi
MUSIC »
Watch jazz history in the
making at the Chan Centre
=HOTO COURTESYTRACY LOVE
Terri Lyne Carrington to perform with Cecile McLorin Salvant.
Rachel Levy-McLaughlin
Contributor
"Wouldn't it have been cool to
see Ella Fitzgerald as a young
artist?" said Christine Offer,
artistic presenting manager for
the Chan Centre for the performing arts. Wouldn't it be cool
to see a Grammy-Award-winning
drummer? You know what would
be even cooler? To see them
both together.
For one night this month, and
one night only, UBC students
have the unprecedented opportunity to see up-and-coming
jazz-vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant alongside Grammy-Award-winning drummer,
band-leader and producer Terri
Lyne Carrington.
On February 14 at 8 p.m. in the
Chan Shun Concert Hall ofthe
Chan Centre, 25-year-old Cecile
McLorin Salvant will make her
Vancouver debut, featuring songs
from her Grammy-nominated
recording "WomanChild."
"Cecile has burst onto the scene,
signed by the same manager as
Wynton Marsalis," said Offer.
"Her debut here is particularly
exciting when one contemplates
the trajectory her career is on.
"As one of our UBC School of
Music professors commented to
me recently, 'she is a goddess,'"
a goddess compared by critics to
Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald.
While this is hardly Carring-
ton's debut given her 20-year
career on the jazz scene, this is
her first time leading. She will be
performing works from her album
"The Mosaic Project," which received a Grammy in 2012 for Best
Jazz Vocal Album.
The Mosaic Project is a celebration of "female artistry in the
form of a compilation featuring
various well-respected women of
the jazz world," said Offer.
"Now there are so many
women who play and I wanted to
celebrate that," said Carrington.
"It's very powerful to see so many
women on stage playing at such a
high level."
This concert represents the
power of music: its capacity to
implicate something greater, and
create social change.
"These artists are making their
mark on jazz in an industry that
is constantly making strides towards better equality," said Offer.
"Due to traditional perceptions in
many cultures, it has been historically more difficult for females
to become recognized as instrumentalists than songstresses. As
a whole, this show demonstrates
how times are changing."
The most important thing
should not be lost in these social
reflections, however, accordingto
Carrington. And the most important thing is the music.
"The point is not that they're female," said Carrington. "The point
is that they're excellent musicians."
Carrington spins a contemporary flare on her jazz, mixing in
funk, soul and blues. "I'm not a
purist, so I try to mix styles, mix
genres," said Carrington. "So even
those who think they don't like jazz
enjoy it."
Students can purchase tickets for
$15, available at the Chan Centre
Ticket Office.Xi
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 15001
Public Open House
Wesbrook Place Lots 27 & 29 Faculty & Staff Rental Housing
You are invited to attend an Open House on Tuesday, February 17 to view and comment on the
proposed faculty & staff rental residential development in consolidated Lots 27 & 29 in
Wesbrook Place. Plans will be displayed for two adjacent 6-storey residential buildings, with a
total gross floor area of 18,312m2.
Date:
Place:
uesday, February 17,2015 4:30 - 6:00 PM
Vesbrook Village Welcome Centre, 3378 Wesbrook Mall
Smith
Park
Crescent :*
West  ^
a
Spirit
Wesbrook Mall
Ultima
Meeting
Location
Mundell
Park
Prodigy
^
Representatives from the project team and Campus +
Community Planning will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about this
project.
The public is also invited to attend:
Development Permit Board Meeting
Date + Time: March 18 from 5:00-6:30pm
Location: Classroom, Tapestry Building
3338 Wesbrook Mall
For more information on this project, please visit:
plannine.ubc.ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
For further information: \m\ j£
Please direct questions to Karen Russell,
Manager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
ttttAAfl
-a-^ms^a. smmM
0| »*l^gtfS°l«! ^SlfegfiSSS^rSOl Si£L-|r4.
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA EDITOR JACKHAUEN
MONDAY
// Sports + Rec
REC»
Faculty Cup 2015 was a display of inflatable savagery
"Archery tag" is just as intense as it sounds.
Soren Elsay
StaffWriter
UBC, with its 50,000 students and
11 faculties, can feel like a big place
with not a whole lot of spirit. The
AMS looked to change that by pitting 11 faculties against each other
in a social-media-fueled, Hunger
Games-esque athletic tournament
called the Faculty Cup — a faculty
vs. faculty sports tournament.
This event, run last year by UBC
Rec, is a quasi-annual event that
has evolved this year. Organized
through a joint effort by the Faculty Cup Committee and the AMS'
Student Life and Communications
Committee, this year the Cup
looked to reach a wider and more
diverse population at UBC through
the addition of free programming,
LACROSSE»
including a wellness fair as well as
an active living festival.
After the food truck festival and
the wellness fair, the tournament
began. In its first round, faculties
competed against each other in the
ridiculous games of sitting volleyball and dodgeball. Then the competition moved to War Memorial
Gym and the third competition,
the tug-o-war, took place.
Sitting volleyball has eight players on each team sitting on a small
volleyball courts with lowered
nets. The ball is allowed to bounce
once before being returned and
serves are thrown in.
Points were awarded to the
winners of these matchup as well
as for various acts of self promotion on social media and faculty
participation in the various fairs
and activities that took place
earlier in the day. The points were
tallied up and the top two teams
to emerge from battle competed
in the adrenaline soaked game of
archery tag.
Archery tag is basically paintball
with bows and arrows. Real bows
and arrows. The arrows have giant
foam marshmallows as tips. A team
wins a round of archery tag by
eliminating every player from the
opposing team, or by shooting 10
foam targets.
An exciting dodgeball matchup
between the Faculty of Science and
Sauder revealed the true colours of
the two faculties. Sauder, employing
a free-market strategy of every man
and woman for themselves, were
readily defeated by the more meticulous and organized Science team.
=HOTOLOUISGONICK^HE UBYSSEY
These gallant blue warriors used
their superior scientific minds to
devise an unbeatable strategy. They
stockpiled balls, waiting to fire them
at their foes in a single volley. This
strategy overwhelmed the Smithian
Sauderites, allowing Science an easy
but well-deserved victory.
Another tournament highlight
was a close matchup between
Engineering and Arts in sitting volleyball, with the Engineers coming
out on top. With more advanced
communication and teamwork,
even Arts' selfie-taking could not
help them.
This sport of bruised knees,
bloodied elbows and butt-hopping
lacked the excitement of standing up volleyball, but more than
made up for it in awkward dives
and laughs.
"It's lots of fun showing faculty
pride," said Engineer participant
Sarah Powers.
Kin ruled supreme in the
tug-o-war round, but their late
challenge could not make up for
the calculated performances of
Science, and the raw, lumberjack
power of Forestry in the previous two rounds. The battle to
decide this conflict of 11 armies
would be the best of three rounds
of archery tag between Science
and Forestry.
The final started with reserve,
both teams rarely ducking out
from behind inflatable cover. The
Foresters struck first, knocking
down several targets. Science
retaliated ruthlessly, slaying two
ofthe Foresters. The Foresters
continued to aim for targets,
Science for people. In the end, the
Foresters emerged victorious after
knocking down all of their targets.
Science started the second
round strong by knocking down
two targets with a single shot. Go
physics! But it was not enough — a
combination of tree magic and
lumberjack sawdust overpowered
the Scientists and Forestry,
in their dark green uniforms
and face paint lifted the huge,
golden trophy.
"This is a start of a revival of
the event. We are trying to push
the envelope with it and we have
plans to make it even bigger next
year. We hope that for the first
time in a long time it will stay for
more than a year or two," said
Alex Remtulla, head ofthe Cup's
organization this year.
Tanner Bokor, AMS President,
was excited for the future ofthe
event and hopes to see more of it.
"This is pretty amazing, it's really
great to see actual student engagement for once and see people
out there having school pride. I
think it's fantastic that all these
different groups decided to put
something in term two because
that's something we haven't really
seen before on this campus."
The festivities concluded with
an afterparty at The Academic
Public House. Xi
Rez lawn to Canada West: UBC Lacrosse Club keeps growing
The team poses for a photo during a tournament in Edmonton.
Soren Elsay
StaffWriter
The UBC Lacrosse club enters the
home stretch of their inaugural
season in the Canada West Field
Lacrosse League sitting in a respectable fourth place out of seven.
While this may not sound especially
impressive, the club's position is an
astronomical success considering
their humble beginnings just four
years ago, when Dan Millar first
tried to bring some semblance ofthe
sport he loves to UBC.
The fifth-year mechanical engineering student recalls struggles of
the very early days before the club
really came to fruition: "When this
thing truly first started, it was just
me and my buddies throwing the
ball around in the backside of Totem
[Park]," he said. "[I would] just find
anyone I could recruit, throw them
=HOTO COURTESFTHUNDERBIRD LACROSSE
a lacrosse stick and a beer. That was
really the starting platform of club
membership."
Today the club's membership
is over 30 members, with more
than 20 members on the men's
competitive team, and a women's
team in the works for the 10 female
members. The club is also open to
anyone who wants to give the sport
a try by offering non-competitive or
new players the chance to practice
with the team and be part ofthe
close-knit group.
One ofthe formally inexperienced players is Paul Fijal, who
joined with minimal lacrosse background and now finds himself on
the executive council ofthe club.
"Last year Dan approached me
[about joining the team], I had
never played before, but at that
point there weren't that many
players and I picked it up pretty
quickly," he said.
Fijal's first year with the club
coincided with the club finally
getting some real traction as a
legitimate lacrosse team.
"This is the second year that
this thing has really kicked off.
Last year we had only had one
game with UVic and a tournament in Edmonton, this year we
joined the [Canada West] league,
which plays every week."
The relatively new club recently got a major boost when
UBC designated it as having competitive club status beginning in
September of 2015 as part ofthe
university's athletics reorganization last year. The new status
provides the Lacrosse Club with
improved access to facilities as
well as support for marketing
and communication. Millar
hopes that this designation will
help achieve the club's over-arching goal of creating a university
league for their end of Canada
down the road.
"We've been working towards
a western Canadian university
league with the University of
Victoria, University of Alberta,
University of Calgary and the
University of Lethbridge," said
Millar. "There have been a few
setbacks in terms of those schools'
level of competitiveness, but looking forward to the future, that is
one ofthe main goals of our club."
As for the immediate future,
the club has six regular season games remaining before
the Provincial Championship
tournament in the first week of
April, where the winner moves
onto the National Championship
tournament. Whether they make
it or not, this year will already
mark a historic success for Millar
and his club, which has come a
long way from its days of tossing
back beers and balls on the
Totem lawn.
If you're interested in joining the
UBC Lacrosse Club, come out to one
of their open practices on Fridays
from 6:30-7:30 pm on the Varsity
Turf Fields, contact ubclacrosse@
gmail.com, or search "Thunderbird
Lacrosse" on Facebook. Xi 10    I   SPORTS   |    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2015
HOCKEY»
T-Birds take back-to-back 5-1 wins
Victories become all the more valuable toward the end of the season.
Jenny Tang
StaffWriter
The UBC Thunderbirds women's
hockey team extended their winning streak to three games this
weekend with a pair of identical
wins over the University of Lethbridge Pronghorns.
The 'Birds were on the offensive
the entire game, managing to score
in every period.
In the last three minutes of
the first, Tatiana Rafter was able
to bang in a loose puck off of an
assist from Stefanie Schaupmeyer
and Nicole Saxvik for her 11th of
the season.
Only 20 seconds into the second
period the three struck again. This
time Rafter and Schaupmeyer
assisted Saxvik, who found her
way into the goal at the front ofthe
net. Saxvik follows closely behind
Rafter in the scoring race, as this
was her 10th goal ofthe season.
Rebecca Unrau would help
extend the lead to 3-0 just 12
seconds after the second goal.
Firing the puck in front of the
goal, this would be her 10th goal
ofthe season as well.
The Pronghorns soon struck
back, with Sadie Lenstra managing to get past Thunderbird
goalie Samantha Langford.
With the score at 3-1, the second
period did not produce any
more goals, mostly thanks to the
net-minding of Pronghorn goalie
Crystal Patterson.
In the third period Unrau
scored again, with the team
capitalizing on a power play. In
addition, graduating senior Lisa
Trainor scored her first goal of
the season off of a rebound to put
the 'Birds ahead at 5-1.
Things got pretty heated in
the third period. The Pronghorns
fought hard to try and turn things
around, which resulted in a fight
breaking out towards the end of
the game.
"I thought that we kept our
cool for the most part," assist-
PHOTO SOFYTSAIfTHE UBYSSEY
ant coach Mike Sommers said.
"You're going to get those moments near the end ofthe season"
Stephanie Schaupmeyer was
the only one of the 'Birds to
fight back, having head-butted
a Pronghorn, and sat out for the
rest ofthe game in the penalty
box.
Despite the Lethbridge attempts to even out, the score remained 5-1 and the Thunderbirds
took home the weekend win for a
clean sweep.
"They all came out really
hard," said Sommers. "Lethbridge played us really hard both
nights but we're committed going
down the stretch. We're taking
things one game at a time, one
weekend at a time, and we'll look
forward to the following week
when it's there."
Next weekend the 'Birds face off
against the University of Manitoba
Bisons at Thunderbird Arena. Puck
drop is at 7:00 pm on Friday and
2:00 pm on Saturday. Xi
REC
This year's Versus was a Smashing success.
=HOTO SERGEYGALYONKIN/FLICKR
Mario Versus: friendship-
ruining good times
Ford Atwater
Contributor
UBC Rec's Versus event, though
video game-themed, was a
nerd's worst nightmare: physical
competition. Mario Versus is the
latest trial of strength, endurance and who can eat the most
'shrooms. It's the third year the
event has taken place, with a
different theme every year. Last
year was the Hunger Games, the
year before Zombies and this
time it's Mario Party.
The teams were randomly
selected from a large pool of volunteers, and each group is named
after a different character from
the Mario universe. There was
some downtime at the start, so
everyone was given a chance to
get to know each other before the
brawl began. Halfway through
the opening ceremony Bowser
kidnaps the princess. Undaunted,
the teams race to their challenges, spread out around campus.
The first event was Mario
Kart; the track was the UBC
fountain. Racers had to push
themselves around with chopped
off ends of hockey sticks, dodging obstacles and other racers,
before switching out with
another member of their team.
The challenge was not as easy
as leaning into your turns while
clenching a greasy GameCube
controller; expletives were heard
and insults were thrown like red
shells. Racing conditions were
cold are windy, but the intrepid
karters were unflinching in their
dedication to saving the princess.
If drivers managed to find a coin,
they could hang onto it for later.
Other challenges and coins
were won as the night progressed: in front of Koerner's
library was Super Smash Bros.,
where balloons were tied to players' ankles, and the teams have to
pop each other's balloons to win.
There are no rules here, just like
the video game, except for "don't
be a dick," which is not so much
like the video game.
The math building was Donkey
Kong country — some degenerate
Kremlings tore up a picture, and
the teams have to reassemble the
picture to win. The classic Luigi's
Mansion makes an appearance
as well, where players are tasked
with completing various challenges in the dark and fighting
ghosts.
The final battle between all
the teams culminated at Bowser's
Castle, a multiple-part competition. Teams could use their hard-
earned coins to buy power ups,
without any knowledge of what
they'd do. Some power ups helped
or hindered others — and one did
nothing at all. The task was simple: win a one-legged relay race
while dodging fireballs, solve a
puzzle, throw pudding at Boo and
kill Bowser with a ton of balls.
In the end, Team Toad emerged
victorious. The real work here
was done by the UBC Rec team
though: from leading icebreakers,
to guiding volunteers or dressing
up as Bowser, they were on point
the whole night. Xi
Terri Lyne Carrington s Mosaic Project
and Cecile McLorin Salvant
SUN FEB 15 2015/7pm
| CHAN CENTRE AT UBC
Tickets and info chancentre.com
$15 Student Tickets
chancentre.com/students MONDAY FEBRUARY 2,2015    I    SPORTS    I   11
BASKETBALL»
BASKETBALL»
W^mmWi
Philip Barndt had 35 points across both games
PHOTO WILLMCDONALDfTHE UBYSSEY
T-Birds split heated weekend with Dinos
Jacob Gershkovich
Senior StaffWriter
Two of Canada West's leading
scorers butted heads for a marquee
matchup in the Pioneer division
this weekend. Jarred Ogungbe-
mi-Jackson and the 11-4 University
of Calgary Dinos were in town to
take on Tommy Nixon and the 9-5
Thunderbirds.
UBC, arguably the hottest team
in Canada West after having won
eight straight games, was in no
position to dote over their recent
success. Clinging to the final
playoff spot in the Pioneer division
with the end ofthe regular season
looming, and playing host to the
number one seeded Calgary Dinos
— this weekend's story was a best
seller before the opening tip.
Fans were treated early in
Friday's game to a frenetic pace
of play. Bodies crashed into each
other violently for every loose ball;
fastidious coaches threw down their
clipboards and wore out their voices;
the crowd roared at a deafening
volume. After trading baskets for the
majority ofthe quarter, the visiting
Dinos held a small 27-23 lead.
As has been known to happen in
the world of sports, the abundance
of energy in such a competitive
environment translated into hostility. Things got ugly in the second
quarter. First, UBC's head coach
Kevin Hanson received a technical
foul while disputing a controversial
non-call against his team. Minutes
later, Calgary's Matt Letkeman was
handed a flagrant foul, followed by
another technical foul assessed to
Calgary's head coach, Dan Vanhoo-
ren. Capping off what was surely
UBC's most rancorous quarter of
play this season, Calgary's LJ Heg-
wood was ejected for pushing UBC's
Conor Morgan after the former was
hit with a questionable blocking
foul. The crowd serenaded Heg-
wood as he left the building.
There was also some basketball
played. Entering the break, the
Dinos led 48-41.
"They were playing very physical," said UBC's assistant coach, Vern
Knopp. "The game was getting a
little chippy, and we just told our
guys that we need to show some restraint and be the more disciplined
team, so that we don't put ourselves
in a situation where we have a player
getting kicked out or suspended for
tomorrow's game. It was tough, but
you have to be able to control your
emotions."
While the wave of technical and
flagrant fouls dissipated in the third
quarter, the superlative level of play
did not. UBC slowly chiseled down
Calgary's defence until the visitors'
lead was no more. With less than a
minute to go in the quarter, UBC's
Tommy Nixon, who entered the
weekend as Canada West's leading scorer, finished a layup while
absorbing heavy contact from a Calgary defender. Nixon took the free
throw line to the sound of "MVP"
chants from the home town crowd.
Though he missed the free throw,
Nixon knocked down a mid-range
jumper at the buzzer next time
down the court, leaving both teams
deadlocked at 68.
A neck-and-neck race to the
finish seemed the only just way
for this narrative to end. With 1:00
left in regulation time, the Dinos
led UBC 88-85. After a massive
defensive stop, Nixon tossed a lob
pass to UBC's second-year guard,
Kedar Wright. Wright drove to
the rim and was fouled hard by
Calgary's Lars Schlueter, who was
slapped with a flagrant foul on the
play. Wright hit one of two free
throws, and due to the flagrant
foul, UBC kept the ball. On the
ensuing possession, UBC's Morgan
knocked down an enormous three
pointer to put the 'Birds up 89-88.
Calgary responded with a basket
of their own, only to be matched
by two clutch free throw shots by
Wright.
With UBC's Tonner Jackson on
the free throw line, a 91-90 lead,
and 5.1 seconds left to play, UBC
looked to have the win locked up.
Ogungbemi-Jackson, Canada
West's second-leading scorer, and
Calgary's most dangerous offensive weapon, did not.
Jackson hit one of two free
throws to put UBC up 92-90.
Ogungbemi-Jackson received the
outlet pass after Calgary rebounded
the missed free throw, frantically
dribbled up the court, and pulled up
for an off-balance, fadeaway three
pointer from well behind the three
point line. The high arcing shot flew
through the air, hit the back board
and tickled the mesh as it passed
through the rim. A speechless
crowd read the scoreboard with
disbelief. Calgary 93, UBC 92.
Like others in attendance, Knopp
seemed stunned with what had just
occurred, but was already looking
forward to the rematch to be played
the following day.
"It's cliche, but our backs are
against the walls. We're fighting for
a playoff spot. They're in first place
in Canada West for a reason. They
didn't lose their composure when
they fell down, and a great player
made a great shot at the end ofthe
game. We just have to talk to our
guys, refocus. Tonight's game is over
now. As soon as we leave the gym,
it's over."
The high energy, high-tempo
style of play continued on Saturday.
The high scoring offence did not.
Call it bad shooting, or good defence,
both teams failed to capitalize while
they held the ball in the first quarter.
Still, the visitors obtained an early
lead, 19-16.
The second quarter of play was
the Nixon vs. Ogungbemi-Jackson show. UBC's Wright was dealt
the challenging task of defending
Ogungbemi-Jackson, and despite
his commendable play, Ogungbemi-Jackson lit up UBC for 20 first
half points. On the other end, Nixon
was as a wizard, which is all UBC
has come to expect from their fifth-
year leader. Nixon ended the half
shooting 9-13 from the field for 19
points, and UBC led 41-40 after two
quarters.
"[Nixon] is just in the zone right
now," said UBC's head coach,
Kevin Hanson. "He's been playing
unbelievably well. He's certainly
scoring and putting those numbers
up, but also playing great defence
for us. He's doing a lot of things that
people don't see. He's embracing the
moment right now, and it's nice to
see him shine in front ofthe home
crowd."
In the final minute ofthe fourth
quarter, Morgan managed to toss
a lob pass to Wright for the layup,
which put the 'Birds up 89-86.
Ogungbemi-Jackson took revenge
during the next play. The all-star
knocked down two high pressure
shots from the charity strike to
bring the Dinos within one point.
With 23 seconds remaining, the
Dinos were forced to foul. Unfortunately for them, they couldn't avoid
putting UBC's own all-star on the
line. Nixon looked like he believed
himself to be the only person in the
gym as he took the free throw line.
He knocked down two ofthe game's
biggest free throws to put the 'Birds
back up by three. That was as close
Calgary would come. The final
score: 93-88 for UBC.
"I'm just happy with the way
that we executed down the stretch
tonight. It was a real gut check game
after last night. That was one of
the toughest losses we've had as a
group, and that I've had as a coach.
Defensively, I thought we did a
pretty good job tonight. Ogungbemi-Jackson is obviously one ofthe
best players in the country and he
showed that this weekend," said a
relieved Hanson.
The road to the playoffs continues
next weekend in Regina for UBC.
The 7-9 University of Regina Cougars, a team eager to nip at UBC's
hold on a playoff spot, will host the
'Birds in what looks like a gem of a
matchup.
"We're facing a team that had
a bye week this weekend, which
means they've had lots of time to
scout us out. They're all important
games, and I think the way the
league is structured, it's very difficult to really understand the difference between one through seven
in the Pioneer division. It's getting
down to crunch time with a couple
of weeks left. We're just tryingto
focus on ourselves, and play better
basketball," said Hanson. tJ
=HOTO STEVEN DURFEEfTHE UBYSSEY
Kris Young (6) had 49 points on the weekend.
Women's ball
continues tear
against Dinos
Mason Mcintosh
StaffWriter
Coming off a 80-53 win over the
Dinos on Friday night, the T-Birds
women's basketball team continued their smooth play to keep
their win streak alive with a 56-67
win in the second game.
The Thunderbirds started off the
game with some superior defence,
leading to a handful of transition
buckets. Cassandra Knievel (11
points) and Kris Young (12 points)
led the pack in the first half. Knievel
had flawless vision up court, finding
teammate Adrienne Parkin on back
door cuts and Harlene Sidhu under
the hoop for easy baskets. The Dinos
had no answer for the energy UBC
was playing with, they had nowhere
to go on offence, settling for long
twos and heavily contested three
pointers. Calgary's defence was no
match for the Thunderbirds' quick
ball movement; UBC was able to
capitalize off Young's Russell Wilson-like longbombs.
The second was very much the
same story; the quarter kicked
off with Parkin making a beautiful pass to a cutting Sidhu who
wrapped up the impressive chemistry with two easy points. Young
continued her tremendous play
with relentless penetration to the
hoop — she ended the game with a
game-leading 20 points.
Kara Spotton was a beast on the
boards. Offensive or defensive, she
made her presence noticed while
the Dinos watched in awe. High
energy was the theme for this
Saturday night battle; the team who
got involved and secured loose balls
had the upper hand for the whole
night. The T-Birds forced UofC to
lob passes, giving them no chance
to form any rhythm on offence, and
capitalizing on the other end.
Sidhu wrapped up the third
quarter with a very pretty and-one
basket, pumping up the crowd and
leading her troops into the final
quarter. Sidhu finished the game
with 19 points and six rebounds.
This tired Calgary group never
let the game get away from them
until the bitter end; their pressure
ensured the game stayed within
reach. However, their continuous
settling for low percentage shots
didn't help their cause, shooting
a surprising 44 per cent from the
field, and a concerning 7 per cent
from beyond the arc.
With the second season just
around the corner, this upbeat
Thunderbird squad can't afford
to let up. "We must continue to
get better," said head coach Deb
Huband. "With only four league
games left, this is when the season
is on the line." Xi 12    I    GAMES    I    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2015
Such Yoga. Much Vancouver. Very Beauty.
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
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