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The Ubyssey Jan 16, 2014

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Array JANUARY 16,2013 | VOLUMEXCVI ISSUEXXXIII
CAN I DO THAT ONE MORE TIME? SINCE 1918
TROUBLE BREWING
AMS council votes down proposal for a             P/l
microbrewery at UBC                                       Wr*W
CANTONESE CLASSES
UBC Asian studies department to develop Canada's                     D*2
first for-credit university Cantonese program                                  1^5
UBC PROF HEADING TO SOCHI P2 RACIAL DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT DISMISSED P3
DANCING FOR SIX STRAIGHT HOURS P10 RUGBY RIVALRY P8 CHANCELLOR SEARCH P3 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON i    THIS WEEK, MAY
THURSDAY   16
RAPE CULTURE: A YEAR
IN REVIEW
6 P.M.-8 P.M. @ THE GALLERY
The Terry Project's latest BarTalk wil
discuss sexual assault, the media
and our campus.
Free, 19+
FRIDAY ' 17
NARDWUARS VIDEO
VAULT4.0
12P.M.-2P.M.@SUB212A
KurtCobain, Lady Gaga, Snoop
Dogg, Jean Chretien — Nard-
waurthe Human Serviette has
interviewed them all. Come and
watch old interviews that the CiTR
alumnus has done during your
lunch hour. Dootdoo!
Free
SATURDAY ' 18
CHECK OUT SOME ART
12 P.M.-5 P.M. @ BELKIN ART GALLERY
Graduating soon? Better make
use of your free gallery admission
status. Into art? Check out the
latest collection featured at the
Belkin, The Spaces Between:
Contemporary Art From Havana.
Free
ON
THE
COVER
Inspired by Bret Hansen's Designer Projector project, today's cover
is our take on retro futurism — or just some Adobe Illustrator mess-
ing-about. Design by Ming Wong, photos from UBC Archive, including
a shot of an Arts One seminar from 1985 (top, center).
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
^|THE UBYSSEY
*^
JANUARY 16,2014 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUE*
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Veronika Bondarenko
vbondarenko@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producers
Lu Zhang +
Nick Grossman
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ehotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
Angela Tien, Carly Sotas, Alex
Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
Tang.AdrienneHembree^
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LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University/ of Rmish Cn-
umbia. It is publishe
andThursdaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
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The Ubyssey reserves the right tc
editsubmis: ir length and clar-
ty. All letters must be received by 12
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will be published in the following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
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esponsible for _, ■ nanges or ty-
aographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONEONONEWI
JE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
Bob McCormack, Olympic
medic, is Sochi-bound
',   C J Pentland
'   Managing Editor, Web
When he started medical school
at Queen's University, Bob McCormack had hopes of competing at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. He had come
off of a successful track career
during his undergrad at Queen's,
setting Canadian records in the
1000m and 1500m indoors, and
negotiated with the dean to take
some time off and give his Olympic dream a go.
Alas, Canada was part ofthe
boycott of those Olympics, which
abruptly ended his dream of
competing. But 34 years later,
McCormack will get his trip to
Russia as a part of Team Canada,
although this time it'll be as the
chief medical officer at the 2014
Winter Olympics in Sochi.
McCormack, a UBC professor in the Faculty of Medicine
and orthopedic surgeon, will be
heading to his fifth Olympics as
Chief Medical Officer (CMO)
for Team Canada, and his ninth
overall since 1976. With the
position, he focuses on athlete
health issues and injuries, as
well as doping issues.
"Being in sports I guess I had
a little bit of an association with
athletic injury and such, because
like most athletes I'd had a few
injuries myself," said McCormack. "I decided to do [sports
medicine],... and I ended up deciding to do orthopedics, which
has worked out well for me."
The Ottawa native committed
himself to helping out in any way
he can to work his way up the
ranks. What started out as volunteering at the Vancouver Sun
Run led to helping out with provincial championships, which led
to nationals, then the Canada
Games, the Commonwealth
Games, the Pan-American
Games, the Student University
Games — and in 2000, he made
his Olympic debut in Sydney as
a orthopedic surgeon for Team
Canada. In 2006, he went to
Turin as chief medical officer,
a position he's held at each Olympics since. He'll also be heading
to Rio de Janeiro in 2016, and
it's possible that he'll head to
more after.
"The strange irony is that I
wasn't able to get to the Olympics as an athlete,... but I've gotten to way more Olympics as part
ofthe medical staff than I ever
would have as an athlete," he
said with a chuckle, adding that
the continuity with the position
has allowed him to make Canada
more prominent on the world
stage. "It's worked out pretty
well for me."
McCormack originally came
out west to UBC to do his orthopedic training before starting
his practice, initially as a clinical
COURTESY PAUL WRIGHT/THE UBYSSEY
UBC professor Bob McCormack is Team Canada's chief medical officer.
OLYMPIC VETERAN
Summerorwinter, Bob
has been to all the Olym
games since Turin:
2006 Turin, Italy
2008 Beijing, China
2010 Vancouver, Canada
2012 London, United
Kingdom
instructor and then eventually
as a clinical associate professor.
He then switched over to the
academic stream, which includes
working with medical students
and doing research. However,
since his practice is based in
New Westminster, he works
more with SFU athletes, which
leads to some ribbing from
UBC colleagues when the rival
schools face off.
"One ofthe nice things about
my work is that it's quite diversified. One day I'm doing research,
the next day I'm doing patient
care, the next day I'm at the gold
medal game in hockey at the
Olympics," he said. "The variety
keeps it all interesting."
After working with so many
athletes and at so many events,
there are still specific moments
that stick out. He described
walking into his first opening
ceremonies as "impactful," and
was amazed at the support and
excitement that all of Canada
had during the Vancouver
games. "That was amazing
for me, to see how downtown
Vancouver was in 2010,... and
the pride that people took in
Canadian athletes."
At this point, the focus is on
Sochi, and getting Team Canada
to peak fitness. For some athletes, their health may not come
until the day before their event,
but when they eventually get
out there in front of world and
perhaps on the podium, it makes
the work he does all the more
impressive.
"I enjoy just going to the
games and watching the sports
because I'm a bit of a sports
junkie, but it's very, very rewarding when you can help somebody
else achieve their dream when
everything is looking pretty
black."
Turning black into gold, silver
and bronze: that's what Bob
McCormack does. XI
CORRECTION
Due to a miscommunication between writers and editors, we published on Jan. 10 after the AMS's
all-candidates meeting in our article, "Candidates confirmed for 2014 AMS elections," that Jackson Chen was running as a joke candidate in the upcoming elections. Chen is in fact not running as a
joke candidate.
The Ubyssey regrets the error, and apologizes to Jackson Chen. // News
ORS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
URSDAY, JANU
EQUITY »
PHOTO STEVEN RICHARDS/THE UBYSSEY
Jennifer Chan claims UBC racially discriminated against her during their hiring process.
Racial discrimination complaint dismissed
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
The B.C. Human Rights Tribunal
has dismissed the complaint of
a UBC education professor who
says she was the victim of racial
discrimination.
Jennifer Chan argued she was
denied appointment to the David
Lam Chair in Multicultural Education, which was granted to a white
candidate, in part because she is
Chinese-Canadian. The tribunal
dismissed her complaint after four
years of legal proceedings.
On Dec. 19, tribunal member Norman Trerise determined that, based
on the evidence before him, the case
had no reasonable chance of success
at a hearing.
"There is really nothing to support that race, colour, ancestry or
place of origin played a role in the
outcome ofthe selection process,"
Trerise wrote.
He determined that the decision
likely came down to the differences
between the hiring committee and
Chan's definitions of multicultural-
ism, since "breadth of representation of multicultural education"
was a criterion for the position.
Chan asserts that five ofthe six
members ofthe hiring committee
were not experts in multicultur-
alism.
"It's huge pity because if
[Trerise] had moved the case to
hearing, then obviously the crucial
thing would have been to hear the
experts in the field," Chan said.
Chan first brought her complaint to UBC's Equity Office
in 2009 after being denied the
position. The office ran an investigation and then dismissed the complaint, which led Chan to bring her
case to the tribunal in May 2010.
"I was disappointed all along
the way. I think one ofthe most
disappointing things ... would be
the UBC Equity Office's way of
handling the whole thing."
Chan alleges that the VP equity
at the time, Tom Patch, had hired a
friend of his to do the Equity Office
review which dismissed her case.
UBC made multiple attempts
to have the case dismissed, but in
January 2012, the tribunal ruled
that Chan's case would go to a
full hearing, which was originally
scheduled for September 2013.
In March 2012, UBC applied
to the B.C. Supreme Court for a
judicial review ofthe complaint
on the grounds that the case had
already been dealt with by UBC's
investigation through the Equity
Office. The Supreme Court ruled
that the tribunal's decision not to
dismiss the complaint "was based
on a misapprehension ofthe evidence and on irrelevant factors."
The court directed the tribunal to
reconsider its decision.
Chan asked for the tribunal
to include in its reconsideration
evidence that she had obtained
after filing her original complaint, and UBC said it should
not consider materials submitted
after that point. The tribunal sided
with UBC.
Chan said that, had the case gone
to hearing, the additional information would have helped her case.
Chan has no plans to continue
pursuing this case.
"In terms ofthe legal realm, it's
really over," she said.
"Dr. Chan is a respected scholar
and a valued member ofthe UBC
Faculty of Education," wrote UBC
director of public affairs Lucie
McNeill in an emailed statement.
"UBC took her complaint very seriously and investigated her allegations thoroughly under the procedures set out in UBC's policy on
discrimination and harassment.
"The tribunal's findings in December concur with our own, and
that is gratifying."
Although the complaint was
dismissed, Trerise did decide that
UBC's Equity Office investigation was not a proceeding in the
legal sense.
"There, we won, and it's extremely important in the sense
that even though this case is
dismissed, this part... is going to
set a legal precedent for future
complaints," Chan said.
Chan hopes that her case has
drawn attention to greater structural issues. In August 2012, only
eight per cent of 110 education
faculty members belonged to a visible minority.
"We're talking about a huge
structural gap in the Canadian
equity scene here. There's no
effective and efficient system for
any equity complaint, and for me
that is very serious.."
During the case, Chan received
no merit pay from the university,
although she had every year since
2003 before that. She was also
nominated twice for the Killam teaching award, and claims
that she did not win because of
her complaint.
"I thought of that as retaliation," Chan said.
Chan, who is still a tenured
professor, said that re-establishing
positive working relations with
UBC will be tricky.
"I guess right now I have to
deal with closure. After fighting
for this for so long, it's almost like
dealing with death — it's the death
ofthe case, there's grieving and
closure," said Chan. "I think it
will take a long time." XI
ADMINISTRATION »
UBC accepting
nominations for
new chancellor
NEWS BRIEFS
Harbour Air seaplane makes
emergency landing off Point
Grey coast
At 3:30 p.m. on Jan. 12, a Harbour Air
seaplane had to make an emergency landing in the waters off UBC.
Eric Scott, VP flight operations
and safety for Harbour Air, said
there was only one passenger
aboard the plane. The plane landed safely, with no one harmed and
no damage to the aircraft.
The plane was towed to shore
soon after the landing.
The seaplane was on its way
from the Gulf Islands to downtown
Vancouver when it began experiencing mechanical issues and had
to makethe landing.
"There was a mechanical failure
with the engine, [and] it's still
being investigated at this time as
to what caused it," said Scott.
The end of days
This term, UBC is offering a new
course called "Living with Nuclear
Weapons" (POLI369T). The
course is the brainchild of engineering professor Matthew Yedlin
and political science professor
Allen Sens.
"There's a very powerful
prestige element when it comes
to some of the motives of some of
the nuclear-weapon states. But in
other cases, it's much more driven
by security from the threat of an
outside force," said Sens. "It's
those motives that we'll look to
uncover in the course." xi
ASIAN STUDIES »
UBC to introduce
new Cantonese
program
Maura Forrest
Contributor
UBC's department of Asian studies is developing Canada's first
for-credit university Cantonese
program, thanks to a $2-million
donation received last year.
The donation from brothers
Alex and Chi Shum Watt will be
used to hire a full-time lecturer,
and Cantonese classes will begin
in September 2015.
"The department has wanted
to be doing Cantonese for many,
many years," said Ross King, head
ofthe department of Asian studies.
"We want to teach about China
in a way that presents it... as a
really diverse place that has many
regional Chinese languages."
The program will offer elementary and intermediate language
courses, as well as one or two Cantonese history and culture courses
throughout the year. Students will
be required to complete some Mandarin prerequisites prior to taking
the language classes. Students in
the department of Asian studies
will be given priority, as language
classes are capped at 24 members.
"We are anticipating that
[demand] will be pretty good,"
said King. "We anticipate that
one lecturer position will not be
enough to satisfy all ofthe demand
for Cantonese language."
PHOTO STEVEN RICHARDS/THE UBYSSEY
UBC's department of Asian studies is starting a new program in Cantonese studies.
King hopes the program will
eventually expand to offer more
language, history and culture
courses. Ideally, he would like to
hire a professor for a full-time
research position.
However, he said the funding
for any future development will
need to come from outside the
university.
"There are no new professorial
positions on offer right now, and
Cantonese would not be first in
line for university internal funding," King said.
Henry Yu, associate professor
in the department of history, said
programs like this are important in light of China's increasing
emphasis on Mandarin to the
exclusion of Cantonese.
Though Cantonese is spoken by
roughly 70 million people, particularly in Hong Kong and southern
China, that number accounts for
only five per cent of China's current population. Yu said Cantonese
has been under threat since Hong
Kong's reversion to China in 1997.
"There's been a real sense of a
besieging or a potential loss of not
just the language, but a kind of
unique culture," said Yu.
Yu believes the Cantonese
Studies program will join with a
new Asian-Canadian and Asian
Migrations minor starting this fall
in the Department of History.
Cantonese has traditionally
been the predominant Chinese
dialect in Vancouver. Yu says the
majority of early trans-Pacific
Chinese migrants to Canada spoke
Cantonese, and the language and
culture have deep roots here.
"In order to understand... the
history ofthe Chinese in Canada
and British Columbia and Vancouver in particular, Cantonese is an
essential part." XI
=HOTO COURTESY UBC PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Current chancellor Sarah Morgan-Silvester's term in office ends in July 2014.
Jovana Vranic
StaffWriter
As the term ofthe current chancellor, Sarah Morgan-Silvester, nears
its end in July of this year, the
Alumni UBC Board of Directors is
leading a search for candidates to
fill the position.
Members ofthe UBC community, including staff and students,
are able to make online nominations for candidates through the
Alumni UBC website. Also posted
is a candidate profile outlining the
key requirements nominees should
meet.
Judy Rogers, chair of both the
Alumni Association board of directors and the chancellor search
committee, outlined the process
of building the profile. The search
committee reviewed past candidate profiles at the times when
past chancellors were appointed. Rogers said the committee
solicited the UBC community for
advice to develop the criteria for
the new candidate. The criteria
include leadership experience,
communication skills, political
acuity and diversity.
All nominations fitting the
criteria are sent to Boyden Global
Executive Search, an international
staffing and recruiting company.
A timeline has not been set
for the search, according to
Rogers, as the search committee
wishes to allow as much time
as possible to choose the most
suitable candidate.
"If one thinks of how much
time the role of chancellor takes
up in that person's life, you need
to give somebody time to be able
to be thoughtful about taking on
the magnitude ofthe most senior
volunteer at UBC," said Rogers.
The top nominees will be chosen
and notified as soon as possible in
order to allow enough time for an
easy transition before the term of
the current chancellor expires.
The nominations will be sorted
through by the Alumni Association
board of directors, and finalists
will be submitted to the UBC
Board of Governors for deliberation.
So far, there have been over
a hundred nominations since
submissions opened on Jan. 1. The
deadline for nominations is Jan.
20. XI NEWS    I   THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014
BZZR»
AMS votes down funds for microbrewery
Veronika Bondarenko
Senior News Writer
A microbrewery may not make it
to campus after all.
At an AMS council meeting on
Jan. 8, councillors voted down
the decision to add a new student
fee for the construction ofthe
microbrewery. It was voted down
because of a lack of information
regarding the exact costs and
benefits of such a project.
Aaron Bailey ofthe AMS
brewery committee, who presented on behalf ofthe microbrewery to council on Wednesday, was surprised by the turn
of events.
"Council had been in support
of adding the microbrewery to
the referendum on the AMS Yes!
Campaign at past meetings. It
took me by surprise when the
vote went the other way only
about a month later."
After the location of the
microbrewery project was moved
from the New SUB to the UBC
Farm in 2012, the AMS brewery
committee discovered that funding the project with the $1.2 million previously set aside through
the Student Spaces Fund could
not be used due to limitations on
what constituted student space.
The committee asked the AMS
to make an exception to code and
fund the microbrewery with this
money anyway.
But VP Finance Joaquin
Acevedo believes that, because
ofthe immense costs in time and
money of both constructing the
New SUB and selling the Whistler Lodge, a microbrewery is not
a financially feasible option for
the UBC community.
"We don't have the money
to invest [in the microbrewery]
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
UBC won't be getting a brewery unless the question goes to referendum and then students vote to pay for it.
right now. And it's not just about
the money, it's about the time
of our staff, who are currently
working on the Whistler Lodge
and the New SUB."
If further action is not taken
to finance the construction,
there will be no microbrewery on
campus — a choice that, Bailey
pointed out, would be unpopular
with the larger UBC community.
"This is a project that's been
almost half a decade in the
works. It had an interesting
journey in terms of its transformations, but in every single time
that it's come to the AMS council
besides this last time, it's passed
through because there is quite
a large number of support from
students, whether it's through
brUBC, online, or simply people
in the community who see the
added cultural benefit."
Acevedo pointed out that the
original project included a brew
pub that would both make and
sell its own beer in the New SUB.
A microbrewery that is moved to
the UBC Farm area, he argued,
would not have the same profit-generating or culture-building potential as outlined in the
earlier proposal.
"There are many questions
that still exist in terms of the
operation ofthe actual brewery,"
he said. "I think that we need
to have a solid plan and really
do our due diligence in order to
spend students' money responsibly and be able to know for a
fact what we are actually spending money on."
brUBC VP Marketing and
Promotions Patrick Warshawski
pointed out that with the revisions to the brew pub idea that
were made in 2011, the microbrewery does not need to be in
the SUB to be successful.
"We decided against [the
brew pub] two years ago. The
argument has always been for
a microbrewery, which would
then put the kegs in a place like
the Gallery or the Pit. So in that
sense, the location doesn't matter
because it's not like people are
going to be interacting with this
brewery every day."
Warshawski said building
the microbrewery on the UBC
Farm could bring in additional
benefits, including opportunities for education and hands-on
work experience.
"The whole exciting thing
with the proposal for the farm
would be that it would be mixed
with the educational classroom
and there is space for it to not
only be a brewery, but also the
hub of a certain space to do education on the farm."
Bailey also believes the
UBC community should have a
microbrewery and will continue
fighting for its construction.
"People see the benefits to
it. And as such, we definitely
haven't given up in terms of lobbying it for it."
Alongwith several executive
members of brUBC, Bailey and
Warshawski are putting together
a new campaign and circulating a petition. If it gets 1,000
signatures by this Friday, the
petition will put the question of
the microbrewery fee back on the
referendum. XI
ELECTIONS »
Skiing, spending, saving and smog
AMS announces the questions that will be on their 2014 referendum
Sh.  4^BE2aM8PWVii&£- jMwbmI     ! The final nronosnl would
C J Pentland
Managing Editor, Web
The AMS has announced the list of
referendum questions for the 2014
AMS elections.
For the second time, the question
of whether to sell the Whistler
Lodge will be on the ballot. The
question first appeared in 2012 and
saw the majority of students vote yes
in favour ofthe sale, but not enough
students voted to meet quorum.
The question reads: "Do you
authorize the AMS Student Council
to dispose ofthe land located at 2124
Nordic Drive in Whistler, B.C.,...
together with all buildings thereon,
such land and buildings collectively
being the AMS Whistler Lodge'?"
All proceeds from the disposal
ofthe lodge will go into the AMS
Endowment Fund.
There are three questions on the
ballot that focus on AMS student
fees. None ofthe changes will
increase or decrease the amount
students pay.
The first question asks to consolidate the $7.25 fee for student
services and the $4.14 fee for external and university lobbying and
advocacy into an AMS membership
fee. The second question asks to
reduce the fee for the student spaces
fund by $5.00 from $12.39 to $7.39,
and transfer the $5.00 into the AMS
membership fee.
=ILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON3THE UBYSSEY
For the second time, students will be asked to sell the Whistler Lodge.
The final proposal would rename
the student spaces fund the "capital
projects fund," and allow the AMS
to spend this money on improvements to their software systems
in addition to student spaces. If
approved, the fee changes will take
effect in Sept. 2014.
The AMS also proposed administrative amendments to their bylaws.
There are a total of 10 amendments,
which include changing the annual
general meeting from February
to October and removing some
no-longer-performed duties ofthe
VP academic.
UBCC350, a group of UBC students committed to climate action,
will also have a question on the
referendum after their campaign
exceeded the 1,000 signatures required to put a divestment question
on the ballot. The group is calling
for UBC to divest from fossil fuels,
and a "yes" vote on the referendum
would call for the AMS to make all
reasonable efforts to urge UBC to
divest from fossil fuels.
Another group has put forward a
petition to get a question on the referendum asking the AMS to lobby
for lower tuition.
Voting on the referendum questions runs from Jan. 27 to 31. Each
question must receive affirmative
votes from 8 per cent ofthe student
body, which totals to 4,663 people,
in order to be passed. XI II Features
cum OR ARNO ROSENFELD
*&
BY LAWRENCE NEAL GARCIA
In her first year at UBC, Ennas
Abdussalam took an introductory computer science course,
"Computation, Programs and
Programming." Abdussalam
sat with hundreds of others in a
large lecture halls with hundreds
in attendance, went to lab sections, wrote midterms, submitted
projects and eventually completed the course — and like most
students, she paid for the credits
she received. Now a computer
science major, Abdussalam is in
her fourth year and the introductory course that she took is now
offered online — for free.
Now called "Introduction to
MOOCs AT UBC
Systematic Program Design, Part
1," the course is taught by Gregor
Kiczales, Abdussalam's professor from first year, is one of four
non-credit massive open online
courses, or MOOCs, first offered
by UBC in partnership with
Coursera in May 2013.
MOOCs — online courses
aimed at theoretically unlimited
participation ("massive") and free
access through the web ("open")
— have captured much ofthe
spotlight in debates of higher
education practices over the past
two years. Coursera first emerged
in 2011 as a dominant platform
for MOOCs from different universities, operated by Stanford
University professors Andrew Ng
and Daphne Roller. Two other
major providers, Udacity and
edX, swiftly followed; The New
York Times even dubbed 2012
"The Year ofthe MOOC."
"When the MOOC thing
started happening... exactly how
that was going to go was unclear, but that it was going to be
important was pretty clear," said
Kiczales, who had been teaching
and reinventing his introductory
computer science course for
many years. The course became
one ofthe first four MOOCs
offered by UBC through Coursera. It has now been run twice,
with another session offering in
September 2014; during its first
offering, Abdussalam was one of
the teaching assistants.
But while UBC has jumped
on the MOOC bandwagon, the
university insists that is only one
aspect of their pedagogical innovation — which may be for the
best, given that MOOCs are not
free of skeptics and critics. UBC's
partnership with Coursera is one
element of a broader project: the
Flexible Learning Initiative.
The initiative falls under the
domain ofthe Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology
(CTLT) which academic director
Simon Bates says is positioned to
support faculty members and departments to transform teaching
and learning at UBC.
According to Bates, the
flexible learning initiative can
be divided into four "planks" or
"strands": the transformation
of undergraduate courses; the
development of new professional programs; non-credit space,
which includes community
access and lifelong learning; and
finally, what is simply termed
"experimentation."
For UBC, MOOCs fall under
the fourth strand.
For now UBC has limited
its offerings on Coursera to
five MOOCs: "Introduction to
Systematic Program Design, Part
1," "Climate Literacy: Navigating
Climate Change Conversations,"
"Game Theory," and "Useful Genetics, Parts 1 and 2," — a choice
which Bates says is deliberate
in order for UBC to maintain a
focus on both undergraduate and
graduate education, as well as
limit cost.
PARADISE LOST
That even UBC, whose initial
partnership with Coursera
generated quite a bit of fanfare, is
expressing caution when it comes
to MOOCs speaks to a growing
skepticism that has emerged in
academic circles.
Coursera co-founder Daphne Roller has played up the the
unprecedented reach of online
education, particularly to under-
served demographics, making
the case that MOOCs may bring
world class education to those
who are otherwise excluded for
socioeconomic or geographic
reasons. But a recent study from
the University of Pennsylvania
revealed that over 80 per cent
of surveyed individuals taking
MOOCs already hold college
degrees.
"What we're doing is providing an additional route to access
learning, knowledge and courses
for a group of people who, by and
large, already have that," Bates
said. Coursera "has not really
delivered yet on the 'educate the
world' promise that 12 months
ago was being touted as the value
proposition for platforms like
this."
Indeed, Kiczales shared
that in the Coursera offering of
his systematic program de
sign course, a large number of
students already had previous
programming experience and
were only taking the course to
"clean up" their foundations.
Similarly, Abdussalam, who has
taken a few MOOCs in her own
time, says she probably wouldn't
have majored in computer science
if she had only taken the online
version ofthe CPSC 110 course.
"I think that these free courses
are valuable for me personally
as a resource, to help my education in university, but I wouldn't
view them as something that can
replace that."
For UBC, then, the focus is on
taking lessons from the MOOCs
they offer and applying them to
classrooms in Point Grey.
"There's things we can learn
from teaching in this environment and teaching at this scale,
[things] that we can... bring back
to on-campus courses, whether
they're face-to-face, distance
courses, or a blend of online and
face-to-face," said Bates, a sentiment Kiczales agrees with.
"In some sense, you can't be
doing a MOOC at UBC - or you
shouldn't be doing a MOOC at
UBC — without some notion that
it's going to increase the quality of your on-campus course,"
Kiczales said.
UBC's reluctance to expand
their free online offerings and
instead use them as a sort of
educational lab to glean lessons
from can be further understood in the context of MOOC
companies' financial troubles.
But the absence of a concrete
business model is certainly not
for lack of trying.
Around two months ago,
Coursera competitor Udacity
shifted their focus from higher
education to corporate professional development through
the Open Education Alliance, a
circle of industry partnerships.
Ostensibly a move to address
the efficacy ofthe courses, the
move also provides a source of
revenue. Currently, Coursera
offers Signature Track, a service
that allows one to link courses
taken to their identity — a form of
certification — for around $30 to
$100 per course.
"There isn't really a business
model for these things right
now," observed Caroline Le-
mieux, a second-year honours
math major and a teaching assistance inKiczals' online course.
"You'd hope that there wouldn't
have to be a business model in
education, but in our world you
kind of do need to have one."
Many, including Eric Mazur,
a Harvard psychics professor,
see an impending "MOOC bust"
— at least in the realm of higher
education — as witnessed by
Udacity's courting of corporate
partners and Coursera's attempt
to introduce a paid element to
the classes.
Others, including Kiczales,
contend otherwise.
"If [Udacity and Coursera]
switch to corporate education
now, start generating revenue
and spend time getting better at
what they do, then that's hardly
failure," he wrote in a blog post
entitled "Udacity: premature
claims of demise?" Still, he
admits, "Giving a very expensive
product away is not a long-term
business strategy."
CONTINUED > FEATURES    I    THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014
(tontine
d from p9-
But the entire question of
whether or not the companies facilitating UBC and other universities' online offerings are able to
turn a profit is irrelevant to other
MOOC critics. For a great many
— including Jon Beasley-Murray,
an associate professor of French,
Hispanic and Italian studies
at UBC — the whole notion of
a profit-seeking model is the
problem.
"There's a possibility to really
democratize higher education,
really open it up," he said. "Unfortunately, what's actually happening is a kind of 'marketization'
and privatization of education."
Beasley-Murray speculates too
that UBC's heart may not really
be in online education in any
case. "It seems to me that many
ofthe so-called initiatives that
are going on in flexible learning
are about following a trend rather
than thinking through what the
role ofthe university is."
Bates said this is something
the university has been careful
about, but that he too sees the
danger of viewing MOOCs as the
hot new thing.
"A number of institutions
have kind of gotten distracted
by MOOCs, and in some ways,
I think a bit seduced... There's
a number of institutions that I
think have dived in too deeply,"
Bates said. "It's not that MOOCs
are going to drive everything and
inform us about all aspects of
on-campus teaching."
.LECTURES AND FLIPPED
CLASSROOMS
Mazur, the Harvard professor,
gave a talk at UBC earlier this
year entitled "The Tyranny ofthe
Lecture" where he discussed the
drawbacks ofthe lecture as the
primary method of teaching. In
an interview, Mazur explained
that he sees education as a
two-step process: information
transfer followed by assimilation, or contextualization, of that
information. After his first few
years at Harvard, Mazur found
that step one was getting in the
way of his students' learning.
So, he threw it out — ofthe
classroom at least.
The result is what is now
widely termed the "flipped
classroom," also a fixture of
UBC's Flexible Learning
Initiative. In
the standard
approach,
the bulk of ••
class time
is placed
on the
transfer of
information
- typically
through lectures — with
little or none
allotted for
students to internalize
that information. The flipped
classroom inverts this sequence;
the move is to frontload information. Students are given access to
content in the form of textbooks,
screencasts, online resources and
so on, and are expected to engage
with it beforehand. Class time
is used for learning activities
and discussion.
"The information is already
out there. It's widely... and freely
available," said Bates. "There
[are] so many more digital educational resources ... that it just
makes using lectures solely as the
information delivery process a
real waste of valuable time."
Both Mazur and Bates acknowledge that in areas outside
ofthe sciences, where they both
teach, this is hardly a novel
approach. Mazur highlights the
case method of instruction developed by Christopher Langdell
of Harvard Law School around
1890, where learning was done
through student-focused discussions of various cases rather than
a strict lecture format.
"What's happening now is the
continuation of that idea, but
spreading [it] to other disciplines."
Along the same lines, Bates
points out that the rebranded
« YOU
IN A
IT SEEMS
"flipped
classroom" is
already quite prevalent in
the humanities at UBC.
In a post on his blog, Posthe-
gemony, Beasley-Murray writes
that in nine years of teaching,
he has only given four formal
lectures, and teaches almost exclusively in the seminar format.
"My general rule of thumb for a
seminar is that if the professor
talks for more than 10 minutes
consecutively at any one time,
then something is going wrong,"
he wrote. "If that's a 'flipped
classroom,' we have it already."
But the approach remains
far less prevalent in other areas
of study. "It's still a significant
change in practice from using
lectures as transmission vehicles
for information... for many
departments, disciplines and
instructors," said Bates.
This is not to say there is no
place for the lecture — indeed,
Mazur cites departmental col-
loquia, academic seminars and
even TED talks as platforms for
which the lecture is in fact ideal
— only that it fails as the primary
teaching model.
But transferring the flawed
model to thousands of students
may only compound the problems, not serve as an innovative
type of education, Mazur argues.
"I think the 'massive open'
part of it has been so overhyped.
Imagine a company placing an ad
saying
160,000
people have
looked at the ad. No one would
be impressed. It's not how
many people look at the ad, it's
how many buy the product. With
MOOCs it has been exactly the
same thing," Mazur said.
Part ofthe criticism of MOOCs
is that they simply translate
this flawed model to an online
platform. By and large, MOOCs
still look a lot like undergraduate courses, lasting six to 10
weeks, with quizzes, midterms,
assignments and finals. While
this is largely true, MOOCs
still have the potential to offer
something different.
Lemieux, who did the bulk of
the video editing for Kiczales'
course, pointed out that additional graphics and animations
in online screencasts enhance
learning in a way that wouldn't
be possible in a traditional lecture. "It evolves a lot more," she
said, also addressing the possibility of rapid improvement. "It's
definitely not static."
But even proponents of
MOOCs are quick to acknowledge their limitations.
"Right now when people
look at MOOCs, they say, 'Well,
that's nowhere near as good
as a real university education.'
And they're absolutely right.
It's nowhere near as good as
a real university education,"
said Kiczales, who stresses that
MOOCs are simply one of many
possibilities that have opened
up. "The real thing is when the
Internet becomes the channel
[between students and educators]. A MOOC is just one thing
that flows across that channel,
but other things can flow across
that channel too."
Even though MOOCs have
not yet lived up to their initial
ideals, that is not to say that they
have no value. "There's a role for
these open online courses, that
doesn't have to be massive," said
Bates, who sees real value in
such courses on a local or niche
level; and in any case, there is
still something to be learned
from this kind of experimentation—however bombastic
or overblown.
"[The] one positive outcome
from all this MOOC hype is that
people have started questioning
what is it that we should do in
the classroom if we start transferring the information outside
the classroom," says Mazur. "It's
forcing people to reconsider both
the architecture of classrooms
as well as the type of educational
activities that take place in the
classroom."
.DISRUPTIVE
INNOVATION
Whether it's lectures, MOOCs or
variants ofthe flipped classroom
approach, the salient fact is that,
for better or worse, much of this
is now happening online.
The recent flurries of activity
with regards to higher education are all products of what is
known as "disruptive innovation." The term
which refers
to innovation
that challenges
old markets
and creates
new ones, was
coined by Clayton M. Chris-
tenseninl995,
4
although in
u
THEY SAY^UA$ eoOD AS
mriietf
hear
as
ED
UCATION-
AN
*j5Ss>«» THURSDAY JANUARY 16, 2014    I    FEATURES
"^  LEARN LOCKED
Stetextbook.
practice it
goes back
much further. Much
like online platforms
have radically altered traditional newspaper and print media
models, the emergence of online
platforms is affecting both higher
education and its primary channels, namely universities.
"All of higher education is going to be dramatically influenced
by the emergence ofthe Internet
as a channel between educators
and learners," said Kiczales.
"Exactly how that's going to play
out, nobody knows."
In some conversations regarding higher education — particularly those that dovetail with discussion on MOOCs — some have
questioned the future existence
of universities. Sebastian Thrun,
the founder of Udacity, famously
predicted that by 2060, there
would be only 10 universities
thanks to MOOCs, an assertion
that appears much less likely
given the
floundering state of his company. And
while the role ofthe university is
indeed less certain than before,
that it will continue to play a role
is widely accepted. The consensus: universities are not going
away any time soon.
For Beasley-Murray, those
who predict MOOCs as the
downfall ofthe university are
simply wrong. "They miss the
idea of what a university is about.
They miss the embodiment of research, for
example, [which]
gets dropped out
in many of these
discussions."
^ In his
flk     afore-
Bl     mentioned
blog post,
Kiczales
also points
out that
the danger
to universities
was never
MOOCs,
but "the
confluence
of a number of
macro forces,"
including increasing costs of education, the emergence
ofthe Internet and its
scaling power, increasing
learner demand for flexibility in
learning, and the breakdown of
the idea that a university education guarantees a better career.
Others still point out the social
aspects of colleges and universities. "You can learn locked in
a cupboard with your favourite
textbook or something like that,"
said Bates. "But I think for a
lot of people, and what a lot of
people get out of actually coming
to be a member of an on-campus
community, is you get direct access to that social component."
_THE FUTURE OF THE
CLASSROOM
When I sat down with Bates just
outside the Centre for Teaching and Learning Technology
(CTLT), next to the main hall of
the Irving K. Barber Learning
Centre at UBC, he asked me to
imagine the library ofthe future.
Desks, couches and study areas
are a thing ofthe past. Rows and
rows of terminals line much of
the building space. People come
and plug themselves in, downloading or assimilating information as needed. Is this the
future ofthe classroom?
"That's a very kind
of dystopian view that
I think would be a
«real backward step
compared to the
enhancement ofthe
engagement, ofthe
interactivity, which
is what I think we're
moving towards,"
said Bates, who
maintains that
the social aspect
continues to be of
vital importance.
In terms of actual
classroom design,
Mazur believes classrooms that are currently
amphitheaters will increasingly be replaced by spaces
that permit more interaction,
such as studio classrooms, case
study classrooms, design studios
and the like — a move that he
already sees on his own campus
in Massachusetts.
"That's not to say that you
can't have that social or interaction component in a purely
online course," contended Bates.
"You have to be more deliberate
about creating those opportunities."
In the current digital age, the
question now is: what will those
opportunities look like?
At the centre of this innovation
at UBC, at least in Bates' view,
is the aforementioned Flexible
Learning Initiative ofthe CTLT.
Bates is particularly excited
for a flexible learning project
that he is a part of: the pilot run
of a "radical" 100-level physics
course where students will be
required to produce some ofthe
learning material for the course.
Bates describes it as a variant of
the flipped classroom approach,
since students will be given
more autonomy to learn in their
preferred modes, allowing them
to choose a "learning object"
to produce, which may be anything from a lecture slide to a
concept map.
The methods may vary, but
if there is a common thread,
it is the increased
emphasis on learners.
"All these techniques
that put the focus on
the student rather than
the instructor are likely
to replace the lecture
as more and more
instructors are starting
to use other means ... to
transfer information,"
said Mazur.
A CHANGING LANDSCAPE
Whether through open platforms
such as Arts One Open, variants
of traditional approaches such
as the "flipped classroom" or
the increased prevalence of peer
instruction, team-, problem- and
project-based learning, the landscape of education is undergoing
a fundamental shift — and one
that's not primarily centered
on MOOCs.
"It's a golden age for learners.
Learners are going to have better
resources than ever before," said
Kiczales. "In some sense, it's a
great time for people who want
to teach better, too, because
we're going to be in a very rapidly
improving period of education."
Others, such as open education advocate Beasley-Murray,
fear that in the midst of all this
change and partnerships with
outside entities, the basic ethos of
the university is at risk of being
forgotten. "A university is not
meant to be a profit-making institution. A university is — it's in the
name — universal. It's for all. It's
for the common good."
Whether the trajectory of
universities is heading in this direction remains to be seen. But if
there is one thing that educators
can agree on, it is that the precise
future of higher education is
practically impossible to predict.
"Even if I had a crystal ball, it
would look really, really murky,"
Bates said with a laugh. XI
tt
HAS BEEN $"
_Arts One Open and
flexible learning
In the 1960s, a report emerged to try and transform the way the arts and humanities were taught
at UBC. A pilot scheme, launched in 1967, became
the Arts One program. Over four decades later, it
is a well-established program that integrates the
disciplines of history, English and philosophy,
promoting "an interdisciplinary focus on the 'big
questions.'"
"Arts One has always been a vanguard of
experimentation, of doing things a bit differently,"
said Beasley-Murray, also a professor in the Arts
One program, "and it remains in that position."
At the beginning of the 2012-2013 academic
year, Arts One Open (then known as Arts One
Digital) was launched as an extension of the
existing program. Described as a do-it-yourself
alternative to open learning ("Has the potential
to be something a little bit like a MOOC," says
Beasley-Murray), Arts One Open encourages the
use of technology to break down the boundaries
between the university and the public. Twitter is
used as a form of live discussion during lectures,
all which are later placed on YouTube. Student
blogs are likewise hosted online. While there is a
significant use of technology and experimentation
with various forms of interaction within the program, what distinguishes Arts One Open — as its
name suggests — is a commitment to openness.
"Arts One Open is distinct precisely because
of its emphasis on openness on all levels: using
open-source software, opening up beyond the
walls of the university and being quite transparent
on how we're doing this and why we're doing this,"
said Beasley-Murray.
While it is less obvious whether Arts One Open
will become the envisioned educational force
that it aspires to be, it is clear that innovation is
occurring.
- Lawrence Neal Garcia // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
RUGBY»
UBC poised to end 17-year Wightman's Boot drought
Annual home-and-home series between UVic and UBC entering its 43rd year
C J Pentland
Managing Editor, Web
When the UBC men's rugby team
hits Wolfson Field on Saturday,
they won't just be putting their
perfect 10-0 record on the line
— they'll also be looking to do
something they haven't done in 17
years.
The Thunderbirds and University of Victoria Vikes will square
off this weekend in the second leg
ofthe Wightman's Boot series, an
annual contest entering its 43rd
year. UBC took the first leg of
the series 29-16 back on Nov. 9 in
Victoria, meaning the Boot title
could be theirs with a win or a loss
by fewer than 12 points.
"UVic in the last few years has
pretty well had its way with us,
and I think we just caught them
by surprise," said UBC head coach
Spence McTavish ofthe Nov. 9
contest. "The score probably could
have been 40-something to 16; we
had a number of opportunities we
didn't finish off."
UVic in the last few
years has pretty well
had its way with
us, and I think we
just caught them by
surprise.
Spence McTavish
Head coach, UBC men's rugby
The 'Birds stormed out ofthe
gate in that contest, scoring four
tries in the first half to power
them to a 26-6 lead at halftime.
The second half proved more even,
UBC holds a 13 point advantage heading into the second leg of the Wightman's Boot series with UVic.
=ILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON3THE UBYSSEY
but UBC still held tough to close
out the 13-point victory.
Nathan Rees and James Thompson are two ofthe players who
scored tries in that game, and are
also two players who have led the
team all year. Rees is a Welshman in
his first year at UBC, and Thompson plays No. 10 for the T-Birds,
with his coach calling him one of
the best at that position for UBC in
a longtime. However, Thompson
will be out for the second half ofthe
season with a torn ACL.
McTavish cites an older roster
as a key to his team's success this
year — in previous campaigns, the
average age has hovered around 19.
Mix that with what the coach calls
one ofthe better recruiting classes
in recent memory and the 'Birds
are not only able to compete with
these older and stronger squads,
but beat them.
After the Boot series concludes,
another tough test will soon greet
the 'Birds when they face the
University of California, always
one of the top teams in the NCAA.
The two squads have squared
off every year since 1921, making it one ofthe oldest and most
competitive cross-border rivalries
in North America. But as of late,
UBC hasn't been too competitive;
Cal has won the home-and-home
series seven straight times, and
14 ofthe last 17 in total. The first
leg is in Berkeley on Feb. 15, while
the second leg is at Point Grey on
March 23.
"The last few times we've gone
down there and played them the
games have been exceptionally
close," said McTavish. "We've
come out on the wrong sides of
them, but they've been very competitive games, [and] I think that
if we can stay healthy and take the
team that we want to take down
there, I think that we're going to
be successful."
The focus remains on this
weekend, though, and UBC
remains confident in their ability
to knock down their provincial
rival that holds a 38-17-1 record in
the overall series; after 1996, the
competition changed from an annual match to a two-game series.
With another solid performance
from the 'Birds on Saturday, the
bronze-plated rugby boot of Brian
Wightman will be back in their
grasp. XI
Saturday's match begins at2:30
p.m. at UBC's Wolfson Field.
Connect With Your
AMS/GSS
Health & Dental Plan
Your Benefits for 2013/2014
Health
prescription drugs, psychologist,
chiropractor, physiotherapist,
vaccinations, and more...
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ATHLETES
OF THE WEEK
TATIANA RAFTER
Tatiana Rafter is the Thunderbird Athletes Council's outstanding player of the week,
leading the women's hockey
team to a victory on Friday by
scoring a hat trick and two
assists. On Saturday night,
she scored the game-winning
shootout goal. The fourth-year
forward now has 15 goals and
14 assists this season - the most
points ever for a UBC player -
and leads Canada West in goals
and points. She also has a +12
rating, second-best on the
team.
Learn more about Rafter      P\
and the T-Birds at |/^
http://ubyssey.ca/sports.
THUNDERBIRDS
HOME GAMES
THIS WEEKEND
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL
(14-0)
UBC vs. Brandon (11-3)
Friday, Jan. 17 at 6 p.m. and
Saturday, Jan. 18 at 5 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
MENS VOLLEYBALL
(9-5)
UBC vs. Brandon (7-7)
Friday, Jan. 17 at 8 p.m. and
Saturday, Jan. 18 at 7 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
MENS HOCKEY
(7-10-1)
UBC vs. Alberta (16-2-0)
Friday, Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. and
Saturday, Jan. 18 at 7 p.m.
Thunderbird Arena
THUNDERBIRDS THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014    |    SPORTS + REC
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
THUNDERBIRD ATHLETES
COUNCIL
1. If you could have one super power, what
would it be?
2. Which T-Bird, past or present, do you look
up to most?
3. If you were to make one U.S. state part of
Canada, which one would it be?
Flying! Imagine a world
without the99,ormy
campus bike. Although
the rain in Vancouver
might complicate
things.
Brian Johns. Not only is
he my amazing coach,
butasaT-bird won 33
golds medals in his 34
CIS championships.
California, so Canada
can experience the
wonders of In-N-Out
Burger.
ANGUS
TODD
Rowing
Batman's affluence.
Ben Rutledge, because
he achieved the highest
accomplishmentthere
is in sport: theOveral
Men's Championship
for Storm the Wall.
Mexico. I really like
Spanish food.
Definitely being able
to fly.
Andrea Neil. She's
incredibly dedicated to
being an all round good
person and athlete.
Hawaii, forsure. Even
though I've never been
there, it seems like the
most beautiful state.
DEVIN
RAJALA
Track
Unlimited speed.
Nigel Hole, former
athlete and recruiting
coordinator, built up the
cross-country and track
program here at UBC.
California. They'd
strengthen oureconomy
and give us a domestic
vacation spot for the
winter.
Increasing the number
ofhoursinadayon
demand.
Laura Thompson is an
awesome TAC president
and has really pumped
up T-Bird spirit on
campus.
Oregon. It's the only
state you hear people
genuinely say'it's really
nice there,'and it already
seems like Vancouver's
distant cousin.
4. An item on our 95 List you haven't done but
would really like to do?
5. Finish this sentence: If I ran for AMS Council I would...
Make a combination
of#13DotheGrouse
Grind, with #47
Participate in a beer
mile. Grouse BeerGrind
anyone?
...build an In-N-Out
BurgerinthenewSUB.
Go to a TAC event (#39).
I've only ever heard
stories about how much
fun they are.
...abolish umbrellas from
campus.
#25SurfinTofino! I'm
actually planning on
doing it this summer.
...canceltheSports
Targeting Review.
#71 Play a round at the
University Golf Course.
...tryto get Avicii to
perform at the Welcome
Back BBQ.
Hiking the Chief (#14)
and surfing inTofino
(#25)are forsure at the
top of my must-do's!
...have way less free
time.
HOT
Our take on the latest happenings in the world of
UBC sports
Tatiana Rafter
UBC is on a season-high six
game win streak — fourof which
were regular season games.
With 10 games to go, they're pulling closertothe .500 markand
have moved into the last playoff
position, but they've got a tough
weekend ahead againstthel6-2
University of Alberta Bears.
We weren't surprised at all when the TAC chose Rafter as
their athlete of the week, and she remains on top of our
Hot/Not list too for the third straight week. A hat trick and
two assists in last Friday's game helped her break two
UBC records, and she's leading the Canada West women's
hockey scoring race.
Brylle Kamen
Kamen totalled 45 points and 23 rebounds last
weekend with two double-doubles against top
teams, and he was a big reason UBC managed
to take down the CIS No. 7 Saskatchewan
Huskies. He's clearly recovering well from
the elbow surgery he underwent over winter
break.
Men's
hockey
=H0T0K0STAPR0DAN0VIC3THE UBYSSEY
=ILE PHOTO JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
Top: Tatiana Rafter is leading the Canada West scoring race with 29 points this season.
Middle: Brylle Kamen, centre, led men's basketball to a 93-88 win over Saskatchewan.
Bottom: Cole Wilson scored three times in UBC's two victories this weekend, including
Saturday's overtime winner.
The men's volleyball team struggled last weekend without the help of kills leader Ben Chow,
dropping two games at UBCO. Now sitting at 9-5,
the losses bumped UBC from third to fifth in CIS
rankings.
UBC's bench got outscored 25-4 in
Friday's loss to Alberta and 12-7 in
Saturday's loss to Saskatchewan.
The starters have been solid, but
they're going to need more help from
the bench, especially against in the
playoff stretch.
Men's volleyball
The women's
basketball bench II Culture
)R  RHYS EDWARDS
DANCE»
MOVE YOUR BODY
This weekend, hundreds of dancers — professional and amateur alike — will descend onto campus
to celebrate two very different causes: one, a memorial to the colourful life of one of the world's most
multi-talented performance artists; the other, a challenge to push the human body to its limits.
TO THE RHYTHM
Danse Lhasa Danse arrives at the Chan
IMAGECOURTESYPUSH FESTIVAL
Lhasa's original accompanying band plays in the show, which combines theatre, video, music and dance.
Soumya Ghupta
Contributor
"There is no end to this
story / No final tragedy
or glory /Love came here
and never left."
The lyrics of Love
Came Here, by the late
world music artist Lhasa
de Sala, could very well
describe the Canadian art
community's sentiments
toward her passing.
Danse Lhasa Danse is
Montreal choreographer Pierre-Paul Savoie's
tribute to the beloved
Juno-award winning singer. Inspired by the poetic
essence in her music,
Savoie assembled a team
of professional artists
from different schools to
help portray its depth,
compounded through the
medium of dance. Since
the premiere ofthe first
show in November 2011,
the artists and the seven
choreographers involved
in the production have
been motivated to spread
the love and the message
of Lhasa's work.
"She was someone with
a reputation of a lot of
soul and sensitivity," said
Savoie. "After her passing, I
felt like we lost something."
On Jan. 1,2010, the
singer-songwriter lost her
battle with breast cancer
at the age of 37. She was
born in the United States,
but spent most her life
in Mexico, France and
Montreal. Her diverse
background was reflected
in her music, which she
sang in English, French
and Spanish, all in keeping with the eclecticism of
the folk genre.
Savoie created the performance, which toured
throughout Quebec and
Toronto last year, in an
effort to immortalize
Lhasa's contribution to
the artistic world. "The
dances have as many colours as did Lhasa and her
music have colour," said
Savoie.
Keeping true to Lhasa's
expressiveness, Danse
Lhasa Danse is a collection of dances from different disciplines, including
neoclassical ballet, flamenco and contemporary
dance. Each dance is accompanied by live music,
played by five musicians
and four singers.
"It is not so often you
dance, especially contemporary dance, with live
musicians," said Myriam
Allard, a professional
flamenco dancer who
stars in the show. "But
Pierre-Paul directs it such
that we create a connection between the musicians and dancers to tell
a story"
Savoie specializes in
theatre and dancing,
which is evident in his
choreography. The show
bridges music and dance in
order to project a message
to the audience, shedding
light into the revolving
themes of Lhasa's music.
"I spent over six
months conceptualizing
[Danse Lhasa Danse]"
said the seasoned choreographer, "researching
all her interviews, her
music, her life, trying to
visualize how to convey
her passion for life on to
the stage [with] the dual
practices of live music and
dance." XI
Danse Lhasa Danse will
play at the Chan Centre at
8 p.m. on Jan. 18. Alongside her music, there is also
a pre-performance talk at
7:15p.m., which will brush
up the audience with a
little background about the
artist and the production
ofthe show.
Dance Horizons hosts first UBC danceathon
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
Dacia Goh, Jonathan Kim and Jenny Peng are among the organizers responsible for the intensive workout.
Olivia Law
StaffWriter
While six hours of exercise
is not something many of us
would consider an ideal way
to spend a Sunday afternoon,
members of UBC's Dance
Horizons are planning
on hosting a six-hour
danceathon to raise funds
for the Red Cross supporting
Children of War.
Aiming to showcase some
of campus' most talented
dancers and provide a back-
to-school entertainment
opportunity, participants
must dance continuously for
a whole six hours — that's
360 minutes, or 21,600
seconds — without stopping.
Fortunately for some, the
danceathon canbe completed in teams of five — but a
team will only be considered
"dancing" if three or more
members are on the dancef-
loor at a time. Some daring
individuals, however, will be
attempting the monumental
challenge alone.
Dance Horizons emphasizes that dancing is an
extremely effective form
of exercise. Though the
danceathon may seem intimidating, the club says the
event can be a great way to
explore a healthier lifestyle
while doing something both
enjoyable and sociable.
Jenny Peng, one ofthe
event organizers, encouraged participants to think
ofthe danceathon as "a big
party."
"The event is more emphasized on endurance and
participation — we aren't
expecting everyone to come
with fully choreographed
routines," she said. "Perhaps
everyone can learn something new."
Kunal Sethi, a second
year civil engineering
student from Tanzania, is
looking forward to the event.
"It's a different, maybe more
attractive option than just
parties. It's a party atmosphere but with more talent."
Although a student organization, several members
ofthe club are highly skilled
dancers; for this reason,
some students are planning
on attending not to dance,
but simply to spectate.
The organizers expect a
number of talented dancers
in various genres, from hip-
hop to Latin and ballroom,
to display their abilities on
the dancefloor.
The ability to amalgamate
so many different cultures
through dance is partially
what makes Dance Horizons
so popular, according to
Sethi. "I come from a hip-
hop background back home,
so I'm excited to combine
my passion for dance with
others like me."
As a club, Dance Horizons' mandate is to provide
dance classes in multiple
genres, from classical to
street dance. Professional
instructors from different studios are hired to
provide technical classes
as well as choreographing
routines; the club works
on minimizing the costs of
events and classes in order
to create a community for
anyone who wants to get
involved. Funds raised
during the danceathon will
also help the club provide
affordable dance classes to
dancers both on campus and
in Vancouver.
The first event of its kind
on campus, Dance Horizons
is hoping for a large turnout
at the event, and with a prize
of $200 for the winner (or
winners), there certainly
is motivation for powering
through the six hours of
dance. XI
The Dance-a-thon will take
place on January 19th from
1 till 7pm in the UBC SUB
Ballroom. II Opinions
ILLUSTRATION JETHROAU/THE UBYSSEY
UBC's public affairs staff downs shots with President Stephen Toope and spokesperson Randy Schmidt takes the opportunity to draw
on Toope's face. They are all wearing Thuggies. This comic has no deeper meaning, but we talk about drinking and Thuggies in our
Last Words this week and thought we might illustrate that in the above manner.
LAST WORDS //
TAKING JOKES
SERIOUSLY
This year, three joke candidates
are running in the AMS elections.
While some students may
think joke candidates hurt the
election process, we at The
Ubyssey welcome joke candidates,
while this year's candidates
probably won't live up to the
legacy of candidates like Kom-
mander Keg who ran to protest
liquor laws, they look like they'll
give the other candidates a run
for their money.
Joke candidates have an
opportunity to call out other candidates and problems in the AMS
in a way the other candidates
do not. While some joke candidates just run for an opportunity
to be silly in debates, we hope
this year's contenders will take
advantage of their opportunities
run funny, relevant campaigns
that aren't afraid to criticize
the AMS.
TEACH ME HOW TO
THUGGIE
You've seen their ads in the SUB
washrooms. Their motto? "Life is
short. Live it long." That's a nice
way to market their oversized,
knee-length hoodie to the YOLO
generation. According to their
website, the Thuggie began as a
"seemingly silly inconsequential"
idea, and maybe it should've stayed
that way.
We support local businesses
but our negativity boils down
to a simple fact: Thuggies look
ridiculous. They look silly. Don't
wear them. Don't use the "it's
like a dress" argument. It's an
oversized hoodie. Don't say that
you can wear a Thuggie and
then not wear pants. No. We
just can't take people who wear
Thuggies seriously.
DEFEAT OF BREWERY A
LOSS FOR STUDENTS
bruBC is rightfully angry that it
appears there will be no student
brewery on campus. Granted, by
attaching their measure to a larger
and more important spending bill
they hurt their own cause at the
AMS. For those who worked on
the initiative for years, one might
expect to see somewhat more
political savvy.
Still, the AMS has to understand there are only so many
things students care about at this
university. Transit and fun rank
near the top of these things. The
student brewery would have been
a unique feature for UBC, helping
its image as a fun place to go to
school instead of a commuter
school and neighbourhood for
wealthy Vancouverites.
Alas, it was not meant to be.
For shame.
ON THAT NOTE, DRINK!
Just to let you all know, you should
be drinking. Yes, that's right: in
addition to your daily vitamins
you should be scarfing down a
glass of red or two. It will make
you live longer, according to TIME
Magazine. As long as you don't exceed the 14 drink cap a week, your
liver will apparently stay golden,
Ponyboy.
CONSTRUCTION WOES IN
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
UNACCEPTABLE
The Geography Building's
construction issues are pretty
unacceptable. One would think
a university aspiring to be an
international powerhouse would
respect its strongest departments
— like geography — instead of subjecting them to prolonged, noisy,
dirty and dangerous construction.
Perhaps if the geography
professors gave up their offices
and turned them into overpriced
student housing, the university
might get their act together and
finish the work.
FREE MOHAMED FAHMY
We would like to add our relatively small voice to the chorus of
Vancouver institutions calling for
the release of Mohamed Fahmy,
the Egyptian-Canadian Al Jazeera
PHOTO COURTESY TWITTER
Detained Canadian-Egyptian journalist
Mohamed Fahmy has Vancouver roots.
journalist being held by the Egyptian government in Cairo.
Fahmy has been detained
for three weeks in what the
Vancouver Sun described as "a
cold, dark, insect-ridden cell at a
notorious Cairo prison."
Fahmy graduated from Vancouver's City University in 1999,
studying marketing before moving to the Middle East where he
has worked as a driver and interpreter for the Los Angeles Times
and now works as a producer for
Al Jazeera English.
Both UBC President Stephen
Toope and UBC journalism
school director Peter Klein have
called for his release.
"Here's this guy who went
to school right here in Vancouver," Klein said in comments to
the Sun. "He could have been a
guy you were sitting next to in a
coffee shop, but now he's sitting
in one ofthe most brutal prisons
in Egypt."
Toope said Fahmy's detention
was "a worrying development as
Egypt moves toward elections."
Indeed, any government too
afraid to let journalists work
freely is one that has given up
on the last semblance of legitimacy. Here's to hoping Fahmy
is released immediately, and
that the Canadian government
does its part to contribute to his
release. XI
Canadian student
press fiasco continues
iyj'
GEOFF LISTER
Editor's Notebook
From time to time, we devote some
column space to a little navel-gazing and discuss the wonderful
world of student journalism.
Last year, The Ubyssey left the
Canadian University Press (CUP),
an organization claiming to represent the student press across the
country. We did so reluctantly, but
out of necessity — the organization
cost us more than $5,700 a year
to be part of, and we believed we
could give you, our readers, better
value for your money.
One ofthe main problems with
CUP is its wire service. The organization devotes more than half
of its non-conference resources to
paying a national bureau chief and
regional bureau chiefs, including
travel, training, office space and
other associated costs of having
a staff who supposedly operate a
wire service of aggregated and original articles covering university
affairs nationwide.
None of that is necessary.
Much of what CUP publishes is
aggregated from student newspapers as part of a content-sharing
agreement. The rest is written
by regional bureau chiefs, but
it often duplicates assignments
these employees have at their
respective newspapers, and many
bureau chiefs fail to meet their
quotas. Worst of all, perhaps, is its
irrelevance at student newspapers
that are increasingly focusing on
providing great local news, rather
than trying to keep up with The
Globe and Mail, let alone the Internet at large.
Another major problem is
CUP's governance structure.
CUP's president serves as its head
officer, which means that instead
of being the organization's leader,
she serves the board's wishes.
Presidents are elected for their
vision and then bogged down by
red tape. They are rarely given
the freedom they need to succeed
and make important changes in
the organization.
For these reasons, most large
papers in Canada have made the
same decision as The Ubyssey
to leave CUP. In fact, when The
Ubyssey left this year, we were
one ofthe last large papers to
go, following the University of
Toronto, Western, McGill, Queen's
and York.
So why am I talking about this
now? This weekend at the organization's annual general meeting, the
editor of U of T's The Varsity and
I presented a plan to reunite CUP.
This plan required the organization to make significant changes
and cuts to maintain its membership and recruit those who have
left. It was a holistic attempt to
preserve CUP.
After several hours of debate,
the proposal failed 19-15 in a vote
that afforded papers at small
colleges the same power as those
at the University of Alberta and
SFU. That the proposal failed is
sad, because more student newspapers will leave the organization,
frustrated with its status quo
approach to fixing problems. And
without CUP, it's difficult to see
its phenomenally popular and
educational national conferences
continuing. It won't have the same
oomph when its members are
facing adversity.
So, in an effort to create an
organization that does represent
the interests of student papers, The
Ubyssey and a handful of other papers are building up the National
University Wire, an organization
founded at the start of this year to
replace the CUP wire for papers no
longer in CUP. The organization
will be initially free to join and
work cooperatively to build community and services as member
papers. It will offer an aggregated
wire service using the miracle of
the Internet, instead of hundreds
of hours of manpower.
And most importantly, it will
put pressure on CUP to change.
The end goal of this campaign is
to unite campus newspapers and
strengthen the campus press,
those tireless journalists who
keep a watchful eye on campus
administrators and showcase
university achievement, in
training to bring their skill set to
wider audiences.
So we hope to bring you content from more campuses across
Canada as more papers join the
National University Wire, and we
hope CUP changes, because we'll
miss it when it's gone. XI
PHOTOJUILYOON/CUF
Delegates from student newspapers across Canada listen to a speaker at the 76th na-
tionafconference organized by the Canadian University Press in Edmonton this year.
Got something you want to rant/rave/
write about? Write for Opinions!
Email editor Arno Rosenfeld at features©
ubyssey.ca 12    |    GAMES    |    THURSDAY, JANUARY 16,2014
CROSSWORD
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1-City near Kobe
6-First Arabic letter
10-1998 Wimbledon winner
Novotna
14-Birth-related
15-Completed
16- Hydroxyl compound
Championship
AChaplin
Having a sound mind
■ Inter	
Antagonism
Crown of ancient Egypt
Actually existing
Primate with a short tail or no tail
27-Cavalry sword
29-Musical drama
32- Viscounts' superiors
33-"Lord, is ?": Matthew
36- The Time Machine people
37- Dispute
38-H.S. exam
Deli bread
Extra-terrestrial being
Back in
Peaks of Peru
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lines
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56-Marquand sleuth
57-Conductor Dorati
58-Frond plant
59- Med school subject
60- Selassie
61-Worry
62-AMEX counterpart
63-Luges
DOWN
1-Available
2- Leaves port
3-Room at the top
4- Desert region in SW Africa
5-Bass, e.g.
6-Take as one's own
7-Coil
8- uncertain terms
9-Probable
10-Clown
11-Diarist Nin
=UZZLE COURTESY BESTCR0SSW0RDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION
12-Taboos
13-Coeurd'	
21-Any person
22- Supermodel Sastre
24-Clean airorg.
27-Wise ones
28- Give for one's money
29-Not'neath
30-Layer
31-Fair-hiring abbr.
32- Buffalo's lake
33-Believer's suffix
34-Pitch
35-Figure skater Midori
37-Councillor
38- Private
40-Chipin
41-Numbered rd.
42-Thumbs-up
43-Melancholic
44-Grain husks
45-More healthy
46-Alert
47-Benjamin
48-
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Free laces, say
Author Dahl
City on the Rhone
Emaciated
Greek letters
57-Sighs of relief
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Jan. 12 answers
Design,
layout,
natural lighting
emaileditor
MingWong
printed itor@
ubyssey.ca
/
Volunteer for The Ubyssey
What are you interested in?
Lights,camera,
selfies
email editors
Carter Brundage Lu Zhang + Nick
photo@ Grossmar
ubyssey.ca video@ubyssey.ca
Toope,
AMSelections,
current events
email editors
WillMcDonaldanc
Sarah Bigam
n ews @ u bysse y. ca
Arts,
entertainment,
sophistry
Q9
Varsitysports,
athletic reviews,
milkshakes
emaileditor
Natalie Scadder
sports@ubyssey.ca
Investigative pieces,
longformjournalisnr
pizza
emaileditor
Arno Rosenfeld
features©
ubyssey.ca
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A multilogue with
leading professionals
MentorLink Movie Night (Part 1 of 3 Part Series)
\pm\m>\^ M©mm mm\}W°o
HHYOND OUR DIFFERENCES
Tuesday January 28th, 2014
6:00-8:30pm (food starts at 5:15pm)
Global Lounge
RSVP to mentorlink@ionapacific.ca/604-822-0245
lona
Pacific
SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
Canada    dgHS, Embrace
This project is made possible through funding
from the Government of Canada and the
Province of British Columbia.
Checkout
www.ionapacific.ca/student-leadership
for more info!

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