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The Ubyssey Feb 24, 2014

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Array FEBRUARY24,2013 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXLII
TIME IS A FLAT CIRCLE SINCE 1918
CHANT CHANGES
UBC recommends new equality course, fund in       n*|
response to September Sauder FROSH chants       1^5
V-BALL DYNASTY
UBC women's team hopes to
capture sixth straight national title
P8
This guy definitely
knows where
Matthews Field is
THE
UBYSSEY
BLOCK PARTY
LINEUP REVEALED
Adventure Club, Dan Mangan to
play at year-end celebration P3
■■}*'
TRANSIT ANXIETY
Don't know where to sit? Read
our slightly irreverent guide to the
buses and trains in Vancouver
P6 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON
MONDAY   24
SUSTAINABILITY FAIR
UA.M.-2P.M.@SUB
Want to get involved with green
initiatives but not sure where to
start? Come by the Sustainability
Fair and visit booths from different
groups for snacks and games.
Free
TUESDAY ' 25
FREE SKATING
12 P.M.-2 P.M. @ DOUG MITCHELL
THUNDERBIRD SPORTSCENTRE
(NORTH DOORS)
Looking for a fun way to pass time
during your lunch break? Skate
with the Jumpstart program for
free. Go live out your Olympic
dream or watch first-timers struggle and fall in thestands.
Free, $3.50 for skate rentals
WEDNESDAY'26
FESTIVAL DIONYSIA
7 P.M. ©DOROTHY
SOMERSET STUDIOS
UBC Players Club is hosting a
theatre festival featuring six one-
act shows directed and crafted by
UBC students. Runs until March 2.
$5 for Players Club members, $10
for non-members at the door or
online
"The picture speaks for itself." illustration by Indiana Joel.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
<**-
^|THE UBYSSEY
= EBRUARY24,2014 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXLI
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
erinteditor@ubyssey.es
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News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Veronika Bondarenko
vbondarenko@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatheringtori@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
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features@ubyssey.es
Video Producer
Lu Zhang
video@ubyssey.es
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eopy@ubyssey.es
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Catherine Guan, NickAdams
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LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of RritKh Cn-
umbia. Itispublished
andThursdaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone
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t is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the
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OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
Mount Rev
KANT01
STEPHEN CHi
gFnd,y,Apnl23,',W8:00p'
lltk:
Stephen Chatman has been teaching at UBC for 38 years and has received three Juno nominations during this time: in 2004,2007
and now 2014.
Juno noms aplenty for
prof Stephen Chatman
Mormei Zanke
Contributor
Stephen Chatman is a composed
man. Managing his role as a
professor and chair of composition at UBC School of Music, it
does help that he has this trait in
his repertoire.
When he's not teaching,
Chatman is reaping awards
upon awards. His latest nomination is for Classical Composition
of the Year in the upcoming
2014 Juno Awards, happening in
March. His nominated work is
"Magnificat: Songs of Reflection," a piece commissioned in
2010 for the Winter Olympics.
He has been nominated two
times previously.
"I haven't won yet," Chatman
said, "but it's still fun to go."
Chatman has been teaching
at UBC for 38 years. He applied
for a position in 1976 right after
graduating with a PhD in musical
arts from the University of
Michigan. He has been at UBC
ever since.
"I've been very lucky," he says
about teaching at UBC and influencing his composition students
and being influenced himself.
Chatman has a clear grasp on
what it means to be a musician.
"It's a combination of imagination ... technique and a lot of hard
work," he says. Perhaps it is this
thoughtful analysis that has enabled him to succeed throughout
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his career, composing music
for symphonies and more.
He has written over 100
pieces of contemporary classical music, most of which are
choral pieces, but he's also
written orchestra, chamber
and even children's music.
Chatman is also the composer
behind "Hail UBC," the little-
known UBC sporting anthem.
But on the whole, his work
has not gone unnoticed. He is a
three-time winner ofthe Western Canadian Music Award for
outstanding classical composition. He has won three BMI
awards, two SO CAN awards
and was the first Canadian
ever to be shortlisted in the
BBC Masterprize competition.
He is also a member ofthe
Order of Canada.
With work spanning almost
four decades, the evolution of
his music reflects his growth
as a composer. When he was
younger, he experimented
more with different styles
and aesthetics.
"As I get older, I'm not
exploring so much anymore,"
he said. "I'm more settled and
I think my expression is more
consistent in that way."
Although he feels more
comfortable in his position
now, he does not neglect to
acknowledge how difficult
composing music canbe
sometimes. "Fear of failure has
a big affect on people," he said.
"To stare at a blank piece of
paper and then try to think of
the first thing to write down —
[that] can be scary."
Despite these fears harboured by most creative types,
Chatman says he is most
inspired when he is working
and not worrying too much
— when he is just "fooling
around" with the music.
Chatman is living proof that
with talent, hard work, and a
little bit of luck, anything can
happen. As someone who has
been working at his craft for a
longtime, Chatman is someone
who has solved the riddle of
creation: "I improvise." 31 // News
)RS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
MONDA1
EQUITY »
FUN»
=ILE PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
A press conference in October addressed the Pocahontas chant and announced the formation of this task force to address systemic issues.
UBC drafts equity recommendations after chants
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
A UBC task force is seeking feedback on draft recommendations
to address gender-based violence
and the trivialization of Aboriginal
peoples in the campus community.
The Intersectional Gender-based
Violence and Aboriginal Stereotypes
Task Force was formed in November 2013 in response to the "Y-O-U-
N-G" and "Pocahontas" chants at
Sauder FROSH in September. The
group included VP Students Louise
Cowin, representatives from six faculties, two student representatives
and the director of student housing.
The 14 recommendations include
a new course requirement for
students, new guidelines for events
and the establishment of a fund for
community-led equality initiatives.
The group recommended adding
a "culture of equality" course
requirement to all undergraduate
and professional degrees. Students
would have to take one course
from an approved list dealing with
gender, ethnicity or sexuality to
meet the requirement.
The report recommended
creating a mandatory online
orientation module for UBC students to complete beginning their
degree that covers UBC's inclusive
environment policies.
The document also recommended immediate changes to
student-led orientations including the immediate development
by the AMS, the UBC Students'
Union Okanagan and UBC of
guidelines for all UBC events,
hosted both on and off campus,
"with clear enforcement mechanisms."
The group recommended increased diversity in hiring and the
development of an "equity action
plan." The group also suggested
that goals on representation,
hiring, promotions and curriculum
renewal be reported to the associate vice-president of equity and
inclusion and that this information be available to all members of
each faculty.
The report also recommended
the establishment of an intersectional transgender and gender
diversity task force that will lead
a new "intersectional gender and
sexual diversity strategic plan."
"A focused plan is necessary to
address both overt discrimination
and violence and the day-to-day
subtleties of gender discrimination
on campus that are not necessarily
covered in wider policies, particularly those issues unique to transgender and gender diverse people,"
the report said.
The report recommended the
university use new and current
sources of money to create a fund
to reward UBC community-based
initiatives that aim to further
student and faculty understanding
of equality.
The report also recommended
increased communication of UBC's
position on equity.
"Goals of all student-led activities must complement official
university welcome events and
such events must be scheduled to
take place after official welcoming
events," the report said.
"The issues at this university,
and others, represent and are tied
to systemic issues of intersectional
violence where women, Indigenous Peoples, people of colour,
and sexual and gender minority
populations are often the target,"
the report said.
The task force's goal is to begin a
dialogue on these issues. Feedback
can be given online until March 4. XI
NEWS BRIEFS
Liking the sound of your own voice
A UBC study on vocal attractiveness
found that people prefer voices that
are similar to their own. The study
found that similar-sounding voices
conveyed a sense of community to
listeners.
The study also found that North
Americans preferred the voices of
men who spoke with a shorter average word length and who sounded
physically larger. North Americans
werefoundtoprefer"breathier"
females voices, like that of Marilyn
Monroe, over "creakier" voices like
those ofthe Kardashians. Researchers who led the study said this reflects
oursociety's obsession with youthful-
ness, because breathy voices come
from youngervocal cords.
Researchers flex robot muscles
UBC researchers are helping create
inexpensive artificial muscles using
coiled fibres from fishing line and
sewing thread.
"In terms of thestrength and
powerof the artificial muscle,
we found that it can quickly lift
weights 100 times heavierthan a
same-sized human muscle can,
in a single contraction," said UBC
electrical and computer engineering professor John Madden. "It
also has a higher power output for
its weightthan that of an automobile combustion engine."
The muscles contract and relax
in response to temperature changes. They could be used in medical devices, humanoid robots,
prosthetic limbs or fabrics, xi
VOTING »
Ski and Board Club
pushing for another
lodge referendum
Veronika Bondarenko
Senior News Writer
After the referendum question
giving the AMS permission to sell
the expensive Whistler Lodge
won by a 4.6 per cent margin in
the January elections, some students want another vote.
The Ski and Board Club has
launched a petition calling for a
revote. However, the lodge lost the
AMS $220,000 between 2005 and
2013, and the club has no specific
financial plan for how to fix this.
Logan Parker, spokesperson for
the Ski and Board Club, believes
the lodge's cultural and recreational benefits make the lodge
worth keeping despite the money
that is lost on it every year.
"We think [having a lodge] is
a really neat opportunity for students to have at UBC and we see
it in a different light too because
while it is losing money right now,
we feel that the Whistler Lodge
shouldn't be sold to solve short-
term problems," said Parker.
As it currently stands, the lodge
is a large drain on AMS resources.
The majority of UBC students do
not use it when they go to Whistler and the house itself is in a state
of severe disrepair. AMS President
Caroline Wong pointed out that
even the most basic renovations
would cost upwards of $200,000
FILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON3THE UBYSSEY
Students may back asked to vote once more on the Whistler Lodge.
— money she feels could be better
spent on other student services.
"In terms of capital spaces,
we were looking at almost
$2-300,000 in renovations right
away," said Wong. "And even if we
advertised that and took a look at
our operational losses as well, we
would still lose about $55,000 a
year."
The money from the sale ofthe
lodge would go into the AMS's
endowment fund. Wong suggested
that the yearly proceeds from this
money be used to subsidize skiers
and snowboarders.
Parker argues that with new
management, better advertisement, and some repairs, the lodge
could once again be made both
into a profitable student business
and a longstanding symbol of skiing culture on campus.
"We want to work with [the
AMS] as much as possible because
we agree with them that the lodge
isn't making money right now and
that it isn't sustainable and that
things do need to change," said
Parker. "We just see the change
not as selling the lodge, but rather
as taking that as more incentive to
make it profitable."
Wong said that there are other,
much more sustainable, symbols of
student culture that will continue
to be built for UBC students in the
years to come.
"We're going to continue
building these kinds of legacies,"
said Wong. "Keeping [the lodge]
for the sake of a symbol and losing
money where we could be using it
for other services and events for
students doesn't really make sense
to me."
The petition would need to
gather 1,000 student signatures
to allow the Ski and Board Club to
call a second referendum.
Block Party
to be held in
Matthews Field,
lineup features
Dan Mangan
=HOTO SILVIA BOBILVIA/WIKICOMMONS
Dan Mangan and Adventure Club will
headline this year's Block Party.
Will McDonald + Ming Wong
News Editor + Managing Editor,
Print
The AMS has announced that
Block Party will take place at
Matthews Field this year. The field
is located on south campus next to
Thunderbird Stadium.
The concert has traditionally
been held on Maclnnes Field, but
the AMS had to find a new location
this year due to plans for construction of a new aquatic centre.
AMS events manager Anna
Hillar said the new venue will
still have a 6,500-person capacity.
Block Party will remain a 19+
event.
"It's one ofthe best fields for us
to have the event on. There's not
a lot offences that are restricting
us," said Hillar.'T'm excited about
the move. There's obviously lots of
logistics that are going to have to
change ... [but] because it's a bigger
field, everything's going to be a bit
bigger."
"I think it's going to be a fantastic concert and the lineup is going
to be awesome," said Hillar.
This year's Block Party will
feature headliners Dan Mangan +
Blacksmith and Adventure Club.
Also performing in the annual
last day of classes celebration are
folk rockers the Crackling, Vancouver-based rapper Shad, Block
Party staple MGH! (formerly My!
Gay! Husband!) and the winner
ofthe AMS competition, Last
Band Standing.
According to Dan Mangan's
website he's performing under
the moniker Dan Mangan +
Blacksmith because he wants
to move away from the acoustic
singer-songwriter label. His next
album will focus more on making
music as a collective with his band.
Adventure Club has remixed
several bands including Metric
and Alexisonfire, but they are
most known for their spin of
Foxes' Youth.
The Crackling is a five-piece
band who released their latest
album "Mary Magdalene" in April
2013. They cite Neil Young and
free jazz as influences.
Shad is performing at Block
Party for the first time, and DJ
MGH! will be returning after
performing sets in last year's Block
Party and Welcome Back BBQ.
Tickets will be on sale Wednesday Feb. 26, and will cost between
$15 and $25. The event takes place
Tuesday April 8 from 2:30 p.m. to
9 p.m. XI 4    I    NEWS    I    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2014
INTERNATIONAL »
HEALTH»
Activist talks human       B.C. hits record number of organ transplants
trafficking in Cambodia
PHOTO GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR EDUCATION/FLICKR
Children and parents wait in line for a medical screening in Cambodia.
Mariam Baldeh
Contributor
On Feb. 13, a former RCMP
forensic scientist came to UBC to
speak about human trafficking
in Cambodia.
Brian McConaghy began
with a brief overview of Cambodian history. According to
McConaghy, Cambodia has a
graphic history of child abuse
and domestic violence.
"No country exists in a vacuum — there's always a reason
for why it is the way it is," said
McConaghy. "The psychology of
this country is unique in terms of
what it's been exposed to."
In the early 1990s, McConaghy said, Cambodia was
AIDS-free as a result ofthe
country being sealed from in-
or-out migration for three years.
According to McConaghy, the
arrival of UN troops to reconstruct the nation resulted in
the proliferation ofthe AIDS
epidemic in the country as the
troops sought after the young
girls, offering them higher pay
than their poverty-stricken families were making at the time.
McConaghy, who said he broke
the UN embargo to smuggle in
two suitcases of medical supplies
to Cambodia, said kids as young
as five can be forced to work in
brothels.
"If you're going to execute
warrants to rescue such children,
you need the participation of
[the police] ... but [the police] are
part owners of and frequent the
brothels," said McConaghy. "So
when you're sitting across the
table engaging in negotiations
with these people, you're really
sitting across the enemy."
McConaghy founded the
NeeSong Rehabilitation Centre, which he said offers
medical intervention and
intensive therapy.
"When you rescue a girl from
the brothels, you have stolen
product, and the traffickers will
be coming after you to retrieve it.
It's not pretty," said McConaghy.
The centre partners with numerous organizations to provide
job skills programs. McConaghy
said job skills give them a sense
of value so that they don't relapse
when they leave.
"It's also therapeutic — the
girls see that they can make
something beautiful and desirable, so there's beauty and value
within them," said McConaghy.
He also said he took over a
brothel from the Vietnamese
mafia and redeveloped it into a
community centre called "the
Sanctuary" right under their noses. According to McConaghy, by
also serving traffickers, the clinic serves as a way of leveraging
relationships with the mafia to
excuse children from being sold
or abused.
McConaghy said over 500
kids engage in the educational
programs, church services, counselling and youth programs the
centre offers daily. He said several
changes have resulted from the
work being done — a decline from
98 per cent to 60 per cent ofthe
centre attendees being abused,
mothers coming up to the centre
staff asking for help to stop selling
their children. He also said four of
the girls went on to university.
According to McConaghy,
spirituality makes a huge impact
in trafficking. He said when the
girls internalize the idea that
they are so valuable and loved
that someone died for them, it
makes for successful rehabilitation. McConaghy said the new
trend in Cambodia is recruiting
girls aged 17 to 22 into the KTV
bars — brothels masquerading as
karaoke bars.
"I was in Phnom Penh recently
and it's crazy — it's really well
hidden, so unless you're looking
for it, you'll miss it," said Allison
Yang, a first-year UBC student.
Diane Buermans is part ofthe
University Christian Ministry,
which helped organize the talk.
"I think what's most inspiring
about Brian's work is that he's
bringing dignity back to the girls.
It might be a drop in the bucket
rescuing one girl, but that one
life counts. So it's important to
not despair, and to know that
there's hope."
"It's not about breaking
down a door and rescuing a kid,
although that's important too,
it's about changing the community so that they aren't selling
children anymore," McConaghy
said. "That's how you stop human
trafficking." XI
St. Paul's Transplant Centre performed 140 organ transplants in 2013.
Graydon Leigh
The Martlet
VICTORIA (NUW) - 2013 was a
banner year for organ donations in
B.C., surpassing the previous year's
total by more than 40 transplants.
The 346 transplants within the
calendar year saw organ waiting
lists shrink and patient satisfaction
grow. Most notably, transplant centres have recently been granted the
capacity to fast-track living donor
assessments. Also, programs with
Federal Canadian Blood Services
enabled medical professionals to
connect matching donors with
recipients on a national level.
Out of every one million Canadian residents, 28 donated an
organ last year. But that only
accounts for donors that are still
alive, as 14.5 out of every one million
deceased citizens also donated a
functioning organ. While the latter
statistic is on par with the national
average, the former exceeds the
median among all provinces by a
substantial margin.
"The record numbers are great
— and we have more work to do,"
said Peggy John, communications
manager for B.C. Transplant, in an
email. "More than 85 per cent of
British Columbians support organ
donation, but only 19 per cent have
registered their decision."
Those involved in organ donation
question why such a small fraction
ofthe population each year (less
than .00003 per cent) is able to
donate. One answer speaks to the
necessary sophistication of these
operations, as doctors have less
than 10 hours to preserve a lung, for
example, before the organ begins
to deteriorate due to a lack of blood
containing nutrients and oxygen.
The number of kidney transplants, which was the most
common procedure last year, saw
a considerable increase from 2012,
as more than 40 procedures were
successfully executed. Following
=HOTOGRENTGRANDBY/FLICKR
that was the frequency of heart
transplants. At 23 operations, the
risky procedure boasted a 31 per
cent provincial increase in volume
from 2012.
The institution responsible for
administering the heaviest bulk of
these transplants was Victoria General Hospital's Transplant Centre.
Performing over 199 transplants
last year, Victoria General Hospital
is one of only three locations registered in the B.C. Transplant Agency.
The others — St. Paul's Transplant
Centre and the B.C. Children's Hospital — performed 140 and seven
operations, respectively.
"Organ donation isn't something
people think about until it touches them in some way," said John.
"Stats show you are more likely to
need a transplant in your lifetime
than you are to become an organ
donor."
There are currently 495 individuals on the transplant waiting list
in B.C.
Public Open House - February 26
Amendments to the Chancellor Place Neighbourhood Plan
UBC is making minor amendments to the Chancellor Place Neighbourhood
Plan to revise the permitted uses ofthe lona Building located in UBC's
Chancellor Place neighbourhood.
Da
Pic
Vednesday, February 26, 2014 4:30-6:30pm
Ihapel, St. Andrew's Hall, 6040 lona Drive
*©
Chancellor
Place
Theology Mall
lona
Building
Meeting
% \    LoCatlOll^^V^- Andrew's Walk
St.
^Andrew's
Hall
The proposed amendments are being made to the Chancellor Place
Neighbourhood Plan to remove outdated language and certain
references to the Vancouver School of Theology (Sections 2.3.4 and
2.3.4 [d]). Join us on February 26 at the Public Open House to learn
more about the proposed amendments.
You can also submit written comments by email to joe.stott@ubc.ca,
or by mail to Campus and Community Planning, 2210 West Mall,
Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z4 from February 13 to February 28.
To read more about the proposed amendments,
please visit: planning.ubc.ca.
For further information, contact:
joe.stott@ubc.ca
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| #*|fe «St °IS t Si^ #£ffi-gs.7|-#cH SisM^K
sum flsH =l a# y^sFfer >4im ssi*W7i huh^.
m&AMmm*
a place of mind
campus+community planning II Culture
EDITOR  RHYS EDWARDS
MONDAY, F
PROCRASTINATION
STATION
BLOGS INTO
BOOKS
The peculiar trend ofblogging book deals
Some people may have forgotten this, but
the term "blog" comes from the union of
the terms "web" and "log." Though there
are some predecessors, the blog as we
know it started to rise in popularity in the
late '90s. As of 2011, there were over 150
million blogs in existence.
It comes as no surprise, then, that
managers, editors and producers would
soon realize that some of these blogs were
actually quite good, ultimately going on
to bring some of these online creations to
bookstores nearyou.
Granted, many blogs are either about
cats orfood. Unfortunately, many of these
have also been turned into books — I'm
talking about masterpieces like / Can Has
Cheezburger?: A LOLcat Colleckshun —
but some of these blogs turned books are
actually quite good, and definitely worth
a read.
A recent example is Allie Brosh's Hyperbole and a Half. Published in late October
2013, the book is doing so well that the
Chapters on Broadway and Granville was
out of stock several weeks ago.
Hyperbole and a Half'is a combination
of comics and written entries. The images
are drawn in MS Paint, making them look
intentionally crude and infantile. Brosh's
entries are usually about her life growing
up in rural Montana orabout her current
life and issues with depression; it's pretty
funny stuff. The book offers some content
that is not available online, but if you visit
her website, you should definitely read
"Depression Part 2," one of her most
famous entries.
Kate Beaton's Hark, a Vagrant! is
similar, yet different. Also a collection
of comics, Beaton's work often focuses on historical or fictional characters
from Western literature. Her work is less
personal than Brosh's, but equally funny
and probably a bit smarter. Beaton, who
was born in Nova Scotia, started posting
her comics on the web in 2007. Hark,
a Vagrant! was released in September
2011, and TIME magazine named it one
of the top 10 fiction books of the year.
Another example that might be better
known is Julie Powell's Julie and Julia.
Originally known as "Julie & Julia: 365
Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment
Kitchen" when it first started in 2002, the
(now defunct) blog was mainly about
Powell's attempt to spend a year cooking
her way though Julia Child's cookbook
Mastering the Art of French Cooking.
When the book came out in 2005, it was
more self-reflection than cooking tips,
but it was good enough to be turned into
a film starring Amy Adams and Meryl
Streep.
This isn't the first time blogs have
been an entryway for authors into the film
world. Back in 2005, Diablo Cody was
only known for her memoir Candy Girl:
A Year in the Life of an Unlikely Stripper.
Originally a blog about her experiences
working at a strip club called the Pussy
Ranch, Candy Girl is laugh-out-loud
funny — funny enough to get her a
contract to write a movie. This movie
turned outto beJuno — forwhich Cody
eventually won an Oscar. U
—Aurora Tejeida,
Senior Culture Writer
ART»
Four curators unite famous artists
World-class O'Brian collection unveiled downtown
Soumya Gupta
Contributor
Postmodern photography is coming face to face with First Nations mythology in downtown Vancouver.
Satellite Gallery recently opened its latest exhibit, "Cindy Sherman Meets Dzunuk'wa," which features 36 artists and 41 works
from the nationally famous art collection of Michael O'Brian.
In addition to being an adept collector, O'Brian, with his
wife Inna Vlassev O'Brian, founded the Michael O'Brian
Family Foundation. He is a major benefactor of UBC's Museum
of Anthropology.
"Satellite Gallery is a space created by O'Brian as a means to allow multiple institutions of arts to work collaboratively together,"
said Karen Duffek, a curator ofthe North West Coast collection
at the Museum of Anthropology. Duffek is one four curators in
the show; collaborators from other institutions include Helga
Pakasaar (Presentation House Gallery), Cate Rimmer (Emily
Carr University) and Keith Wallace (the Morris and Helen Belkin
Gallery at UBC).
"To honour the opportunity of this space, for the first time
ever, all four of us are working together for the exhibit," said
Duffek.
O'Brian's collection has articles of art from both international
and local artists. It includes works by famed artists such as Ann
Kipling, Victor Vasarely, Mary Pratt, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Brian
Jungen and Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, along with the highlighted artists from the title ofthe exhibition: Cindy Sherman and
Beau Dick, the carver of Dzunuk'wa.
"Cindy Sherman comes fact to face with the Kwakwakw'wakw
artist and mask carver Beau Dick's Dzunuk'wa," said Duffek.
Cindy Sherman's work, a photographic portrait of vanity and
the grotesque, contrasts with Dick's mask, which represents
Dzunuk'wa, the wild woman ofthe woods. The mask refers to a
myth from the Kwakwaka'wakw First Nation of a woman who
went to get her eyebrows shaped, but ended up with them being
sliced off by the hairdresser. Both featured artworks illustrate the
often crude nature of existence, a theme repeated among many of
the other works in the exhibition.
IMAGE COURTESY SATELLITE GALLERY
The original paintings for Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas' beloved book Red are
Just some of the many works on display at Satellite.
"Mr. O'Brian doesn't discriminate against any category of art,"
said Duffek. "His collection includes pieces from different art
traditions, with quite a range of artists and all sorts of different
kinds of media."
What distinguishes Cindy Sherman meets Dzunuk'wa is the
wide range of different practices and traditions on display. The
curators did not worry about maintaining boundaries between
each of them, instead allowing them to come into contact with,
and reflect upon, each other.
"This exhibition has combined the creative power of four curators to collaborate and formulate a rare assembly of works," said
Duffek, "to provoke each artist's approach and take on things." U
"Cindy Sherman Meets Dzunuk'wa" runs until March 29 at Satellite
Gallery, 560 Seymour St.
For web exclusives and more
Procrastination Station, visit
ubyssey.ca/culture
TECH»
New app wants you to party right
Olivia Law
StaffWriter
How many times have you been excited for a night
out downtown, only to be disappointed by expensive
cover charges, long lines and a sketchy atmosphere?
Two UBC computer science graduates, alongwith a
friend, have come up with a solution they hope will
change Vancouver's nightlife for the better.
Nightbound was released in the iOS App Store at
the beginning of February, and an Android version
will be available soon. It provides users with real-time
statistics, such as capacity, queueing times and gender
ratios, for nightclubs and bars on Granville Street in
downtown Vancouver.
On any given night in Vancouver, there is no guarantee that revelers will have a consistently good club
experience. According to third-year computer science
student and app designer Matt Gu, "lots of venues
like to pretend that it's a good night. It's definitely not
always the case."
The data for Nightbound is supplied by users ofthe
app each night. Using this information to gain wider
recognition for Nightbound, the creators are hoping to
eventually collaborate with the nightclubs directly.
"So far, we're limiting the venues to just Granville
Street," said Gu, who developed the app with master's
student Rahul Jiresal and PhD candidate Deepak Azad.
"There's a really big interest and a wide market for
the idea, but it's all about the execution. Once we have
enough users, we will be able to use it for leverage with
nightclubs directly, having them take over the real time
information, and using us to advertise for their events.
Essentially, we can become a digital promotions team
for the venues."
The development process for Nightbound was
relatively short. It began in late October 2013 after the
designers conducted customer interviews with over
100 people who complained about the unreliability of
a good night out in Vancouver. The idea was born to
create a crowdsourced app where users can provide
real-time updates for the benefit of others, creating a
continual cycle of information.
"Quality is the key to making our idea successful,"
Gu said. "Our ultimate goal is to get venues on board,
relating directly to the people of Vancouver." All the
people behind Nightbound are volunteers.
Future plans forthe app include expanding to more
venues, and creating partnerships to offer customer
loyalty and reward programs.
"We are building a product that we can see has a
future," said Gu. "We're just hoping to make people's
experiences of Vancouver nightlife more enjoyable.
Happier party-goers mean a more active nightlife scene
in Vancouver. It's winners all round." %
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development corporation bastiondevelopiTient.coiTi 6    I    CULTURE    I    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2014
The Ubyssey presents:
The unspoken
rules of
Riding the Bus
Words: Karen Wang
Illustrations: Indiana Joel
There's a familiar sight that greets every commuter stepping on
board their daily bus ride home.
Flashing their blue U-Passes at the driver, the incoming passengers select their seats — the corner and window spots are typically claimed
first — and proceed to gaze intently down at their phones. Those uninterested in staring at mobile devices instead turn to look nonchalantly out the
window or up to inspect the ceiling. If they can help it, the strangers in the
vehicle don't sit next to each other, talk, or make eye contact.
This unspoken code of public transport conduct may appear absurd
to the outsider, but from their experiences, most students can come to a
consensus on a few common "rules" of riding the bus.
"If there's empty seats on the bus, then normally [people] will go for
the empty seats instead of sitting right beside someone else," said Tom
Wang, a fourth-year microbiology major
This observation is echoed by Neil Lloyd, a master's economics student. "You always try and make sure there's one space between you and
the person next to you," Lloyd said. "And you never want that awkward
eye contact when you realize that there's someone looking at you while
you're looking at them."
"If there's room, [passengers will] try to sit away from each other,"
Randy Goreman, a bus driver on the 99 B-Line, conceded. "I don't know
why, but it's not uncommon for them to try and keep their space. I don't
know if it's they're worried about getting sick, or [if] they just don't like
taking the bus but they have to."
While nearly everyone agrees on the type of behaviours found
aboard public transit, articulating a reason for these events was more of
a struggle.
In order to preserve the common good, avoid acknowledging the presence of others
wherever possible. If eye contact is indeed made with another passenger, look away
'hen selecting a seat, sit as close to the window as possible. Always leave one empt'
at between you and other passengers.
"[People] don't really want to sit together with strangers, I guess," said
Eunice Park, a second-year commerce student.
"I think that as a society we live very individualistic lives, so we don't
really [sit] with strangers, [and we] have a fear toward strangers," Lloyd
suggested. "And some people just like to listen to music and they kind of
mind their own business, and that doesn't help."
Peter Suedfeld, a social and environmental psychologist at UBC,
attributes part of this phenomenon to our preferences for personal space
— interpersonal distances, to use the technical term. Interpersonal distances between people vary with different relationships; strangers aren't
comfortable with small distances between each other, while romantic
partners are emotionally and physically closer.
"[On transit in Vancouver,] we are generally with strangers, and the
interpersonal distance preference between strangers is relatively high,"
said Suedfeld. "At least a foot.
"Of course, when the bus is really crowded, as it often is, coming to
UBC or leaving from UBC, that makes people uncomfortable, because
they have to stand closer than they would really prefer to, and that makes
them irritable. It can make them also very eager to not touch people,"
he said.
Eye contact is typically also avoided, because "although it isn't physical
contact, it's an intrusion on your privacy.
"And it's kind of rude to be caught staring at somebody you don't
know," Suedfeld said.
Suedfeld drew an analogy to a crowded elevator, another confined
and potentially claustrophobic public location. When multiple people are
present on an elevator, similar behaviours can be observed, where people
tend to look up at the floor number rather than at each other.
This act of respectfully refusing to acknowledge strangers in close
proximity is known as civil inattention, a term coined by sociologist
Erving Goffman.
The code dictating the ordered madness on buses and similarly
uncomfortable public situations is built upon a mutual understanding:
people keep distant on the bus both for their own comfort as well as to
avoid impeding upon fellow passengers' boundaries.
As with everything, however, there are a number of factors that can
influence our preference for space and conduct on the bus. Of course,
culture is a major factor.
"In general, some cultures, European cultures especially," said Suedfeld, "tend to prefer larger interpersonal distances than, for example,
Middle Eastern cultures and some others around the world... Africans,
[for instance.]"
"[In Singapore,] the norms are definitely different," said Ili Rahan, a
second-year Arts student. "If you start talking to someone, they're just
going to be like, 'Who is this person? I don't know them.'
"When people take the bus, they're always in a rush, so they're not in
the mood to start talking."
In contrast, Lloyd, who came to Canada from South Africa, found the
people there more open to sitting next to and striking conversation with
strangers. "If you go on public transport in South Africa, people are far
more chatty," said Lloyd.
"Coming here... you wonder sometimes if it's a cultural thing." tJ
Do not speak to other passengers. Ignore anyone who tries to make conversation.
At most, use courtesy phrases such as "Excuse me" and "Is this seat taken?" instear MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014    |    CULTURE
Does the price of
wine actually matter?
JOSHUA
DEC0L0NG0N
Wine
Spoiler alert: maybe.
There's something about wine
that leads people to be a bit more
dubious about its price. Perhaps it
lies in the higher costs compared
to beer, subsequently leading to
the sometimes unintended visage
of pretension. And because wine
can be a difficult thing to communicate about, it's understandably convenient that consumers
might treat wine quality and its
cost as a neat linear scale. But if
we skip the whole Economics 101
supply and demand thing, we can
look at the price of wine from two
ends ofthe spectrum. So let's enter
the world of alcoholic analogies.
Think back to Harry Potter,
Lord ofthe Rings, Game of Thrones
or your favourite massively multi-
player online role-playing game.
There are always those elusive
weapons that happen to be carved
from the rarest metals for which
someone needs to climb dangerous
monster-infested cliffs, or potions
made from forest faerie tears that
are so scarce that you need to save
up your precious gold pieces and
trade on the black market.
What I love about wine is
that it's sometimes equivalent-
ly mystical: the world's most
prized dessert wine, Sauternes,
is a coveted golden liquid whose
best wines must be created from
grapes affected by "noble rot,"
also known as Botrytis cinerea.
Perfect weather conditions control the stage and therefore the
rot's chancy quality. And although
technically a fungus, if controlled
carefully the rot can concentrate
the wine's sugar and acid, making
it both luscious and long-lived.
It also contributes an inimitable
and mostly indescribable flavour
which might sound disgusting
in theory, yet it commands legit
dolla billz: there's your rare faerie
potion, with +100 points to your
happiness stat.
'HOTO JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
Repeat similar stories about
the difficult growing regions of
Champagne and cooler areas of
Germany, and suddenly, the wine
snob who gets excited about a
Champagne vintaged 2002 doesn't
seem so far from the gamer whose
flame ruby-bejewelled adamantium
sword is about to slay the final boss.
But also think about mass-produced coffee and some famous
branded clothing. Wine can have
parallels here, where prices are
held mostly by reputation or marketing. Quality can be pushed into
the backseat simply because, on the
extreme end, money becomes the
driver. Though I'd be hard-pressed
to come up with specific cash-commanding wines that aren't necessarily matched in quality (mostly
because I'm a poor student),
Yellow Tail is a prime example of a
well-selling wine on the lower end
ofthe price spectrum, even though
it doesn't exactly command much
complexity or excitement.
Sometimes, the whole thing
doesn't matter. If it makes you
happy, you'll buy it; as long as it
has caffeine, you'll drink it. It's
almost like the shirt I bought from
H&M, which I recently discovered
had a hole in it. But then I remembered that it was from H&M.
You can't always expect fantastic
things out ofthe cheaper bottles,
but there are the disjointed bunch
that provide great value or more
adventure. You'll just need to know
where to look to find out which
ones they are. Or drink more.
Bottoms up! U
THEATRE»
Sauder school sings on stage
Student cohort to perform in murder mystery musical
Alex Meisner
StaffWriter
When the suits at the Sauder
School of Business take off their
ties and kick off their heels, it's a
mysterious sight.
On Thursday, Feb. 27, students
from Sauder and fellow faculties
will be hosting a murder mystery
musical charity fundraiser under
the direction of Katie Coopersmith
and Raeanne Lee.
The musical, this year titled The
Clash ofthe Chorus, has the Sauder
"Banknotes" butting heads with
the dedicated Arts' "Sunshine"
choir.
"It pits two opposing choirs
against each other. One of them is
a Sauder business choir who is just
doing it for their Arts credit, and
the other one is the super artsy,
hippy choir," said Coopersmith,
one the musical's co-directors.
Besides a comical direction,
intense rivalry and thrilling plot
twist, the audience can anticipate a busy intermission catered
by Calhoun's, raffle draws and
contribution to the musical's
fundraising efforts.
"At intermission we'll have a
good sense ofthe plot so far, and
we'll ask [the audience] to put
a ballot forward with who they
think the murderer is, and for the
correct guesses we will pick out a
name. We have a couple of exciting
prizes," said fellow writer and
co-director Lee.
Coopersmith said funds raised
will go to the Vancouver Foundation. "They have a bunch of
sub-charities within it and one of
them is the Homelessness Initiative, and that is what our proceeds
are going to.
"They basically triple whatever
you give them, so we couldn't pass
that up."
The Sauder Murder Mystery
Musical, which has been under
the umbrella ofthe Commerce
Community Program (CCP) for
several years now, will be hosted
at the Hillel House on campus.
The cast, which consists of nine
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
The musical will feature two opposing choirs: one a Sauder business choir and the other
an artsy hippy choir.
Everyone managed to get along
just fine — including the participating Sauder professor.
As tradition holds, a Sauder faculty member takes part in assuming a role for the murder mystery
musical. In previous years this position was filled by Jeff Kroeker, a
full-time professor in the accounting division. This year however,
the musical has a new shining star:
Professor David "DJ" Miller.
"He is actually really awesome;
he can do different accents. It was
really fun working with him,"
Chung said.
Miller's inclusion in the
play is just one ofthe ways in
which students from Sauder want to promote increased
campus interconnectivity.
"This year we wanted to make it
more inclusive to all faculties," Lee
explained. "We're trying to make it
more of a UBC staple, rather than
just a Sauder thing." U
Tickets will be available for sale on
the musical's Facebook page, or at
the event's booth in the SUB on Feb.
25 and 26.
students and a Sauder faculty
member, first got involved with the
musical during their auditions back
in November, and since the beginning of January have been avidly
rehearsing together.
Sauder cast members Wendy
Vaz and Bernice Chung, along
with LFS colleague Isabel Antonio,
are eager to see a big turnout for
the event.
"The plot ofthe musical is
really cute, it's really cheesy, it is
very cliche, but that's what makes
it entertaining," Sunshine choir
member Antonio said.
As one ofthe three Sauder
students present in the musical,
Vaz said the only challenge of
having a diverse range of faculty
participants was that scheduling
rehearsals and important dates
became difficult.
"I have never [been a director
or writer] before and neither had
Raeanne. We've both acted but
have never been on this side of it,"
Coopersmith said. "It was a challenge, but lots of fun, and it was
cool to have people actually listen
to you and follow your directions."
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www.greencollege.ubc.ca   @greencollegeUBC // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
DYNASTY»
Women's volleyball sets sights on seventh straight championship
Geoff Lister
Coordinating Editor
For many teams, winning the Canada West conference is a significant achievement. But for six-time
national champions, it's another
notch on their way to the big show
in Regina next weekend.
UBC's three-set win over Manitoba for Canada West gold was a
refreshing game for Thunderbird
fans after suffering through back-
to-back losses to Alberta before
the reading break.
"We had some late season
struggles, so for us to turn it
around, win the match we had to
last night and come back and play
really well as a group today is encouraging moving forward." said
head coach Doug Reimer.
"I think it's a real positive from
where we were two weeks ago in
Alberta where we were struggling,
and doing when we have to."
UBC's offence came from all
angles, with hitters Lisa Barclay,
Rosie Schlagintweit and Juliana
Kaufmanis coming from all sides.
Middle Abbey Keeping put up
an excellent nine kills and a .333
hitting average. While Manitoba
managed to hold Barclay to a .161
hitting average, she still managed
to keep up with her average kills
per game for the season
"[Barclay] struggled a little bit
more, but we had way better offensive balance. She opens things
just with her presence on the
court because they know what she
can do," said Reimer.
"I thought we played a really
good game," said Barclay. "We've
UBC's women's volleyball team beat the University of Manitoba Bison to claim the Canada West title and banner.
struggled putting away teams in
three so I think that really showed
the work we've put in."
Briana Liau Kent had two big
games this weekend, with 23 digs
on Friday night against UBCO
and another 12 against Manitoba.
Her play will be a key part of the
Thunderbirds defence next weekend in Regina.
"She was on fire. She dug balls
that were incredible and she was
steady throughout," said Reimer
after the game.
UBC's season has been stellar
by any measure, save against
themselves. This year's 18-4
record wasn't quite up to UBC's
past two years (21-1,18-2). And
while UBC didn't go more than
four sets in any wins last year and
never failed to take a set in a night,
they let five games slip to five sets
this season. But after a two week
break, the team seems to have it
together. Reimer credits some
of that to the team's work in the
last week.
"More of it was being [a] group,
being together," he said. "The
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
break was good. We had a chance
to get some quality training and
we had Rick Hanson come in
and speak to the group and that's
positive."
UBC will play in Regina next
weekend at the CIS national
championships. UBC has won the
past six CIS titles and was ranked
first going into the playoffs. 31
YOUR VOICE IS A
POWERFUL FORCE
FOR EQUALITY
©   Visit vpstudents.ubcca to provide feedback on preliminary
recommendations addressing gender-based violence and
Aboriginal stereotypes at UBC.
In 2013, objectionable chants heard during student-organized FROSH events brought to light attitudes and lack of
understanding related to gender-based violence and Aboriginal stereotypes. A task force was formed to take stock of the
issue and prepare preliminary recommendations. The University is now looking for your input to present to
Professor Stephen J. Toope alongside these recommendations.
UBC
a place of mind MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014    |    SPORTS + REC
SWIMMING »
Women's swimming 3-peats as CIS national champs
Team sets record for widest margin of victory in the championship's history
Natalie Scadden
Sports Editor
At the 2014 CIS Swimming Championships in Toronto, there was
little doubt the UBC Thunderbirds
women's swim team was going to
win their third straight national
title. The only question was how
much distance they'd put between
themselves and the runners up.
By the end ofthe third and final
night, the UBC women had 802.5
points, nearly double that ofthe
second-place Montreal Carabins.
The 397.5 point margin of victory
was a new CIS record.
"We challenged them from the
start ofthe year to be the best
performers they can be on the
day," said UBC head coach Steve
Price. "Throughout this competition they really pushed themselves
and conducted themselves like the
championship team we know they
are. I think for the most part this
season they did that from start to
finish."
Leading the way this weekend was rookie Erika Seltenreich-Hodgson, who came away
with three individual gold medals
as well as an individual silver
(behind a new CIS record-setter in
Laval's Genevieve Cantin) and one
relay gold.
They really
pushed
themselves
and conducted
themselves
like the
championship
team we know
they are.
Steve Price
Head coach
"She's obviously a great recruit
— I'm very happy she chose us,"
Price said of Seltenreich-Hodgson,
who was awarded both the rookie
and overall female CIS swimmer
ofthe year. "She was considering
the U.S. very much, and then when
she came to visit UBC in the fall,
she really liked the team and liked
the school, liked the girls and
made the decision to stay with us.
She's done very, very well."
Seltenreich-Hodgson's winning
times in the 200m and 400m individual medley were the fastest by
any woman in Canada this season.
Her 4:34.76 in the 400m shattered
the previous CIS record of 4:37.81
set by Calgary's Tianna Rissling
last year.
"That's the level of kids that we
recruited, and I think people continue to be attracted to the school,"
said Price. "We let everybody
know that we're about performance and that we can coach them
as well as anybody else in the
world."
One ofthe strengths of UBC's
women's team is the depth and
longevity of athletes. Looking
ahead to next season, it will lose
just two fifth-year swimmers in
Laura Thompson and Brittney
Harley, who both finished their
CIS careers with lifetime best
times and podium performances.
"That's one ofthe things I want
to do with this women's program;
if you're going right through the
program, you're still improving
=HOTOCOURTESYMARTINBAZYL/UNIVERSITYOFTORONTC
The UBC women's swim team celebrates with their CIS banner in Toronto.
every year," said Price.
On the men's side, UBC again
finished in second place to the
Toronto Varsity Blues, who swam
well in front of their home crowd.
Having lost by 15 points last year,
Price said he would've liked the
guys to have been a bit closer than
the 80.5 points they were behind
this weekend.
"Every session matters, especially the heat sessions — you've
got get into scoring position," he
said. "Ultimately, we didn't have
enough scoring swims. They
were close, but they couldn't get
themselves through. It's a numbers
game at this meet and you cannot
have that many misses."
The UBC men were in first
place after day one, but Toronto
made a strong comeback on the
second day and Price believes that
was the difference. "We won the
first day and maybe still won the
last day just on the day alone but
not by very much," he said. "So we
learned that lesson. It wasn't a surprise or like we didn't know what
we had to do, we just didn't get it
done. I don't want to hang that on
them in a negative way because it
was a tall order for a young team."
Coleman Allen: CIS male
swimmer ofthe year. Won seven
medals and set CIS record in
100m butterfly.
Erika Seltenreich-Hodgson:
CIS female swimmer ofthe year.
Three individual golds, one individual silver, one relay gold.
Price knew his squad would rely
heavily on the leadership of third-
year standout Coleman Allen, the
Canada West male swimmer of
the year. Allen certainly delivered,
winning seven medals and setting
a new CIS record in the 100m
butterfly (51.44). He was rewarded
with the CIS male swimmer of
the year honours, an award his
roommate, former T-Bird Kelly
Aspinall, took home last year.
Allen also anchored UBC's
4x200m freestyle relay, breaking
the Canadian record with a time
of 7:09.50. In fact, for the first
time since 2006, the UBC men
and women stood on top ofthe
podium in all six relays throughout the meet.
"We went in ranked first in all
the relays just based on our times
this season, but to be able to come
out and actually sweep them all
is really good," said Price. "To be
a great team, you have to have
great relays. They count for double
points, and it also shows the depth
of your program."
Every swimmer on the roster
contributed points for UBC, but
Price gave special mention to Justin Chan and Fionnuala Pierse.
"Justin is a local kid that's
come through the club program
and now on the varsity team and
was a little bit overlooked with
the coaches before me," said the
coach. "He really stepped up
and earned a spot on the men's
4x200m relay, which ended up
breaking a record and got us a
gold medal. He swam very well
— 100 per cent personal bests
throughout the weekend."
Fionnuala is one ofthe five
Pierse sisters who have swam for
UBC, and her dedication to the
team paid off this weekend with
her first individual CIS medal in
the 100m freestyle on Saturday
night. "She swam well throughout," Price said. "She's a fourth-
year for the team that has hung
in there, plugged away and did a
great job, also winning the gold in
the 4x100m freestyle relay."
Overall, Price was impressed
with both his teams and the calibre of competition this year, and is
encouraged by the growing rivalry
on the men's side between UBC
and Toronto.
"It's good for Canada [and]
it's good for CIS swimming," he
said. "This meet itself, the level
of competition and results ofthe
meet from all over the place was
great. It's raised the bar of college
swimming and helped some of
these people who are going to be
on the national team get ready for
the next level of competition. Plus,
any time they have a chance to
race each other and race hard domestically, it's only going to make
them better." XI
LAUNCH YOUR CAREER
WITH A POSTGRAD
IN BUSINESS
CHOOSEYOUR
CERTIFICATE
<J)'HUMBER II Opinions
LAST WORDS//
THE RETURN OF THE SON
OF THE WHISTLER LODGE
The Ski and Board Club's campaign to force another vote on
the Whistler Lodge is well-intentioned, but as it stands, it's a
bad idea.
The lodge is, in theory, a nice
thing for students to have. But
in reality, students don't use it
a whole lot, especially since the
nicer and almost equally cheap
hostel opened nearby.
The lodge lost $220,000 between
2005 and 2013, and currently needs
at least $200,000 in renovations to
meet basic building standards. For
people who try to book a bed in the
lodge on a Saturday in January, it
doesn't seem like this should be the
case — it's always full. However,
while the lodge is full on weekends
during peak season, it's practically
empty during the week and during
the summer. That's why it's losing
so much money.
If the Ski and Board Club, or
any group on campus, really wants
to keep the Whistler Lodge, they
need to come up with a financial
plan that doesn't have it losing
thousands of student dollars every
year. If they can come up with
that, that's awesome. The lodge
was built by hand by students in
1965 and is an important symbol of
student initiative.
As it currently stands, the AMS
would really like to sell the lodge,
and they've already voted down
the idea of running it as a student
service. If the club doesn't come
up with anything, and the revote
passes anyway, this petition will
only serve to further delay an
already drawn-out process.
HOW TO RIDE THE
GODDAMN BUS
Our feature story this issue highlighted the peculiar social rules
that determine the way people
utilize our much beleaguered
bus system. Though arguably
well-founded in principles of
Canadian politeness and personal
space, the extent to which we follow these rules — at the expense of
our own well-being, as well as that
of others — is absurd.
Here is a list of issues that people
will avoid addressing in order to
maintain precious, precious face:
• Someone sitting in an aisle seat
with a window seat free
• Someone standing in an aisle
blocking off a free aisle seat,
while bizarrely refusing to use it
themselves (no one is allowed to
sit there, apparently)
• Someone placing a bag on a seat
so no one can sit in it
• Standing in the exit door aisle
area, which blocks people from
using any free seats available
further back in the bus while
simultaneously preventing new
passengers from from filling up
_LUSTRATIONJETHRO AU/THE UBYSSEY
free aisle space, and exacerbating
the difficulty of leaving the bus for
other passengers
We at The Ubyssey— with
the greatest possible degree of
Canadian politeness imaginable
— would like to kindly remind the
public that face is ultimately an
abstract idea which, if effaced, will
not necessarily instantiate the end
ofthe world, and further, that you
are quite unlikely to interact with
the same people on the bus again.
As such, we hope that newer
generations of bus riders will learn
to speak up when other passengers exhibit profuse forms of
douchebaggery, as in the examples
enumerated above.
TRY MEDEO, ITS BETTER
THAN GOOGLE
Medeo, now part ofthe AMS's
healthcare plan, allows you to visit
a doctor from the comfort of your
own home. It's a great idea, especially since many ailments simply
require reassurance or advice from
a doctor, not a full inspection or
medication. It's certainly better
than trying to diagnose yourself
with Google. Of course, public-private partnerships should come
with some skepticism — Medeo
wants you to use its service so
it can make money — but on the
surface, it seems like a better time
than traipsing to UBC's overworked medical clinic, or anywhere else in Vancouver. XI
Letter: UBC Counselling article was unfair, misleading
LETTER
Dear editor,
Your article ("Waits, complaints
and constraints: the state of UBC
Counselling Services," Feb. 10)
identifies the difficulties many
students have in seeking out help,
and the importance of supporting
the mental health of students
at UBC — on this we agree.
However, the portrayal of UBC
Counselling Services is inaccurate
and based on a complete lack of
meaningful evidence.
Long lines are not the experience ofthe majority of students
who seek help. In surveys
conducted by UBC Counselling
Services in the past two years, 82
per cent of respondents agreed
or strongly agreed that they
received service in a reasonable
amount of time.
Contrary to your anecdote,
friends and family members
are encouraged to sit with
students in the waiting room.
We know this is a support to
many students.
The vast majority of counselling is one on one. Pre and
post data for group counselling
show it is a very effective form of
treatment for our community as
well. Finding the right course of
support for each unique circumstance is vital, and our team is
extremely dedicated to student
well-being — students are encouraged to raise concerns and
actively help us find the right fit.
Our data shows that 86 per
cent of students are satisfied
with the services and care they
receive from UBC Counselling
Services. To suggest otherwise,
and possibly keep students from
trying to receive such support,
is irresponsible.
Janet Teasdale
Managing Director,
Student Development and Services
Student movements need to
look internally to be succesful
7:1
DHOTO RYAN KELPIN/THEVARSITY
Student activists need to listen to students to get back on message.
OP-ED
ABDULLAH SHIHIPAR
TORONTO (NUW) - Over the
past few months in the city of London, U.K., hundreds of students
have been taking to the streets to
protest the forced closure ofthe
University of London Union — the
University of London's central
students' union.
Throughout the demonstrations, the students have faced
aggression from the authorities,
been arrested, and have had their
right to protest severely curtailed
bythe university administration.
In contrast, when it comes to
mobilizing against cuts to university education in Ontario, the
situation is dismal. The now-defunct annual protest to "drop
fees," organized by the Canadian
Federation of Students (CFS),
could only ever muster lukewarm
support; while students certainly
don't like paying high fees, there
is little enthusiasm to do anything
about it.
One doesn't have to go far
to see student mobilization in
action. In 2012, Quebecois students went on strike in response
to a proposed tuition fee increase
of 75 per cent. Student activists
across the province have posed
the question of why Ontario
students can't replicate Quebec's
results. The finger is often pointed towards the apathetic masses
of students, who do not take part
in the work towards affordable
education — either consciously or out of ignorance. And so
organizers spend most of their
time during the year appealing
to students through rhetoric and
buzzwords to encourage action
and involvement.
This sense of apathy does exist
to a certain extent. But with
respect to mobilizing for education, students are far from being
disengaged members of society.
Both inside and outside the classroom, many students are actively
involved in issues they care about
— whether the issue is tackling
the stigma around HIV/AIDS, or
examining the effect municipal
policies have on the city's working
class; students are involved. The
problem does not lie with students,
but with the student organizers.
We are asking the wrong questions. Rather than assuming students are as apathetic as we think
they are, we should be asking how
we came to that conclusion in the
first place.
The answer is simple: while
well-versed in activist ideology
and rhetoric, student organizers in
Ontario, including myself, all fail to
listen to their fellow students. We
get so lost in talking and reading
about organization that we fail to
stop and give students the chance
to participate in the movement. It
is not a case of merely forgetting;
when students try to participate in
the process and present alternative
ideas, they are either shunned or
treated with hostility. Often those
who dissent, regardless of political affiliation, are referred to as
right-wingers bent on pursuing a
campaign of union-busting. It is
true that there are political parties
that do try to undermine the work
of student unions, but, for the most
part, the threat is exaggerated.
While claiming to speak for
students, organizers continue to
maintain a condescending attitude
that gives the impression that they
know the best practices to guide
the student movement, and that
the student body is too ignorant to
contribute effectively. The status
quo of ignoring voices in student
movements needs to change. We
need to radically rethink how we
organize ourselves on campus. We
may not agree with all the ideas
presented to us, but we need to
attempt to include as many voices
as we can. Theory is important,
but without the involvement of
students, it is meaningless.
In addition to listening to
students, we need to restructure
our systems of participatory
democracy to ensure students have
more of a say more often. One such
model exists in the direct democracy model, applied in general
assemblies ofthe Quebec student
movement and the Occupy Wall
Street protests. Direct democracy
allows people to vote on specific
policies, as opposed to leaving all
ofthe decisions to a representative
executive. Organizers in Ontario
have rejected the model, suggesting
that such a structure would disenfranchise minority voices. However, as Occupy has successfully
demonstrated, direct democracy
can be put into place with controls
to ensure that minority voices are
adequately represented.
If we do not take these steps, students will continue to be disenfranchised, organizers will continue to
boast about victories, and tuition
fees will continue to increase.
This article was originally printed
in The Varsity, the University of
Toronto's student newspaper. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2014    |    GAMES    |   11
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It's 2045 and since everyone backs up their memory on the
computer, the red arrow stole the green arrow's memory via
USB stick! The green arrow usually knows her way around Di-
no-Mall but not when her sense of direction and map skills are
in the hands ofthe conniving red arrow! Help the green arrow
catch up and take back what is hers.
ACROSS
1-Heroic
5-Cravat
10-Ladies of Sp.
14-Building block brand
15-Mislead
16-Actress Skye
17-Earth Day subj.
18-Army leader?
19-Ferrara family
20-Values highly
22-Collided
24- -mo
25-Queue after Q
26- By accident, old-style
29-Resistance unit
32-Stickum
36-Zenoof__
37-Straight man
39-Coal scuttle
40-In spite of
43-Friend of Fidel
44-Move unsteadily
45-Sea-going eagle
46-Snap course
48-Snitch
49-Played the part
50-100 percent
52-Paid player
53-Outfit
57- Highest singing voice in women
61-Actor Estrada
62- Unit of weight in gemstones
64- Son of Zeus in Greek mythology
65- A Death in the Family author;
66-Kool-Aid maker
67- New Mexico art colony
68-ActorAuberjonois
69-Approvals
70-Sicilian spewer
DOWN
1-Gen. Robert	
2-Bodybuilder's pride
3- Rhythm
4-Cabbage salad
5- San Antonio landmark
6-Letter opener
7-100yrs.
8- Ear-related
9-It's human
10-Midday nap
11- Hashanah
12-Get in a hand
13- Tournament favorite
21-TVTarzanRon
23-Colorado resort
26-Therefore
27-Hawaiian greeting
28-For sake!
29-Alternate
30-Plantain lily
31-Sacred song
33-Tee, e.g.
34-1,000 kilograms
35-Created a border
37- -Foy, Quebec
38-Needlefish
41-Author Calvino
42-Embellish
47- Federal soldier in the Civil War
49-Dada pioneer
51-Fortunate
52- Annie of Designing Women
53-Rip
54-Impulse to act
55-Nothing, in Nantes
56-Shipping deduction
57-Ump'scall
58-1 smell !
59-It's a gas
60-Greek peak
63-       Tafari (Haile Selassie)
FEB. 11 ANSWERS
3UZZLE COURTESYKRAZYDAD. USED WITH PERMISSION.
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Volunteer for The Ubyssey
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Get it right. THE 7TH ANNUAL AMS
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PAI I
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