UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 15, 2013

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126140.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126140.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126140-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126140-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126140-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126140-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126140-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126140-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126140-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126140.ris

Full Text

Array &'*
v; T~rTJ.7f r.w«wTw.
•;i.O"v?."7'.'1ti^Tfarers
THE
UBYSSE
■~»^»T*wjkwA Awjk™A jkwjk™* ji
•>:♦:♦:♦>:♦:
:♦:♦:•:♦:•:♦:«
.v.w.v.v.v
••••••••••<
'.V.V.W.V.V.
:♦:•:♦:•:♦:•:♦:<
•:•:♦:•:♦:•:♦:♦:
'.V.V.W.V.V.
►•••••••••••
WRECK LANDSLIDE   I KOERNER'S IS BACK
Retired Trail 5 has been turned into a 600
foot cliff after erosion causes slide
After more than two years of negotiations, renovations and
paperwork, the pub is set to reopen under private management
SECOND SEXUAL ASSAULT ON CAMPUS P3 CULTCH AND WESTERN FRONT CELEBRATE 40TH P9
WOMEN'S HOCKEY SPLITS HOME OPENER P5 MEN'S SOCCER P5 MENTAL HEALTH FILM SERIES P8 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON l    THIS WEEK, MAY WE:
TUESDAY/15
POST-THANKSGIVING
FOOD COMA
ALL DAY ©YOUR BODY
Maybe it's the turkey, or maybe it's
the overall sluggishness from the
long weekend^ but you're way too
full to pay attention today.
Free
WEDNESDAY' 16
COMEDY NIGHT
7P.M.-9P.M.@THEGALLERY
As seen on CBC's The Debators,
Justfor Laughs and many other
comedy festivals, Graham Clark,
comedian and beard-painter
graces the Gallery stage. Jokes
are free; drinks are not.
Free
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
THURSDAY ' 17
CASUALSOCCER
LEAGUE
1 P.M.-2P.M. @ SRC
The Casual Soccer League offers
soccer pros and those looking for
recreation fun to either commit
for the whole term or just drop
in occasionally.
$15 for students
THE
COVER
"Yayl Butts on the cover! I feel sorry for this innocentcharacterihave tortured with hot
iron, but even more sorry for the poorburntcows I looked at as drawing references."
Illustration by Indiana Joel.
Video content
Check out our "UBC on Thanksgiving"
video, airing now at ubyssey.ca/videos/.
►
^|THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER15,2013 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXV
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Brandon Chow
ochow@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
culture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producers
Lu Zhang +
Nick Grossman
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ohotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Graphic Designer
Nena Nguyen
nnguyen@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
Angela Tien, Carly Sotas
\A/rite/shoot/contribute to The
Ubyssey and attend our staff
meetings and you too can see
your name in the glorioustones
of black that only offset printing
can produce. We meet every
week in our office, SUB 24—ir.
the basement, squirreled away
in the back, there. Yeah, we
know. You'll get used to it.
BUSINESS
Business
Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@
jbyssey.ca
604.822.668l
Ad Sales
MarkSha
advertising®
jbyssey.ca
604.822.1654
Ad Sales
Tiffany Tsao
webadvertisinc
@ubysseyca ~
604.822.1658
Accounts
Graham
McDonald
accounts®
jbyssey.ca
Editorial Office:
3UB24
SO 4.822.2301
Business Office:
3UB23
Student Union Buildinc
6138 SUB Boulevard ~
Vancouver. BCV6T1Z1
Web: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: ©ubyssey
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of Rrirish Cn-
umbia. Itispublished
andThursdaybyTheUl
dons Society. We are ai 1 dutonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion of the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stones, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
ediMubrm--: I ir length and clar-
ty. All letters must be received by 12
noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point
will be published in the following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
t is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the
Jbyssey Publications Society fails to
aublish an advertisement or if an er-
'or in the ad occurs the liability of the
JPS will not be greater than the price
aaid for the ad. The UPS shall not be
•esponsible for slight changes or ty-
aographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
3ECCA WILLIAMS/THE UBYSSEY
The Agora staff are happy to serve up their delicious, local food, located at the basement of the Macmillan Building.
Agora Cafe serves up
local organic meals
Kaitlyn Fung
Contributor
It's obvious that Anita Gillespie
and Emily Hunn love food.
Part of it might be the fact
that they're both fourth-year
Land and Food Systems (LFS)
students, with Gillespie majoring
in dietetics and Hunn majoring
in food, nutrition and health. But
being the co-general managers of
Agora Cafe seems to help, too.
Since 2005, students at Agora
Cafe, located in the basement of
the MacMillan Building, have
been serving healthy and sustainable food to the UBC community. Having their space and
facilities donated by the LFS
faculty also allows the non-profit to be just that — nothing on
the menu costs more than $5.
"There's a lot of image around
[organic food] like, 'I can't
afford to buy organic, it's too
expensive,' so we really show
to people that our food is local
and organic as much as possible
and you guys can still afford it,"
said Hunn.
Serving local, organic and
sustainable food requires lots of
help, which comes from Agora's
many volunteers. This year, they
amount to over 100. Gillespie
noted a big difference, as last
year's numbers were around 70.
It's this combination of
fresh recruits and committed
veterans that keeps Agora going,
with the experienced volunteers
helping the newcomers. After
all, Agora is a learning cafe
where students are encouraged
to gain the skills and confidence to work with food and
people, and everyone has to
start somewhere.
We really show to
people that our
food is local and
organic as much
as possible and
you guys can still
afford it.
Emily Hunn
Agora Cafe
co-general manager
Hunn got her start at Agora
during her first year after asking
her undergrad orientation leader
for ways to get involved. She then
became the food safety manager
the following year. Gillespie also
began as a general volunteer, later
obtaining the assistant manager
position. Now in their second
year of co-managing Agora,
the two have already learned
a lot.
"Over the years, I've built
up a lot of confidence in myself as a leader and someone
that can be approachable,
but at the same time knows
how to lead appropriately,"
said Hunn.
"Coming from a small
town, I didn't have a lot of
people from different backgrounds ... so UBC is really
good for that," said Gillespie,
who hails from Brentwood
Bay on Vancouver Island.
"Interacting every week
with all these different
people and learning about
their stories is just really interesting, as well."
For Hunn, who grew up in
Phoenix and in a family that loves
to cook, the environment Agora
creates has also been valuable,
and something that makes Agora
unique compared to UBC Food
Services establishments. "We're
a cute little family-run community," she said.
Hunn said Agora has been complimented for demonstrating their
faculty's values well by sustainably
bringing food from the farm to the
plate. They use produce from the
LFS orchard and UBC Farm.
The two share similar reasons
as to why they're studying food
and the importance of food: both
discovered they could help people
through nutrition, as its effects
are numerous and significant.
"It's in control of your environment, your health and how
you interact with people," said
Gillespie. "What you eat is how
you live, really." XI
Know someone at UBC who's done something
interesting/amazing/amazingly interesting and
worthy enough to be profiled in Our Campus?
Email all candidates to printeditor@ubYSseY.ca.
H THE flp
PRINTING HI
iwc
Custom silk screened
t-shirts for your
campus club
or team.
Mention this ad and
receive 5% off your
next order!
Tel: 604-408-5236
thehiveprinting.com
info@thehiveprinting.com // News
ORS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
BARS»
NEW SUB »
PHOTO GEOFF LISTER3THE UBYSSEY
Tim Yu serves up a round at the newly remodelled Koerer's Pub. Fear not — though they've gone Gastown chic with the decor, there's still pool and shuffleboard.
Koerner's Pub to open Tuesday afternoon
Will be run by third party, has been closed since May 2011
Will McDonald
News Editor
Koerner's Pub will be open for
business tonight.
Koerner's Pub, formerly run
by the Graduate Student Society
(GSS), has been closed since May
2011 when it was shut down for
losing too much money. The pub
will reopen on Tuesday, Oct. 15 at
4 p.m., and will be run by a third
party, HK Commerce.
Koerner's liquor license was
approved on Oct. 10. GSS President Chris Roach said there were
delays in getting the liquor license
due to executive turnover and
the need to update a few forms,
which caused the B.C. Liquor
Control and Licensing Branch to
NEWS BRIEFS
Woman sexually assaulted
in Fairview
At 3:30 a.m. on Sunday morning,
a 20-year-old female student was
sexually assaulted on campus.
According to an RCMP press
release, the assault occurred
inside her apartment building
in Fairview. The woman was
returning home when an unknown
man emerged from a stairwell in
the building and attempted to
take off her clothes and put his
hands up herskirt.
The woman managed to break
free and when she screamed for
help, the man fled on foot. She
escaped unharmed.
The suspect is Caucasian and in
his mid to late 20s, approximately
5-foot-10 and of medium build. He
was wearing a dark hoodie at the
time of the attack.
"UBC RCMP would like to
remind everyone walking on
campus at night to be vigilant of
theirsurroundings and potential
vulnerability when alone," the
release said.
Anne Kessler elected AMS VP
academic and university affairs
With 55.4 per cent of the vote,
Anne Kessler is the winner of the VP
academic byelection.
Kessler received 935 votes, while
heropponent, Adam Melhem, had
752.3.8 per cent of eligible students
voted in the election.
Kessler will be in office until
February, xi
put their application on hold for
several weeks.
"We're licensed for 150 people
inside. I don't see why we couldn't
be full pretty much everyday," said Tim Yu, president of
HK Commerce.
Roach said the pub's prices have
been set with graduate students
in mind.
Yu said beer will range from
$4 pints of Pabst Blue Ribbon to
$5.50 pints of craft beers. He said
there will an increased focus on
quality food than in years past. The
pub's food will include $5 small
plates and $12 burgers made from
ground steak.
"We tried our best to keep things
very affordable," said Yu. "We've
tired to put a little more effort into
RESEARCH»
something... that will be like the
Alibi Room or something on Main
Street... really putting more of an
emphasis on quality than perhaps
was there before," said Yu.
HK Commerce will have control
over the operations of the pub.
They will contribute $5,000 a
month or five per cent of profits to
the GSS.
"We have full operational say,"
Yu said. "The GSS is our partner,
but is really there to make sure that
overall... it's still a place that really
supports the graduate student
community."
Roach was hopeful that the
renovations to the pub will bring
more students to it.
"Before, it was rather dark, it
was a little dingy... but now it's
really different. It's really nice.
It's really open. It's bright. It's still
got this kind of West Coast woody
feel, but it's also very modern,"
said Roach.
The pub's staff are members of
the service worker union CUPE 116.
Although the GSS had a spat with
the union when the pub abruptly
shut down in 2011, Yu said relations
with the union have improved.
"All our staff are union and we
hope it should be smooth. Our
agreement is actually really pretty
fair and I don't foresee there being
any problems," said Yu.
Roach was optimistic about the
expected turnout for the pub.
"I really think students will like
the space," said Roach. "I think
[students will] flock to it." XI
Debate over medical access to heroin continues
Miriam Baldeh
Contributor
Controversy continues regarding
the federal government's Oct. 3 announcement that they are banning
the practice of heroin-assisted
treatment for heroin addicts.
On Sept. 20, Minister of Health
Rosa Ambrose vowed to remove
doctors' ability to prescribe drugs
such as heroin to their patients
through the Special Access Programme (SAP).
SAP allows practitioners to
request access to drugs that are
unavailable for sale in Canada. It
limits this access to patients in
life-threatening situations on an
emergency basis, when conventional therapies like methadone
or abstinence-based treatments
have failed, are unsuitable or
are unavailable.
According to a Health Canada
press release, new regulations were
put into place on Oct. 3 to prevent
patients from accessing products containing heroin and other
drugs such as ecstasy and cocaine
through SAP.
"This program provides
emergency access to life-saving
medicine. It was never intended to
provide heroin to addicts, and we
are taking action to close this loophole," Ambrose said in the release.
However, not everyone agrees
with this decision — including participants of the SALOME trial, a
study done by UBC and Vancouver
doctors that attempts to determine
the effectiveness of using heroin to
treat heroin-addicted participants.
Health Canada has approved 20 of
the 35 applicants to receive continued access to prescription heroin for three months after the end of
the SALOME clinical trial, but they
have stopped accepting applicants.
Scott Bernstein, a lawyer representing the SALOME patients, said
the government's action is standing
in the way of people receiving
life-saving healthcare. According
to Bernstein, Section 7 of the applicants' Charter rights — the right
to life, liberty and security of the
person — are being violated.
Donald MacPherson, director of
the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition, agreed that heroin itself is not
the treatment but the stabilizing
factor. The regular contact with
social and housing workers and
doctors is the treatment.
Bernstein and MacPherson said
that when addicts don't have heroin, they spend much of their time
trying to get it. For people with low
income, this means giving up their
food and rent money and engaging
in sex work and criminal activity to
procure the drug. This, said Bernstein, is even more damaging than
the drug itself.
"Once you've taken away the
illegality of the drug [and] now
provide it in a medical environment with all that support, then
you can start getting people to a
space where they are like, 'Oh, my
life is actually OK and I don't want
to be high all the time.'"
Heroin treatment has been
around for over 100 years. According to Bernstein, there is plenty
of evidence that heroin-assisted
treatment results in better health,
better housing and better employment opportunities. He points to
successful trials done in Switzerland in the 1990s as exemplary of
this.
For Dave Murray, founder of
the SALOME/NAOMI Association
of Patients that represents the
participants of the trial, the odds in
savings in continuing the treatment, when compared to the dollars wasted on punishing criminal
activity ranging from shoplifting to
robbing homes to acquire heroin,
are self-evident.
"[It costs] $120,000 to keep
someone in federal prison for one
year," he said. "The savings in the
justice system alone are enormous."
He also pointed to savings on
healthcare when addicts don't have
to wait until they are very sick to go
to the emergency room.
For patients for whom conventional treatments have failed,
there are not many other options
out there. Hydromorphine, a new
drug being tested as an alternative,
won't be approved until at least late
2014. a
Shortlist of
New SUB names
released
...... "i, iC' 0 '  'T
PHOTO WILLMCDONALD3THE UBYSSEY
The New SUB is set to be completed between September 2014 and January 2015.
RJReid
Contributor
The AMS has released the shortlist of seven possible names for
the New SUB.
The seven options all begin
with "AMS Student" and are
meant to reflect a place of community within the university.
Names on the shortlist include
the AMS Student Hub, the AMS
Student Centre, the AMS Student
Life Pavilion, AMS Student Hall,
AMS Student Station, the AMS
Student Nest and the AMS Student Community Centre.
The New SUB committee made
the names by piecing together
options from a list of possible
"starters, middles and enders"
they compiled.
"All combinations came from
the initial crowd-sourcing part,"
said Derek Moore, head of the
New SUB committee. "They came
off the cube, they came from
suggestions from committees,
suggestions from the AMS, people
talking to friends."
The cube is the New SUB
design office where UBC students
have been able to write name suggestions on the walls for the past
few weeks.
"It started out with a couple
names, and I remember getting
so excited when there were just
a couple," said Rae Barilea, New
SUB community engagement
coordinator. "I think it was after
one pit night, then there were so
many more."
Options on the cube such as
"Hogwarts" and "the SUBstitute"
did not make the cut.
The presence of the word "student" in all of the name options
was important to the New SUB
committee.
"Lots of places have their
buildings named after donors, and
the students are the biggest donor
on this building — they donated
$85 million for the construction
of the project," said Moore.
The seven shortlisted names
will now enter a week-long voting
period, where students can like
their favourite option on the New
SUB Facebook page. The top three
choices will go to AMS Council
for a final vote.
Moore and Barilea are both
pleased with the list, though both
have favourites.
"I like the Nest quite a bit. I
think it's fun, and a lot of the
building is themed after the
Thunderbirds," said Moore.
"I like the Hub," said Barilea.
"It symbolizes what this building
will be."
Barilea hopes to see a lot of
people voting on Facebook over
the next week.
"It's a cool way to get involved
in a little piece of history here,"
she said.
Voting will remain open until
Oct. 16. a NEWS    I   TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2013
CLUBS»
AMS sends eviction notices to 75 clubs
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
The AMS gave 75 clubs eviction
notices on Wednesday.
31 of these clubs are being
evicted from their offices, with
the remainder losing their locker
space in the SUB. The list of clubs
evicted from offices included
prominent clubs like the Ski and
Board Club, the Sailing Club and
the Surf Club.
Student Administrative Commission vice-chair Nina Scott
said these clubs received notice
because they failed to turn in their
tenancy agreements for 2013-2014.
"We had a deadline and it
passed," Scott said.
The locker tenancy agreements
and office tenancy agreements are
two-page agreements that grant
clubs space, with the commitment
that the club will maintain the
safety and cleanliness of their
space.
"We have over 380 [clubs], so
it's a small fraction," Scott said.
She said a "good chunk" of the
clubs who received the notice
were clubs that either have been
inactive or already dissolved.
Peter Wojnar, president of the
Ski and Board Club, said he turned
in his tenancy agreement one day
after the Sept. 30 deadline. "We
were assured at the time that it
would probably be fine [so it] kind
of came as a surprise," he said.
Wojnar said that he received an
email reminder of the deadline in
the monthly AMS clubs newsletter
in September, but then not again
until one hour before the deadline.
Scott said that all clubs receiving this notice had a chance to
appeal it before the eviction date of
Friday, Oct. 11 listed on the email.
"There will be a few people who've
genuinely made the mistake and
Peter Wojnar, president of UBC Ski and Board Club, has to deal with his club's potential eviction.
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
we obviously want to do what we
can to accommodate them," she
said.
Clubs can appeal by emailing
the Student Administrative Commission, according to Scott. "They
give a good reason why they didn't
[send the form in], and just explain
to us why they need the space."
She said there is a large waiting
list of clubs who want the space
if any of the clubs who received
the notice fail to appeal before
the deadline.
However, the email giving the
eviction notice made no mention
of the option to appeal. "You
are expected to move out by
Friday, Oct. 11," the email read.
"Penalties for failing to do so
can include suspension of other
club privileges, freezing of bank
accounts and deconstitution."
Although the original email
made no mention of appeals,
Scott said that an email was sent
out on Thursday to all clubs who
got the eviction notice, telling
them that they had 10 days from
Wednesday to appeal. "It's not a
hugely urgent thing," Scott said.
Wojnar sent in the Ski and
Board Club's appeal on Friday,
and said they have no plans to
start moving out.
"[I think] what's happening is
that this year the AMS is really
tired with the fact that nobody is
taking them seriously and is just
trying to get us to take them seriously," said Wojnar. "I wasn't too
surprised to see it coming to us,
we get these things often enough,
but I was surprised to see things
like UBC Cancer Society, and
sorts of clubs that are actually
providing really important services to students [get the notice]."
Scott said that in the meantime, clubs who are appealing
can stay where they are.
"For now, they can stay. We're
not going to come with pitchforks and torches and say, 'Pack
up now.' That would be ridiculous." XI
EROSION »
HOUSING »
Landslide destroys
retired Wreck Beach trail
St. Johns resident finds bedbugs
Student seeks new mattress as compensation
PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
The landslide occurred on Trail 5, located behind the Nitobe Gardens.
Will McDonald
News Editor
A landslide left behind a 600-foot
cliff at UBC on Sunday.
The landslide occurred on Trail
5, which is behind the Nitobe
Gardens and leads to Wreck Beach.
RCMP said the landslide took
place around 2 p.m. and no people
were injured.
"It left a sheer cliff 600 feet
down. It was formerly a trail," said
Sgt. Drew Grainger.
RCMP, Vancouver Fire Department and Greater Vancouver
Regional District (GVRD) staff
responded to the scene. Grainger
said the cliff has been barricaded
off and GVRD is investigating
the area.
"The area around Trail 5 has a
significant barrier around it. It's
still very unstable," said Grainger.
Trail 5 has been closed to the
public for more than 10 years due
to safety concerns and erosion. The
trail is not marked on park maps. XI
Tammy Kwan
Contributor
A student in UBC housing says
her room was infested with bedbugs.
Hala Louay, a journalism student residing at St. John's College,
has been affected by bedbugs
in her room. Louay is seeking
compensation from UBC Student
Housing and Hospitality Services
(SHHS).
Louay said she was bitten by
the bedbugs on her arms, back
and legs. "They were really itchy
and small," said Louay. "Some
weren't even visible and I only
knew there was something because it was so itchy."
Louay said the bites began
in September, but she initially
misinterpreted them as mosquito
bites.
Louay said SHHS gave her
instructions on how to prepare
for pest control the following Oct.
7 after she filed a maintenance
request Oct 3.
Louay requested to be removed from the room during
treatment, but said her request
was denied due to the concern
of the potentially spreading the
bedbugs.
"For me, it wasn't acceptable,
because I'm basically quarantined
for two weeks while the treatment is going on," said Louay.
"There have been bedbugs
before," said SHHS building
services manager Randy Gvora,
who insisted it was not a big issue.
Gvora refused further comment.
Henry Yu, the principal of St.
John's College, acknowledged
that he understood the student's
perspective.
"Only one resident has been
affected and it has not spread
from that one room," said Yu. "It
is incredibly upsetting, but until
[the bedbugs] are treated, the
worst thing you can do is spread
it."
Louay has notified her friends
and fellow residents of the college
about the issue of bedbugs, but
some residents were unaware
of what has taken place. Jaclyn
White, a current resident at St.
John's College, had not heard
about the bedbugs.
"I'm a bit worried," said White,
"but I think it'll be OK because I
know that the maintenance and
staff here at St. John's are very
quick and efficient in dealing
with problems, and I imagine it
will be the same for this situation
as well."
Louay said she refused to
return to her room until the bedbug treatment ended due to the
distress and agitation it caused
for her.
"The worst part is that it is
so distracting from my school
ing," said Louay. "I had to get
extensions from professors in my
department."
Louay said she is frustrated with SHHS, not St. John's
College. Louay emphasized that
St. John's has been extremely
supportive, with the principal and
staff trying to help her as much
as possible. Louay said they have
been able to accommodate her
needs to the best of their ability,
and have helped her move into
a temporary guest room at the
college.
"It was really tough on her.
I have all the sympathy in the
world for her, which is why we
tried to help alleviate the situation," said Yu.
"We wanted to make sure her
studies weren't interrupted."
At the same time, the principal
also understood SHHS's policy of
containing the bedbugs.
Louay said she intends to seek
compensation from SHHS. She
believes that her demands are not
unreasonable, and is requesting
a new mattress for her room.
However, she doubts that it will
happen. Louay said she would
buy a new mattress with her own
money if SHHS will not provide a
new one.
"Other people have encouraged
me to request my rent back for the
month," said Louay, "but [a new
mattress] is all I want." XI // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIESCADDEN
DAY, OCTOBER 15,2013
HOCKEY»
Women's hockey hit and miss in first home series
UBC blanks Calgary 4-0 on Friday night, but comes up empty in a shootout loss on Saturday
Jenny Tang
Contributor
The UBC women's hockey team
had plenty to be thankful for this
Thanksgiving weekend as they
shutout the University of Calgary
Dinos 4-0 in their home opener
on Friday night. However, they
were humbled the following
afternoon as they were unable to
continue the win streak, losing 4-3 in a shootout in Saturday's rematch.
On Friday, the 'Birds were
raring to go despite the delay in
the puck drop, and were able to
score three goals by the end of the
first period. With goalie Danielle
Lemon's fantastic saves, they were
able to carry on in the game without any goals from Calgary. Lemon
managed to stop all 26 shots on
goal from the Dinos, her first
career CIS shutout and win.
In a fast and furious final five
minutes of the first period, goals
by Tatiana Rafter and Stephan
ie Schaupmeyer put the 'Birds
ahead by three. The first came on
a brilliant wraparound by Rafter,
who was set up by Sarah Casorso
and Nicole Saxvik. Less than 30
seconds later, Saxvik initiated a
breakaway for Schaupmeyer, who
expertly put the puck past Calgary
goalie Amanda Tapp. Rafter then
added another on a power play to
end the period, assisted by Nikola
Brown-John.
Rookie Melissa Goodwin added
the fourth and final goal in the
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Danielle Lemon was outstanding in net for UBC on Friday night, stopping all 26 shots for her first career shutout as a Thunderbird.
second period. It was her first
career CIS goal.
The Dinos fought back in the
third with plenty of shots on
goal, but simply could not get
past Lemon.
This success was fitting for captain Christi Capozzi's 100th regular season game celebration. When
a player plays their 100th game
with the Thunderbirds, they are
given a golden helmet by a veteran
alumna of the women's hockey
team, who also gives a speech.
"I'm pretty excited," Capozzi
gushed. "I can definitely use that
as an extra boost."
However, Capozzi also said she
won't let individual achievements
defer her focus from the game. "I
try to play the same every game
and do what I do," she said firmly.
"[The 100th game celebration] is
something super special in the
background that I can come back
to after the game."
Despite the win, head coach
Graham Thomas was critical,
emphasizing the team's need to
hit for a full 60 minutes, which is
a fault that has plagued the 'Birds
in previous games. He noted how
many saves Lemon had to make in
the third period.
"We can't get fixated on the
score," Thomas said. "If we're
going to be one of the top teams in
the league, we can't take periods
off or teams will bite us."
UBC was intent on riding this
success into Saturday's game, and
were all set to go with the raising
of the their first Canada West
Championship banner, a reminder
of their success last year. But just
as Thomas had warned, Calgary
was ready to bite back.
It was clear throughout the
game on Saturday that the 'Birds
were being sloppy, and a failed
clearing attempt gave Calgary their
first goal in the first period. This
was followed by a neat retaliation
by UBC forward Rebecca Unrau,
which evened out the score to 1-1
by the end of the first period.
Calgary were looking to kill
throughout the second period and
were able to extend their lead with
two more goals. However, this
was short-lived as Christi Capozzi
did, as she had said the day before,
"what [she] does," and along with
Tatiana Rafter, the two scored the
equalizing goals within the last
five minutes of play.
The 'Birds were one man down
in the last crucial moments of play
— Capozzi having been given a late
penalty — but were able to hang
on for overtime. The teams were
neck-and-neck in overtime, sending the game to a shootout, and the
Dinos emerged victorious.
Thomas attributed this loss on
the team's apparent lack of focus
in the game, and praised Calgary
warmly on their impressive play
over the weekend.
"[Calgary's] a very different
team, with some of the best players
in the world," Thomas commented.
"I was impressed. They've got
some very good players and some
new young players. We're all going
through this regrowing phase and
we've got to hit where it counts."
The Thunderbirds will be
playing the University of Regina
Cougars on the road next weekend, and Thomas is determined
to get the girls into battle shape
in order to move forward into
their season. XI
SOCCER»
Men's soccer win streak hits double digits again
Defending CIS champions clinch division, earning the right to host 2013 Canada West playoffs
Nick Adams
StaffWriter
This weekend, the Thunderbirds
extended their win streak into
the double digits, first beating the
University of Winnipeg Wesmen
2-0 on Friday and then the Mount
Royal University Cougars 3-0 on
Saturday. The games brought their
record to a division-leading 11 wins
and one loss.
This position isn't an unusual
one for the UBC men's soccer
team, who hold an a 2012 CIS
crown and myriad of other titles.
After losing their year-and-a-half
undefeated streak earlier this September, the T-Birds haven't let the
mistake happen again.
Mentally, falling into the trap
of overconfidence is all too easy
for successful athletes. Big games
have been lost countless times
because of the cognitive bias
extended win streaks create — the
Miracle on Ice, Buster Douglas
over Mike Tyson, Steve Darcis
over Rafael Nadal and so on. It's
simply indisputable that complacency comes with the territory.
After the game, head coach
Mike Mosher spoke about what the
team does in order to ensure that a
mentality of guaranteed winning
doesn't develop.
"It's been a case of just
[focusing] upon weekend by
weekend, game by game, and just
[playing] what's in front of you,"
said Mosher. According to him,
it's about looking at the future
and not letting the past affect
your game.
On Saturday night, the T-Birds
did exactly that.
In the first minute, Harry
Lakhan curled a free kick in from
the corner, and the keeper was
beat by the deflected clearance
off one of his defenders. UBC
kept the pressure on, creating a
chance only minutes later that
resulted in a gravity-defying
goal-line save from Cougars
keeper Kamil Zielinsky.
Almost the entire half was
spent in UBC's attacking third,
seeing unspectacular chances
from Lakhan, Navid Mashinchi,
Milad Mehrabi, Niall Cousens
and Paul Clerc. Due to some over-
zealous offside calls, the score
remained at 1-0 as the teams
headed into the locker rooms at
the half.
Starting off the second half,
Mount Royal seemed to come out
with a somewhat reinvigorated
demeanour. In the 54th minute,
the Cougars broke through with
their best chance of the game: a
free kick from the fifty-yard-line
saw a chip sail over the UBC defense and onto the foot of forward
Matteo Valdes. His shot, however,
trickled past the far right post and
out for a goal kick.
Then, in the 77th minute, a mid-
field push up the center saw Reynold
Stewart illustrate what a perfect
touch and turn looks like as he slotted a left-foot curler into the bottom
corner from the top of the box.
Putting the final nail in the
coffin, Mashinchi placed home
a deflected save off a shot from
Cousens, drawing the scoring to a
close at 3-0.
"We take every practice properly," said Lakhan. He stressed the
importance of winning the Pacific
Division this year, which would
give UBC rights to host playoffs.
"Our focus has been for a couple
weeks now getting that spot in
Canada West because we don't
lose here. We did once a couple
games ago against UFV, but that's
pretty much it."
With a 14-point advantage over
Victoria, UBC has now clinched
the Pacific Division crown, which
means they will host Canada West
playoffs starting on Oct. 31.
"At this point in time, we've put
ourselves in a great spot," Mosher
said. "We've had 12 games over the
last six weeks and now we've got a
bye week in front of us.
"It wasn't easy this weekend. A
couple teams came in and battled
us. That said, we did take an opportunity to rest a couple players."
UBC will rest next weekend before playing their final two regular
season games in Alberta against
the University of Lethbridge
Pronghorns and the University of
Calgary Dinos. XI
PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Rookie striker Niall Cousens has been giving goalies grief all season for the Thunderbirds. He scored one of three goals in Saturday's victory over Mount Royal.
BIRD DROPPINGS
Men's soccer (11-1-0) Men's hockey (0-2-0)
Friday vs. WIN: 2-0 W Friday @ CGY: 3-1L
Saturday vs. MR: 3-0 W Saturday @ CGY: 9-5 L
Women's soccer (7-0-3)     Women's hockey (2-1-1)
Saturday @ LETH: 3-0 W       Friday vs. CGY: 4-0 W
Sunday @ CGY: 3-1W Saturday vs. CGY: 4-3 OTL FEATURES    I    TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2013
The rankings bonanza
In the latest Times Higher Education university rankings, UBC fell one
spot to 31st place. While a standard fanfare always surrounds new
ranking results, with friendly trash-talking between friends at rival
universities and chats with relatives, one question should always be
asked: do the world university rankings affect things like the quality of
new applicants, faculty recruitment and employment opportunities
upon graduation?
Words by Elba Gomez Navas
Graphics by Ming Wong
AHEADS-UPFOR
INCOMING STUDENTS
As an "international university,"
UBC relies heavily on both the
quality and quantity of undergraduate students coming from
abroad. Given that the university
actively recruits in approximately 60 countries worldwide and
16 states in the United States, it
cannot rely exclusively on its local
reputation alone for attracting
applicants.
"If students and their parents
don't know much about Canada,
they'll look at the rankings to see
which Canadian universities rank,
let's say, on the top 500," said
Karen McKellin, executive director of the International Student
Initiative at UBC.
McKellin added that in addition
to buttressing a school's reputation, the rankings give prospective
students a sense of their chances of
getting accepted and how far their
tuition dollars will go at a given
school.
"It does play a role in early-on
considerations of which college to
attend," she said. "But it isn't the
reason why students decide on a
particular university."
Ultimately, McKellin said it is
about finding best fit.
The right academic program,
the networking possibilities for a
future career and interaction with
superstar professors are all factors
that McKellin said play a more significant role than the overall ranking of a university, though such
elements often go hand in hand.
Milena Khalil, a first-year in
UBC's new bachelor of international economics (BIE) program, said when she was first
applying to UBC, she initially
examined the overall rankings.
But once she was admitted to both
the Sauder School of Business
and the BIE program, operating
as part of the Arts-based Vancouver School of Economics, she
started looking at subject-specific
rankings.
"I decided to enroll in the BIE
program not only because it interested me more but also because
the Vancouver School of Economics was better ranked [than
Sauder]," she said.
Although Khalil said rankings
were not the defining factor in
her program selection, she does
acknowledge the weight they have
on employment opportunities in
the future.
"I think it would be naive of me
to assume that the ranking of a
university doesn't play any kind of
role in having a successful career
after graduation," Khalil said.
JOBS, JOBS, JOBS
As more and more students
graduate from universities,
post-graduation employment
has become a growing concern
among undergraduate students
and their parents — especially for
international students who pay a
higher tuition.
"We are obviously looking for a
university in which we have some
degree of certainty that we will
be able to get returns from our
investment in our education, so to
speak," Khalil said.
Rankings for top universities
are generally closely correlated
to high post-graduation salaries,
said Ashok Kotwal, an economics
professor who also heads the BIE
program.
But Kotwal added that non-
elite universities often emphasize
educating students to meet the
realities of the job market rather
than vying for a higher ranking
through dedicating more funding
to research, for example.
"There is a selection of
high-calibre students at prestigious colleges, and surely keeping
everything else constant, you
would think they are more likely
to land jobs than somebody else,"
Kotwal said. "[But] some colleges
are highly ranked by one criteria
[and] if you add employment criteria, the rank goes down.
"Part of this is because they
don't have the programs that are
much more professionally-oriented like engineering and applied
science."
Kotwal emphasized that for this
reason, the ranking alone is rarely
enough to tell prospective students
how they'll fare once they leave
the ivory tower.
Nonetheless, rankings provide essential propaganda for a
university to launch marketing
campaigns at potential employers
of their graduates.
For the Sauder School of
Business, which heavily relies on
employment statistics to promote
its program, rankings do play their
fair share in marketing strategies.
Lida Gulli, director of the bachelor of commerce Career Services,
said rankings can open doors
to jobs that would otherwise be
inaccessible to graduates.
"[Rankings are] what come to
mind when you say UBC and you
say Sauder," Gulli said. "If the
rankings are favourable, it's certainly not going to hurt the brand."
While local employers may already have a sense of the different
programs at UBC, rankings are especially important when graduates
apply to foreign firms unfamiliar
with Canadian universities as
a whole.
"Although Sauder generally
measures itself through business-specific rankings, when marketing abroad, UBC has a really
strong brand. So we'll start with
the UBC brand and then introduce
Sauder," Gulli explained.
IS THE IVY LEAGUE ALL
THAT?
So, how does UBC stack up against
the big dogs?
In 2011, Times Higher Education (THE) introduced a new ranking, where it rated schools by reputation. In the reputation ranking,
UBC actually fares better than in
the overall rankings: 25th versus
31st. And yet, under the metrics
used by THE, Harvard University
was nearly 90 per cent better than
UBC when it comes to reputation
— a much wider gap than under
the overall quality ranking.
Gulli said the Ivy League's
golden advantage compared to
universities like UBC when it
comes to landing graduates with
top employers comes from a number of factors, one of them being
geographical location. Vancouver,
in Gulli's words, is not a "headquarter town."
"We don't have the competitive landscape and the quality or
number of jobs that you would
have around the Boston area or in
the main cities in the U.S.," Gulli
said, adding that universities in
western Canada even suffer when
compared to schools in Ontario.
I think it would be
naive of me to assume
that the ranking of
a university doesn't
play any kind of role
in having a successful
career after graduation.
Milena Khalil
First-year Arts student studying
at UBC's Vancouver School of
Economics
"When we put on networking
events, there's a smaller pool of
professionals to draw from, to
work with our students, as opposed to major financial centres
[and] major headquarter centres,"
Gulli said.
Ultimately, this turns into a
helpful cyclical system for Ivy
League schools, where the top universities in the world like Harvard
and Stanford build communities
of alumni near their schools, and
can then rely on those networks to
help future graduates.
But even schools located in financial hubs don't
necessarily embrace the
rankings wholeheartedly.
David Naylor, president of Canada's highest ranked school, the
University of Toronto, said rankings don't tell the whole story.
"It's obviously very hard to boil
institutions as complex as universities down to a single number,"
he said.
METRICS AREN'T
FLAWLESS
Questions are constantly being
raised about how the rankers come
up with their lists. The University of Toronto, for example,
has climbed in the Quacquarelli
Symonds (QS) rankings, while
falling in the THE rankings.
That was the result of a serious
shift in how the two rankings were
generated, with THE partnering with Thomson Reuters and
re-engineering their metrics
almost entirely. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15,2013    |    FEATURES    |   7
UBC's rankings in the past 10 years
Years
2003    2004    2005    2006    2007    2008    2009    2010     2011     2012     2013
or
£
C
re
CC
Academic Ranking of World Universities
(ARWU), since 2003
QuacquarelliSymonds
(QS), since 2004
Times HigherEducation
(THE),since2010
Times Higher Education-QS, 2004-2009
But when it comes to determining the quality of a university,
whatever system is employed often
results in oversimplification. For
example, the student-to-faculty
ratio is used by both QS (where
it composes 20 per cent of total
score) and THE (4.5 per cent of
the total) to determine the quality
of teaching.
Even the rankers acknowledge
the flaws with this method.
"A key part of that is access to
academic support. I think student-faculty ratio is a reasonable
proxy measure for this," said Ben
Sowter, head of research for QS.
"This is not to say that I am satisfied with it, though."
Phil Baty, rankings editor for
THE, was harsher in his criticism
of the metric.
"A staff-faculty ratio is an exceptionally crude instrument for
judging teaching quality — does
the number of waiters in a restaurant tell you how good the food
is?" he said. "It fails to take into account a whole range of issues, like
the balance between intimate personal tutorials and large lectures,
major variations in student-faculty
ratios by subject area, and the data
is exceptionally easy to manipulate
depending on how you count your
faculty."
Another issue hurting Canadian
universities' rankings has been
the egalitarian funding model
employed by the federal government. While other countries invest
heavily in one or two universities
in order to boost their rankings,
Baty said the Canadian government doles out funding equally,
and that will mean lower rankings
going forward.
Naylor agreed with the critique,
and slammed the federal government's funding model.
"While it's fantastic that QS
says we're 17th in the world,
and we can all have a little brief
victory dance about that... we
are still swimming against the
tide in this country. And frankly,
it's shameful.
"All over the world you see strategic investments being made by
other jurisdictions to ensure that
they have a set of [highly ranked]
institutions. So far, what's happening in Canada is not aligned
in any way, shape or form in that
direction," he said.
However, Sowter, of THE, said
Canada's funding model was sound
and shouldn't hurt its universities'
rankings.
"With Canada's population
spread over such a vast area, it
would seem counterintuitive to
put all the focus on one or two universities," Sowter said. "From the
standpoint of our ranking, Canada
looks highly competitive and
appears to be holding its ground
much more robustly than the U.S.
"Canada has a funding model
that works for Canada."
THE IMPACT ON FACULTY
It's not only prospective students
that eagerly await the new rankings every year. For university
officials, a fluctuation in rankings
can have a significant effect on
recruitment of new faculty.
"Faculty care a lot about the
reputation of a university and the
rankings — the higher you rank,
the easier it is to recruit," said
Kotwal, the BIE director.
All over the world
you see strategic
investments being
made by other
jurisdictions to ensure
that they have a set
of [highly ranked]
institutions. So far
what's happening in
Canada is not aligned in
any way, shape or form
in that direction... and
frankly it's shameful.
David Naylor
President, the University of
Toronto
But it's not only department
heads who worry about the rankings — university officials also
fret over changes in their school's
ranking, especially when those
changes are the results of different
metrics being used.
"With a slightly more different
methodology, you can go from
17th to 47th. And that is a valuable
source of information to some
parent of an international student,
and they may not let them go,"
Kotwal said. "The consequences
for a change in rankings can be
quite severe fiscally for a university, especially when the methodology can fluctuate at any time."
That has led some universities
to object to the rankings, or at least
try to minimize their impact.
Suzanne Fortier, who heads Mc-
Gill University, said the rankings
were prone to making mistakes.
"These aren't very accurate scientific studies, so the margin of error
is big," she said.
Naylor, the University of Toronto president, told a meeting of the
school's governing council that he
was concerned over how to best
balance a student-to-faculty ratio
versus faculty publication rate, another important metric, in order to
improve the university's ranking.
"If we don't count all the faculty, we have a high student-faculty ratio, which is taken as a
proxy for educational excellence in
some of the rankings systems," he
said. "[But] if we count all of them,
the publications per faculty per
faculty member fall dramatically,
and we lose again."
Ultimately, the rankings —
regardless of their methodological
value — play a role not only on
discourse around campus, but
also when it comes funding, networking and access to objective
third party information.
Yet there might be a new trend
emerging for the future, according
to Gulli.
"Now, there's just so many
other ways that employers can
recruit candidates, like Linkedln,
for example, that employers have
access to candidates all over the
world at their fingertips. I think
the power of the rankings is going
to diminish." XI
-With files from Liza Agrba and
Teodora Avramov, The Varsity
(University of Toronto)
How do they decide the ranking criteria?
International staff,
student, research
(7.5%)
ndustry
nnovation (2.5%;
Citation
(30%)
Research:
volume, income,
'eputation
130%;
Teaching:
awards, staff,
'eputation
130%;
The other five
metrics divided
cy number of full-
time staff (10%;
capers in Nature
120%;
Research:
I papers mdexec
in Scienceanc
I Social Science
Citation Index
(20%;
Faculty:
highly cited
researchers
(20%)
Faculty: staff with
Nobel Prizes,
medals
(20%;
Education: alumni with awards
(10%;
THE
An equal split
between teaching, research and
citation. 2.5 per cent
is on how much
industry would pay
for products from
this institution. Even
though THE and QS
split, they are similar
in how much they
allocate to a university's reputation and
citation output, and
their international
focus.
ARWU
Proof of academic
excellence, according to ARWU, is
based on how many
papers are produced
from this institution
and the amount of
awards won by alumni and faculty. Focus
is on prestige, not
so much on student
experience.
Bold denotes
similarities betweer
thethreescales
International
students (5%)
Citations
perfaculty
(20%)
Facultytc
student
ratio (20%:
Employer
reputatior
(10%:
Academic
'eputatior
140%;
QS
Both of the reputation metrics are
based on global
surveys. Academics vote on where
they think the best
work is coming
from and employers
vote on where they
think produce the
best graduates,
something the other
scales don't have. II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
FILM»
Through a lens darkly
Psychiatry pepartment hosts film series about mental health at Cinematheq xe
Gabriel Germaix
Contributor
Were they crazy starting such
a project?
Apparently not.
For 11 years, Harry Karlinsky,
a professor in the UBC department of psychiatry, and Caroline
Coutts, a filmmaker and curator,
have kept a particular habit: on the
third Wednesday of each month,
they go to the movies at the Pacific
Cinematheque on Howe Street,
downtown. But since they prefer
to choose what they are going to
see, they actually select the films
the Cinematheque shows.
Over a decade, their tastes have
not changed a bit. Every month,
Coutts and Karlinsky present a
movie about a different mental
health issue. Their educational
project, based on world-class
works of art, surprises audiences
with an intelligent and interactive
approach to what might otherwise stay a niche debate. Mental
disorders, coping with trauma
and overcoming a behavioral
disorder are just some of the many
themes that Frames of Mind, this
unique program, introduces to the
general public.
"We do think it is an effective learning experience," said
Karlinsky. "If we were to give a
lecture on schizophrenia, it may
not attract as many from a general
audience as a film that happens
to be on schizophrenia. It's a nice
way to engage the community in a
discussion about a mental health
issue."
Leaving the dull ambiance of
a classroom or a seminar, Karlinsky turned toward the warm
atmosphere of the Cinematheque,
an art-house movie theatre with
cinephile-oriented programming.
This is where Coutts steps
in. As a professional curator,
Coutts selects the movies that
best embody Karlinsky's idea.
The equipment available at the
Cinematheque allows her to use
different media and show the most
PHOTO STEPHANIEXU3THE UBYSSEY
Caroline Coutts and Harry Karlinsky have spent over a decade working to connect the public with mental health issues through the
medium of film.
recent films in both 35mm and
digital formats.
"It's a real cinematic experience, not just DVD," Coutts said.
Finding the right movie can be
challenging. "We wouldn't show a
movie that we think is completely out there and say, 'This is not
accurate,'" said Coutts. Instead,
the films they select try to fight
against the image of the stereotypical "madman" of blockbuster
cinema, Frankenstein-like with
scruffy eyes and gloomy grins.
This is why Coutts and Karlinsky choose realistic features or accurate documentaries — provided
they are the best movies they can
find, and not one of those deadly
boring educational movies students are forced to watch in high
school. Both founders of Frames
of Mind agree that the movies are
really "a springboard for discussion," leading the general public to
get involved in the discussion that
follows the movie.
Each week, Karlinsky invites
professionals in the field to provide information and lead a debate
with the audience. Filmmakers,
film-lovers, psychology amateurs,
students and doctors in psychiatry
that make up the audience are all
invited to take part in a debate that
embraces many points of view on
the matter.
"[Frames of Mind] is about ignorance, and addressing ignorance
and misinformation," Coutts said,
noting that people are not forced
in any way to be active during
the discussion. Some even leave
before. "I am completely okay
with that," Karlinsky added with
a smile.
Others ask questions, while
some just want to listen. "The
important part is that they engage,
no matter what way they do so,"
said Karlinsky.
If we were to
give a lecture on
schizophrenia, it may
not attract as many
from a general audience
as a film that happens
to be on schizophrenia.
Harry Karlinsky
Professor in the UBC department
of psychiatry
To engage with UBC, Frames
of Mind has set up a series of
agreements with the department
of psychiatry and Faculty of
Medicine. Alan Wai, a liaison with
the UBC community, makes sure
that 10 psychiatry residents and
10 medical students attend each
screening for free.
In addition to the educational
purposes of the series, discussing
mental health issues can help
viewers relate to the characters
of the movie, or someone they
know who has mental health
issues. They can easily approach
one of the organizations that are
invited to the Cinematheque for
each viewing. "It's a nice and
gentle way to increase access to
the community services as well,"
Karlinsky said.
As for the future of Frames of
Mind, both Coutts and Karlinsky
don't lack ideas. For Coutts, she
envisions a travelling Frames of
Mind festival in smaller Canadian towns, while Karlinsky
recently launched the Lucid Book
Club at Green College at UBC.
As a partnership with the UBC's
creative writing program, the
book club is the literary twin of
Frames of Mind, focusing on the
same issues.
People who would prefer to
stick to the movies can go to this
Wednesday's screening, Tyran-
nosaur. The British film is about
the tentative friendship between
a hard-drinking, violence-prone
unemployed worker and a woman
who hides a traumatic life behind
her fair Christian facade. "It is a
fantastic film — pretty bleak, but
there is still hope at the end," said
Coutts.
Those who doubt such a
movie can end well should see
themselves: they might change
their minds.
Frames of Mind plays at the Pacific
Cinematheque, 1131 Howe St., every
third Wednesday of the month.
Tyrannosaur plays Oct. 16 at 7:30
p.m.%
THEATRE»
Dissolve receives renewed relevance at Sauder
Students look on
sexual assault.
PHOTO GEOFF LISTER3THE UBYSSEY
at last week's performance of Dissolve, a play about drug-assisted
Leyna Michela
Contributor
Almost 11 years after its premiere,
Meghan Gardiner's one-woman
show has come full circle.
Entertaining and provocative,
Dissolve is the story of drug-assisted sexual assault. Gardiner
first wrote the play during her
time in the BFA acting program
at UBC. As part of recent sexual
assault awareness initiatives,
she was invited back for a return performance by the Sauder
Undergraduate Office.
Dean Robert Helsley of the
Sauder School of Business hoped
the play would raise awareness
and foster dialogue about sexual
violence on campus. "Now that I
have seen it myself," he said, "I can
attest to the play's importance and
impact."
The brightly lit lecture hall
in Wesbrook was more than
half full at its first performance.
Many members of the Commerce
Undergraduate Society (CUS)
were in attendance, including VPs
and new president Sean Fleming.
Just past the entrance, the Sexual
Assault Support Centre's table provided pamphlets on drug-assisted
sexual assault.
After the performance, Gardiner answered audience questions and spoke about her writing
process. She was open and honest
about her own experiences with
drug-assisted sexual assault.
Gardiner said she hoped Dissolve
would be put out of business;
however, incidents such as the
rape chants at UBC and St. Mary's
prove that the play is still relevant.
"The CUS has been helpful in
reaching out to the student body
and connecting them with information about the performance,"
Helsley said.
According to CUS VP internal
Thea Simpson and VP academic
Nil Keshmiri, Sauder students
were not pressured to attend. "It
was presented as an opportunity
for reflection," said Keshmiri.
Dissolve has two more performances on Oct. IS. At 12:30p.m.,
the play will be in Room 201 of the
Wesbrook building, and at 6p.m., at
Dorothy Somerset Studio. Admission is free.
CULTURE VULTURE
Cool story
B.C. native Alice Munro has
been awarded the 2013 Nobel
Prize in literature. She is the
first Canadian to ever win the esteemed award, and was the writer in residence at UBC's creative
writing program in 1980. The
jury declared her "the master of
the short story."
No, not that kind of apple
Friends of the Garden, a charity
that supports the UBC Botanical Garden, is running a pop-up
store from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. today
at Robson Square. They are
giving out free apple products
to celebrate the upcoming
Apple Festival (Oct. 19-20).
Cheap deal
Ballet BC is offering a student
rush ticket discount for TILT at
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
downtown. Students who come
to the box office with valid
student ID pay $15 plus fees,
a discount of over 50 per cent
from regular seating. The performance runs from Oct. 17-19
at 8 p.m.'a TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2013    |    CULTURE
ART»
The big
Two of Vancouver's
most important cultural
powerhouses are celebrating
their ruby anniversary this year. In
their own ways, both the Cultch and the
Western Front have rigorously supported and
advocated for the independent production
of avant-garde and experimental art, theatre,
music and dance.
Global venue, community stage: Vancouver East Cultural Centre
Canadian experimental art spearheaded
at the Western Front
PHOTO FOCTONGUE PHOTOGRAPHY/FLICKR
The Cultch hosts dancers, musicians, comedians, and artists from across the planet while catering to local interests.
Alexandra Meisner
Contributor
Forty dancing candles, exquisite
world premieres and thriving new
programs; these are some of the
highlights the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre — affectionately
known as the Cultch — has to look
forward to during their upcoming
40th anniversary year of artistic
performances and celebrations.
On Oct. 15, the Cultch - located
at 1895 Venables St. - is celebrating the milestone of bringing
40 years of choreography, music
and creative talent to the stage
for all Vancouverites to enjoy.
The Cultch's executive director,
Heather Redfern, is bustling with
excitement for the momentous
occasion and pride in the centre's
years of achievement.
"We bring in work from all over
the world. There just isn't that
much access to live performance
in Vancouver from other countries
and the rest of Canada," said Redfern. "And then for local companies, there are not a lot of theatre
spaces in Vancouver. We play a role
there by presenting their work."
The anniversary event being
held at the Cultch will be an
informal celebration free to the
public. The party will feature a
live band, food and drink, and an
archival exhibition of posters and
photos that document past years
of performances. "The first show
here was Oct. 15,1973, [an] Anna
Wyman dance," Redfern said.
The event is one highly anticipated by the staff of the Cultch,
and Redfern cannot wait to share
the fun with everyone attending.
"I just want everyone to come and
have a really good time."
Along with Redfern, colleague
Robert Leveroos is eager for the
celebration of 40 years, and equally as eager for the future plans of
the Cultch's specialized programs.
Leveroos has been the active youth
program coordinator for the past
two years, a program he believes to
be unique in the Vancouver area.
"We have a mentorship program
for anybody between the ages of
13 to 24. It's for artists in specific
disciplines. We pair them up with
mentors to work on their own
projects," said Leveroos.
"[The] mentorships are for
dance, the spoken word and
song-writing," Leveroos explained.
Along with play writing and
directing, organizers are looking
to add new aspects to the program
for youth to learn about stage
management.
Leveroos sees the Cultch as an
irreplaceable contribution to the
cultural experience of Vancouver.
"Nobody in this city is offering
the kind of programming that we
do," he said. "[The Cultch] not only
presents local artists, but national
artists and international, and it
spans the spectrum of contemporary art."
Redfern was also excited about
the Cultch's upcoming year of programming. "We're actually [going
to be] seeing work that is maybe a
little edgier, a little more challenging," she said.
Included in that programming
is the highly anticipated work of
Canadian dance icon Margie Gil-
lis, set to appear in the premiere
of Bulletins From Immortality...
Freeing Emily Dickinson. Pre-
miering on Oct. 23, the Cultch
will be the first venue on a worldwide tour of the show, which
interprets the life of the famous
American poet through dance
and spoken word. Gillis says she
is delighted to be performing
once again at the East Vancouver
Cultural Centre.
"It's a perfect intimate space
for us to have our premiere, and
get it out of work-in-progress and
into its final stage," Gillis said.
"We have followed the poetry and
unleashed — unbound — Emily
Dickinson."
With the upcoming anniversary
party, the expansion of incomparable youth programs and anticipated performances scheduled,
the Cultch is forecasted to remain
a significant cultural experience
that Vancouverities will continue
to appreciate.^
=HOTO WIKIMEDIACOMMONS3THE UBYSSEY
Though innocuous on the surface, the Western Front has played a pivotal role in the
development of art, music and other media platforms in Vancouver.
Aurora Tejeida
Senior Culture Writer
In 1973, a group of eight artists bought a building in Mount
Pleasant that once belonged to a
secretive fraternity known as the
"Knights of Pythia." Their idea
was to create a place where artists
could live and create art. This
resulted in the creation of Western
Front, one of the oldest artist-run
art spaces in Canada.
"Western Front sort of originated as a relationship between art
and life that was quite fluid," said
Sarah Todd, curator of the media
arts program at the Front.
Forty years ago, all founding
members lived in the building
that sits on 303 East 8th Ave.
Today, only one of them still lives
there, but the Front continues
to be an important space for art
in Vancouver.
"What makes it unique is the
interdisciplinary program, and
that it is an artist-run centre,"
Todd said.
This means that artists have the
opportunity to connect different
disciplines like music, art and
multimedia, which, in Todd's opinion, reflects the way artists are
presently working.
Currently, the Front has a media
arts program, an exhibition program and a new music program. In
the past, there were literary and
performance arts programs, but
funding issues have narrowed it
down to the current three.
This year's anniversary was
celebrated in the summer with an
open house. It coincided with the
building receiving a special designation as a place of interest from
the City of Vancouver.
Each program contributed
something to the celebration.
Todd's program did a screening of
videos from their archives, which
consist of over 18,000 videos
of original artwork and documentation of performances and
concerts that have taken place at
Western Front.
"We chose some [of the] greatest hits from the archives and sort
of matched them with temporary
works that were not produced
here. The theme was fancy dress
party, which is kind of pointing at
Western Front's history of dressing up," said Todd.
The Front has changed a lot
in relation to the funding that is
available. They are publicly funded, so when the funding changes,
programs come and go.
A few years ago, they had to
close the performance arts program, which was a big part of the
centre, so the media arts program
and the exhibitions program had
to step up their support of performance-related projects. The
Front also had to stop publishing their zine, Front Magazine,
in 2011.
"Western Front is still very
much interested in experimental art practice, things that are
research-based, things that are
performative, things that are not
necessarily objects based, because
we have all of these different
spaces," said Todd. "There are
many aspects of what we do."
Performance art projects are
still very much on the agenda. Last
May, Adam Frank, an associate
professor at UBC's English department, produced a project called
Radio Free Stein. The project's goal
is to stage at least 10 of Gertrude
Stein's plays that have not received
critical reception, and to make
recordings in collaboration with
composers and sound artists, directors and actors.
"The basic idea [is] that if you
can put on an audio version of
these plays, it will be easier to
understand what they're about,
like radio plays with a musical
component," said Frank.
For the Country Entirely: A Play
in Letters was the first Stein play
produced for the project. It was
staged live at the Front in front of
roughly 75 audience members, and
a recorded version will soon be
available online.
The project is just one of many
similarly experimental projects
being supported by the Front.
"Western Front is interested in
avant-garde or experimental performances and art of all kinds. It's
a great venue that's been around
for a long time and it's one of the
good spaces for hearing good
music and watching performances
and experimental art," said Frank.
The Front's attraction as an
experimental site stems from its
multi-functionality. The building
includes a performance space,
guest rooms, production studios, a
gallery, a kitchen and two residential spaces.
For Todd, this is what makes it
such a unique place. "There [have]
been a lot of changes in [our] 40-
year history, but one uniting factor
is the building. In a way, it forms
what we do."
The Front has also been a driving force in the use of technology
for art. According to Todd, it is one
of the first institutions worldwide
to have cameras available for the
artist's use.
But sometimes, it seems like
only other artists are aware of the
Front.
"From the outside, it's not very
noticeable. We don't have a sign
that says Western Front, it's a
strange building in a residential
area, you have to buzz in — but
this is an active and vital place,"
said Todd, adding that most of the
events are free.
"It's a great place to become
involved with what is happening
in the art scene in Vancouver," she
said.tl II Opinions
A mangled name for our $90M baby?
Eager to rebrand, the AMS has bungled the naming
process for the New SUB — a building you paid for
For those of you unaware of
the hulking rump of concrete
and steel — growing incrementally under the shadow of the
SUB and several Christmas-light
adorned cranes, forcing you and
thousands of other students to
cram your way through alternate
entrances to the SUB — let us give
you some background on the New
SUB project.
In 2007, the AMS came to the
realization that a 1960s brutalist
piece of civic architecture with
collapsing ceilings, clubs relegated
to closets and an entry door that
can't be locked (shhh!) should
maybe possibly be replaced by
a newer building with room to
accommodate UBC's massive
student population.
In 2008, students approved a
student fee in a referendum to
attain funding for the nearly $90
million the AMS is contributing to
the New SUB.
Since then, construction has
progressed at a steady enough
rate, and despite a delay of a few
months, it looks like the new
building will open sometime
next year.
But the New SUB project isn't
just about building an awesome
new building for students — which
by all indications the New SUB
will be.
REBRANDING
Instead, the AMS is taking this
as an opportunity to rebrand
their entire image. As part of the
project, the AMS has spent tens of
thousands of dollars on rebrand-
ing the AMS businesses in the
SUB and creating a new logo for
themselves.
Didn't like pizza or beer before?
Well, with offerings such as
BOOM! Pizza (nee Pie R Squared)
and the Perch (nee the Gallery),
the AMS thinks they can expect
some massive uptick in sales
and revenue.
If this sounds like
the AMS turned to
a game of Boggle
to name their
crown jewel, that's
probably not so far
off.
Or, more likely, they see the
new logo and the renaming of
SUB businesses as part of a grand
project to remake the image of the
AMS as your student society.
This is no small part of why,
when it came to a name for the
New SUB (if you thought that was
itself a name, apparently you'd
be woefully mistaken), the AMS
shunned corporate sponsorship
and even, it appears, genuine
student input. This is the AMS's
moment to shine, they believe, and
they won't let anything get in the
way of that — not even good names
for their new building.
But they also apparently won't
take help from professionals. Despite hiring consultants to revamp
all their businesses and their own
brand, they figured they'd just take
over this whole naming-the-build-
ing-itself thing on their own — and
WE'RE 60NNA     \
HAVE   SOHE GREAT
NAMES TO CHOOSE FR»mW
WWTE "AMS STUDENT
PAVILION"... AND "AMS
STUDENT STATION"... OH,
HOW 'WOT   "AMS STUDENT
COMMUNITY CENTRE"!?
We warned them!
LLUSTRATIONJETHROAUffHE UBYSSEY
While students could suggest names for the new SUB, it's clear the AMS, with the help of the dark lord Voldemort, had their own ideas about
what to name the New SUB.
proceeded to do so in a maddeningly inefficient and, quite frankly,
bad way.
A 3-PART NAMING
AMS VP Administration Derek
Moore, who is overseeing the New
SUB project this year, said there
were four ways the New SUB
committee came up with their
shortlist of names: from student
suggestions left on the Cube
(that glass-enclosed architecture
design room looking out on the
Aquatic Centre from within the
SUB), from friends, from internal
AMS committee suggestions, and
suggestions from other people in
the AMS.
In other words, the AMS's
name generation process was essentially an exercise in self-indulgence, seeing what might happen
if student hacks and permanent
staff stepped into an echo chamber and spent a few weeks seeing
what came out. The only meaningful student input allowed into
the process came off an actual
echo chamber, the Cube, and in
case the AMS was unaware that
tossing a Magic Marker at college
students and telling them to name
your $90-million project was not
a fantastic idea, we have decent
information that most of the student suggestions - "FROSH 2013
never happened," "hAMSter,"
"China SUB," "Herpody Herpes"
— were thrown up after a drunken Wednesday night at the Pit.
But the AMS's naming procedure was already so convoluted as
to render even serious suggestions
— "the Bird's Nest," "the Aviary,"
"the Forum" — unusable.
The New SUB committee
decided that not only were they
the best people to generate name
suggestions — because everything
works better by committee — but
that some combination of refrigerator word magnets, Mad Libs and
children's menus provided the
perfect inspiration for a powerful
new name.
The committee decided the
names for the shortlist would be
LLUSTRATION INDIANA JOEL^HE UBYSSEY
In the Oct. 3 edition of Last Words, we warned the AMS of the dangers of
poor name choice. There, the concern was selling off the naming rights; we
never considered they'd come up with original names that were just awful.
At the time, we offered our own suggestions for SUB names, none of which
were selected for the short list. Guess we won't be teaching any students
how to read good and do other stuff good too.
"The AMS was supposed to have had a name forthe New SUB a long time
ago. Since they can't seem to come to a conclusion, we took it upon ourselves
to offersome suggestions:
BOOM SUB: The AMS thought it was a good idea forthe new Pie R
Squared. Why not apply it to the whole building?
AMSterdam: The new student union building will be a haven for students
looking to avoid UBC's draconian drug laws.
The Next Obsolete Building (NOB): Let's face it, construction will never
end on campus. Soon enough, students will be sick of the New SUB and will
wantsome other shiny new building.
The Ubyssey Centre for Children Who Can't Read Good and Wanna
Learn to Do Other Stuff Good Too: If the New SUB gets this name, we promise to teach students to read good and do other stuff good too."
chosen in three parts: "starters,"
"middles" and "enders." They took
the submitted name ideas that
they liked, cut them into these
categories and regurgitated some
incredibly mediocre names that no
students seem to want.
Not to mention that considering every name on their
shortlist starts with AMS, it
seems clear who was driving the
decision making.
When you think about how
the names were put together, it's
understandable that the final options are looking a little off.
In the interest of transparency,
here's the part-by-part breakdown:
Starters: the, the AMS, AMS,
the Student, Student, the Student
Life, Student Life.
Middles: Activity, University,
Community, Union, Social, Society, Association.
Enders: Commons, Forum,
Centre, Block, Base, Quarters,
Zone, Habitat, Site, Area, Nest,
Cloud, Ranch, Branch, Web, Bird,
Core, Society, Club, Union, Station,
Hall, Mall, Pavilion, Building,
Clubhouse, Plaza, Hub.
If this sounds like the AMS
turned to a game of Boggle to
name their crown jewel, that's
probably not so far off. But imagine the possibilities: "the Alma
Mater Society Community Area,"
"the Student Life Society Quarters" or even "the Activity Ranch"
are all valid options.
This building is
a big deal, and
whatever name gets
stuck on it will be
there for decades.
From this list, it looks like most
of the serious suggestions written
on the Cube, such as the Lett Student Centre, the HUB, Pacific Students' Pavilion, the Bird's Nest, the
Nest and the Forum were taken
into account, and that's good. (See
our blog for the full list.)
STUDENT INPUT
SNUBBED
But with the convoluted beginning-middle-end naming process,
none of the student suggestions will
become the actual name. A couple
of other legitimate ideas, like the
Sanctuary and the Aviary, were left
out. This is understandable in any
process of elimination, but then
we are forced to ask where lengthy
devils like the "the AMS Student
Community Centre" came from
when better student-suggested
alternatives were passed over.
Actually, we know where they
came from: the AMS.
They're the ones with all the
power over the decision. They
created the shortlist, and it will be
AMS Council that chooses the final
name from a top-three list later
in the month. And while it makes
sense that the AMS should have
the power to veto names like "Old
SUB's subordinate" or "the Poop"
for their new building, students'
feedback should be taken into
consideration more seriously than
it has been, when they are paying
close to $100 million for a building.
We don't know what may have
come up in informal talks between
New SUB committee members and
other students, but we know, for
example, that none of the suggestions on the Cube began the
building's name with "AMS."
If you're going to name your
Student Union Building after your
student union, why not just leave
it as the SUB? Or, if you want to
get really adventurous with your
rebranding, even the AMS SUB?
You may think we're making too
big a fuss out of all this, but this
building is a big deal, and whatever name gets stuck on it will be
there for decades at a minimum.
Students have the ability during
the next few days to vote for what
will become the top three names
presented to AMS Council. Your
options might not be stellar, but
it's worth it to vote for the lesser
of seven evils: anything but "AMS
Student Station," please. XI II Scene
COMIC »
bird
byTubey
THE    LATE    BIRD
CATCHES   SWE   SLE£F>
THE    EARUY   BIW)
CATCHES  THE   WORM
tuteytoons-com
CATCULTY
LAND AND FOOD SYSTEMS
LLUSTRATION LUELLASUN/THE UBYSSEY
Why the UBCO student government execs should resign
KELOWNA - Three of UBC Oka-
nagan's four student government
executives, including the chair of
the UBC Students' Union Okanagan (UBCSUO), are currently
facing impeachment — and for
good cause.
To the extent that UBC Vancouver's sister campus' student
politics turmoil has caught your
attention, many of you may be
wondering what exactly is going
on over here.
Honestly, many of us are wondering the same thing.
Our student union has been
in turmoil for the better part
of the 2013-2014 winter term,
mostly due to the actions of our
elected executives.
Slightly different from the AMS,
students in the Okanagan elect
four executives with an executive
chair, like a president, chosen
out of those four executives. This
year, the students at UBCO elected
two new executives who had no
experience in the student union,
and one executive who had been
appointed the previous year.
The motions for impeachment
that have been submitted to the
UBCSUO for consideration at the
annual general meeting contains
a lot of jargon about violations
of the constitution, bylaws and
policy.
But the tricky language obscures the straightforward factors
that led to the impeachment drive.
The students who submitted the
motions are heavily involved in
SUO and have been pursuing dialogue with the executives and staff
for some time.
However, they decided that a
point had been reached where no
further dialogue would help, a
position that I agree with.
Let me break down why each
of the three executives are being
put up for impeachment and show
you where I reached my breaking
point.
ALEX GULA: EXTERNAL
COORDINATOR
The external coordinator is like
the VP external in the AMS. One
of the primary roles of the external
coordinator is to meet with all
levels of government. Yet when the
minister of advanced education
visited UBCO, Gula was conspicuously absent from the meeting.
You might say that this alone
doesn't warrant impeachment,
but Gula has literally not done
anything whatsoever since being
in office.
We have not seen the launch
of any campaigns on our campus;
no discussion around transit; no
advocacy around post secondary
education; and no discussion
around national and provincial
lobbying organizations.
The external coordinator opted
to take leave during the summer,
and had planned no campaigns for
the year. Now, in mid-October, still
no projects have begun.
Despite the lack of action, Gula
has continued to collect full pay
each month.
Does doing nothing while being
paid to do, well, something, warrant impeachment?
Given that we are six months
into the term of the external coordinator, and as a student paying
into the organization, I have not
seen anything coming from that
portfolio, I argue yes.
SHAMAN MCLEAN:
INTERNAL
COORDINATOR
"Inexperienced" is the word that
best describes Shaman McLean's
behaviour on the job.
McLean has failed to properly consult students through
the formal advisory committee
system before submitting multiple
policy amendments — including
a pay raise for executives—to the
SUO board.
One of the most concerning
decisions made by McLean was his
attempt to cut off funding for the
Women's Resource Centre. The
SUO is an organization that has
always been an advocate for gender
equality, and yet McLean argued
that because the Women's Resource
Centre's membership was stagnant,
we should cut off funding.
In fact, it is McLean's job to
ensure that the centre is staffed
and has the necessary resources.
Rather than starve them of funding, he should have been assisting
them in recruiting new members,
for example.
Due to student pressure, the
group's funding has been restored.
But the decision to withhold
it in the first place suggests an
executive out of touch with the
student body.
NICK DODDS: SERVICES
COORDINATOR
This is the second time that students have made a motion to impeach Dodds, and for good reason:
out of the three executives facing
impeachment, students have probably felt the most frustrated and
disenfranchised with Dodds.
Dodds put in place an incredibly
convoluted club policy with barely
any input from club presidents. He
tried to enact and overhaul policies
governing course union, similar to
clubs, after the academic year had
begun. And students have generally been unable to communicate
with the Services Coordinator,
who, for example, rarely replies to
their emails.
A point had been
reached where no
further dialogue
would help.
Dodds spends more time debating
students who object to his actions
than actually doing his job. I believe
Dodds has lost touch with the constituents he claims to represent.
The real question now is whether or not students believe that
with a wake-up call can get these
executives to turn it around, or if
their incompetence will continue
unless they are impeached.
Being involved in student
leadership and student unions for
almost three years now, what I have
witnessed this term from the three
SUO executives is nothing short of
a joke. I don't see the possibility for
much improvement unless they are
kicked out of office.
Curtis Tse is the Board of Governors student rep at UBC Okanagan. 12    I    GAMES    I    TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15,2013
Crossword
1
2
3
4
5
G
7
8
15
9
10
11
12
13
14
1G
17
IS
19
|20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
37
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
3G
40
4G
38
39
41
42
43
44
45
|47
|4S
43
50
51
■ 52
53
54
55
5G
57
58
53
GO
Gl
62
G3
G4
G5
G6
ACROSS
=UZZLE COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
1-Swiss peaks
5-Collective word for
intellectual pursuits
9-Pressure
13-And goes
14-Pages
16-Need a scratch
17-Litigant
18-Great bargain
19-Fill to surfeit
20-Girder
22-Dines at home
24-29th president of the U.S
27-A big fan of
28-Familiarize
29- Bid lowerthan another
33-Wash lightly
34-Ferrara family
35-Arizona city
36-Sleazy paper
37-Alternate
8- darntootin'!
39-Till bills
41-"Believe" singer
42-Skip	
44-Coil site
46-Pines
47- New Mexico art colony
48-Whip
49- District adjacent to a city
52- Debtor's letters
53-Alamo rival
57- Between ports
58-Baratthebar
60-Cat call
61- Breather
62- Rate
63-Sigmund's daughter
64- Commedia dell'	
65- Barton Fink director
66-Attempt
DOWN
1-Beast of burden
2-Bud's bud
3-Chart shape
4- Walks with long steps
5-Missing
6-Put a new price on
7-Abound
8-Pampering place
9- The aggregate of past events
10-Greek letters
11- Broadway opening
12-At that point
15-Thin
21-Twining stem
23- Broke bread
24-Strong aversion
25- Richards of Jurassic Park
26-Like Saturn
27-Bury
29-Doorkeeper
30-Purchaser
31-That is to say...
32-Pub game
34-Community spirit
37- Tenth month of the year
40-Locate
42-Loser to DDE
43-West Atlantic islands
45-Swiss river
46-Holly shrub
48-Sarge's superior
49-Franklin D.'s mother
50- -friendly: not too technical
51- Of the highest quality
52-Sock me!
54-Let off steam
55- New Rochelle college
56-Large mop
59-Animal pouch
Oct. 10 answers
B
A
A
*L
1
■p
A
R
E
"e
1
'•s
A
C
E
R
1
T
E
A
D
0
R
N
ti
L
A
N
A
R
M
s
*
0
U
N
D
A
B
0
U
T
■
H .
c
A
R
E ll
A
T
E
R
S
s
P
0
u
S
E H ~A
A
R
E H
S
E
E
N
T
o Is
T
R
JN TC
0
S
L
1
D
S
3L |3a
M
B
S
D | A
R
E
A
D
A 1
H'b
0
A 1
|v
A
N
N
E
T \"s
T
0
R
T |*E
T
1
N
S
C
L
E 1 E
A
V
r: H '
E
W
A
G
E
Is
A
M
i H ~
T
T
1
R
E
0
D
E
s
S
A H^E
R
E
C
T |
1
R
E
M
1
S
S
i
B
L
E
l
T
A
L
c
E
M
1
L
1
H
A
R
E
M
"E
V
E
R
L
0
R
E
A
L
0
S
s
*
A
N
T
Sudoku
3
8
6
5
1
7
5
1
8
4
8
1
7
3
9
5
7
1
4
6
2
5
2
7
8
3
5
6
4
6
3
2
1
1
5
4
9
8
Write
Shoot
Edit
Code
Drink
v.'« *
,    1
N
=UZZLE COURTESY KRAZYDAD USED WITH PERMISSION.
SHAMELESS
| GIVEAWAY
THE USYSSEY HAS
FRIGHT NPTS tickets
AND IS SHAMELESSLY
GIVING THEM AWAY!
COME TO ROOM 23 IN THE SUS
AND SHOW YOUR STUDENT ID
TO CLAIM YOUR FREE TICKET.
SAVINGS & DETAILS AT FRIGHTNIGHTS.CA
MM
STALK US ON:
PNE-PLAYLAND    PNECLIPS
For non-opt-out students only. While supplies last.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126140/manifest

Comment

Related Items