UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 16, 1968

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126152.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126152.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126152-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126152-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126152-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126152-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126152-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126152-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126152-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126152.ris

Full Text

 THE UBYSS
Vol. XLIX, No. 34
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1968
— bob brown photo
UNTIL NOW, THE THEORY was always that you kept dogs on leashes, and let children, those
wild little beings, go unshackled. But, with the development of new  intelligent theories on
child-rearing, the situation has been reversed. To wit— father and son in front of the library,
accompanied by free dog.
Sign-up lineups are in
By MIKE FITZGERALD
Registration could see a week-long traffic
am again next year.
"We are doing away with pre-registration,"
TBC registrar Reg Parnall said Monday.
"Many students would receive counselling
uring the summer, fill out their cards and then
Chess is lively
A live chess game featuring UBC co-eds as
ieces will be held at noon March 14.
The game, to be held at the Cairn in front
f the bookstore, is the product of a challenge
sued in a letter Monday by
lath prof Dr. Nathan Divinsky
) Ubyssey editor Danny Stoff-
lan.
"Euclid refused this chal-
mge, but that, Stinker Stoff-
ian, will only make you a
ouble stinker," Divinsky
rrote.
"We accept," said Stoffman
[onday.
The challenge was prompt-
i by a story in Friday's Ubyssey pointing out
rrors in Divinsky's chess column of Jan. 5.
"Stinker Stoffman doesn't know his pawn
om a hole in the ground," wrote Divinsky.
According to rules laid down by Divinsky, The
byssey is required to supply 32 "beautiful" co-
is to serve as pieces. They are to include the
bmecoming queen for The Ubyssey team and
te Science queen for Divinsky's team.
"They should be wearing mini-skirts to in-
ire that all can clearly see that they move
roperly," Divinsky wrote.
The pieces will be sought and recruited by
he Ubyssey.
Divinsky's letter will appear in full in a
.ter edition of The Ubyssey.
PARNALL
DIVINSKY
change their minds in September. So next year,
everybody, or at least all arts students and science
freshmen, will register in the first week of
school."
Pre-registration was initiated
in the summer of 1966 to drain
off part of the fall flood of students.
Arts and science faculty advisors at that time said the pre-
registration program made it
easier for both faculty and
students.
Parnall was optimistic about
getting a computer to handle
the difficult chore of registering an entire student body in five days.
"I don't feel pessimistic about it," he said.
"I still feel we can do the trick of registering
4,000 students a day for five days by lengthening
the registration hours."
A main problem, he said, involves the first
and second year students, who are usually undecided about what they want to take. Students
in third and fourth years are honors or majors
students, and have most of their program set out
already.
"It'll be a fair pressure, I admit, but it's not
beyond the realm of possibility," he said.
"We are considering pre-registration immediately following the previous year but for
now most will register in September."
Students who want will still be able to receive counselling during the summer as well as
in September.
The arts faculty hopes to encourage students
to ask advice before they leave campus in May
so that they will have some sort of idea about
what subjects they will take next term.
"It's useless for a student to fill out all his
cards before September and then change his
mind before then and have to do it all over
again," Parnall said.
224-3916
HARE
Senators urge
special meet
over secrecy
UBC's student senators are urging acting president Walter
Gage to call an emergency meeting of the senate to discuss
senate secrecy.
Senator Gabor Mate Monday asked Gage
to arrange the meeting in an attempt to avoid
a senate sit-in at the body's next regular meeting
Feb. 14.
Mate also asked Gage to arrange a meeting
between the student senators and new UBO
president Kenneth Hare, who is scheduled to
visit the campus next week.
Gage said the plan for an emergency meeting "has possibilities."
"I want to discuss it with student council
and others concerned before we go ahead,
though," he said Monday.
Mate said Hare wants no engagements during his visit, but
said Gage told him he would ask the president about a possible
meeting.
More than 600 students last week voted to hold a sit-in at
the February meeting.
The students almost unanimously endorsed the action at an
open meeting to discuss the threatened resignation of student
senators.
Arts president Stan Persky Monday also
started meetings with faculty members over the
secrecy issue.
Persky said he met with ten" senators Monday.
"I emphasized the reasonableness of the
students in their position. We're anxious to
initiate talks," he said.
"I ask them if they feel senate should be
open or closed and how they justify it being
closed in light of other parliamentary bodies the
world over being open.
"We also get the attitude that 'student senators have to prove
their worth'. It's a very paternalistic attitude."
"Why should we have to prove ourselves anymore than they
should ?" added Mate.
Student council Monday night decided "to organize a meeting
between council and members of the senate to discuss the proposed sit-in and the conflict over senate secrecy.
The meeting will be open to the public and
will be called as soon as possible.
In making the motion AMS first vice president Don Munton said the sit-in was a phony
idea because the student senators had made
no real effort in senate to force an open gallery.
"It's a horseshit idea," he said. "They got
everything else when it was decided to publish
an agenda and a summary."
Student senator Mark Waldman said he
was confident the senators would come to the
meeting.
"I have talked to two members of faculty who are on senate
and they have expressed a willingness to meet with students,"
he said.
Mate said a senate sit-in was not being planned at the
moment.
"I don't know anyone who is organizing a sit-in now," he
said.
POLITICKING   BEGINS
iFOR ARTS ELECTIONS   ,
i Eight candidates have thrown their hats in the ring for ;*
^   arts elections next Monday to Wednesday. 2
i Harley Rothstein, arts vice-president, said nominations g
for the elections will close Wednesday. I
1 Running for president are Ralph Stanton, arts 3, and J
John Mate, arts 2. |
Vice-president   nominees   are   Henry   Hoekema   and ~
Dennis Hutton, arts 3. '
Mark Warrior, arts 3, and Richard Stead, arts 1, are -;
bidding for the position of treasurer, while Guida Chunn and *
Ruedi Soonne, arts 1, are vying for secretary.
PERSKY
MATE Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 16, 1968
FOR RESIDENCES
New financing tried
UBC's board of governors has decided to try
a new approach in constructing a residence for
1,200 students.
The board has agreed the new complex will
Mental retardation
research expanded
An expanded program of research and training for work with pre-school mentally retarded
children will begin at UBC in February.
The program is a continuation of one started
several years ago by the Vancouver Association
for Retarded Children.
It will be supported by a $30,000 grant from
the B.C. Mental Retardation Institute.
Half of the grant will be used to set up a
classroom and research facilities on Acadia road.
The remainder of the grant will provide operating expenses.
The program will be primarily used in the
training of professional personnel to work with
mentally retarded children.
toe built at a pre-determined cost and with rentals
pre-set at the lowest practicable level.
The decision came after a request from
UBC's future housing committee.
To be built just north of the student union
building, the complex will consist of three low-
rise buildings and two 15 storey towers. Projected opening is 1970.
A negotiated contract will place a ceiling on
total costs even before detailed planning begins.
This will allow UBC to pre-determine rentals
on a non-profit basis.
The new complex will house 600 students in
single rooms in its two towers, and 600 students
in either single rooms or one-bedroom housekeeping suites in the three low rise units.
All single rooms will be grouped in clusters
of 12 around small lounges to provide a "congenial" atmosphere.
Only students 21 years or older will be allowed to live in the residence.
Unlike other residences, this one will provide
room only, not room and board. Students are
expected to make their own meal arrangements.
Completion of the projects will allow UBC
to demolish old accommodation now used by
1,000 students.
BACK-T0-THE-
BOOKS
EYEWEAR
Don't let poor
eyesight hinder
your progress.
If You need
new glasses,
bring your
eye physician's
prescription to
us.
SPECIAL
STUDENT DISCOUNT
iM^Opttecl
seven
locations
in Greater
Vancouver
1701   W.   Broadway
731-3021
Hycroft Med. Bldg.
3195 Granville
733-8772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENSES
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
MOTHER TUCKER'S
YELLOW DUCK
TUES.-FRIDAY — JAN.   16-21
By Popular Demand
Reduced Rate For Students
VILLAGE BISTRO
2081   West  4th  Ave.
BRAUN SAYS:
LOVE
WITHOUT  FEAR -
THAT'S WHAT
EVERYONE WANTS
SCHOOL DISTRICT
No. 36 (SURREY)
Interviews with student teachers who have completed their
professional year of training and who will be eligible for an
E.A. certificate or better by September, 1968 will be held
regularly at the School Board Office in Surrey, 14225—56th
Avenue, Cloverdale, each Friday.
Interviews during other days of the week may be arranged
by phoning 594-0411.
E. Marriott,
District  Superintendent
of Schools.
FACULTY OF
GRADUATE STUDIES
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
All graduating students who hope to enter graduate
study at this University in 1968-69 are urged to file
applications as soon as possible. Places will be limited
and most decisions on admission will be made by
April 1.
The University offers graduate scholarships to outstanding students wishing to pursue studies toward the
Masters or Doctoral Degree in many fields of graduate
research. Scholarships range in value up to $3500
per annum. In addition many departments have positions available as teaching assistants or research
assistants.
For detailed information consult the head of the Department in which you wish to study.
For application forms and further information please
apply to the Dean of Graduate Studies, Biological
Sciences 2312.
EFFECTIVE
RAPID
READING
can help YOU
There's still a lot of reading to be accomplished, understood and remembered.
The Reading Dynamics method GUARANTEES to at least triple your reading speed
while retaining or increasing your present comprehension.
ENROLLMENT IN READING
DYNAMICS WILL ENSURE
THE FOLLOWING
You are guaranteed a three fold increase in reading
speed
You will also acquire greater comprehension
You will enjoy our modern up-to-date class rooms
You will meet our top rated teaching staff
You will be impressed by our detail and personal
attention
No classes have more than 26 people
During your classes you will meet and get to know
some interesting people
Your fee is tax deductible
On graduation you receive life time membership and
without cost receive additional tuition at any
Reading Dynamics office throughout the world.
LEARN THE MOST RECENT STUDY PROCEDURES
AND RECALL SKILLS
SPECIAL OFFER
TO STUDENTS
Demonstrations can be arranged
during business hours for any
University student unable to attend one of our regular demonstrations.
To make an appointment call
685-2374 or contact one of our
campus representatives . . .
PERRY SEIDELMAN 261-1809
or leave a message in the Student Mail Box in the Law Building.
MIKE MENARD 266-5574
JIM RUST 266-0403
They'll tell you how effective
Reading  Dynamics can be.
^^^^^^^^■^^^^.^^^^^^^■^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^« i
REGISTER   BY   MAIL
Mail this application now to reserve the class of your choice, to:
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS INSTITUTE,
602-1075 Melville St., Vancouver 5, B.C.
Please accept my application for admission to the Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics Institute.
Enclosed is my deposit (minimum $10) to reserve space in the class indicated below. (Refundable if class of my choice is not available.) Please forward to me the standard form so
I may complete my enrolment by mail.
NAME   	
ADDRESS
-TELEPHONE
CHECK THE CLASS OF YOUR CHOICE:-
D Thursday, Jan. 18—7 p.m. Q Saturday, Jan. 20—9:30 a.m.
f***^^^^-^-^-*-^^^^~i
(Qvelu/n  Wood READING DYNAMICS OF B.C. LTD.
601-1075 MELVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER S. B.O.        PHONE 685-2374
%
r Tuesday, January 16, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
<i>'->"».
— powell hargrave photo
TWISTING AND GYRATING through the paces of the play Viet Rock, part of a Theatre 300
course practices dodging falling napalm bombs and flying bullets. The class of 80 has broken
the play up into six sections, each section being done by part of the class.
Victoria must change attitude
The B.C. government's philosophy toward
Jducation must be changed, NDP-MLA Tom
Berger said Monday.
"Too much money is spent on health services
ind profit making ventures such as highways
ind dams," Berger told 30 students in an educa-
ion month lecture.
"Industrial development comes first in this
'overnment, at any cost. Priority should be given
» education."
Science  week
starts  with   roar
Dr. Betty Howard didn't flinch when three
notorcycles roared through her physics 110 class
Monday.
She paused as the three cycles, their blue-
:lad riders waving banners proclaiming Science
rVeek, repeatedly crossed Hebto Theatre before
150 amazed students.
After several minutes of raucous noise, the
ntruders left with a screech x>f rubber to practice
vheelstands in front of the building.
Class then resumed.
The episode is becoming an annual event.
Similar class disruptions have occurred at the
Deginning of Science Week for the past two
roars.
"It was just to tell everyone that our week
las started," said Bill Brumpton, science undergraduate society member.
"The class got a big bang out of it, especially
since neither they nor the prof expected it."
Dr. Howard said later she wished she had
seen warned of the event.
"But it was quite amusing," she said.
Science Week continues today with a free
;tudent-faculty coffee party in Brock at noon.
Featured will be the presentation of this
rear's Honorary Scienceman award.
Berger said B.C. is urgently lacking in vocational schools and regional colleges.
"Construction has come to a
halt in this province because
the government is overly concerned with gross national product.
"If we keep up the pressure,
Bennett will be forced to lift
this building freeze."
Berger suggested a university grant commission be established to make university decisions without interference from
the government.
"Far too often, a referendum becomes an
exercise of futility because it is defeated by the
minister of education."
There must be a larger share of provincial
revenues, Berger said. "Twenty-five per cent of
the B.C. budget on education isn't good enough."
Protestors war
A group of UBC students against armament companies recruiting on campus say
they want to forcibly block job candidates
from entering the student placement office.
John Mate, one of the organizers of the
demonstration, said Monday forcible blocking is a follow-up of last year's peaceful
sit ins.
"If the non-peaceful sit-in lacks support,
demonstrators will try to verbally dissuade
candidates from entering the placement office for interviews," he said.
A meeting will be held in Buchanan
lounge today at noon to discuss a demonstration against the Boeing company this
week.
Student sit-ins and a vote by student
council at McGill University has resulted
in the barring of all armament companies
from McGill.
Commission urges
Berkeley revamp
BERKELEY (UNS) — The report of a faculty-student commission issued Monday at Berkely University recommends that
the university become autonomous and give students a greater
role in running the university.
The commission, including six faculty members and six students, was appointed to study campus problems after a student
strike in December, 1966.
It calls for:
• an independent, student-faculty judiciary system making
it unnecessary for chancellor Roger Heyns to exercise any
law enforcement powers;
• a revamping of student government. One member of the
commission called the present student council a tool of the
administration;
• students on all committees having the power to make
decisions affecting them;
• four lower division colleges with 500 students each having
control over its own budget, curriculum, staff and physical
resources.
According to campus observers the report was prepared by
four or five of the most radical members of the commission. Two
faculty members, regarded as conservative, are preparing a
minority report. \
California governor Ronald Reagan got his lumps from the
commissions.
"For the first time in many years we are faced with a consistently unfriendly state administration whose theories of education financing are a logical accompaniment to its suspicions of this
campus," the report said.
"At times the main educations purpose of the university has
been obscured by political reprisals against higher education in
California and an atmosphere of distrust and suspicion exists on
campus."
Last week Reagan attacked campus "troublemakers" and said
he would call for strict new legislation to control those who interfere with the orderly process of education.
In recommending autonomy for Berkeley, the commission
also suggested that the rigid central university structure should
be eliminated. It also recommended that the university president
and the regents do no more than set broad policies and serve as
defenders of the university in struggles with the state government.
—     BUILDING   BUDGET  OK
A capital spending budget of more than $6 million has been
approved by UBC's board of governors.
Chief source of funds for the final year of UBC's current
five-year building program is a $4 million provincial government
grant.
Other sources are the Three Universities Capital fund, the
federal government's health resources fund and the Kinsmen
Clubs of B.C.
New construction includes a civil engineering structural
laboratory, computing centre installations and alterations, a boiler
addition and construction of a new incinerator for biological
waste.
Other items concern development of south campus field research areas, installation of roads and parking areas and grounds
development.
The five-year building program totals $32,676,194.
'Grads to double'
The new head of the department of geophysics at UBC wants
to double the number of graduating students form his department in the next few years.
Dr. R. D. Russell said UBC already has the largest undergraduate program in this field in Canada, graduating ten to 12
students per year.
"But there is an ever-increasing demand for specialists in
this area by companies in the fields of mining metallurgy and
oil exploration," he said.
"One of our primary objectives will to double our output
of trained geophysicists in the next few years."
^r^MORALITAME MUST/WE 0/i/£ lASTl^^snomi^m^mi^
^m jomr this Amw. ^ wsnlMMM^^J^^T ii^Ci' ~,,-       f*rfrV?«
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays end Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loe.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
JANUARY 16, 1968
ma
; 4
Smiles
What is education action?
Education action is an invitation to a Socred MLA
and an NDP MLA to UBC to speak to sparse noon-hour
audiences. Moreover, education action is smiling Shaun
Sullivan receiving a short audience with smiling Premier
Cecil Bennett.
It may sound funny but, believe it or not, that's
what education action is for UBC's student council this
year.
Council this year is making a brave attempt to
accomplish nothing in UBC's ongoing struggle with- a
hostile provincial government. In this effort council has
achieved remarkable success.
Last year, when education action was something
more than just a joke to UBC student leaders, the minister of education faced an angry crowd of 2,000 on the
legislative steps. The march to Victoria was a small but
well-executed beginning at showing the government
there are people in this province with a serious concern
about education and with the guts to exert active opposition to government policies.
This year the minister of education and smiling
Cecil were not met with 2,000 concerned students.
Rather, they were met with smiling Shaun. The Socreds
cannot be blamed if they conclude that the UBC student
leadership this year is a pushover. They cannot be
blamed because they are right.
The laughable ineffectiveness of Sullivan and other
non-leaders in mobilizing student support for decent
government treatment of UBC is one of the reasons
campus officials fear a disaster when the Socreds announce their 1968 budget. With no active opposition to
its university policies from those most affected —
university students -— Bennett likely figures he has
nothing to lose by continuing his policy of short-funding
UBC.
Given their own predilection for student timidity,
non-leaders like Sullivan are in no position to bargain
effectively with Bennett, whose power is in his control
of the provincial purse-strings. Students possess no
power — except in their numbers. But properly used,
numbers can have some effect on government policy.
Mass action is the student movement's trumo card.
It is chiefly valuable as a threat — a last resort. Without
such a threat neither Sullivan nor any other student
leader has any real basis for effective negotiation either
with government or with university administration.
Unfortunately,   Sullivan  shies  away   from  talk  of
mass student action the way maiden Aunt Molly shies
away from talk of sex. By discarding student  power's
ace in the hole, he becomes impotent as a student leader.
i And while smiling Shaun smiles, smiling Cecil gets
/ ready to screw UBC.
Styles
Now that male pupils on campus are happily resigned to seeing mini, mini short dresses, what highbrows have always threaded has happened.
Nits with all kinds of legs, who by wearing varicose
stockings often skirt a chance to utilize the true purpose
of the minis, have added something to boot.
Often the sole reason for a raised hemline is a set
of glossy, creaking clodhoppers. Alas, a lass who keeps
her legs out of charm's way while her calves chafe
doesn't realize that looking like a ringmaster won't get
her a ring faster.
Almost everywhere clumps of pinched misses clomp
loudly about, ensuring that a tramp is always in evidence. Most girls who keep their clomp pose sure can't
know what a wolf whistle sounds like. And they couldn't
hear one even if it did accidently slip out.
Kneeless to say, some seamingly legal boots go so
high it's hard to tell tops from bottom. It is a deplorable
situation when a pair meant to be stimulating must instead be fumigatng. Obviously, males must make the
reeker sex come to heel immediately. — S.E.G.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman other issue. Mark DeCoursey got some
... «»,.,,» ,.,„„ ash in his eye and thought it was a
S'JJj '«.'..»» rr«««h» Winking shame, while Miss Elgin Lee
Hews , .•.SuSan.?'2M?by san«   madrigals.   John   Tollman   ate
Managing   Murray McMillan swords   and  Da^id   Salmon  nettedal|
SIS?,. Pat Hrusho'wS few bIorgs- Mike FitM*rald began in
|*"'iT       iiEI ?..«« earnest.    Laurie    Dunbar    was    red-
fSflJ*  m„,„,„V?Hn!C faced-   &ene   Wasilewski   ate   frog's
2.2 FrVdi.  Judv itaS legS'    and    Mike    Flnlay    WaS    P3Wn«d
asst. city   Bom Lee toUed too> as Fred Cawsey interview-
Afterwards, purple lightning greet- ed about an interview.
ed   Janie   Kennon   as   she   thundered J°hn Twigg,  Bob  Banno,  and  Jim
down   the   stairs  to  help  create  an- Maddin sported about.
Memories
NEGOTIATION  TRAIL
To prevent a sit-in
By STAN PERSKY
6 a.m., Monday, January 15.
Rain falling in the morning
pitch-blackness outside. Camera moves in across a darkened room to a round table lit
by a mini-lamp. It glances at
the negotiator's macroneurotic
breakfast (coffee, cigarettes
and The Province). Then close-
up of his face: mid-twenties,
anthropology student, already
feeling older than he wants to
be, glint of self-mocking irony
in his eyes. A year ago he had
never had an idea of being in
politics.
I don't think anyone's made
a serious movie about the student movement to date, but
it's only through thinking
about it as a kind of movie
(snatches of rock music on the
sound track) that I'm able to
consider the UBC academic
senate hassle between students
and establishment (is that the
right description of them?)
with some amusement.
You'll remember some of
the earlier scenes: 600 students meeting in Brock Hall
to figure out how to end senate secrecy. Speeches by student leaders. In the movie version Jeal-Paul Belmondo plays
Gabor Mate, Brandon DeWilde
plays Charlie B o y 1 a n and
Henry Fonda plays Shaun Sullivan. Orson Welles portrays
Stan Persky.
Next day we have a series of
cameo shots of various deans
angrily denouncing the student
effort to end senate secrecy as
"force and violence ....
against the democratic process . . ", etc. Dirk Bogarde
stars as arts dean Denis Healy.
The movie version I can figure out. But in the real world
it's a little harder. On the one
hand the students (played by
The Other Side) are not the
hell-bent hot heads the movies
will show them to be and the
real-life establishment is not a
collection of munitions-making
businessmen and indifferent
academics conspiring to cover
up some scandal.
•    •    •
On Monday, I started out to
begin a series of negotiations
with various members of the
academic senate because I believe   students   are   interested
in having an open senate but
I don't want them to participate in a secret body.
When I read the recent comments of UBC deans in response to the student meeting
in Brock last week, I was surprised that not one of them
said something like, "Gee,
that's an unusual decision for
students to make. After all, our
students at UBC don't go in
for riots, violence, etc. They
must be pretty disturbed about
this senate thing. Maybe we
ought to look into the whole
question again."
Instead, most of them ended
up saying, "I won't be intimidated." And of course when
you get that kind of bravery,
the movie version begins. (I
wonder if we can get Sidney
Poitier to be in this?)
Also, for the deans to treat
the issue in this way is to get
out of talking about the real
questions and reduce the matter to "handling" student unrest, which is exactly what students don't want.
RIDICULOUS
From the student point of
view the question isn't too
complicated: we believe the
academic senate is important
and we believe it should be a
democratic institution, i.e.,
available to the people who
are affected by the decisions it
makes. Available in the sense
that its proceedings should be
open to the public and press.
Wouldn't it be ridiculous if the
parliament were a closed, secret body? Of course the senate
has some confidential business, all legislative bodies do.
And all legislative bodies have
an in-camera clause so that
they can meet secretly on sensitive maters (personalities and
money, I guess). Why can't our
senate do the same?
Another question students
have thought about is: who's
keeping the senate closed? I
think for a while we tried to
pretend it was"those businessmen". Then I looked at the list
of senators: chancellor, president, 14 deans, 12 teachers
elected individually by faculties, 23 teachers elected by a
joint meeting of the faculties,
3 principals of affiliated theological   colleges,   1   librarian
and 4 students. In other words,
almost three-quarters (59 out
of 81) of the senate membership is directly tied to the university. If senate secrecy is a
failure (morally?), that failure
must be attributed to the men
who teach us. Yet I can't remember any teacher of mine
at UBC, in class or out, praising the virtues of secret societies in a democratic structure.
TIRED ARN
I don't have any idea what
the negotiations will produce,
if anything, or how they'll go.
I don't know that I feel some
responsibility for seeing to it
that the matter is talked about
in a serious and reasonable
way. (No, the cameras don't
have to zoom in on the straw-
thatched huts of Panmunjon
or the unthatched huts of
Geneva.)
So far the meetings have
been casual. I talked to Arnie
Myers, the administration's
public Info man. He has a tired
face that says it's been through
many negotiations. (Arnie is
the guy who quit the Sun
when they wouldn't print his
stories as he wrote them. In
the movie version he's played
by Chester Ronning: that is, be
believes in peace and open senate, but works for admin and
government.)
We exchanged notes and impressions. I suggested a few
plans and alternatives that
might get us out of this dilemma and uttered a few exasperated, "Why in the world do
they want to keep the damned
senate secret anyway?"s. He
said he'd pass on my observations to some people he knew.
(I wonder if they've ever made
a documentary called Quiet
Diplomacy?)
NOT MEMBER
Then I talked to a teacher in
my department who isn't a
member of the senate. He
wanted to know why we were
so worked up about all this. I
heatedly replied, "I'm not
worked up!" He suggested that
1) I worry more about Vietnam and that 2) the student
senators carry a big tape recorder and microphone to sen-
To Page 5
See: SENATE 4 Tuesday, January 16, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS  TO THE EDITOR
Adoption again
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to express my appreciation for being correctly quoted
when I stated that "the Children's Aid Society no longer
has any reason to remain in
existence as a valid organization. That farce should be terminated." (Ubyssey, Nov. 14).
I am concerned,' however,
that the quote did not go far
enough to point out my reasons
for this statement. Both the
Catholic Children's Aid Society
and the Children's Aid Society
of Vancouver depend on charity
dollars to continue their work,
while throughout the rest of
the province this same service
is provided by the provincial
department of welfare. No
child's needs should depend
upon the whims of charity,
however minute that section of
the agency's budget may be.
Secondly, both private children's aid societies were set up
on religious grounds, and while
these religious barriers do not
exist throughout the rest of the
province, they are still ostensibly the main reason for the continuation of the above named
agencies.
Thirdly, private agencies that
are deeply committed to doing
the prov i n c i a 1 government's
work tend to develop vested
interest in the status quo and
therefore lose their unique pioneering of experimental responsibilities.
If the above reasons are not
sufficient to satisfy those who
feel my remarks are incorrect,
I would welcome the opportunity of debating this issue publicly with any member of the
Children's Aid Society senior
staff, any accredited member of
the provincial department of
welfare at any time at any
place.
DAVE BARRETT. MLA
Coquitlam
No snow
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It is snowing in Vancouver!
SENATE
From Page 4
ate meetings to freak them out
by making a verbatim record
of the minutes. I think he also
said that he didn't think there
was any point in having the
senate or student government.
Then I talked to a grad student friend of mine. I complained that grad students take
less part in campus affairs
than anyone. (I hinted that
maybe they were too busy becoming professionals.) She explained the progress that had
been made this year in improving the M.A. program and
teaching assistant situation.
Then I made an appointment, at his request, with anthropology head Cyril Bel-
shaw. I said, "Maybe you can
help me out of a dilemma." He
said, "Maybe I'll only confuse
you further." We're scheduled
to meet Wednesday.
Today, I'll try to get meetings with professors Clark,
Kenny, Scott and Smiley.
They're all senators.
And if it doesn't become a
movie, maybe it'll become a
soap opera.
I feel that this is outrageous.
AH my life I have believed
that Vancouver was the land
of the monsoon, not of the iceberg. This is undoubtedly a
severe violation of my constitutional rights of life, liberty,
and the happiness of pursuit.
However, I still hold out
for a solution to this problem.
Vancouver is blessed with a
powerful mayor. It is my firm
belief that if he put all of his
mystic powers to the problem
(as he did in the case of a
newspaper and magazine last
year) he could successfully ban
snow.
Perhaps with the help of
God's emissary on earth
(Premier, oh sorry, Prime Minister Bennett) in a few years
the Mayor could ban weather
altogether and God's Land of
the Apple could flourish in its
true glory and magnificence.
DAVE MACKILLOP
arts 1
Criteria
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I was rejected as a possible
delegate to the Quebec affairs
conference at McGill last week.
In analysing my reaction to
this rejection I have come up
with several suggestions that
might be useful. Why, in matters of this sort, cannot the general criteria on which the successful applicant is to be chosen
be published also? I realize that
a certain amount of flexibility
is required but surely there
must, or should be, general
guidelines on which the judges
act.
The advantages of such a
move are many. It would keep
away many applicants who are
obviously not qualified, thereby, saving time and effort. It
would minimize the danger of
arousing false hopes. Finally, it
would decrease the inevitable
ARTS U. S.
OFFICIAL  NOTICE
ELECTIONS
will be held January 22-24, 1968
Candidates for the offices of President,
Vice-President, Treasurer and Secretary
may declare . their candidacy between
now and January 17 by registering at
the Arts Council office, in the lounge of
the Buchanan Building.
*y$°      dinner  & dance
*~0£»e"a   to   aVt~
'©Idtetein * 15.00/
suspicions that crop up as to
the motives of the judges. Of
course, to be thoroughly democratic, it would require some
kind   of   appeal   board.   How
about it?
T. J. FRIGON
grad studies
WINTER IS HERE!!
^ Free Antifreeze Check
ic Free Battery Check
jr; Goodyear Winter Tires
if Imported V.W. Chains
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
Management
and Specialist
Careers
for Graduates
Sun Life of Canada will be on campus to discuss
your future with you.
The life insurance industry today offers an
interesting and rewarding future to ind.viduals
with management and technical potential.
Make your appointment now
at the placement office
to see Sun Life on
Jan. 19
Our booklet 'Careers with Sun Life'
is available at the placement office.
SUN LIFE
ASSURANCE COMPANY
OF CANADA
The Insurance People with Ideas
HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL
WILLIAM  TURNER
SPEAKS ABOUT
' fill KEIEDY ASSASSINATION
JhuhA. Ybojrv   —  $cun. 18  —   SjidxJl Jbungn
Free Admission-Special Events Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 16, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Economy and education
EDUCATION ACTION
Social Credit MLA Ernie Le
Cours  will  discuss  How  Our
Economy Effects Higher Education today noon, Bu.  106.
FILMSOC
Spring general meeting noon
Wednesday, Brock Ext. 357.
Projectionists, old members,
new members and the odd
blorg please attend.
FILMSOC
A Funny Thing Happened
on the Way to the Forum,
Thursday noon, Aud., 50 cents.
It's good clean fun . . . well
it's fun anyway.
NDP CLUB
General   meeting   noon   Fri-
Music  gains
concert organ
UBC's new music building
will be the recipient of a successful organ transplant.
An anonymous gift of $100,-
000 to the music department
will be used for a new concert
hall organ .
The gift was one of five
donations worth over $170,000
accepted by the board of governors at its last meeting.
day,  Bu.  212  — not  Wednesday.
COMPUTER CLUB
Dr. Swirles of the faculty of
commerce will speak Wednesday noon in Chem. 250 on
UBC's Master of Business Administration program.
PRELIBRIARIANSHIP
Tour of government publications and microfilm division,
Wednesday noon. Members
meet by main card catalogue
in library.
IL CAFFE
Maria   Tomsich   will   speak
on Tiziano (Titian) at IH 402,
Wednesday noon.
U.N. CLUB
Film: You Don't Back Down,
noon today, Bu. 104.
CHORAL   SOC
Important practice   Wednesday, 6 p.m., Bu.  104. Full attendance please. Pictures will
be taken.
WUS
General meeting, noon today, Brock council chambers.
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
Important meeting, noon today, GG 101. Speaker attending.
PRE-MED
Seminar: Abortion and the
Sanctity of Life, Jan. 21, 7
p.m., IH. Members only. Films
on heart disease at regular
meeting, Wednesday noon,
Wes. 201.
EDUCATION ACTION
Wednesday   noon,   Dr.   Ray
Parkinson, NDP MLA for Van-
couver-Burrard    will    discuss
Students and Fees, Bu. 106.
SCIENCE US
Get your tickets to the Crystal  Ball  in math   annex   by
Thursday.
SCIENCE US
General meet Wednesday
noon, Henn. 200.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Co-op   bookstore   committee
meeting   Wednesday    noon
Brock ext. 362.
ARCHEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting with film noon today, Bu. 202.
PRE-LAW SOC
Meeting   to   organize   court
house  tour,   today,   Ang.   410,
noon.
SCIENCE US
Come to the student-prof
coffee party, noon today,
Brock. Free coffee and donuts,
presentation of honorary sci-
enceman award.
GERMAN CLUB
Preiswinnender film: Sport
in Deutschland. Heute mittag.
IH, auch: Skifahrt nach Mount
Baker.
'The freedom
and responsibility
mean a lot to me.'
Dave Shelly, a London Life representative in Montreal
"In my last year of university
I talked to recruiters from several
different types of companies.
All of them offered jobs with
training programs which would
eventually lead to a position
of responsibility. But I wanted
something more. I wanted something
that would let me get out and
meet people. I wanted a position
that would give me responsibility
right away and at the same time
a degree of independence and freedom.
In other words, I wanted
something more than just a job.
That's why I joined London Life."
Dave Shelly graduated from
Loyola College in economics
in 1966. After a three-month
training course, he chose the agency
he wanted to work in from among the 100
operated by London Life across Canada.
If you are interested in a career
that offers you something more, ask
your placement officer about
London Life sales positions.
Or write to the Personnel Department,
London Life Insurance Co.,
London, Ontario.
FILM SOC. PRESENTS
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED
ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM
ZERO MOSTEL, PHIL SILVERS
THURS., JAN. 18-AUD.-50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 dayi $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
II
Lost & Found
13
LOST—COLLAPSABLE BLACK UM-
brella Thurs. in Engineering 201.
Please phone 936-3116 after 6 p.m.
LOST BEFORE XMAS IN CHEM. 324.
Opal ring.  Reward offered.  736-7063.
LOST—BROWN WALLET VICINITY
lower mall. Keep money—return I.D.
Reward.  Ph.  224-9062, Rm.  309.
POUND — FUR HAT IN VILLAGE
Tuesday,   claim   at   6006   Chancellor.
FOUND—LADIES' WATCH ON EAST
mall. Please claim and identify at
Extension Dept.  PBX,  228-2181.
WOMAN'S AFTER SKI BOOTS
found on campus Jan. 11th. Phone
and  describe,   RE  3-0393.
FOUND: BROWN LEATHER RA-
cing gloves in girls' washroom Brock.
Claim  publications office,  Brock.
Rides & Car Pools
14
THREE GIRLS DESIRE RIDE FROM
Fraserview   area.    327-2674.
WANT   TO  JOIN  CAR   POOL  FROM
North Shore. Ph. George at 987-6781.
RIDER WANTED FROM PATULLO
Bridge. Travel via Marine Drive
for  8:30s,   526-4903.	
WANTED RIDERS FOR CAR POOL,
west of Granville phone Ian after
6 al  733-4031.
RIDERS WANTED FOR CARPOOL
vie. of Nanaimo and Kingsway, ph.
TR.   4-1798—Pete.
NORTH VAN CAR POOL NEEDS
driver in upper Lonsdale area. Ph.
Bob at   988-1548.	
RIDE WANTED OR JOIN CAR POOL
from   Mallardville,   Ph.  936-8941.
Special Notices
15
RODEO? ALL PEOPLE INTEREST-
ed in starting a Rodeo Club please
phone Neil at 224-9833 between 6:00
p.m.   and   7:00   p.m.     	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
WANTED: FEMALE MODELS FOR
photographer, object photography.
For further information ring Alan,
434-8228  after   6.
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED —
Forum Thurs., Jan. 18, And. 50c.
12:30,   3:30,   6:00,   8:30.
SEE AND HEAR THE HONOUR-
able Robert Stanfield in Hebb, Friday,   Noon. 	
NDP GENERAL MEETING FRIDAY,
Jan.  19 not Wed. in BU. 212, Noon.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
FERSON WHO SCRAPED GREEN
Vauxhall please contact 988-5874,
after 6:00 p.m. and give particulars
•—note unreadable.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sals
ai
Automobile Parts
23
W1ANTED. TWO SNOWTIRES FOR
Volvo. 15x approx. 6.00. 224-9812.
Room   205.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles - Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and Used
SPORT CARS
N T
O     Motors     S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS —
Reservation for Mardi Gras. 5620
Dunbar  St.   Phone   263-9011.
Scandals
37
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON
The Way To The Forum. Thurs.,
Jan. 18. Aud. 50c.
FILM SOC NEEDS HELP! WE NEED
projectionists, and bodies to help
with posters, tickets, doors, etc.
Sex is no object. We already have
3 female proj.'s. Room 357, Brock
Ext.,   Help.
Typing
40
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable   Rates   TR.   4-9253
TYPING: PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00 TO
c:0":   n'-onp  266-6662  after 6:00.
EXPERT   TYPIST.   10   YEARS   SEC.
"n,   ^Teat,   accurate  work.   325-7630.
ASSAYS     AND     TERM     PAPERS
neatly  typed,   736-0538.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
SI
BABYSITTE R-HOUSEWORKER
wanted, 3-5 days a week, 2-3 hours
a day, after school. Girl is age 5,
home small with all appliances, ph.
738-8315 after 6 p.m.
GIRLS INTERESTED  IN CREATIVE
photographic modelling, ph. 224-0711.
Male or Female
53
HELP WANTED — STUDENT TO
babysit occasional evenings. Will
drive home. Excellent rates. 731-
5946.
Work Wanted
54
DAY CARE FOR PRE-SCHOOLERS
by mother who knows her Spoek.
?3.50 a day or 50c an hour. Telephone  224-1052.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
WANTED — TUTOR FOR HIGH
high school chemistry student in
west  Pt.  Grey.   Ph.  224-0491.
Tutoring
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
tutoring given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Individual, $2.95 hr. Phone
736-6923.
EXP. ENGLISH TUTOR. EXCEL-
lent references and results. Phone
AM   6-9740.
MATH TUTORS REQUIRED,
grades 7-13. Third, Fourth Years.
5:00-7:00   p.m.,   736-6923.	
MATH, PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, Biology lessons given by competent
tutors. First year only, 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Still a few left
—    BIRD CALLS    —
on Sale at: Publications Office
Brock  Hall  or  UBC   Bookstore
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
LARGE ROOM ON GROUND FLOOR
in  a  auiet  new  home,   vacant.   Call
224-047T.
NEWJLY DECORAED BED-SITTING
room, private entrance, kitchen facilities, avail, immed., $40 per mth.
4472  W.   15th,   call  224-5757.
ROOM MAIN FLOOR,  PRIVATE EN-
trance,  boy  only,   after  5  p.m.  ph.
.   224-7623.
SINGLE   ROOM   AND   BREAKFAST,
UBC  student,  266-9280.
ROOM AVAILABLE FOR ONE OR
two male students, good study atmosphere. Phone 738-0784 after 6:00
p.m., ask for Paul.
Room & Board
•2
ONE ROOMATE REQUIRED TO
share West End apt. with three
others. Rent $75-mo. Phone Rick
736-9480.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
for males. Quiet hours, weekly
cleaning service. Free parking, etc.:
Phone  224-9665  after  6  p.m.	
BE A BOARDER AT PHI GAMMA
Delta. First-class food and friends.
$85 mo. Call Jake or L.B., 224-9769.
IGNORE CLAIMS OF BRAND X —
check with Dekes first, phone Len,
224-5916, after  6.
Furn. Houses & Aprs.
•3
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE BEAUT,
furn. apt. with 5th- yr. girl., $70
per month, 926-2869, after 5 p.m.
ROOMATE WANTED TO SHARE
furnished apartment near Broadway
and Granville, phone Ernie, 731-1056.
Unfurn. Houses 8t Apts. 84
TEMPORARY PARTLY SELF-CON-
tained Kerrisdale. Suit four—children welcome, 266-0350 after 4:30,
$75 per month.
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, January 16, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
—george   hollo   photo
WANDERING AMONG the neatly spaced undergrowth by Fort Camp, couples dare not stop to
sit and chat. The owners of the glade, it seems, would prevent over-crowding, stomping on
the tender shoots and flowers, and in general, desecrating the delicate landscape.
Firing protested at Waterloo
WATERLOO, Ont. (CUP)—Waterloo Luther-
a±i University students council and the campus
newspaper, the Cord Weekly, have called for a
class boycott Wednesday.
They are protesting the firing of one professor, and the non-renewal of next year's contract for another.
Both have apparently been the chief agitators
here for academic and social change, and have
been outspoken in their criticism of the administration and the faculty.
Gary Taylor, a psychology lecturer, was fired
because he wasn't "living up to the accepted
standards of the profession," according to WLU
acting president Henry Endress.
Taylor says he was fired because "the administration decided to clean house, and myself and
others were deemed to be unclean and were
purged from the House of Luther in Waterloo."
Another professor, George Haggar of the
political science department, has not been offered
a contract renewal.
Endress said: "Haggar has made it very evident he is unhappy. He is unsympathetic to the
purposes and operations of this institution."
Huggar, an Arab, is a major spokesman for
the Canadian Arab community, and has levelled
scathing attacks on Israel in the news media
during the Arab-Israeli war.
John Braun Speaks On
u
SEX,   LOVE
and MARRIAGE
A THREE PART SERIES
WED.-12:30-BROCK
Thursday — 72:30 Angus 104
— 8 p.m. Brock
COLLEGE LIFE SERIES
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ of Canada
n
w
-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THE PHYSICISTS"
xs
(An Intellectual Thriller)
by Friedrich Durrenmatt
with
Tom Wheatley
Barney O'Sullivan
Dorothy Davies
Joseph Gotland
r\
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
JANUARY 12 - 20, 1968
Student Tickets $1.00
(available for all performances)
-    SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES    -
Monday, January  15th -7:30 p.m.
Thursday, January 18th — 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207 - or 228-2678
One of the few contemporary German plays to win international acclaim
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
&
Crabbus forces crawling to victory
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) — The latest word from action
central indicates that Eraticus Crabbus is leading his forces to
victory over the creeping green fuzzy-rot.
Hear
"Braun On Sex"
Tomorrow
At Brock
BRAUN SAYS:
Believe It Or
Not It Was
God Who Came
Up With The Idea
Of Sex
FILM SOC. PRESENTS
RICHARD LESTER'S
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED
ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM
with Zero Mostel, Phil Silvers
THURS., JAN.  18-AUD.-50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS!
Your are cordially invited
to the sixth annual
Student Alumni Banquet
Tuesday, February 27th,  1968
at 6:00 p.m. in Brock Hall
GUEST SPEAKER: Mrs. Margaret (Ma) Murray
Editor,  Bridge  River - Lillooet News
Free tickets may be obtained by phoning, visiting or writing
the Alumni Association Office at Cecil Green Park (next to the
School of Social Work), call 228-3313 BEFORE February 7, 1968.
(Accommodation is limited so reserve NOW!)
IT'S MORE FUN TO
SEE WITHOUT GLASSES
«>C0NTACT LENSES
Once you've learned the facts about Vent-Air contact lenses
—their unique four vented design, their wafer thinness,
their tiny size—you'll understand why so many thousands
have discovered the thrill of seeing without glasses!
NOW BY POPULAR DEMAND'-with every original pair of
Vent-Air contact lenses you will receive a spare pair at no
extra charge . . . tinted grey, blue, green, or brown as
desired. LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS.
To find out more about Vent-Air Contact Lenses, call or
come in at your convenience for a private no-obligation
demonstration... no charge, of course. WeM oe delighted
to answer any question!
AVAILABLE OSL>
KLEAR VISION CONTACT LENS CO.
HOURS: 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. daily Ind. Sat; Mon. to 8 P.M.
Suite 616, Burrard BMg. ITBr , /M
1030 W. Georgia Street UBC 1/M
Vancouver, B.C. MU 3-7207
CALL
MU 3-7207
Please send me your free Illustrated booklet
and Oncost of inviSMtolwmt.
Mr.
Mr*.
Mis* ■
BIFOCALS, TOO!
Addn
City_
-Zona.
-State-
L__-;_:i._l._ ' OFFICES THaOUGHOUT U.S.*. AM) UNAM Page 8
THE      U BYSSEY
Tuesday, January 16, 1968
W
'"fTMU. ."■
''     88*t
Skiers find elbow room on slopes of Mt. MacKenzie.
Revelstoke area offers great skiing
By KURT HILGER
With the increasing popularity of skiing as a family sport,
the number of people who
flock to the local mountains
has become a burden to the
skier who prefers to have some
elbow-room.
Whistler has become overcrowded  and  expensive  with-
Hear Braun
At Brock
TOMORROW
in the last few years and as a
result it is becoming difficult
to find a ski resort that has
good facilities and is easy to
reach.
The only solution is to turn
to the little known slopes of
the interior. One of these can
be found in the Revelstoke
area.
Outside being the training
ground for professional skiers,
it is only used by the local
townspeople.
This slope, Mt. MacKenzie,
has a bunny slope, a rope tow
and a T-bar slope. There is a
THE RECREATION
ACTIVITIES PROGRAM
HAS STARTED AGAIN
Badminton
Ballroom Dancing
Tennis
Circuit Training
Skating
Women's Keep Fit
and many other activities are
offered free at any level of ability
Information:
Rm. 208 — Memorial Gym
or
Phone 228-3838
EDITOR: MIKE JESSEN
Ice hockey Birds
do the splits again
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds continue to split their
two game series as though it was the only way to progress, one
step forward, one step back.
The Birds won Friday's penalty-filled game with the University of Manitoba Bisons 6-3 but, although they once lead 3-2,
couldn't duplicate the feat Saturday as the Bisons came back with
two third period goals to win 4-3.
Quick tallies by Cal Botterill and Rod Lindquist vaulted
the Bisons into the lead before Wayne Hunter replied for UBC
late in the first period of Saturday's contest.
Hunter and Miles Desharnais scored early in the second
period and then UBC held on to take the 3-2 lead into the third
frame.
Lindquist netted his second goal of the game at 9:17 of the
third to pull the Bisons even and Jim Pineau finished the scoring
at 15:01 to give Manitoba the win.
The Birds were unable to get another goal as they let down
completely after the Bisons' go-ahead goal.
Penalties cost the Bisons the first game as they picked up
10 of them to UBC's seven. Scoring for the Birds were Mickey
McDowell with two, and Don Fiddler, Laurie Vanzella, Maurice
Lambert and Desharnais with one apiece. Pineau, Botterill and
Jim Bell got the Bisons' goals.
Weatherman's wrath
puts damper on sports
Rub-a-dub-dub, three sports in the mud, Or, 40 days of rain
again?
Otherwise, all the outdoor sports at UBC were cancelled
over the weekend due to a slight build-up of rain, sleet and
slush, which, together with soil, makes mud.
The powers that be, the UBC teams not-withstanding, called
off the rugby, soccer and field hockey games, thus sparing the
players a bath.
Actually, there was good reason to cancel the games.
For example, the UBC rugby Thunderbirds were to open
their new season in the Northwest Intercollegiate Conference
against Oregon State University, at home.
Of course, it only costs about a thousand dollars to send a
team on a road trip, and even a rich American university cannot
afford to risk their money in hopes that a game could possibly be
played, when they know beforehand that there is a good chance
of a washout.
But there's always next week, if the weatherman is benevolent.
Thunderless   Thunderettes
defeated in own tourneys
The Thunderettes lost both the volleyball and basketball
tournaments held at UBC on Friday and Saturday.
In volleyball, the Thunderettes placed sixth, well behind
Renfrew.
UBC fared a little better in basketball, as they lost a close
final to Victoria Rawlings, 55-46, to finish second.
Judy Douglas with 12 points and Angie Radonovich with 11,
led the Thunderettes.
~ Icurt hilger photo
chalet with coffee bar and
complete   ski-rental   facilities.
Skiing is from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. with night skiing from 6
p.m. to 10 p.m. The rope tow
is $1 for the day and the T-bar
$2.25 (student rates).
Plans are now being made
by the owners to enlarge the
slope and eventually install
another T-bar.
The fare to Revelstoke is
about $22 return by bus or
train. There is plenty of snow
and the weather is usually
good. A long weekend or
group excursion to Revelstoke
for any skier who wants to tap
the resources available would
be well worth the effort.
IN BASKETBALL
Birds upset by Bisons
By BOB BANNO
The thermometer plunged below zero, a
coyote howled and a pack of wolves were inside
the gym.
Enter an unsuspecting UBC Thunderbird
basketball team — minus injured star Ian Dixon
— and the stage was set for an upset.
The 2,500 screaming Manitobans present in
the gym weren't disappointed Friday as the Manitoba Bisons, vastly improved under rookie coach
Darwin Semotiuk, edged past UBC 79-76.
Paced by Neil Murray, the Birds managed to
hold on to a tenuous lead most of the way.
But Bison forward Eric Bartz salted it away
for Manitoba with four last-minute charity tosses.
Forward Greg Gillies led the Bisons, pouring
in 19 points while Bartz added 17 more.
High scorer for the game was UBC's Murray
with 25 points.
"We made the mistake of pressing and fast-
breaking," lamented UBC coach Peter Mullins.
"We couldn't rattle (Manitoba guard) Terry Ball."
In the Saturday rematch Mullins slowed the
pace and the ball-controlling Birds squeaked to
a narrow 73-69 victory and regained a piece of
first-place in conference standings.
Guard Phil Langley led the Birds with 18
points, mostly on long jumpers.
Murray had 17 points and rookie center
Frank Rotering added 16 points.
The superlative Ball, despite double-teaming
by the Birds, paced Manitoba with 26 points.
The UBC Junior Varsity easily defeated Kil-
larney 77-45 on Friday night at UBC. Gary Best
scored 23 points for the winners.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126152/manifest

Comment

Related Items