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The Ubyssey Jan 13, 2011

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Array Morituri te salutant SINCE 1918
♦ EIGHT FULL PAGES
♦ CANDIDATE Q&A
♦ DON'T FORGET TO VOTE!
AMS ELECTIONS
SUPPLEMENT
PULL-OUT PAGES 5-12
ENTER
THE
COLISEUM
TALENT
IS  COMING TO  THE
CHAN  CENTRE THIS
FRIDAY.  LEARN  ALL
ABOUT THE SHOW,
THE PARTICIPANTS
AND  THE TALENT
on PAGE 13. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2 011.01.13
JANUARY 13,2011
VOLUME XCII,  N°XXXI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Arshy Mann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR NEWS WRITER
Mich Cowan: mcowan@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Ginny Monaco: gmonaco@ubyssey ca
CULTURE ILLUSTRATOR
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Marie Vondracek: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
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BUSINESS
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print advertising: 604.822.1654
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PRINT AD SALES
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WEB AD SALES
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ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Samantha Jung
Karina Palmitesta
Kellan Higgins
Erika Baker
Ashleigh Murphy
Michael Chung
Paul Bucci
Josh Curran
Teresa Matich
Front cover illustration by Indiana Joel
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
7\V
^» %f^ Canadian
-r-r* qi s~^ University
roL        Press
jpe- Rainforest
Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come help
us create this baby! Learn about
layout and editing. Expect to be
fed. • Every Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
MAN RAY, AFRICAN ART AND THE
MODERNIST LENS • A groundbreaking exhibition exploring the pivotal role of photography in changing the perception of African objects from artifacts to fine art.
• Ongoing tilJan. 23, Museum
of Anthropology.
SKATING AT ROBSON SQUARE* Free
public skating rink, with skate
and helmet rentals, skate sharpening and a concession stand on
site. • Ongoing til Feb. 28, Sunday to Thursday 9am-9pm, Friday to Saturday 9am-llpm, free.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 12
REMEMBERINGTHEDISASTERIN HAITI: "VOICES FROM OUR HEARTS" • Jan.
12 will mark the first anniversary of the devastating earthquake
that struck Haiti. Over 250,000
people lost their lives and countless victims were seriously injured and handicapped. To this
day over one million are still homeless. Come spend a day in remembrance and prayer. • 7pm,
The Unitarian Church of Vancouver, 949-49h Avenue, Oak Street.
ARTS WEEK CAREERS IN THE ARTS
SYMPOSIUM • Explore your career
options at the careers symposium as part of Arts Week 2011.
• 5pm, Laserre Building.
THURSDAY, JAN. 13
STYLUS PHANTASTICUS: MYSTERY
AND EXOTICISM IN 17TH CENTURY
TRIO SONATAS • A programme of
virtuoso Trio Sonatas from the
17th century, featuring leading
musicians from Canada and the
West Coast. The programme
will include music by composers such as Schmelzer, Rosenmul-
ler, Reinecken, Erlebach, Legren-
zi, Leclair, Rebel and Clerambault.
• 5-6:30pm, Green College, free.
FILM SCREENING: SPIN THE BOTTLE
—SEX, LIES AND ALCOHOL* As part
of Sexual Assault Awareness
Month (SAAM) at UBC we invite you to join us for a screening of Spin the Bottle: Sex, Lies
and Alcohol, a film by activists,
professors and filmmakers Jean
Kilbourne and Jackson Katz. This
film discusses issues of alcohol and sexual assault and explores the roles that media play
in how we think about sex and
intoxication. A question and answer will follow with on-campus experts in sexuality, sexual assault, health and wellness.
• 6:30pm, Woodward 6, e-mail
sa.awareness@ubc.ca for more
information.
Q&A WITH MINISTER BAIRD AND
DEBORAH MEREDITH • Come by
for a chance to meet, ask questions and speak with both current and future federal politicians. Guests include Minister
John Baird and Conservative
candidate Deborah Meredith.
Free pizza will be provided. •
3:30pm, The Global Lounge, Marine Drive Residence.
FRIDAY, JAN. 14
UBC'S GOTTALENT* Be a part of history in the making—UBC's very
first campus-wide talent showcase! Watch participants as they
perform their way into your hearts
on the world-renowned stage
at the Chan Centre. Don't have
a ticket yet? Just go online and
claim one. Need more incentive
to make it down to the show?
UBC President Stephen Toope
and AMS President Bijan Ahmadian will sing a duet if all the seats
are claimed! • 8-1Opm, Chan Centre for the Performing Arts. Tickets
are by donation at the door, book
online at talent.ubc.ca.
THE AUS PRESENTS: MARDI GRAS •
What other way to end an awesome week dedicated to everything arty-farty but a Mardi Gras dance party! Dig up
your old love beads and put
on those glowsticks and face
paint because it's going to be
awesome. With winner of the
CiTR DJ contest, Vinyla Xtrax,
opening up the show, followed
by Hood Internet, be sure to
come early to dominate the
dance floor. $2.50 ciders and
beers. • Jan. 14, 8pm-12am,
SUB Ballroom. Ticket info un-
released. 19+ event.
HAITI'S HUMANITARIAN CRISIS ONE
YEAR LATER* There will be a panel
discussion and video screening
featuring local aid and solidarity activists. This event is organized by Haiti Solidarity BC and
co-sponsored by Help Hear Haiti, Hands Hearts and Minds for
Haiti at stopwarca. • 7pm, Harbour Center, 515 W. Hastings
St, call (778) 858-5179 or go to
canadahaitiaction.ca for more
information.
SATURDAY, JAN. 15
GREAT PIANO CONCERTOS • Piano
students of Corey Hamm present an evening of piano concertos by Barber, Rachmaninoff
and Liszt. • 7-9pm, UBC Music Building Recital Hall, free.
SUNDAY, JAN. 16
OPERA TEA ON THE STAGE • UBC
Opera ensemble presents their
Teach English
Abroad
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' Honey-Back Guarantee Included
* Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-343071-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
January is a busy,
busy month, as you
can see. Send us
your events while
you still can!
events@ubyssey.ca
tlT lEUBYSSEYc
newest series, Opera Teas on
the Stage, with shortened versions of operas in a cabaret setting on the stage of their new
theatre. Light refreshments are
served. • 2-4pm, UBC Old Auditorium, $20 adults, $15 students/
seniors. Reservations required,
call (604) 822-6725 to reserve.
MONDAY, JAN. 17
BREATH OFTHE WORLD • This talk,
led by David Prest, Green College Resident Member, addresses how poetry can cross the
boundaries of culture, race, gender, sexuality, politics, religion,
science and the arts. No matter
what your field of study, this interdisciplinary evening will focus
on what we have in common
through the global language of
poetry. • 8-9pm, Coach House,
Green College, free event, go
to greencollege.ca or e-mail
gc.events.©ubc.ca for more
information.
MOVIE SCREENING: INSIDE MECCA
AND THE LEGACY OF MUHAMMAD
• The UBC Muslim Students
Association is presenting two
film screenings as part of Islam
Awareness Week on campus:
Inside Mecca and The Legacy
of Muhammad. • 1-2pm and
3-5pm, Woodward 1, free.
TUESDAY, JAN. 18
LAMAREA* La Marea is an outdoor, site-specific performance
conceived by artist Mariano Pen-
sotti of Buenos Aires. Made up
of nine different scenes, audience members move freely
from street corners to illuminated store windows, creating
their own narrative. A man lies
on the ground following a motorbike accident; an insomniac
tosses and turns; a couple has
their first kiss. Projected subtitles reveal the intimate thoughts
of the characters in these poignant vignettes showcasing the
beginning of love, the end of love
and everything in between. •
Runs until Jan. 22, 7-9pm, Gastown, Zero hundred block Water St, free admission.
JABULILEI-A MONOLOGUE • An accomplished young storyteller
gives life to the struggles and
secrets of four market vendors
from Swaziland. Transforming herself into a dozen different characters, Kemiyondo Coutinho finds
the humour and resiliency in these
women who seek a way past loss
and brutality to the future. • 6:30-
8pm, Marine Drive Ballroom.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 19
CIRCA + 46 CIRCUS ACTS IN 45 MINUTES • Presented with PuSh
International Performing Arts
Festival, Circa, created from the
Brisbane, Australia-based troupe
Circa's most acclaimed works,
is an extraordinary performance
that is breathtaking, beautiful
and sexy. Impossible to forget,
the company is hailed worldwide as one of the most dynamic forces in new circus. • 7:30-
9:30pm, Freddy Wood Theatre,
rush tickets $12 for students,
2pm matinee $12.50 adult/$5
under 12 years/$25 family of
four, buy tickets online at ubc-
theatre.universitytickets.com or
call (604) 822-2678.
DEAD MAN'S CELL PHONE • An incessantly ringing cell phone in a
quiet cafe. A stranger at the next
table who has had enough. And
a dead man—with a lot of loose
ends. So begins Dead Man's Cell
Phone, a funny, affecting and often otherworldly exploration of
modern life from American play-
writing sensation, Sarah Ruhl
[The Clean House]. • Runs until
Jan. 29, 7:30-9pm, Telus Studio Theatre, $22/$15/$10, book
tickets online at ubctheatre.uni-
versitytickets.com.
ISLAM AWARENESS WEEK DISCUSSION PANEL • The UBC Muslim
Student Association presents
four different discussions as
part of Islam Awareness Week
on campus. The discussions include: Pillars of Islam and Articles of Faith, the Prophets and
the Scriptures, Women in Islam:
Oppressed or Honoured?, What
is Jihad? and Are all Muslims
Arab? A Glimpse into the Multiculturalism in Islam. • 3:30-
6pm, Woodward 2, free.
THURSDAY, JAN. 20
l-SLAM: EXPRESSED »Part of Islam
Awareness Week. Come by for
an evening of talent and breaking
misconceptions through art, featuring spoken word artist Boon-
aa Mohammed and local talents.
• 6:30-9pm, Woodward 6, $5.
WATER WARS • Water Wars features an array of water-themed
activities. With classics including joust, inner tube water polo
and water basketball, this year's
events promise to be a splash!
• 6:30pm-2am, Aquatic Centre, $80-175, register by Jan.
13, go to rec.ubc.ca for more
information.
FRIDAY, JAN. 21
ISLAM AWARENESS WEEK KEYNOTE
EVENT* Feature Lecture: The
Legacy of Muhammad: Terror
or Greatness? Featuring guest
speakers Sheikh Navaid Aziz
and Dr. Syed Ibn Iqbal. • 6:30-
9:30pm, Woodward 2, $10, $5
student discount.
SIKILIZA:ATOASTTO MAMAAFRICA
• An Afro-fusion night with performances, entertainment and a
DJ celebrating the end of Africa
Awareness Conference Week. •
7:30pm, Abdul Ladha Centre, $10
non-members, $7 regular members, $5 premium members.
SCIENCE WEEK CARNIVAL* Love the
carnival? Love happy clowns? You
don't? We don't either. No clowns
will be there. However, we do
have your favourites like a bouncy castle, popcorn and cotton
candy. If you love to bounce or
watch other people bounce, come
stuff your face and join us for a
rip roaring good time. • 12-4pm,
in front of Ladha (inside in case
of rain), free.
SUNDAY, JAN. 23
BRASSFEST! • The U BC School of
Music presents their first annual BrassFest! For brass players
of all ages and levels, featuring
guest artist and Northwestern
University professor Gail Williams. • 12pm-6pm, UBC Old
Auditorium, free pre-registration
by Friday, Jan. 21 at noon, $20
registration fee at the door, to
preregister, go to music.ubc.ca/
brassfest or e-mail brassiest®
ubc.ca.
MONDAY, JAN. 24
SCIENCE WEEK KICKOFF • The
opening ceremony for Science
Week 2011. It will feature the
talents of the Burnaby North Vikings (marching band), the UBC
Cheerleaders, a flag ceremony,
free food (and cake) and high
spirits! Join at any time by falling in step with the parade that
will be travelling around campus
starting from the Rose Garden.
More festivities will be held at
Abdul Ladha Science Student
Centre (where there will be face
painting and food). • 11am-2pm,
UBC campus, free. 2011.01.13/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT EDITOR KALYEENA MAKORTOFF»kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
Chaaban back in race
AMS Elections Committee reinstates electoral candidate
KALYEENA MAKORTOFF
kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
Presidential candidate Omar
Chaaban was reinstated to the
AMS presidential race late Tuesday evening after the AMS Elections Committee completed an
investigation regarding Chaa-
ban's incomplete nomination
form.
On Monday, January 10, Elections Administrator Erik MacKinnon had announced that Chaaban was disqualified when one
of his 50 nomination signatures
was deemed invalid. The student number of the individual
was initially found invalid by
UBC Enrollment Services. Chaaban had collected the minimum
amount of nominations, and the
questionable signature left him
with only 49 nominations, disqualifying him from participating in the AMS elections.
The student nomination in
question was ruled a legitimate member of the AMS, after re-checking their registration details. A press release issued Tuesday evening explained
that the student is no longer registered at UBC, but is attending
Corpus Christi College, an affiliate of St. Mark's College and an
affiliate of the AMS.
According to the press release, the student admitted that
their finances were not in order
and it was unclear whether their
AMS fees had been paid or not.
"On Monday Erik told me not
to worry about it and to continue
campaigning," Omar Chaaban
explained. He did continue campaigning until later that night
when he was officially disqualified. "But when I talked to the
student, she assured me she'd
paid AMS fees," Chaaban said.
"I wanted to look into it and Erik
really did his research."
MacKinnon said he contacted Director of Operations at Corpus Christi and St. Mark's Helen
Lamb who found that the fees
were transferred to the AMS from
St. Mark's College in November
2010. AMS Accounting Supervisor
Amy Lam also confirmed that the
paymenthad been received, paid
on Corpus Christi's behalf. The
nominator was assuredly "a valid member ofthe AMS and therefore a valid nominator on Omar's
nomination form."
"Erik, the elections administrator, was trying to call me all
day [but] I was in class." Chaaban got the call "right after I
finished class and he explained
to me, in great detail, the whole
thing. I was expecting him to
say that he did all he could and
GEOFF LISTER FILE PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
I was still out ofthe race, but instead he told me I was back in."
"I'm just really really happy
that I'm back in the race," said
Chaaban.
"I sincerely hope that future
candidates view this as a lesson to collect more signatures
than the minimum amount required to submit their nomination," MacKinnon said. "Thankfully this situation has worked
out for the positive, and Omar
Chaaban is free to run for the
AMS Presidency." tl
UBC student awarded Rhodes Scholarship
ERIKA BAKER
Contributor
Aneil Jaswal was having dinner at a restaurant last term
when he received the phone call
he had been waiting for: the
Rhodes Scholarship selection
decision.
The man on the phone started the conversation by talking
about how difficult of a choice
it was to select who had won the
scholarship, valued at $150,000
for educational expenses, at Oxford University. "You think it's
not a good response but you
are hopeful," Jaswal said. After the man on the phone told
him that he had won the scholarship, right there in the restaurant, his heart jumped.
Jaswal contacted his parents
with the good news, but had no
idea how excited they were until he returned home to Vernon,
BC for the winter break. Family members had created a banner and t-shirts to celebrate his
achievement, a reaction Jaswal
didn't expect.
Jaswal shared his story
with The Ubyssey over coffee
and laughed at the unforeseen
Aneil Jaswal, Rhodes Scholarship winner. JOSH CURRAN PH0T0/THE
UBYSSEY
situation. He will be one of 11
Rhodes Scholars from Canada
studying at Oxford University
next September, where he intends to study global health science, global governance diplomacy or public health in the
form of two masters or a PhD.
Jaswal is no stranger to his
fields of interest. He has had the
privilege to intern with the World
Health Organization in Geneva,
as well as conduct research in
Nairobi where he helped investigate how cell phone use can
improve health results in HIV
patients. Jaswal also worked with
Social Capital Partners, a national not-for-profit social finance
organization.
Jaswal is currently a fourth-
year Land and Food Systems
student enrolled in the Global Resource Systems program.
During his time at UBC, Jaswal
has taken advantage ofthe campus community through investing his time with STAND Darfur, creating an online course
for Health Sciences Online and
leading a Student Directed Seminar on trade, aid and international health.
"UBC is a big place and the
size is a bit of a challenge at first,
but over the years I've learned
how to take advantage of it and
just enjoy it all," Jaswal said.
With only a few months left until he graduates, Jaswal has been
thinking of building a bucket
list of things he wants to take
part in on campus before leaving for Oxford, such as participating in Storm the Wall and
exploring Pacific Spirit Park.
Jaswal is thankful for the relationships he has built at UBC
and is getting ready to graduate
and begin his new adventure, va
NEWS BRIEFS
MAN ATTACKED NEAR UBC
Police are investigating a Monday
morning attack on a 31-year-old man
in the 4700-block of West Fifth Avenue near Blanca Street, accord-
ng to CTV.
Const. Lindsey Houghton said
that the victim is currently in critical condition and has multiple injuries, adding that police knew the
victim and that the victim knew
his attacker.
CTV captured footage of a substantial amount of blood smeared
on the outside wall of a residence
Police say that a baseball bat might
have been used in the attack
CANDIDATES WITHDRAW FROM
BOARD, VP EXTERNAL RACES
As some candidates moved forward with their campaigns in the
2011 AMS Elections, others ceased
their involvement altogether.
Sean Cregten and Mike Silley
have both resigned from the Board
of Governors (BoG) race. Silley is
still a contender in the VP Administration race.
In addition, Noam Chomsky, who
has no relation and bears no resem-
blence to the real professor and philosopher, has withdrawn his name
from the VP External race. Accord-
ng to the AMS Elections Twitter
account, Weina Zhou has removed
herself from the Senate race due
to personal reasons
UBC DOCTORS FIND LINK BETWEEN DOWN'S SYNDROME AND
ALZHEIMER'S
UBC researchers have discovered
the genetic mechanism responsible for development of Alzheimer's Disease in both the genera
public and those who have Down's
Syndrome
According to a UBC press release, excessive production of
Regulator of Calcineurin 1 (RCAN1)
is the catalyst for a chain reaction that eliminates neurons in the
cortex and hippocampus in people with Alzheimer's and Down's
Syndrome
The researchers say that this is a
potential new target for drugs that
treat dementia in those patients
"We can develop therapies that
nterfere with the gene's ability to
produce that protein, and hopefully
short-circuit the destruction of brain
cells," said Dr. Weihong Song, Canada Research Chair and professor
of psychiatry at UBC
CELLPHONE USE IN CLASSROOM
PROMOTED IN NEW PROGRAM
Top Hat Monocle, a company founded by recent engineering graduates,
has created a program that utilizes both computers and mobile
devices in the classroom to increase communication between
students and professors. Seeking
to revitalize and update the student experience, they developed
MonocleCAT, software that allows for interactive participation
through quizzes and polls created
by instructors. Founders of the
program say they have tracked a
five to seven per cent grade increase with software use in the
classroom
Launched at the University of
Waterloo last year, usage will be
expanded to Wilfred Laurier University this semester. Va 4/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/2011.01.13
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ubyssey. cal volunteer!
submit-a-comic.
VIRGINIE MENARD |
production@ubyssey.ca
tlTHEUBYSSEYca
January 20 to 29 - 7:30 pm
TELUS Studio Theatre
Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, UBC
NEW! buy online at theatreubcca
COME TO SUB 23 FOR
jJtec flOnjsfc
(WHILE SUPPLIES LAST)
Want to volunteer? Productions are on Wednesday
and Sunday afternoons. Free dinner ifyou come!
U THEUBYSSEYc
Justin mcelroy | coordinating@ubysseyca
Got a Great ^f
Science Instructor?
Let Us Know.
Every year the Faculty of Science awards
five Killam Teaching Prizes to acknowledge
excellence in undergraduate teaching and to
promote the importance of science education.
This is your chance to reward outstanding teaching
and to acknowledge a professor, instructor or lecturer
who has inspired you. All it takes is a letter.
P
Students, alumni or faculty members
can send a signed nomination letter to:
Killam Teaching Awards Committee
Dean of Science Office
Biological Sciences Building
1S05-6270 University Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z4
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III 6/UBYSSEY.CA/ELECTIONS/2011.01.13
AMS
QUESTIONS FORTHE AMS
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES
1. What specific qualities suit you for the position of AMS President?
2. What is the proper relationship the AMS should have with the university?
3. If you could only accomplish one specific initiative next year, what would it
be?
4. Assuming the AMS doesn't have enough funds, what are the core functions
of the AMS that must be preserved? And what would be first to go?
5. UBC will soon begin discussions to move to a new governance model for
non-academic lands. How should students be represented in this?
WHAT DOES THE AMS PRESIDENT DO?
The President of the AMS is the leader and spokesman of
UBC's student society. As such, they chair the executive
committee and oversee the actions of the vice-presidents,
are responsible for setting the agenda of council meetings and typically choose a few areas to focus their time
and energy each year.
5th Year Arts
1. A PRESIDENT NEEDS TO BE A CONFIDENT
SPEAKER.ACAPABLETEAMLEADERANDHAVE
HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR THEMSELF AND THE
AMS. I believe that I have all of these qualities and that I have demonstrated them
well during my time at UBC.
In my opinion, my past experience best
qualifies me for the position of AMS President. During my two years on Council I
have demonstrated, time and time again,
my ability to mediate, be the voice of reason, build consensus and educate those
around me. I have not been afraid to stand
up for what I believe in and I have always
worked to make the AMS an accessible,
relatable place. I have always strived to
do what is best for students and put the
AMS at the top of my priorities.
I know it all sounds stupidly cheesy, but
I am being honest here. I've spent the last
five years at UBC working towards this
point, and I'm not quite done. I guess it's
this dedication that best suits me to be
President.
2.THE AMS AND UBC HAVEALONG AND COLOURFUL HISTORYTOGETHER, AND HAVE SPENTTHE
BETTER PART OF A CENTURY WORKING TO MAKE
LIFE BETTER FOR STUDENTS.
I feel that the proper relationship is one
of mutual respect, of collaboration and of
openness and honesty. We are all here for
the same reason, to make things better,
but often times we have different opinions of what that entails. It is this diversity of opinion that increases the level of
debate and ultimately translates to a better campus.
Essentially, the AMS should take advantage of every opportunity to work and
collaborate with the university, but should
never be afraid to openly speak its mind.
UBC prides itself on being a diverse campus, where constructive dialogue and debate are encouraged and all possibilities
explored, and our relationship should be
no different.
3. OBVIOUSLY IT WOULD BE THE FEE REFERENDUM. The AMS, like the rest of the world,
had been riding the coattails of uninterrupted growth for the last 20 years, but
has now been faced with reality—we cannot rely entirely on our businesses. Our
fees are amongst the lowest in the country and if the AMS is to even maintain its
historic levels of spending, we need to seriously address our fees.
Passing this referendum would be one
of the biggest accomplishments for the
JEREMY MCELROY
AMS since the fee referendum in 1982,
and would guarantee financial stability,
at least for the near future. If the referendum fails, ensuring financial sustainability through all possible means stays
priority one.
4.IDLIKET0STAYP0SITIVEANDSAYTHATWE
WON'T RUN INTOTHIS PROBLEM, BUTIFWE DID
NEED TO MAKE CUTS NEXT YEAR.THEY WOULD
BE DETRIMENTALTO THE FUNCTIONING OFTHE
AMS. Even if we take out computer and
hardware upgrades, furniture, committee and council food, conference allowances and exec benefits, council orientation weekend, all project spending in
all portfolios, all lobbying and we were to
leave CASA, we would still not even balance the budget. Most people don't realize that the student government budget
is already pretty tight around the middle.
We had to make more than $200,000
in cuts this year, and we will likely have to
make $250,000 next year to balance. This
is a systemic problem, not overspending
or financial mismanagement on the part of
the AMS. I do not want to have to determine what must be preserved and what
must be cut, because everything the AMS
does is essential.
5. WHILE I KNOW THAT STUDENTS ARE RELATIVELY WELL REPRESENTED ON THE AMS AND
THAT 0URTW0 STUDENT BOG REPS DO A FANTASTIC JOB, THESE ARE HARDLY REAL MUNICIPAL MECHANISMS. We will likely be looking
at the establishment of a community advisory board of sorts, on which the AMS
will likely have a seat, in addition to the
UNA, UEL and maybe GSS. This board
would provide input to the BoG for final
approval, before Royal Assent at the provincial level.
If this model is to be adopted, the best
way for students to be represented would
be through the AMS. The institutional
memory of the organization, not to mention the staffing and resources available,
allow the AMS to be a more effective
mechanism for representation than, say,
students independently elected at-large.
Given the number of student groups
living on this campus, like those in residence and living in Panhellenic House and
the Greek Village, the AMS will have to
do a much better job liaising with these
groups if we are all to be effectively represented, but I think that the AMS is the
best option for best representing students
in whichever governance model is chosen.
1.1WASTHE VICE PRESIDENTOFTHE CANADIAN
ARAB FEDERATION, WHICH LOBBIES THE GOVERNMENT AND VARIOUS GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS. I was in charge ofthe BC chapter
and through this job I gained experience
in talking to politicians and ministers. As
President of SPHR (an AMS club), I developed excellent relations with the university president and administration.
I know the position very well and I know
what I am fighting for.
2. IT SHOULD BE A RELATIONSHIP BASED ON
MODERATION. Not too antagonistic and not
too friendly. The AMS is a student union
and should behave as such. Its job is to
fight for whatever the students want regardless of the university's position. Having said that, there is no need for the AMS
to be hostile to the university.
3. LOWERING TUITION FEES IS GOING TO BE MY
TOP PRIORITY.
4. THIS WOULD NOT BE THE FIRST OPTION TO
CONSIDER. Before considering ridding
the AMS of core functions, the president, the execs and the AMS Council
have to come up with alternative methods to come up with funding. The students at UBC pay an immense amount
of tuition fees (more than what is needed), and there is no reason for the AMS
to fall in such a problem.
Falling in this problem reflects
nothing but poor leadership and
short-sightedness.
5. COUNCIL WILL HAVE THE THE UPPER HAND
WHEN IT COMES TO THIS ISSUE. It is a very
important issue and students must be
very involved in the project. By holding meetings and discussion with students who are very interested in the issue, I believe that the AMS can come
up with policies that properly reflect
student opinions.
1. MY COMMUNICATION SKILLS, VISION AND
STRATEGIC THINKING, MY UNDERSTANDING OF
STUDENT INVOLVEMENT ON CAMPUS.
2. THE AMS SHOULD HAVE A RELATIONSHIP
THAT IS CONSTRUCTIVE WITH THE UNIVERSITY. We are both here to serve students and
I do believe we must collaborate to ensure
that this mission is fulfilled year in year out.
Having said this, it is in students' interests
to make sure the university takes students'
views into account when making decisions
and this is where the role of the AMS President, student senators and Board of Governors is crucial in making sure students' voices are at the table during those discussions.
3.1 WOULD LIKE TO TACKLETHE LACK OF KNOWLEDGE THE AVERAGE STUDENT HAS ABOUT THE
AMS: ITS FUNCTI0NS.THE SERVICES IT OFFERS
AND H0WTHEY CAN GET INVOLVED. Hacks will
tell you "students don't care." I don't believe it. Students don't know and because
of this, when they hear about the AMS
it's always petty politics in their eyes, and
who wants to hear about the problems
of an organization that is supposed to be
doing more than squabbling? This is not
to say the AMS doesn't do anything for
students, and I believe the AMS serves
a great purpose, but it has no avenues to
tell students what it's up to, share its success stories or let students thank or complain. So I would like to set up communication channels for this very purpose.
A weekly AMS newsletter/video newsletter sent by email, a monthly print edition
and a weekly blog space for executives and
committees to share what they're working
on. These can be set up on The Ubyssey
website. It's not shouting the loudest to
get your voice heard; you must go where
your brand is being talked about and join
the conversation.
4. THIS IS A DIFFICULT QUESTION BECAUSE I
BELIEVE THE CORE FUNCTIONS OF THE SOCIETY ARE THOSE WHICH ALIGN DIRECTLY WITH
THE STRATEGIC FRAMEW0RK0FTHE AMS AND
THE ONES WHICH ARE MOST EFFECTIVE AT IMPROVING AND ENRICHING THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE. I have not had a chance to look
over the entire budget and I think this is
something that my entire exec team and
council would look over and make that
decision together. Having said this, I believe that all budgets should be re-evaluated and trimmed where necessary to
cut down on waste. But once we communicate to students the importance of
such services and how a free referendum will ensure that we keep and or increase what the AMS can offer, then we
will be better off in the long run.
5. AGAIN, ITISESSENTIALTHAT STUDENTS HAVE
A VOICE IN THESE DISCUSSIONS AND THAT WE
STRIVE TO MAKE SURE THAT THE DECISIONS
MADE WILL BE BENEFICIALTO STUDENTS. I believe the AMS should work closely with
our student senators and Board of Governors to take the best advantage of this
new government structure if that decision is made.
<
333333
JEREMICHAELMOLLERY
Jeremichael Mollery, a joke candidate
portrayed by Isaac Rosenberg, did not respond to our questions. However, he did
leave us with the following comments.
My name is Jeremichael Molleroy and I
am running for the position of the 102nc
president of the Alma Mater Society (that's
the AMS) at UBC (that's the University of
British Columbia). I am in my fourth year
of a double major in Political Science and
Commerce and my GPA (that's grade point
average) is really high. I am currently the
great leader of a really cool frat and president of a council that does lots of really
great things for you and all students every day.
Ifyou elect me as your president I promise to lead with cutting edge leadership, cooperate endlessly, and communicate loudly. I will blah blah blah SUSTAINABILITY,
and blah blah blah IF blah blah and then
LEADERSHIP blah blah PARTNERSHIP. I
blah blah INCREASED COMMUNICATION
blah blah blah LACK OF ACCOUNTABILITY. More TRANSPARENCY blah blah blah.
With my EXPERIENCE blah blah blah and
the WAR ON FUN blah blah. My VISION
is blah blah blah MODERATION blah blah
and RESULTS. MY BEARD!
I can see SFU from my backyard, so blah
blah blah maverick and blah blah.
The AMS needs Yes We Can, so vote
for me and I Will. AMS
2011.01.13/UBYSSEY.CA/ELECTIONS/7
QUESTIONS FORTHEVP FINANCE CANDIDATES
1. How reliant should the AMS be on revenues from its businesses?
2. What level of financial independence should AMS subsidiaries, such as Resource Groups, CiTR and faculty associations, possess?
3. Events, such as Block Party and Welcome Back, have been financially flagging for the past couple of years. How would you rectify that?
3rd Year Arts
ELIN
TAYYAR
DTHEAMSNEEDSTO BE WORRIED ABOUTBUSI-
NESS VOLATILITY.
Over 48.6 per cent of our budget this
year relied on business contributions. This
reliance on businesses is simply too much.
We are seeing the consequences this year
as we see our businesses not meeting our
expectations as well as the economic situation and HST—external factors with a
lot of impact.
It is important to note that this year, I introduced a change in code to protect AMS
Services from this volatility, leaving only
the Student Government, Events and Programs subject to the uncertainty.
Also, because ofthe growth in population at UBC over the years, our businesses have grown. This growth has covered
income lost due to inflation. But now enrollment has stabilized and we can no longer rely on growth in businesses to continue. This fact reaffirms my argument for
less reliance on business profits.
Students have made significant investments in the past in our businesses like
the Pit Pub or the Whistler Lodge renovations a few years ago. And we are expecting returns on these investments. Essentially, we should always aim to run efficient and effective businesses to make
money for our student society.
We need to decrease our dependence
on business profits to ensure stability—
but still make sure our businesses are performing well.
2) FIRST, CITR ISN'T AN AMS SUBSIDIARY. It's
a separate organization. However, they
do pay to use our financial systems.
As for the other subsidiary wings of the
AMS, it is clear that the AMS has legal
jurisdiction over them. The AMS should
clarify general rules and guidelines for
clubs, faculty associations and Resource
Groups—but should refrain from directing spending.
This is our current practice. We oversee
the finances of over 360 clubs, constituencies and other wings of the AMS. We are
responsible for ensuring that all transactions
that go through us are legal and well-recorded—as we are audited every year.
Which is why this year, we have frozen over 20 club accounts (with subsequent de-constitution of the majority) and
the Arts Undergraduate Society account
(for a lack of a budget), as well as putting temporary holds on dozens of transactions due to complaints and concerns
raised by members of the relevant club,
constituency or resource group.
Since I am responsible for all AMS transactions, I have personally initiated most of
these. I think it is imperative that the VP
Finance makes sure all of the society's finances are in good order, but should not
attempt to direct their spending.
3) UNFORTUNATELY, AT THIS POINT WE CANNOT AFFORD TO THROW LARGE-SCALE EVENTS
THAT LEAD TO A LOSS OF OVER $100,000. A solution, I see, is to throw parties that host local bands/DJs and seek sponsorships for the
more expensive bands. The problem with our
current situation is that there is just one person (and some part-time assistants) responsible for coordinating and throwing these parties. We don't have the human resources to
do aggressive sponsorship search, marketing and promotions and the selling of tickets.
This year, the executives thought there
should be one executive responsible for Block
Party and Welcome Back. This one executive would be in charge of working with the
events manager to explore sponsorship opportunities and modes of student promotion.
Something like this would require an overhaul
of the executive portfolios. This is something
that is currently being looked at by consultants.
WHAT DOES THE VP FINANCE DO?
The VP Finance is responsible for the financial affairs of the AMS, including overseeing the society's multi-million dollar budget. As the VP Finance takes office in
February and the budget comes out in the summer, it's a quicker transition time
for this position than most. In addition, the VP Finance oversees the finances of
the businesses and services the AMS runs out of the SUB, working with various
managers to ensure they are financially solvent and valuable for students. They
are also a signing officer for the AMS, treasurer for CiTR, AMS Events, Council
and the Resource Groups. They are responsible for overseeing the sustainability portfolio and are a member of a variety of UBC committees.
TAYYAR VS EHTESHAMI
EHTESHAMI
1. IN A PERFECT WORLD, OUR AMS WOULD BE
COMPLETELY INDEPENDENT FROM OUR BUSINESSES, while gaining a substantial surplus from any revenues they make. The
reality of the situation, though, is that the
AMS has become overly dependant on
business revenues and has for the most
part neglected market fluctuations and
student spending. Having nearly 50 per
cent of our funding dependant on a small
number of restaurants is not only ignorant,
but also dangerous for the financial health
of our society.
2. SINCETHE AFOREMENTIONED GROUPS ARE
SUBSIDIARIES OFTHE AMS and receive funding from every student on campus, I believe that spending needs to be made in
accountability to the AMS as a governing body to ensure transparency to students. To ensure fiscal responsibility,
the subsidiaries should be aware that
they, too, hold a responsibility to every
student on campus on how their funds
are allocated. They have to be accountable to the Finance Office, as is every
club that submits their budget to the
AMS for approval.
3. ONE OFTHE KEY ELEMENTS IN ENSURING THAT
THEWELCOMEBACKBBQANDTHEBLOCKPAR-
TY DO NOT BECOME FINANCIAL BURDENS ON
THE SOCIETYISTO PROPERLY BUDGETFORTHEM
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE TERM. Before the
January 12 AMS meeting, no money has
been budgeted to the Block Party, leading many to believe that the Block Party
may crumble under the financial pressures
it is faced with. In addition to that, we do
not hold our AMS events accountable to
our budget, and as VP Finance I will make
sure that our events are sustainable and
not a drain on our resources. One of the
best ways to do this is to employ a strategic plan with the events team and work
with them to undertake a cost-benefit analysis and budget accordingly. I will strive
to search for creative solutions that continue to add value to these events, including proper means of marketing that result
in the success of these events.
VP FINANCE HOTLY CONTESTED
Though usually seen as a low-key administrative position, the VP Finance position was in the public eye this past year
due to the AMS's financial crisis and a
controversial decision to temporarily
hold a resource group's $700 donation.
ABOVE: Arash Ehteshami. BELOW: Elm Tayyar. GEOFF LISTER PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
COACH'S CORNERi
___m   & ~ *~^m
f      f            ™
Tom Dvorak
VP Finance, 2009-2010
UBC students, who do you want to trust with over $20 million of your money? That's the question you need to answer in the upcoming AMS VP Finance
election.
Integrity is the most important thing to look for in a candidate in this role,
followed closely by an ability to be the bad guy. Currently there's a hefty deficit that is driven heavily by the fact that you, the consumer, haven't been frequenting the Gallery, Blue Chip, Bernoulli's, PiR2, Patio BBQ, Honour Roll, Pit,
Burger Bar, Pendulum, the AMS Whistler Lodge and AMS Catering nearly as
much you used to. There's been huge progress in cost cutting this year, but
further work is needed.
Saying no to budget requests from staff and peers can be antagonizing, so
once you're comfortable with a candidate's ethics, double check their anatomy for a spine. 8/UBYSSEY.CA/ELECTIONS/2011.01.13
AMS
VP EXTERNAL
QUESTIONS FORTHE AMSVP EXTERNAL CANDIDATES
1. There are two provincial leadership elections happening right now. What policies should the AMS be pushing to have changed?
2. What should the AMS prioritize, provincial or federal lobbying?
3. Because of the nature of lobbying, VP External is often a difficult position in which to point to specific accomplishments. How
do you measure the success of the VP External position?
3rd Year Arts
1. A STRONG VP EXTERNAL WILL BE ABLE TO
CAPITALIZE ON THE TWO PROVINCIAL LEADERSHIP ELECTIONS BECAUSE POLICIES CAN BE
PUSHED TO THE FOREFRONT OF POLITICAL DEBATES, ESPECIALLY ISSUES THAT HAVE BEEN
SIMMERING FOR YEARS. Students, parents
and politicians all know that the student
loan program is deeply flawed, and as VP
External I will make sure that both political parties understand that this is an issue that can no longer be ignored. Reforms need to happen to make the student loan program more accessible and
to lift the burden off of students. This
can be accomplished through changes
to what constitutes a liquid asset, the repayment program, extending the pay back
period and discussions about decreasing
the interest rate that currently sits at 2.5
per cent plus prime. These issues are already being talked about within the province, and that is because these are the
reforms that students need results on,
and I intend as AMS VP External to push
for these changes to be accomplished.
KATHERINE TYSON
2. WHILE FEDERAL LOBBYING HAS GIVEN THE
AMS ACCESS TO A LOT OF INFORMATION AND
OPPORTUNITIES, THERE IS NO EXCUSE FOR
THE NEGLECT OF PROVINCIAL LOBBYING. The
province has jurisdiction over and controls the resources for UBC and the VP
External's lobbying efforts are most effective when focused on provincial lobbying. I will prioritize student-centric lobbying at the provincial level.
3.THE SUCCESS OFTHE VP EXTERNAL POSITION
CAN BE MEASURED IN BOTH SOFT AND HARD
TERMS. The soft successes include the
more intangible accomplishments such
as the establishment of working relationships with government and external organizations. The hard successes are more
concrete and include achievements such
as Translink commitments or student loan
reform. I will measure my success based
on both the building of relationships that
benefit the AMS and the results I achieve
for students.
WHAT DOES THE VP EXTERNAL DO?
The VP External is in charge of lobbying different levels of government
to advocate for policies on behalf of UBC students. This is done in a
variety of ways—meeting with politicians, preparing policy documents,
working with other student associations—but the specific policies the
VP External wants to pursue are up to him or her. Previous VP Externals
have focused on lowering tuition, reforming student loans and building
better relationships with other student unions.
2nd Year Arts
RORY
Katherine Tyson teaches the gang how hardball is played. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
BREASAIL
1. THE RELATIVE WEAKNESS OF BOTH PROVINCIAL PARTIES RIGHT NOW PRESENTS A UNIQUE
OPPORTUNITY FOR UBC STUDENTS. The AMS
needs to take advantage of this by pushing for a tuition freeze, a reinstatement
and expansion of the Child Care Operating Fund, a student financial assistance
program that focuses more on grants and
iess on loans, adoption of the federal Repayment Assistance Plan and the lowering of the BC student loan interest rate to
the prime interest rate.
2.THEAMS SHOULD PRIORITIZE PROVINCIAL LOBBYING OVER FEDERAL FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS. As the province's largest university UBC has a lot more sway at the provincial level and can make greater demands
on the political institutions of BC. It is the
provincial government that is to blame for
the devastating increases to tuition fees
at UBC over the last decade in addition
to cuts made to the Child Care Operating
Fund, so they are the ones to lobby. Further because the BC NDP and BC Liberal
parties are in the middle of a leadership
transition and they are more likely to be
influenced by our lobbying efforts.
3. DELIVERABLE RESULTS IN ATERM ARE GOOD
BUT NOT ALWAYS FEASIBLE. This is in part
due to the quick turnover as well as the
fact that each and every VP External has
different ideas about which lobbying policies ought to be given priority. I think
something that can be said is that even
though there are always going to be policy differences between incoming and outgoing Externals, a new VP would be remiss to not build on the relationships already developed by their predecessor. I
think it is in the development and utilization of these relationships—whether they
are with the UBC administration on child
care or other BC student unions on tuition or SFA—that one can best measure
an External's success.
4th Year Arts
MITCH
I      WRIGHT
1. THE SIMPLEST AND MOST EFFECTIVE POLICY CHANGES THAT CAN BE ADVOCATED FOR
ARE: the restoration of capital funding
for childcare facilities, allowing for more
care spaces and alleviating the burden
on student parents; an immediate increase in BC's minimum wage, which
sits below that of every other province
in the country; and reforming Studen-
tAid BC, tying it to the Canada Student
Loans Program and amending how financial need is assessed. All of these
reforms can be accomplished quickly and will allow post-secondary education to become more accessible for
everyone.
2. WHILE THERE MAY BE A FEDERAL ELECTION
FAST APPROACHING, A UNIQUE POLITICAL CLIMATE HAS COME ABOUT IN BC, WITH BRAND
NEW LEADERSHIP COMING IN FOR BOTH THE
LIBERALS AND THE NDP. If ever there was
a time in which the AMS could have the
most powerful effect on policies important to students, it is now. There are windows of opportunity to reform the policy areas I mentioned above, and with
reasoned, researched arguments, we
can usher in changes and make British
Columbia an affordable place to pursue
post-secondary education once again.
3. A SUCCESSFUL VP EXTERNAL SHOULD BE
ABLETOPOINTTO TANGIBLE PROGRESS MADE
OVERTHE COURSE OF HIS OR HERTERM. With
lobbying for policy changes, the reality is
that you often won't get what you want;
the results are often in the hands of other actors, but if one is able to lobby effectively on behalf of students and put
together well-researched, effective campaigns, then in my view that is a complete success. What our office has done
this year is set up an invaluable resource
for future External offices to draw upon
in their own lobbying efforts to make education more affordable.
COACH'S CORNER
Stefanie Ratjen
VP External, 2008-2009
There's some truth that an AMS Council position pads a
resume. Government representatives love photo-ops with
"Student Leaders," and there is no shortage of opportunities to 'make connections' when elections are pending. If you're involved with AMS Council, you'll probably
be spending a lot of time with people who are a little too
excited about starting a trendy tie or cufflink collection.
Council meetings can be pretty frustrating, and the actual coolness points for participation are minimal.
What's often missed is the huge potential to work toward
changes that will benefit people long after a term is over.
But these cases can, and do, happen—take the U-Pass,
the AMS Sustainability Strategy, Humanities 101, or even
Sprouts, as examples. If the VP External is doing their job,
they will be supporting student interests through community and structural advocacy around issues like lowering tuition
and improving funding for students, while working toward a
more accessible and equitable learning environment at UBC. M JMIildCTil AMS
2011.01.13/UBYSSEY.CA/ELECTIONS/9
WHAT DOES THE VP ACADEMIC DO?
The VP Academic and University Affairs is in charge of overseeing both the
AMS's policy on academic life at UBC and issues specific to campus governance.
As such, the VP Academic sits on a host of boards and committees, the most
important perhaps being a seat on the University Neighbourhoods Association
(UNA). He or she is also nominally the head of the AMS's budget committee.
The VP Academic typically employs a number of part-time commissioners
and associates who focus on specific areas of interest and advocate to the
university. In previous years, these issues have included campus housing, the
UBC Farm, teaching evaluations, the 'war on fun,' first-year seminars and governance on campus.
4th Year Science
MATT PARSON
1. THERE ARE SEVERAL ISSUES WITH OUR CURRENT STRUCTURE FORTHE SUMMER SEMESTER.
Among them are issues of sustainability,
variety and space in curriculum offerings,
structure of courses and a lack of student
life on campus. Currently, our campus sits
largely unused for four months of the year
which is a waste of resources. Students
are either unable to find a seat in their
desired course or simply cannot find a
course they want to take during the summer. Summer courses as they are currently structured are highly compressed, creating long classes on multiple days during
the week. As a result, this creates a barrier for students who rely on full-time work
during the summer to pay tuition. And finally, with few students on campus, student life ceases to exist for four months,
reinforcing stereotypes about the transient
nature of students; a source of endless
problems in achieving the type of campus planning that students want to see.
2. THE EXTENT TO WHICH THE LAND USE PLAN
(LUP) WILL BENEFIT STUDENTS IS DIFFICULTTO
ANSWERINABSOLUTETERMSATTHISPOINTIN
TIME. As a result of these amendments, the
future of the area known as Gage South (the
current bus loop and Maclnnes field area)
will ultimately determine the effect on the
students at UBC. Recently relabelled as an
"Area Under Review," discussion overthe
issue has been postponed in the hopes of
having the other portions of the new LUP
emphasized and passed. An opportunity for
student input has been created and a proactive stance needs to be taken by the AMS
to ensure proper representation ofthe students' need to the university. Whether the
amendments to the LUP prove to be positive or negative rests solely on the extent
to which the University listens.
3. WITH MORE AND MORENON-UBC AFFILIATED
RESIDENTS MOVING ONTO CAMPUS.THE VOICE
OFTHE STUDENTS MUSTN'T BE DROWNED OUT.
In order to ensure student representation,
the AMS must work towards developing
a unified message from the student body
through effective student opinion polls. In
this act of mobilizing the student's voice,
the AMS will be better positioned, being
able to leverage a united student body.
As the numbers of non-affiliates populate the campus, the AMS will also need
to begin discussions with them in order
to develop harmonious relations. In addition, a mutual understanding amongst all
is necessary to ensure that UBC is seen
as a campus first and foremost to ultimately preserve our student culture.
QUESTIONS FORTHE VP ACADEMIC CANDIDATES
1. What is one academic initiative that you'd like to
move forward on in the next year?
Do you believe that the land use plan amendments
proposed by the university will ultimately benefit
students?
More and more non-UBC affiliated residents are
moving onto campus. As the face of campus
changes, how should the AMS position itself?
f5j
4lh Year (Dual Major) ^H|
Justin Yang plans his next move in the AMS council chambers. GEOFFLISTERPHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
1. WHILE IT'S DIFFICULTTO PIN DOWN ONLYONE
ACADEMIC INITIATIVE, I REALLY WANT TO ENGAGE THE UNIVERSITY TO BETTER EXECUTE ITS
VISION FOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. UBC
is a world-class institution in terms of research output, and faculty and administrators alike have expressed the need to involve research as an integral part of a UBC
degree. The recent closure of the Undergraduate Research Office has been detrimental to the burgeoning undergraduate
research culture but much can be done in
a partnership between the AMS and the
university to mitigate the negative aspects
of the execution of URO while drawing
strengths from both sides. The Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference, for example, is a great place to
start to seek common ground.
2.1 BELIEVETHATTHE SPIRIT OFTHE LAND USE
PLAN AMENDMENTS ARE CERTAINLY INTENDED TO BENEFIT STUDENTS—we are among
their largest group of stakeholders and
their commitment is our postsecondary
education above all else. That is not to
say, however, that these changes are
uniformly beneficial to students—circumstances change and new contexts
may arise at any time. The best things
that students have gained from this process, however, have been a newfound
cause for engagement with the university and a fledgling partnership that situates students advantageously among
university administrators.
3. THE AMS IS UNIQUELY POSITIONED TO ACT
AS THE AGGREGATE VOICE OF STUDENTS ON
CAMPUS, articulating student needs to
University officials. As such, the AMS
needs to increase its political legitimacy
- it will not be able to advocate on behalf
of those whom it represents if no one
truly believes that the AMS is a representative body. Infighting among councilors and executives needs to stop; students at-large need to believe that their
elected officials are effective, accountable and empowered.
Alh Year Arts
WAN
1. THE CURRENT UBC EQUITY OFFICE DOES NOT
PROVIDE FULL CONFIDENTIALITY AND ONLY HAS
THE CAPACITYTO ACT AS AREFERRAL AND MEDIATION SERVICE. Presently, students seeking to appeal their grades or issues complaints are simply told to re-contact their
professors, and this can be a dead-end
if professors are unsympathetic or if students require confidentiality. As VP Academic, I want to lobby for a more effective
Equity Office that has the power and resources to actively advocate for students
facing discrimination. Improving the Equity Office must be a priority because an
enriching learning experience can only be
achieved if students' rights to a safe and
respectful academic space are protected.
2. THE RECENT AMENDMENTS WILL ONLY BENEFIT STUDENTS IF THE AMS REMAINS VIGILANT
ABOUT HOW LAND USE DESIGNATIONS ARE APPLIED. The Gage South area remains under
review and we need to ensure that the interests of students are not ignored by the
Board of Governors. Market housing development in Gage South would interrupt key
aspects of student life, from athletics, to
concert events and future transit development. Similarly, the 'Green Academic' designation for the UBC Farm is a meaningless gre-
enwash that does nothing to guarantee the
status of this leading sustainability resource.
We also need to remain vigilant about the
proposed 'Village Centre Academic,' and ensure that it will in fact be marketed towards
students and low income renters.
3. FIRST, IT IS IMPORTANT FOR THE AMS TO
RECOGNIZE THAT, BECAUSE UBC IS ON UNCEDED MUSQUEAM TERRITORY, THE MUSQUEAM
COMMUNITY IS AN IMPORTANT STAKEHOLDER IN ANY DISCUSSION OF CAMPUS LAND USE.
In order to have productive discussions
about the future of U BC campus, the AMS
needs to be willing to work with not only
the BoG and the UNA, but also with marginalized communities. Second, the AMS
needs to take a firm position promoting affordable and sustainable student housing
over commercial development.
COACH'S CORNER
Alex Lougheed
VP Academic, 2008-2009
The VP Academic and University Affairs position is best described as
the role that takes on "everything
else." Sometimes clumped as the
VP with campus local governance,
student academic interests and the
campus climate and culture, the VP
Academic must be detail-oriented,
aware and organized.
It's an office with a proud history
that needs to continue the efforts
of years past, such as increasing
housing spaces (see: commitments
to house thousands more students),
campus planning (see: revisioning of
Gage South) and an increased focus
on local childcare (see: AMS, UNA,
UBC funding over $2 million towards
more spaces).
The big issue this time around continues to be campus governance.
Readers of The UbysseywiW be aware
of the power struggle for university
lands. The conflict of interest UBC
holds as mayor, landlord, service provider, employer and tutor for most
people on the peninsula is showing itself more and more to be inappropriate. Our next VP Academic will have to ensure that neither
students nor academics are left out
of a new system. An astute VP Academic will cut through false narratives, such as this being an issue of
academic freedom, and push for an
institution which is an accountable
congregation of academics.
A strong relationship directly with
the provincial government will be key. UBYSSEY.CA/ELECTIONS/2011.01.13
QUESTIONS FORTHEVPADMIN CANDIDATES
1. The major aspects of the new SUB have been dealt with. What are
ways that you'll continue to involve students in the process leading
up to the new SUB?
2. The referendum may include a $3 club fee. How should that potential
fund be used?
3. Over the next three years, while students are still in this building,
what are some improvements that could be made to the current
SUB?
5th Year Arts
MIKE SILLEY
AM
VP ADMIN
WHAT DOES THE VP ADMIN DO?
The VP Administration's primary task is overseeing the building of the new
$110 million Student Union Building (SUB), scheduled to be completed by
September 2014. He or she chairs the New SUB Committee and works closely with the architects, project manager and student stakeholders to ensure
that consultation, design and eventual construction are done in accordance
with the wishes of the AMS.
In addition, the VP Administration chairs the Student Administrative Commission, which oversees, approves and resolves disputes within all student
clubs. They oversee the AMS Art Gallery, hire special event coordinators,
organize Clubs Days and oversee AMS's equity program.
Finally, the VP Administration is in charge of activities in the current SUB
as well as any improvements and renovations made to the building, such as
the $80000 renovation to create more club space in 2009.
a
3rd Year Arts
GORDON KATIC
1. NEW DRAFTS OF THE NEW SUB DESIGN PLAN
HAVE JUST BEEN RELEASED. Soon we will be
entering the construction phase ofthe new
SUB project, and student involvement and
participation should be a priority in that
phase. Whether it is through workshops,
directed seminar courses, sustainability projects, events or other initiatives, I'll make sure
we increase student engagement. After all,
the finite details of what goes in each room
ofthe new SUB have yet to be determined
by students. The new SUB is the students'
building and I am going to ensure that students will feel the ownership of it.
2. THAT'S OVER $130,000 OF STUDENT MONEY!
I've been a part of quite a few AMS Clubs
both as an active member and an executive, so I have a good sense ofthe challenges and opportunities within AMS clubs. In
terms of funding, I've noticed that it isn't
always the clubs who need funding that
get it. So, instead of the idle lets throw
money at the clubs to get them involved'
approach, I would like to see an increased
set of special grants and sponsorships. For
example, we should have a seed funding
to support clubs that are starting up. I will
ensure that the AMS will reward clubs that
are truly active in bringing value to students'
lives instead of just those who are adept in
writing grant applications. Furthermore, I'm
going to use some of this money to reduce
the administrative red tape that exists for
clubs, and create new user-friendly online
systems for clubs to access their financial
and membership information. Clubs are the
most engaging aspect of the AMS and we
need to support them better.
3.0VERTHEPASTYEAR.IHAVECHAIREDTHEAMS
BUSINESS AND FACILITIES COMMITTEE, WHICH
DEALS WITH SUB IMPROVEMENTS AND RENOVATIONS. In my experience, any health and
safety renovations plus renovations that will
benefit our clubs and businesses should
be a priority. Other than these, only small
renovations to keep the building operational should be pursued since we are moving
into a new building in 2014.
VP ADMIN ACTION SHOTS!
1. DESPITETHE LIP SERVICE PAID BY COUNCILORS TO PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPARENCY AND
ACCOUNTABILITY, THE AMS REMAINS VIRTUALLY INVISIBLE TO AVERAGE STUDENTS.
Our existing communications strategy
simply isn't working. We need to take
a more proactive approach. I'll make it
a priority to go to the meetings of as
many clubs as possible, ensuring that
the link between the new SUB project
and the students who will ultimately benefit from it is more than just an
email in their inbox.
Furthermore, I will ensure that the details of the new SUB project are available to students, from the day that I
take office to the day that I leave. I
will ensure that students are involved
in every step of the process. Although
much of the design has been finalized,
we can expect significant changes to
take place before we break ground on
the new building.
2. I BELIEVE THAT THE MONEY SHOULD BE
USED PRIMARILYFORTHREEPURPOSES. First,
the AMS ought to have a fund designated for new and/or small clubs. Second,
the AMS should provide more resources to existing clubs, such as AV services, a better web presence and publicity. Finally, we should provide grants to
ambitious projects that clubs want to
carry out. The time has come for the
AMS to start moving in the direction
that most student unions have, providing direct financial support to its clubs.
3. THERE ARE MANY STEPS WE CAN TAKE
TO MAKE THE CURRENT SUB BETTER SERVE
STUDENTS. We need to prioritize space
on the concourse for clubs rather than
commercial ventures. Moreover, we
should open the building 24 hours during exam period to provide an alternative study space to the Barber Centre.
Finally, my administration will be as environmentally sustainable as possible.
We need more compost bins and more
water fountains.
VP Admin contender Katie thinks fast on the court. GEOFF LISTERPHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
1. INVOLVEMENT WITHTHE NEW SUB HAS BEEN
PRETTY SWEET, THOUGH IT COULD BE BETTER.
Most of the work for the new SUB has
been done, so it should be smooth cruising from now. So one of the few ways I'd
keep student interest high on this would
be to have a beer can challenge, where
student groups have to build a model of
the new SUB out of beer cans. Winners
get a floor of the SUB named after them.
You've got drinking and student involvement. I don't know how you'd be able to
say no to that.
2. I'M TORN BETWEEN MAKING MORE CLUB
SPACE AND FUNDING AVAILABLE IN THE NOT-
SO-SOON-TO-BE-USELESS OLD SUB, AND MAKING BEER VENDING MACHINES READILY AVAILABLE ALL OVER CAMPUS (CITR HAS IT RIGHT).
On one hand, we need more club space
and funding to help new clubs get by, but
on the other hand, we really need to get
our drunk texts on, and then regret it in
the morn'. OOOOr, we could make the
breweries fight out the exclusive rights
to these vending machines and have this
great Beer Battle Royale. That way we
can get the winning brewery to pay for
the vending machines, and get our club
spaces and $. Win-win.
3.1 REALLY DON'T LIKE THE CURRENT SUB. It's
dark, dingy and the water tastes funny.
In the wise words of Ke$ha, the Old
SUB is a "D-l-N-O-S-A, you are a dinosaur." I'd way rather spend the money towards the new SUB. So I'd spend
money only when necessary, like for repairs and stuff, but not to build new shit
in the old SUB.
COACH'S CORNER
Crystal Hon
VP Administration, 2009-2010
As a former VP of Administration I have given a lot of thought to the
future of the SUB project and its importance to the society. I don't
think a lot of people understand the enormous significance this project has on the future ofthe society. Our building will dictate the kind
of growth we can do and how the society can expand its services.
Not only is our building our heart and soul, it is our home and the
centre of our activities. If the VP Admin does not throw their heart
and soul into this project, we might face the same problems we do
in our current building in 35 years.
The AMS clubs are also a poorly utilized group in the AMS. The
VP Admin does not nearly have enough time to interact with them
as frequently and as intimately as I think is necessary, so it is important for them to find other ways to create stronger ties with
the clubs. Things like Clubs Days and The All Presidents Dinner
are the only ways we showcase our great clubs.
My challenge to the candidates is to find more innovative ways
to appreciate the work that they do. BOARD OF GOVERNORS
AMS
2011.01.13/UBYSSEY.CA/ELECTIONS/ll
QUESTIONS FORTHE BOARD OF GOVERNORS CANDIDATES
1. What is your current opinion of the UBC board of governors?
2. What is the most important issue you would be advocating for on the
Board of Governors?
3. UBC will soon begin discussions to move to a new governance model
for non-academic lands. How should students be represented in this?
WHAT DOES
THE BOG DO?
The Board of Governors is UBC's final
decision-making body, responsible for
the management and administration of
the university. As the day-to-day affairs of UBC are left to executives, it
deals largely with managing the long-
term financial and property matters:
passing budgets and resolutions, approving buildings, and overseeing the
land use amendments currently being debated.
It is comprised of 19 members: 11
members appointed by the provincial government, three elected faculty
members, two elected UBC employees
and three elected students (one from
UBC-O, two from this campus). In addition to the five yearly board meetings,
members sit on a variety of committees which meet periodically throughout the year.
1. THE BOARD OF GOVERNORSTHESE DAYS IS IN
A BIT OF A FLUX—they've been moving away
from a rubber stamp Board for many years,
but now the Board members are being exposed to and becoming attached to the
campus and campus life. Face time with
students has been at an all time high, and
because of this, student voices carry all
the more weight at the table. The Board is
also grappling with more massive issues
than in the recent past—governance and
the Land Use Plan are both exceptionally
massive items, and they're only some from
a list of critical decisions that are coming
to pass. So, the Board right now is very
powerful, but at the same time very receptive to respectful opinions.
2. SOUTH GAGE AND GOVERNANCE WILL both be
coming to the table, and if I had to pick one,
Governance would be the choice. South
Gage is immensely important, but thankfully
because of the work done by the AMS and
myself over the past year; italready hasa lot
of momentum and attention, which means
more time can be spent focusing on the
beginnings of discussions on governance.
I have already been invited into that initial
discussion, not as a student but instead as
Sean Heisler and my personal reputation,
so leveraging that and helping to steer the
beginnings of that process is where my
time can have the most impact. The point
of the matter is, though, that I am allowed
more than one issue, so expect them both.
3. THE NEW GOVERNANCE MODEL IS VERY MUCH
SO UP FOR DEBATE, and the ideal place for students depends very much so on the model
selected, though "in the centre" should be
the heart of any model. Despite allegations
that students are only here for two thirds of
the time, or that they are transitive, they are
still the heart of the campus and make up
a very substantial portion of non-academic lands. In terms of student representation
during the process, I will be ensuring students are a part of the discussion.
1.1FEELTHATTHE UBC BOARD IS A FUNCTIONAL
entity that makes sound decisions on the
basis of what information is presented to
them. Effective student representatives
can make a difference when they ensure
that they present student interests at the
Board in the right manner. I also feel that
the Board could be made much more accessible to the student body and, as with
any governing body, increase its efficiency by having more time for reflections and
discussions among its members.
2.THEM0STIMP0RTANTISSUEthat I would
be advocating for the students is that of
the Gage South region. After being involved with the Land Use Plan consultation process, I realize that there needs
to be more dialogue created around that
particular issue with the Board. This area,
in the anticipation of the new development that will take place in the following
years will include the new SUB which
will form the heart of campus. Thus it
is imperative that open and comprehensive discussions of this region take
place to ensure that it will allow for student life to thrive and is progressive towards UBC serving its mandate as an
academic institution.
3. THE NEWGOVERNANCE MODEL DISCUSSION
is one that will have far reaching repercussions into the future. There will be
talks in the future regarding UBC being its
own municipality and thus it is essential
that students first of all, be engaged in
this process via consultations. Students
are important stakeholders at UBC and
as such, effective representation would
be necessary for the governance model of these non-academic lands. Effective representation, also first and foremost begins with the student representatives on the Board where BoG student
representatives play a key role in identifying student concerns and long term
effects of the new governance model.
COACH'S CORNER
Darren Peets
Board of Governors, 2007-2008
The Board of Governors is a somewhat unique position. Board duties seem light—only five meetings per year. However, these are all-
day meetings, and each is preceded by an additional full day of committee meetings at which the various issues are actually discussed.
It's all but impossible to make a difference in five meetings, particularly since governors often don't know what it means to be a university and almost always vote Yes. It is, however, possible for a student
to make a big difference on Board. A governor has full access to the
university's documents and administrators, and can raise or discuss
any issue. Most changes are made by either convincing the relevant
administrators that something's a good idea or by helping them after
discovering that they're not the roadblock. The Board position is what
you make of it. That said, a university administration can sometimes
move with glacial speed, so it wouldn't be realistic to expect meaningful results within a one-year term of office—you can start things,
speed them up or slow them down, but it will almost certainly not be
finished, fixed, changed or re-envisioned until well after you leave.
In my opinion, a student governor should be knowledgeable, unafraid of speaking up in front of the higher-ups, have the time and insight required to know what to change and be capable of speaking the
required corporate language. An alternative approach that some students may prefer: stand in front of the Board freight train on principle,
get duly run over and be summarily ignored thereafter, principles intact.
1.WITHTHESTUDENTV0ICE BEING the minority on the Board, it is upon all of us to have
the strongest and loudest voice representing us. Although the Board is the official
decision-making body of the university, it
often turns small decisions to a more complicated ones than what they should be.
2. ONGOING CONSULTATIONS ON DECISIONS affecting each and all of the members at-
large of the university, this ranges from on-
campus housing to transportation.
3. WITH A STUDENT BODY OF 47,000 BEING the
biggest stake holder on campus, I support
an accountable model that both satisfies
the ongoing needs of the university as an
institution as well as the peace of mind
and support of its individual members.
4th Year Science
SEXYSASS
1. IT'S A MONKEY HOUSE. With only three student reps on the Board, one needs to be very
aggressive in order to be heard and taken
seriously. Luckily, that's exactly what I have
to offer. My Iranian roots gave me a sassy
"persianality," and my German upbringing
taught me kickass discipline! Boooyall!
2. NO SUCH THING—I don't have a traditional
three-phrase campaign platform with blurry claims like "sustainability" or "accountability." I'd rather acknowledge that I don't
know in advance what the dynamics of the
issues are when they are discussed during
Board meetings. I guess that means I stand
for dontmakeupyourmindwhenyoudont-
knowthedetails-ility.
3. STUDENTS SHOULD GET AVOICE by means of
choosing or electing student representatives
that will be given an active say in the decision-making process. At the same time, I
don't think trying to include the opinion of
each and every student (as it was attempted for the SUB Renewal Plan) is an efficient
way to make such decision. Students need
"AVOICE" on these subjects, butnotthou-
sands... that's just noise.
4th Year Commerce
CAPPELLACCI
1.1 BELIEVE THAT THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS
plays an integral role in determining the
current activities and future success of
this university. With the recent release of
UBC from Metro Vancouver's jurisdiction,
the role ofthe Board of Governors is more
important than ever. Over one billion dollars in capital building projects, university
initiatives and various campaigns are largely the result of the board's direction. As a
student member of the Board of Governors
I would play an integral role in the Board,
not only ensuring that the student opinion is at the forefront of decision-making
but in communicating the activities of the
Board in a way that it matters to students.
2. THE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE facing all students of UBC and any student looking to
sit on the Board of Governors will be the
fate of U BC governance. Since the appearance of Bill 20, the question of governance
has been largely the topic of backroom conversations and large speculation. As a student who believes in accountable, fair and
representative government, I believe that
the governance issue will be my most important issue.
3.1 THINK THAT THE MOST IMPORTANT principles for a governance model for UBC are
accountability and representation. It is my
belief that there exists a potential for an entirely new model of democratic governance
where BoG members, elected members
of the UNA and AMS will have an opportunity for meaningful representation in the
governance of campus. UBYSSEY.CA/ELECTIONS/2011.01.13
1. What is your biggest criticism of a specific aspect of academics at UBC?
2. Should UBC be looking at moving towards broad-based admissions or is the
current system adequate?
WHAT DO SENATORS DO?
The Senate is responsible for the academic governance of the university. All major
changes to campus academic policy must be passed at monthly Senate meetings,
chaired by UBC President Stephen Toope.
m  -   * 4th Year Medical
mm
Year Science
RYAN
BREDIN
1. The range of teaching quality is my largest criticism. I have had professors who
were exceptionally and fully justified in
receiving the Killam teaching awards. On
the other hand I have witnessed instructors who were incoherent, producing lectures which were obscure and unexplained.
I believe that one cannot become a perfect teacher, which always leaves room
for improvement. Instructors should be
required to periodically attend seminars
to hone their skills, no matter their standing. This will provide a more proactive approach to improving the quaiity of education at UBC rather than relying on class
questionnaires at the end of term.
2. No, the current system is not adequate.
In currentyears, entrance averages have increased with competitive averages approaching 90 per cent for some faculties. This is an
issue as it becomes increasingly difficult to
determine which students will be successful as marks become less revealing of student ability. Therefore, broad-based admissions have been administered with some
success in select faculties. However, this
program is also flawed, as there is a huge
volume of applicants to UBC, and to implement systematic broad-based admissions
would be astronomical in the number of human hours needed and cost. Other means
of student assessment must be explored.
1. The issue that stands out in my mind
regarding UBC academics is the lack of
student-based course and faculty feedback forums. I believe the power of rentable student recommendations and feedback will increase student involvement and
help guide newer students in the correct
direction. UBC needs to create an official
database where students can voice their
concerns and suggestions regarding everything academically related, from exam
length to supplemental applications. Students act upon the voice of their peers at
a more consistent rate than of academic
advisors and UBC needs to give students
back the control they deserve.
2.1 believe the current admission system
is adequate to a certain degree. The recent three per cent raise on admission average is a step in the right direction as we
are searching for the intellectually talented. However, we need to connect to prospective university students at a grassroots level through student-to-student
communication. There are several movements on campus that send student volunteers to local high schools to share experiences of university life, without any
notion of recruitment. These are the key
to obtaining students who develop with
time and become the leaders the world
searches for.
i 4th Year (Dual!
HAJIAN
1. The bureaucracy and lack of flexibility for proposals on curriculum additions
or changes.
2. I support broad-based admissions as
a part of a discretionary admission process with specific quota per each admission cycle.
4th Year (Dual)
JUSTIN
YANG
ASMUSSEN
1. UBC could do so much more to improve
the quality of teaching. Although some programs and departments exist, our university under-invests in training for TA's and
instructors. Most receive little or no support. Plus, given promotions and tenure
criteria, instructors don't have enough incentives to focus on teaching. Official
UBC plans mention changing this, but so
far, little has been done. Student senators, though they have no direct control,
can work on these issues nonetheless.
2. Broad-based admissions, in principle, are
a better solution. Access to university should
be based on more than high school grades
(and, unfortunately, money). But there are
two problems. First, broad-based admissions
risk favouring the privileged. Think about the
kids who can't volunteer because they are
working 20 hours a week to save for university. Second, broad-based admissions cost
money. If thousands of applicants write essays, dozens of staff must be hired to read
them. These are resources that could go
elsewhere. So right now I'm torn, and during the campaign, I'll be listening to students
to hear what they think.
THOMAS
BRENNAN
1. One academic issue that would be
very easy to remedy is exam scheduling. We register in courses and remain
in the dark about when the respective finals will be until just a few weeks before
the end of term. Meanwhile the cost of
airfare increases substantially for any student who travels home for the holidays.
It is easy to fix, and it's common sense
to have the final exam scheduled from
the first day of class. I believe student
senators should push for this in the upcoming year.
2. Broad-based applications are a good
supplement to the purely academic side
of admissions, but they must remain just
that: a supplement. An optional broader-based application is a way for prospective students to demonstrate the
big picture, but making the application
mandatory seems to punish those who
"only" focus on academics, which contradicts UBC's scholastic rigour. Therefore every program should offer optional broad-based applications, but keeping admissions focused primarily on academic performance is crucial.
1. My primary concern with academics at
UBC lies not with the quality of instruction
(which is, itself, an issue that could fill pages
and pages of this paper) but with a preponderance of academic policies which serve
to streamline students through their degree
requirements rather than offer opportunities
for non-traditional degree options. While a
traditional degree is fine for many, it is my
earnest hope that UBC can serve as an institution of higher learning, of opportunities
for intellectual growth and development,
rather than simply a vocational school. My
own experience with the dual degree program has been intellectually stimulating, but
ongoing policy changes that threaten such
opportunities worry me to no end.
2. Broad-based admissions have significantly changed our student population, the results of which still remain to be seen in the
longterm. I am broadly in support of seeking to move towards a broader-based admissions system but am cognizant of the
need for academic rigour. Ultimately, though,
this problem isn't localized to UBC but extends also to provincial governance of primary and secondary education. A holistic review of our educational system might elucidate the benefits of broader-based admissions practices.
3rd Year Enaineer
DISTEFANO
Did not submit responses.
CAMPBELL
Did not submit responses.
AMS nni
STUDENT LEGAL FUND SOCIETY
CANDIDATES WERE ASKED WHY
THEY ARE RUNNING
__
m_
5lh Year (Dual]
JOHN CM
MACLEAN
I currently serve as a member of the Board
and as the Treasurer. This experience has
given me insight into the unique and valuable roles the Society plays in the preservation of students' rights and interests
on campus, something I am steadfastly
committed to.
If re-elected I would work to make
the society more accessible to students
through a variety of means including building a more objective solicitation process
for potential cases, which we have worked
on this year.
?
4th Year Science
SIHOTA
I currently serve as President of the SLFS
and have served previously as Chair of the
Litigation Committee.
If re-elected I would work to make
the society more accessible to students
through a variety of means, including building a more objective solicitation process
for potential cases, which we have worked
on quite a bit this year.
1st Year Pharmacv
STEWART
Jordan has served as a member on various committees and as an executive on
the Science Undergraduate Society (SUS).
During his involvement with SUS he spent
time on the finance committees and on
the science curriculum review committee.
Jordan supports a restrained and responsible student form of governance
with proper attention to real student issues and practical solutions.
WARWICK
I have been heavily involved since my first
yearat UBC. I started my leadership in multiple executive roles for the Political Science
Students Association. I then moved to the
Arts Undergraduate Society, serving first as
General Officer and subsequently as AMS
Arts Rep and AUS VP External. I currently
serve as the Chair of the AMS Arts Caucus,
and as a member of multiple AMS committees. In these roles I have delivered real results for students, and I want to bring that
experience to the SLFS.
C
1" Year Medicine
ANTHONY
BRYSON
Hi, I'm Anthony Bryson, currently on the
SLFS board and rerunning for the 2011-
2012 year. I'm a first year medical student here at UBC.
4th Year Science
HAJIAN
The SLFS is in place to safeguard student's
rights, and therefore it's important to have
the resources in place and available to address any potential issues that would impact UBC students—something Students
for Responsible Leadership thoroughly understands and will strive to achieve. 2011.01.13/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/13
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER GINNY MONACO »gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
ILLUSTRATOR INDIANA JOEL»ijoel@ubyssey.ca
TERESA MATICH
Contributor
UBC students, alumni, faculty,
staff and residents are about to
show you what they've got. This
Friday the Chan Centre for the
Performing Arts will light up with
the best talent that the UBC community has to offer.
UBC's Got Talent is a charity
event which hopes to unite the
UBC community through music
and performing arts, while also
raising money for UBC's United
Way Campaign. Out of 124 video submissions, judges selected
16 finalists to perform tomorrow night.
AMS President and event organizer Bijan Ahmadian said he
was inspired to put together the
talent show after attending a similar event put on by the Faculty of
Medicine.
"I thought to myself if one faculty can throw an event like this
and fill up the Chan Centre, I bet
we can do an amazing event if we
open it up to the entire campus,"
hesaid. "I am hoping that this will
become a tradition that will happen year after year."
Stella Tung, thirdyear international relations student and marketing director for UBC's Got Talent, is also confident about Friday
night. "I think that our artistic directors and judges put together a
really good program that I think
many members of the audience
will be able to relate to," she said.
Ahmadian said that the AMS
has spent about $1000 on UBC's
Got Talent so far. UBC Human Resources has contributed $5000 towards the event and the University Neighbourhoods Association
has donated $10,000. "By this they
are really showing their commitment to community building on
campus," Ahmadian said of the
UNA committment.
Jan Fialkowski, executive director ofthe UNA, was charmed
when Ahmadian came to the
UNA for financial help with UBC's
Got Talent. "He approached us
and said, 'here's an opportunity for the UNA to showcase itself
amongst the students in an event
that's going to raise money for
a really good cause,'" she said.
The majority of the $10,000 donation will pay for the cost of the
Chan Centre, allowing all proceeds from UBC's Got Talent to
go to United Way. "The board was
really pleased to be given this opportunity" said Fialkowski.
Faisal Al-Alamy thirdyear sociology student and finalist for
UBC's Got Talent, thinks that the
event will do just what it is supposed to in bringing the UBC community together. He stated, "It
makes you feel like you belong
to a group of people who are not
only students." Fellow competitor and third year environmental science student Erin Crocket
echoed these sentiments, stating,
"It's great to see all the different
talents UBC has."
Al-alamy a native of Saudi Arabia, considers this event to be
special on a personal level. "It's
hard to do music over there," he
said. "This is a great opportunity to show what I can do freely."
Sixteen finalists will be putting
on a variety of acts involving magic, singing, dancing and even solving a Rubik's cube with one hand.
Most of these group or solo acts
are made up of students, with one
resident act, two staff acts and one
act involving students and alumni.
Tickets are for sale by donation,
and can be purchased online from
Ticket Master, or in person at the
Chan Centre Ticket Office, tl
CHRIS B0RCHERT PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
MEETTHE CONTENDERS: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
ROBERT LIM —MR (MISTER)
What's your talent?
Rob and I are going to try to entertain the Chan Centre by making weird sound effects with our
mouths. It'll be abeatbox collaboration with a bit of freestyle rapping and the aid of a panflute and
harmonica.
How did you learn your talent?
I think that I first started beatbox-
ing in math class just for fun. I
think that vocal percussion is re-
allyagreatwayto showcase what
can be drawn from the widely
ranged colour palettes ofthe human voice. The best thing about
it, is that it's a percussive instrument that you will always have
with you.
SIRI WILLIAMS
What's your talent?
I'm a singer and I'll be rocking
out to some epic Queen radness.
How do you plan to warm up for
a performance for 1000 people?
Booze. Just kidding. Lots of water, tea and...yeah, okay maybe
a little booze. Just a little.
JEREMIAH CARAG
What's your talent?
I have been singing for a while
now but mostly just in front of
friends and family My genre of
choice is music from theatre musicals but I also dabble in R&B
and Jazz.
How did you learn your talent?
As a Filipino, singing has always
been an important part of our
culture. I always say in jest that
I musthave learned to sing before
I even started walking. You can
probably imagine me reaching
out for the karaoke microphone
before I can even talk. I never had
any formal vocal training but I always try to sing whenever I can.
JUNYIM-UNLIMITED CREW
What's your talent?
A choreography piece that tells a
story of a boy who learns not to
trust a woman so easily. Despite
the sweet and happy beginning of
boy meets girl, the girl, through
seduction, is tempted to betray
her partner. The story may be
generic, but hopefully the dance
itself will keep our audience engaged in the telling of.
How do you plan to warm up
for a performance in front of
1000 people?
Unlimited will train as diligently
as possible throughout the week
leading up to the show.
FAISAL AL-ALAMY
What's your talent?
My performance is a debut of my
band's [The Faze Project] single,
called Creme Fraiche (based on
the South Park episode).
How did you learn your talent?
Music never really existed where
I'm from. Saudi Arabia's music
scene was beyond underground.
Guitar never really became apart
of my life until one day—sitting
in class—my teacher picked up a
guitar and started playing "From
a Distance"—I still am a sucker to
that song. My fifth guitar lesson
in I asked my teacher if I could
play Stairway to Heaven and he
justlaughed, he gave me the tabs
sheet for it, the next week I came
in and nailed it—that's when I discovered, through him, that I may
have a talent somewhere!
ERIN CROCKETT
What's Your Talent?
On Friday I will be taking to the
stage with a solo piano performance based on Michael Kae-
shammer's arrangement of a
song called the "Boogie-Woogie
Stomp," originally written by Albert Amnions. So what's boogie-
woogie? It's a lively upbeat style
of music of piano-based blues featuring a driving left hand with
decorative melody in the right
hand.
How did you learn your talent?
From an early age, I began taking classical piano lessons
once a week. Several years later, when I was introduced to
my first 12-bar blues, I became
hooked on the free flowing, creative nature of blues and jazz. I
learned this particular piece by
listening to a recording of Kaes-
hammer's arrangement of "Boogie-Woogie Stomp." As I developed some fluency in the style
of boogie-woogie, I began to incorporate some of my own musical ideas into the song.
MICHELLE KWAN - PENTAT0NICS
What's your talent?
We are a Chinese instrumental
band called Pentatonics consisting of nine musicians. Rather
than playing traditional Chinese
music, Pentatonics uses Chinese
instruments to play mainstream
music such as pop, rock, crossover classical and many more.
The instruments we play include
erhu, dizi, guzheng, pipa, ruan,
yangqin, drumset and keyboard.
How did you learn to play?
Like mostkids, our parents made
us learn the instruments when
we were little. We were all classically trained on our instruments
and, recently we wanted to do
something different and more
exciting. So we decided to form
a group which incorporates Chinese instruments and Western
instruments to play music that
is more mainstream.
PAULINE KONG
What are you performing?
I will be performing my signature act, Fate's Parasol Manipulation Act.
How did you learn your talent?
Magic is one of my passions and
it is something I want to pursue.
I take magic classes to help me
follow my dream. I not only wanted to make a difference in someone's life by being a nurse, but
also by being a magician.
How do you plan to warm up for
a performance in front of 1000
people?
I practice my magic through
shows that I perform in the hospital and at different kinds of
parties including baby showers,
birthday parties and in other
competitions.
ABRIELLE CHAN-THE X GUYS
What's your talent?
We are an all-men's a capella group.
How did you form?
Most of us came from the same
high school, Magee Secondary.
Some of us were in the chamber
choir. Most of us have only been
singing for approximately two
years, vl
ON PAGE 14: A POET, A TAP DANCER
AND A RUBIK'S CUBE PRODIGY. 14/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2011.01.13
Too much
talent for
one page
GINNY MONACO
gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
The Ubyssey spoke with some of
the can't-miss performers appearing on stage this Friday at
UBC's Got Talent.
SITTINON SUKHAYA
One ofthe most astonishing performances of Friday's show may
end up being one ofthe shortest.
Sittinon Sukhaya, a firstyear engineering student, will be solving a Rubik's cube one-handed.
It usually takes him between
16 and 17 seconds.
According to Sukhaya, there
aren't any real secrets to solving
the toy. "Just practice," he laughs.
"Maybe half an hour a day."
Sukhaya has been honing his
skills on the Rubik's cube for
about two years. "There are competitions around the world for this
kind of thing."
Six months ago Sukhaya placed
second in the world in a one-handed Rubik's Cube competition, so
Friday's event hasn't fazed him.
"I didn't expect to get in. I joined
because my friend joined the
RAZZMATAP
"Twentyyears ago a group of women started tap classes in Vancouver," says Jan Kainer. "Over the
years what was once a class for
fun and fitness became an award-
winning tap company."
Razzmatap, this unlikely troop,
will be performing a number choreographed by Jan Kainer called
"It's Just One of Those Things."
As part of Razzmatap, Zanna
Downes has found a way to reengage her love of dance. "I joined
Razzmatap when a friend suggested I take classes with her—
that was 12 years ago. The group
of women [is] simply amazing...
they are my extended family."
Performing at the Chan Centre was one of Downes' goals for
this year. The other, performing
at the Stanley Theatre, was accomplished when Razzmatap performed for Tap Day in April 2010.
MIKE JOHNSTON
As the only slam poet in UBC's Got
Talent, Mike Johnston feels a responsibility to the spoken word
community. "I'm representing
slam poetry for UBC and for Vancouver," he said.
There are key differences between slam and conventional poetry. "The audience really defines
slam.. .with slamyou're really trying to appeal to the audience. A
successful poem is defined by
how well the audience likes you
and how well the audience likes
whatyou do."
Johnston may be new to the
world of slam, but he's making
a name for himself in Vancouver and abroad. Need an example of his talent? Here's how he
described his act: "Think Shakespeare meets Guy Ritchie in a
back-alley of Bladerunner, and
somewhere along the way Calvin & Hobbes take a blurry polaroid photograph of Shane Koyc-
zan holding a smoking ballpoint
pen which points towards a motionless W. H. Auden. And then
Jane Goodall sips a cup of fair-
trade coffee while a noir mist
skims off a sidewalk in the distance. (Note: This is not an accurate description of the content
of my poem for Friday. That one
will be far more complex.)" va
THEATRE
Climbing the Yellow Mountain
Blue Orchid Ensemble assembles at Roundhouse
The Yellow Mountains inspired generations of artists—and for good reason, too. PHOTO COURTESY EVIL TOM THAI/FLICKR
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
"Everything is precious on the
mountain," said Lan Tung, lead
composer of the Orchid Ensemble, a Vancouver based trio of classically-trained Chinese musicians.
She's talking about Huangshan, or
the Yellow Mountains of China's
Anhui province. Huangshan is the
subject of a multimedia collaboration between a team of UBC-O animation students and a number
of traditional Chinese musicians
from Vancouver.
The performance, Mountain
high. River flow (...without end),
takes place at the Roundhouse
Theatre on January 15 and will
feature animations in the style
of Chinese brush painting. It will
be set to music provided by Lan's
Blue Orchid ensemble and a number of other musical acts.
The project is a multimedia re-
imagining of one ofthe most iconic images in Chinese art. "The Yellow Mountain [is] one ofthe most
famous subjects in Chinese [landscape] painting," said Lan. "People
searching for spiritual purpose
would usually wander off and go
to the mountains." Artists like Li
Bai rhapsodized about the mountain's spiritual qualities and the
mountain even spawned its own
school of landscape painting.
The whole team did not have
the opportunity to wander around
the mountain looking for inspiration; that job fell on Lan. "We
went to [the mountain] and we
did research and filming," she
said. "From there, the animations
were drawn to capture the spirit
ofthe mountain." The Vancouver-
based composers and UBC-O animators worked remotely with each
other, sharing notes and meeting
occasionally.
The result is a flowing image
in the style of Chinese ink painting, with traditional instruments
melding with cutting edge technology. On the mountain, Lan found a
similar mix of old and new. While
the mountain today is one of the
most popular tourism destinations in China, she found that modern technology such as cable cars,
have not fundamentally altered
the nature of the mountain and
the people who travel it.
"All the people working on the
mountain bring everything up,"
Lan explained. "Even your toilet paper is carried by people up
the mountain." The mountain is
especially famous for its well-travelled steps; some 60,000 have been
carved into the sides of cliff faces.
Lan says that even though Saturday's show falls close to the Chinese New Year, people shouldn't
assume that the two are linked.
"During the New Year, people are
more aware of Chinese culture and
celebrations," he said. "It just happens that people get in the spirit
of looking into Chinese culture.
The timing works pretty well." ^J
Mountain high, River flow (without end...), features the Blue Orchid Ensemble, music by Rui Shi
Zhuo and Dorthy Chang, and the
work of UBC-O animation students
and faculty. It will run January 15
at the Roundhouse Theatre. For
more information, visit orchiden-
semble.com.
Mashup masters coming to Arts Mardi Gras
The Hood Internet remixes Shepard Fairey. PHOTO COURTESYTHE HOOD INTERNET
ASHLEIGH MURPHY
Contributor
Ever wonder what would happen
ifyou mixed Lil Wayne, The Junior
Boys and a few shots of tequila?
The Hood Internet, comprised
of Chicago-based producers Aaron
Brink and Steve Reidell, probably
comes close to whatyou'd expect.
The DJ duo's set consists of
"stringing together the more
dance-floor-friendly selections
from the 400+ mashups we've created," said Reidell, adding that
they tend towards unlikely marriages between rap and indie-rock.
The two are well suited to it.
"[We've] played in bands for years
and years," said Brink. According to the pair, they've "got an ear
for when a re-purposed melody
works or doesn't work, [and] alternately when the cadence of a
rap verse works with the underlying rhythm."
A few of their personal THI favorites "would probably be R.Kelly
x Broken Social Scene, "I'm A Hirt/
Shoreline" and the Beastie Boys x
Matt & Kim, "Good 01 Fashioned
Rumpshaker." Whether you like
Swizz Beats and Snoop Dogg or
Modest Mouse and Arcade Fire,
there's a little something for everyone, they say. tl
Check out The Hood Internet this
Friday, January 14 at Arts Mardi Gras or visit their blog at the-
hoodinternet.com. 2011.01.13/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/15
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
THE RETURN OF THE ALPHA MALE SOCIETY
Looking over the list of candidates for the AMS
Elections, you may notice a few things.
They seem to be overwhelmingly male, and students of Chinese descent, whether Canadians or
international students, seem to be absent for the
most part. And if those that are running aren't
joke candidates, then they seem to competing for
hotly contested positions where chances of victory are marginal.
This can be said of previous years as well, but
proportionally this election season appears especially bad in the diversity department. You don't
have to be convinced of the inherent righteousness of every progressive cause to acknowledge
that something is amiss here. Of UBC's population, 40 per cent is of Chinese origin and around
60 per cent are female.
We're not expecting exactly equal representation; we're just expecting any representation at all.
Of course, the AMS was already aware that this
problem existed. There are always one or two student politicians who remind people of this annually. Everyone agrees that it is a Big Problem.
However, they haven't taken any steps at all other
than identify this as an issue. We're actually worse
off than we were in previous years when we had
the equity program. Many will be quick to point out
that the equity program wasn't all that effective, but
even if that's the case, there was at least some attempt to change the situation. Whether or not the
AMS is aboys' club is of little concern now—it's just
a matter of fact. For cultural, traditional and even
commuting reasons, undergraduate councils do
a bad job of promoting diversity and it funnels its
way up to the AMS council and then to the executive—there hasn't been more than one female executive since 2007/2008, and the trend is likely to
continue this year.
We're not saying that a quota system should
be implemented, like they've attempted with the
provincial NDP. But just acknowledging there is a
problem is not a solution, and right now we need
to see an earnest attempt at exploring outreach
or ensuring that the AMS is a safe environment
for those who aren't represented there currently.
It's one thing to say 'we have a problem.' It's another to actually do something about it.
DEPRESSION AMONG STUDENTS ASTOUNDING
Every month, our university puts out a nice little
publication, UBC Reports, that details all the various
and wonderful things being done by researchers
and students. Inevitably being an arm of UBC Public Affairs, these stories tend to be, if not sugar-coated, glossied up to put UBC in a very positive light.
Which makes it all the more commendable that
in December's issue of UBC Reports there was an
article on mental health issues facing students.
And the numbers aren't pretty.
In a 2009 National College Health Association
survey 36 per cent of students felt so depressed
atone time in the past year it became difficult to
function. 54 per cent felt overwhelming anxiety.
More disconcertingly 57 per cent said that at one
time, things felt "hopeless." Hopeless.
The striking thing is, university shouldn't be
a place to feel these things. It's a wonderful time
of growth and opportunity.
University is also a time of immense challenges
and stresses (many self-inflicted) and of pushing
oneself to new limits. It's a place where students
don't necessarily have the close support group of
trusted friends and family that they would when
older or younger. These problems are in many
ways inevitable, so effective treatment is key.
As with many problems at UBC, the problem
is not of intent, but communication. There are a
myriad of free resources for students with mental health issues and it is good that the university is increasing these services while acknowledging they need to do more to create a mass
awareness on campus. But it is equally important that students know clearly where they can
go—and that's difficult to do when you're bombarded with different UBC brochures and websites without knowing which one is important in
which situation. Those with mental health problems more often than not suffer in silence. Students need to know that the hand is open and
willing before they will reach out. tl
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BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
OPINIONS
Let's see if McKinnon has it in him
Last three years full of stupid controversy.
Can McKinnon save us all?
PAUL BUCCI
Contributor
Last Friday the usual collection of hacks,
freaks and weirdos sat around the
AMS Council Chambers, eager to
sink their teeth into another round
of campaigning. It's the same every
year: the entire bunch gets tense,
greedy and ruthless, all desperately
grabbing at the highly coveted executive positions. And like every year,
it reminds me of what Henry Kissinger once said: "University politics
are vicious precisely because the
stakes are so small."
At least Elections Administrator
Eric McKinnon seems to understand
that. He came off as the exasperated
father lecturing his unruly children
as he went through the campaign
rules, which include such gems as
keeping a one-poster space in between each of your posters and not
libeling your fellow candidates. I
know he didn't write the rules, but
let's hope he's clear, quick and fair in
enforcing them.
Last year, the AUS elections were
initially a tie. EA Matt Naylor cast
the deciding vote, the ballot counts
went mysteriously missing and then
student court declared the whole
election invalid. I know, I know,
that's AUS, not AMS, but the people
involved are the same. Eric, baby I
know I shouldn't have to say this, but
write the results down. And don't accidentally burn them.
Who can forget 2010, when
$43,000 was spent on investigating a voting system being hacked?
But that's old news—in 2011, we're
off to another controversy as we
revert to first-past-the-post voting
rather than Condorcet, which was
implemented two years ago. McKinnon, it's time to head that one
off at the pass. It needs to be made
quite clear why we are changing,
how we are changing and that the
results will be valid, no question.
We don't need a whole group of sore
losers complaining about an invalid elections process.
Such as in 2008, when presidential candidate Alex Monegro filed
a complaint about Blake Frederick
running a "slate" campaign. The
elections committee revoked his
presidency which was subsequently
returned to him after he appealed
to student court. McKinnon, I know
we're nearly out of the season of the
Knollies, but with their fall came the
rise ofthe Frats. The only way to stop
this sort of complaint is to hit it hard
and hit it early.
McKinnon, all I want is a clean,
safe election where we don't spend
inordinate amounts of time and
money on foolishness. You can do
that, right? You've run companies.
The elections shouldn't be too hard.
Just a calm, reasonable debate between worthy opponents who have
the students' best interest at heart.
Wait, what am I talking about? I'm
a journalist! Grab yer guns, it's time
for a shoot-out! Yeehaw! tl
LETTER
fanuary 9, 2011
DEAR UBYSSEY,
The Spartacus Youth Club protests
the witchhunting, censorship and repeated intimidation of pro-Palestinian students at the hands of the Israel Awareness Club (IAC) and Hillel
House. Aided and abetted by student
bureaucrats at the AMS, the Zionists
have launched a vicious campaign
against the Socialjustice Centre (SJC)
and Solidarity for Palestinian Human
Rights (SPHR), vilifying them as "terrorists" and "anti-Semites." Equating
criticism ofthe Israeli state with anti-Semitism is the standard Zionist
smear of pro-Palestinian activists.
As defenders of all the oppressed and
opponents of racist, capitalist injustice, we say: Defend the Palestinians!
Hands off their supporters!
Late last fall, the SJC attempted to
make a $700 donation to SPHR for
the Canada Boat to Gaza, which is to
sail to Gaza this spring in defiance of
the Israeli starvation blockade. The
AMS has sought to block the SJC donation and, outrageously AMS officials called on CSIS to "investigate"
so-called "links to terrorism" of the
pro-Palestinian groups.
Serving as toadies for the Zionists,
the AMS is in perfect synch with the
Conservative Harper government,
which stands out for its belligerent
support for the Israeli Zionists' murderous campaign against the Palestinians. In this, they overshadow even
previous Liberal administrations as
well as the historically pro-Zionist
NDP. Under Harper, the campaign
of harassment, slander and threats
against pro-Palestinian activists has
greatly increased, and is especially intense on the campuses. The events at
UBC also take place in the context of
ongoing anti-Muslim bigotry which is
underpinned by the capitalist rulers'
continual "war on terror." This phony "war" serves to intensify capitalist state repression against the entire population.
We communists of the Spartacus
Youth Club call on students and youth
to ally with the power of labour in class
struggle against the racist imperialist rulers ofthe U.S., Britain, Canada
and elsewhere. The working class is
the only social force capable of sweeping away capitalism worldwide and
ending once and for all the genocidal
terror against the Palestinians and all
forms of oppression worldwide. Down
with the blockade of Gaza! Israel out of
the occupied territories! For a socialist federation of the Near East! Down
with the witchhunt against pro-Palestinian students!
Sincerely,
—Lynsey Hamilton
for the Spartacus Youth Club 16/UBYSSEY.CA/PROFILE/2011.01.13
....
~'
::=:
MICHAEL MOL
MICKI COWAN
mcowan@ubys~~"
Michael Moll ended up at UBC
essentially by accident.
When applying to universities
from his home in Kenya, Moll
was offered major scholarships
to both UBC and the University
of Redding. The latter was his
first choice and where his girlfriend was planning to go.
"But what happened was
that UBC Fed-Exed their reply
to me, but Redding sent it by
snail mail," said Moll. Thinking that he'd only received an
offer from UBC, Moll accepted,
and hasn't looked back since.
Moll, who received UBC's
Leader of Tomorrow Award, is
now a fourth-year marketing student who's involved in various
facets of university life.
Living up to the title of his
scholarship, Moll has been actively involved at UBC in a variety of leadership roles. He joined
the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity in
his first year and later became
its alumni correspondent, organizing career night and debate
night. For the past year, he has
served as vice president of the
fraternity.
Moll has also been heavily in-
olved in the Commerce Under-
raduate Society (CUS), acting
as the second-year coordinator
and sitting on the CUS Board of
Directors.
"It gave me a lot of exposure
as to how an organization runs
and the Commerce faculty," said
Moll. "That's big money a large
budget and we were running a
lot of programs."
Although he initially was considering running for a VP position, he ultimately decided to
run for president, despite not
having previously held a position in the AMS before.
"I thought if I'm going to
[have] to be rallying support
anyways, I might as well go for
the top job where I can make
real change," he said.
Moll is centering his campaign on increasing student
engagement with the AMS and
bringing the society back to a
strong fiscal standing.
Specifically Moll said that he
would like to start with first-year
students at Imagine Day where
he would set up a mailing list
and give out information just for
first-years to encourage them towards future involvement.
He would also like to
the AMS further into the information age by digitizing club
listings to make it easier for
students to keep track of and
form clubs, and also create
an AMS mobile phone application. This phone app would
have information for students
regarding various AMS services, as well as club information that he thinks they
may not actively seek out
otherwise.
For businesses, Moll believes
that a fee referendum for the
AMS is not only necessary but
long overdue.
"We've got to be honest and
say 'This is what we have, if
you want this, this is what we
need to do,' and that it's plain
and simple," he said.
Moll feels that it is his leadership ability that makes him the
best contender.
"I came here with the Leader
of Tomorrow scholarship, I came
here to lead. I've demonstrated
that across my faculty across
my fraternity and the campus
in general," he said.
"I think the job of a leader
doesn't change with the organization." vl
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBY!
Connect With Your
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Dental Plan
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Your Benefits for 2010/2011
Health
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chiropractor, physiotherapist,
vaccinations, and more...
Vision
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laser eye surgery
Dental
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gum treatments, extractions, and more...
Travel
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and up to $5,000,000, trip cancellation,
trip interruption
Networks Enhance Your Benefits and Save You Money
Get even more coverage by visiting members of the Dental, Vision, Chiropractic,
Physiotherapy, and Massage Therapy Networks.
Find a health practitioner at www.ihaveaplan.ca.
Change-of-Coverage Period
Additional enrolments and opt outs for new Term 1 students must be completed
between Jan. 3 - 24, 2011.
Health & Dental Plan Office, Room 61 - SUB Lower Level
The Member Services Centre is also there to assist you
from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm on weekdays.
Toll-free: 1 877 795-4421
soon
ihaveaplan.ca
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on campus. Come write for news!
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