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The Ubyssey Feb 1, 1968

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Array AD HOC GROUP SHOULD EXAMINE SECRECY'
By MIKE FINLAY
A senator Wednesday night advocated the formation of an ad hoc committee to discuss the secrecy
issue.
Economics professor Dr. Robert Clark told
45 senators and an equal number of students at a
joint meeting at International House the senate
should not have an open gallery but the matter
should not be closed.
"I hope student council will present a brief to
senate on the subject of the public gallery and I
hope this brief will be considered by an ad hoc
committee,"   he   said.
(Such a brief was prepared by Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan earlier this week and
will be presented to the senate Feb. 14.)
Clark said an open gallery would inhibit speakers
would invite the campus press to advocate causes
and would force the senate to move more into committees not open to the public.
"It has been suggested by some intrepid spirits
that such a bold gesture as a sit-in would change
the opinions of some senators hitherto unmoved by
student demands," he said.
Clark said he thought such a move would turn
senate opinion against the students.
Following Clark, arts president Stan Persky supplemented his defence of open senate with his song,
The Nonsense World Is Quite Alright, sung by
Harley Rothstein, arts 4, as a parody of senate
meetings.
Persky said the question was not senate secrecy
but degrees of openness.
"I see no reason why open conversation need not
be honest or need be rhetorical," he said. "And I
do not think The Ubyssey is the dangerous animal
most senators fear it is."
AMS treasurer Dave Hoye touched on the issue
of open senate while giving a resume of AMS accomplishments this year.
After speaking of symposia and the work done
on the student union building, Hoye said he thought
students and faculty should know how decisions on
campus affect them.
"The motto of this university is Tuum Est," he
said, "The opening of senate will be a first step in
answering the challenge of Tuum Est."
Law professor C. B. Bourne emphasized senate
was not a political institution, but an advisory and
legislative body.
He said opening senate would tend to reverse
the progress already made in ending secrecy by
forcing more use of committees.
"Senate was right to reject the open gallery and
I see no reason to change my mind," he said.
After the speakers finished, the meeting broke
down into informal discussions.
Student senator Ray Larsen said he was embarrassed by the small turnout of students and impressed by the number of senators at the meeting .
Senator Gabor Mate said he was pretty sure
senate would be open next term.
Acting UBC president Walter Gage said at the
meeting the dialogue between senators and students
was a good thing.
"I think there's more sympathy now and this
will affect the decision of senate," he said.
deaf
THE UBYSSEY
/ol. XLIX, No. 41
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1968
48
224-3916
— george hollo photo
DeCOURSEY TAKING the  big plunge with a   little  help from  his friends.
Strangers break ice with hack
By MARK DeCOURSEY
Ubyssey Drying Reporter
A concrete E is imbedded in the main mall.
It   was   put   there   Wednesday   with   blood,
weat and tears:.
"Mine,"  grumbled  Mark DeCoursey,  sci.  2.
The occasion was the commemoration of
ngineering week by placing a large plaque in
le shape of an E on the mall.
The engineers positioned the plaque, five
jet long, in the still-wet foundation.
"Just like a tombstone!" shouted DeCoursey.
ngineering president Lynn Spraggs read the
iscription.
He made a speech.
The engineers chanted.  They cheered.
Silence.
"We came to bury the engineers, not to
praise them," whispered DeCoursey.
A rumble spread through the crowd.
The engineers were out for DeCoursey's
blood.
They carried the kicking and screaming student to the slime pond  outside the library.
Spectators covered their ears.
"Tank you," said DeCoursey later, dripping
and shivering.
"There ought to be a better way to break
the ice with strangers."
Engineering stunts continue today.
Money crisis
might limit
appointments
By PAUL KNOX
New appointments in UBC's largest faculties may be
severely limited as a result of a funds crisis.
The faculties of arts, science, and education are not making
appointments until the provincial budget comes down Feb. 9.
It was earlier understood that no new appointments would
be made in the faculty of arts for next year.
Dean of arts Dennis  Healy said the only positions being
filled in his faculty are those created by vacancies in the present university budget.
"I have asked the board of governors for
four new professorships, 12 associate professors and 23 assistant professors," Healy said.
"But I've no idea when we'll know if we
can go ahead and hire them."
Dean of education Neville Scarfe said
Thursday he had authorized no new appointments for next year.
Science dean Vladimir Okulitch said his
faculty had not made any new appointments.
"We've been advised to be cautious," Okulitch said.
Acting president Walter Gage confirmed Thursday that he
had cautioned deans about hiring new faculty.
"We don't know how much money we'll be getting," Gage
said. "We can't say how many people we can hire. This is the
case every year."
UBC registrar Reg Parnall said all timetables for next
year must be submitted to him by today.
Some faculties reported difficulty in drawing up timetables
without knowing how many staff they will have.
Scarfe said his faculty was in particular difficulty.
"We've made two timetables — one with our present staff,
and one with the staff we hope to hire," he said.
In previous years, deans have been able to estimate the
number of new appointments they will be able to make.
Several department heads told The Ubyssey that they
usually finish hiring new staff in January.
"We like to start around Christmas," said French department head Dr. Larry Bongie.
"March is definitely too late to start hiring for next year."
Dr. D. T. Kenny, head of psychology, said the Feb. 9 date
was late, although not impossible.
"We should know by the end of next November how many
people we can hire." he said.
HEALY
to page 6
see: MONEY CRISIS
BLEED - TODAY - ARMORY Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 1, 1968
— sena photo
POLICE ARREST student rioters trying to   storm  military  base.
Police, students clash in Japan
SASEBO, Japan (UNS) — Demonstrators
protesting the presence of the U.S. nuclear-
powered aircraft carrier Enterprise clashed Wednesday with 6,000 heavily armed policemen.
The demonstrators, students from two universities in Fukuoka 60 miles away and members of the radical Zengakuren movement, wore
helmets and improvised towel gas masks to
protect themselves in skirmishes with the police.
The students arrived by tram Jan. 17 and
demonstrated every day in different parts of
the city.
Council advocates
pot legalization
LONDON (CUP) — The student council
at the University of Western Ontario has
advocated the legalization of marijuana.
Two months ago, Mark Kirk, 18, a
freshman student, was expelled after he
was convicted in court for marijuana possession.
The council a week ago accepted recommendations of a special committee on marijuana.
Under the recommendations, the council
will lobby for the reclassification of marijuana from the narcotic control act to the
federal food and drug act.
They will also recommend the national
department of health and welfare study the
properties and effects of marijuana to determine whether the drug is able to meet
the food and drug requirements, and if not,
how much research would be required
before the drug could be considered safe.
The students concentrated their attacks on
two bridges leading to the U.S. naval base. They
had been fortified with barbed wire. Hundreds
of police protected by anti-stone nets, metal
shields and plastic face guards met the students
at the bridges.
The police used tear gas and tear liquid
which were effective in breaking up the demonstration.
The police's violent counter-actions enraged
some citizens. A citizen donated 10,000 yen
($30) to one group for medical treatment and
bail.
The donations reached $2,800 according to
one Zengakuren leader.
He said the citizens became sympathetic to
the Zengakuren during the demonstrations.
"We are trying to break the sanctuary of the
American base," he said.
American  teaching in  Toronto
redassified to  1-A  by board
TORONTO (CUP) — A University of Toronto
professor has been reclassified 1-A by his draft
board because he is teaching in Canada.
Assistant professor Barry Wellman, 25, a
sociology professor from the Bronx, New York,
claims his draft board has not given him the
usual occupational deferment accorded university
professors.
He said when he called his draft board in
New York Friday he was told if he were teaching in the U.S. he'd get a deferment but the
fact that he was in Canada was grounds for
reclassification.
Wellman plans to return to appeal the reclassification on medical grounds. He and his
wife came to Toronto last July from Harvard,
where as a grad student he was classified 2-S.
THE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
invites oil Students, Faculty and Staff
THE THIRD ANNUAL
International Ball
Friday, February Ninth, 9:00 p.m.
in the Hotel Vancouver's
"PACIFIC BALLROOM"
• Trinidad Moonlighters Steel Band
• George Cuba Quartet
• International Floorshow
• Tickets from the A.M.S. Office
or from International House
• Semi-Formal or National Dress
HEAR
CLIFF ER1CKS0AI
Director of Young Life of Canada
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Sponsored by Varsity Christian Fellowship
FINAL 3 DAYS
Our 23rd Annual Record Clearance
Special Clearance   of discontinued  L.  P.   Records
Y2 Price and Less! from 95c to $2.49
All  Classical  Recordings 30%   off  Reg.   Prices
Popular Albums 25% off Reg. Prices
Diamond  Needles from  $3.49
MANY OTHER
BARGAINS AT
SPECIAL
DISCOUNTS
• Record Players
• Tape Recorders
• Radios
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
ATLAS SHRUGGED and Festival '68 was on  its way to success.     Starting
Wednesday, poetry, art, dancing, drama, film and   photography saturate
the armory and other campus points.
Civic group hits Greeks
A prestigious civic group has added
its voice to protests against this year's
Mardi Gras.
In a letter to board of governors
chairman Nathan Nemetz, the Vancouver Civic Unity Association expressed dismay and astonishment at
the event's Minstrel Show theme.
The association lists as its patron
Lt. - Gov. George Pearkes. Honorary
chairmen are former UBC presidents
John Macdonald and Norman MacKenzie. Directors include B.C. Liberal
leader Ray Perrault.
"It represents an incredible lack of
sensitivity to the feelings of the participants' neighbors and fellow citizens," the letter said.
"Are we to infer from Mardi Gras
plans that fraternities and sororities
have abandoned discriminatory practices, and only resort to them when
they are having 'fun'?
"There are many things Vancouver's Negro community needs. Gratuitous insult are not among them.
"We hope students at UBC will
give closer thought to the possible
social implication of their actions."
Nemetz said Thursday he would
discuss the letter with acting president Walter Gage before replying.
"I don't know the facts of the Mardi
Gras affair," he said.
This year's Mardi Gras included a
pep meet which featured several skits
depicting Ku Klux Klansmen beating
Negroes and Negroes beating white
men.
The three-day Mardi Gras drew fire
from groups including the B.C. Association for the Advancement of Colored
People, the Student Non-Violent Coordinating committee, Seattle-Belling-
ham chapter; and UBC's International
House executive.
After the pep meet, the Alma Mater
Society executive condemned the
poor taste shown by certain fraternities in the skits and urged UBC students not to attend Mardi Gras functions.
Meanwhile, the Mardi Gras committee is missing a $300 wig and two
flapper costumes after Saturday
night's dance.
Phil Bernard, producer of the Mardi
Gras floorshow, appealed Wednesday
to the pilferer of the costumes to
return them.
"They will have to be paid for out
of the charity money," Bernard said.
"I think whoever took them must
have been a little high."
Nominations filed
for all AMS seats
Nine nominations have been filed
for five slots on the Alma Mater
Society's first election slate.
Only arts president Stan Persky
had been nominated for AMS president late Wednesday, but another candidate was expected to be nominated
today.
Nominations close today at noon.
Charles Hutton, sc. 2, Ruth Dwor-
kin, sc. 3, and Barry Milasky, comm.
2 are nominated for internal affairs
officer.
Seconder's statements for candidates for president, external affairs
officer, and internal affairs officer
will appear in Friday's Ubyssey.
These must be no longer than 75
words and must be submitted no later
than 1 p.m. today.
Statements by candidates for president (350 words), external and internal affairs officers (100 words),
secretary (100 words) and senator (75
words) will be published next Tuesday. These must be submitted to The
Ubyssey by 1 p.m. Monday.
Tobin Robbins, arts 3, is the sole
contender for external affairs officer.
Both are new offices.
Sally Coleman, arts 2, and Heather
Soles, arts 2, are nominated for secretary.
Tom Grove, comm. 2, and Jane
Fulton, home ec. 3, are vying for the
student senator seat left vacant by
Kirsten Emmott, who has quit university.
The external affairs officer will be
responsible for keeping the students'
council informed of both provincial
and federal government education
policy.
The internal affairs officer will be
Simon Fraser
TAs organize
Eighty teaching assistants at Simon
Fraser University have launched an
association to improve their position
on the campus.
Called the Simon Fraser Non-
faculty Teachers' Association, the
group seeks to improve salaries and
working conditions through collective bargaining.
President Clay Perry said Wednesday the organization was formed because the present system of dealing
with TA's was inadequate.
"There was a widespread feeling
of discontent and frustration," he
said. "We wanted to standardize
working hours and pay scales in the
diffarent departments."
Perry said the organization is now
trying to gain more members from
the 250 TA's at SFU.
He said the association is eligible
for certification as a labor union but
plans to bargain collectively only informally when contracts are signed
in early May.
responsible for the AMS public relations. He will also inform students'
council of all major revisions in curricula at UBC.
The first slate of the elections go
to vote Feb. 7. Advance polls at residences will be held on the night of
Feb. 6.
The second slate, including vice-
president, treasurer, co - ordinator of
activities and student ombudsman will
be held Feb. 14. Nominations for
these positions will close Feb. 7.
Only one nomination has been received for a position on the second
slate. Mike Doyle, arts 2, is running
for ombudsman.
Returning officer Chuck Campbell
said Wednesday he expects a race
for every position on the first slate
except external affairs officer.
Meanwhile the AMS eligibility committee, chaired by AMS secretary
Penny Cairns, will meet at noon today
to discuss Persky's eligibility.
A'MS treasurer Dave Hoye claimed
Persky has not been a student at
UBC for the two years required for
the office.
Persky is officially registered in
arts 3. He attended UBC all last
school year and during the 1967 summer sessions.
Shaun Sullivan, AMS president,
said Persky should be eligible.
Teaching aide
jailed for pot
UBC Spanish teaching assistant Morley Adelman has been
sentenced to six months in jail
for possession of marijuana.
The B.C. court of appeal reversed a suspended sentence
given Adelman earlier by a
magistrate.
Adelman admitted smoking
marijuana for two years but said
he will not smoke it again in
Canada.
"But I don't know whether
I want to be a part of Canada,"
he said in the earlier trial.
"My guilt lies in the fact that
I knew the law was wrong and
disobeyed it, but did nothing
to change it."
Mr. Justice C. W. Tysoe said
in the court judgment that
Adelman's obvious intelligence
and higher education should
have made him realize his responsibility to society.
"This is a most serious defect
of character," Tysoe said.
Hispanic and Italian Studies
department acting head Karl
Kobbervig would not comment
Wednesday on whether Adelman would be rehired.
/*^!
'J^8S*^**B-     JtA
kCWHTMWTW!tfD)%W* THSIIBYSSiY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
FEBRUARY 1, 1968
Misjudge
The sentencing by an appeal court of a UBC teaching assistant to six months in jail for the inoffensive offense of smoking marijuana is merely an instance of an
insane law overzealously applied by backward judges.
It is a strange commentary on the state of Canadian law when the morality of judges compares badly
with the morality of the judged.
For, in smoking marijuana, the teaching assistant
committed no crime, either against another citizen,
against society, or against himself.
Rather, it is the appeal court judges who have offended, by inflicting an undeserved and damaging
punishment.
The suspended sentence originally awarded the
teaching assistant by the lower court magistrate was an
enlightened way to deal with an outdated law. It is to
be hoped that magistrates will not abandon the practice
of awarding suspended sentences under pressure of appeal
court reversals of such decisions. Magistrates need not
become a rubber stamp for wrongheaded decisions of
higher courts.
It is also to be hoped that the change in the teaching
assistant's sentence will not be followed by a change
in his status at UBC. Such an action by the university
would be vicious malevolence in its purest form.
Enemy?
"The enemy force dug in at the compound as six
companies of Korean marines moved toward the town,"
reads the story out of Vietnam in one downtown paper.
"How important is the Ho Chi Minh traffic to the
enemy?" ponders a news analyst in another.
"The word "enemy" in this context, it is apparent,
refers to the Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese. As
Canadian readers of Canadian papers, this somehow
doesn't strike us as quite right.
We realize Canada is a war profiteer. But we had
believed it was still a non-combatant.
The trouble stems from the unfortunate fact that
most international news in Canadian papers comes from
American news services. The above quoted passages are
no exceptions.
It is an abdication of responsibility by this country's
press to rely on the news services of one of the major
combatants in the Vietnam war for its day-to-day coverage of that war. American reporting of an American
war would be suspect even were the U.S. news services
managed and staffed by men saintly in their devotion to
truth. There is little evidence that the AP and UPI offices in Saigon abound in such men.
Apparently Canadian papers and the Canadian Press
news cooperative feel they cannot afford to send Canadian reporters to Vietnam to get a non-combatant's view
of the war. If this is the case, we suggest they turn to
British sources or to translations of the European and
Japanese Press.
And when they must use American wire copy, we
suggest they employ a more neutral blue pencil. We
do not need to be told who our enemies are.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News   Susan Cransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo    Kurt Hilger
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports   Mike Jessen
Wire       Norman   Sidney
Page Friday  Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lee
Of course it wasn't. But then again,
it might have been. The possibility of
its being was undoubtedly a major
factor in its undeniability; but if it
was; it couldn't not have. Nevertheless, Mark DeCoursey felt like a drip
or two, and Paul Knox went into
training for box-car riding. Mike Finlay ran in with a bayonet, and Ann
Arky got the point. Irene Wasilewski
and   Judy   Young   brought   in   three
bags of carrots, while Irving Fetish
brought   broccoli.
Fred Cawsey came dressed as a
doctor of divinities and said halo.
Fran McGrath went on a glider and
came back in a soar temper, while
Laurie Dunbar visited old haunts.
David Salmon tried to talk to spooks
but realized he didn't have a ghost
of a chance. Steve Jackson sat regally on the ass'st city throne. Elgin Lee
hammered off-keys.
Lawrence Woodd, George Hollo,
Chris Blake and Bob Brown made
spectres of themselves in the darkroom, as John Twigg was quite root
in the jock shop. Bob Banno also
sported.
No shows included Lawrence Welk,
Edgar Rice Burroughs, Sally Rand
and Dr. F. P. H. Prick Van Wely, compiler of an English-Dutch dictionary.
'jf ** »*** ** - *   -•    '< ", '„£? 'f, ,
' ... SO THE FACULTY WILL DWINDLE, the enrolment will be cut, the peasants will enter a
new dark age, and the Socred  Reich shall  last  1,000 years.'
'Don't let Ma Murray
give you a bad time'
By MANUEL NEIRA
Neira, a graduate chemical engineer, is studying at
UBC for a master's degree
in business administration.
He is a past president of the
Associated Students' Society,
Santander University, Colombia.
This is an open letter to the
editor of the Commerce Cavalier:
Prof. Robert Hutchins, president of the Center for Democratic Institutions and Ex-
Chancellor of the University
of Chicago, once described his
version of a perfect university.
As Hutchins saw it, the highest purpose of the university
would be to aid the intellectual,
aesthetic and spiritual growth.
The campus would be a center of independent thought and
criticism, and neither could
nor should be popular with
the public. It was to seek wisdom through a conversation
aimed at truth.
The North American university has ignored this powerful
vision. Hutchins gives one
reason which, in part, accounts
for this fact: "I discern the
love of money at the bottom
of the disintegration of the
American university."
Approaching the problem
from a different angle, Dr.
Clark Kerr, former president
of the University of California,
wrote: "The university is
integrated into society and
must adapt sufficently to its
culture if it is to survive."
THE  MULTIVERSITY
According to Kerr, the standard model for the university
is not the small, unified, autonomous community because
small intellectual communities
run against the logic of the
times. Dr. Kerr's answer is
the multiversity, "which provides something for nearly
everybody for farmers, for the
minor and newer professions,
and for the general citizen
who wants to satisfy his curiosity. Thus, the function of the
modern university is the current welfare of the masses.
These two conceptions of
what a university should be
have been built on common
grounds. Both scholars consider academic freedom and
freedom of speech as the very
breath of the university. Indeed their administrations were
characterized by an uncompromising defense of these
principles which are a perfect
expression of intellectual life
in a democracy. (Dr. Kerr was
fired as president of University
of California one year ago
and Dr. Hutchins resigned to
go to Santa Barbara in California).
These considerations came to
mind when I saw in the Commerce Cavalier, (Vol. IV, No.
2), your reasoning to persuade
commerce students in a campaign to change the orientation
of The Ubyssey. I do not want
to comment on your implication that The Ubyssey does
not properly reflect student
opinion. You can say or write
anything you please. I respect
your right to do so. Student
consensus 'will prove if you
were right or wrong in your
judgment. What really disturbs me is the following: "If
student opinion is not being reflected, this is especially serious when we see letters like
Ma Murray's and when we
consider that it is this month
that we go into the community
to ask for money. Now, the
reasoning behind Ma's opinions
was not especially good. But
she does have a tremendous
following that thinks our language is filth and our dress,
manners, and morals are not
much better."
SOCIAL LUNACY "
Good Grief! Either you are
unable to keep composure in
the presence of the waves of
prejudice and random social
and political lunacy, or the
preceding quote properly reflects your thinking.
If the latter possibility is
actually the case, then, unwit
tingly, you have chosen sides
in one of the great ideological
struggles of all time. Frederick R. Kappel, President pf
A.T. & T., has set it forth all
too clearly in a recent book:
"Essentially it is a contest between two quite basic conceptions. One is that men are
capable of faith in ideas that
lift their minds and hearts,
ideas that raise their sights and
give them hope, energy, and
enthusiasm. Opposing this is
the belief that the pursuit of
material ends is all that life
on this earth is about."
COMMERCE  EDITOR
My dear editor of the Commerce Cavalier: Do not let
Ma Murray give you a bad
time. You are a person alert
and intelligent enough to listen and fight back. It might
help you to remember that,
after all, we are part of a not
unimportant segment in society college youth and the intellectual community. "...
We are impatient to substitute
reason for blind obedience, inquiry for ideology."
Our age will be characterized as the time when the new
elites began to divorce their
social goals from those of the
society to which their predecessors were glad to pay allegiance. You and I are, therefore members of an anti-elite
in potency with roots all over
the world. An anti-elite which
now not only wish to share
powers in areas being held by
others but an anti-elite which
strongly Ibelieves in making
use of the force that dominates
our age — the power of
science and scientific technology — to undercut the bastions of privilege and to impose human will on the social
universe. An anti-elite, my
dear friend, ■which now is
striving for a transcendent secular goal to eradicate the
oppressive limitation to
thought and spirit that inhabits the very center of the
capitalist imagination. Thursday, February 1, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Tonkin Gulf
Did   Ho's   Navy  really  challenge  the  Seventh   Fleet?
By HUNTER GOLAY
Dept. of Asian Studies
The official United States version of the
Tonkin Gulf Incident was substantially that on
Aug. 2, 19(54, the United States destroyer Mad-
dox was attacked without provocation by North
Vietnamese torpedo boats in the Gulf of Tonkin
and that a second, unprovoked attack was
launched on Aug. 4 against both the Maddox
and another destroyer, the Turner Joy. The
engagements reportedly resulted in the sinking
and damaging of the North Vietnamese boats
without damage to the United States ships.
There followed a retaliatory attack by United
States aircraft against three North Vietnamese
naval bases, associated oil depots, and a coal
mine. Concurrently President Johnson sought
and obtained a joint resolution from the United
States Congress which in effect expressed support for the retaliatory attack and has since
(been construed to express support for the escalating military measures employed both in South
Vietnam and against North Vietnam.
Some wondered at the time what other outcome than a lopsided defeat the almost primitive North Vietnamese Navy could expect when
it suddenly decided to challenge the Seventh
Fleet. When the events are examined in their
context it becomes clear that the North Vietnamese did no such thing.
The context surrounding the events of Aug.
2 and 4 may be described in terms of the political
and military situation facing
Gen. Nguyen Khanh in Saigon,
the evolving military program
of the United States, and the
domestic political situation facing Johnson.
KHANH CAN'T COPE
General Khanh had justified the coup which brought
him to power in January, 1964,
on the grounds that his predecessor, General Van Minn, was JOHNSON
unable to cope with the growing tide of neutralism which would culminate in a victory for the
Communists. The United States openly shared
Khanh's opposition to neutralism and for the
same reasons. During his first six months in
power, however, Khanh had not only been unable to score victories over the NLF but was
also unable to extend his area of control. On
the contrary his reserves were being so rapidly
depleted by NLF ambushes that he was in imminent danger of losing control of additional
areas. In July his unstable political position was
rendered still more precarious by parallel efforts emanating from U Thant, Gen. DeGaulle,
and the Soviet Union to convene a kind of
Geneva Conference intended to lead to a negotiated settlement of the conflict. In contrast to
the National Liberation Front, the North Vietnamese, and the Chinese, all of whom reacted
favorably to the initiatives, General Khanh and
President Johnson categorically rejected them.
Within a few days after Khan's vehement rejection Johnson ordered the dispatch of another
5,000 troops to Vietnam bringing the total to
21,000. Since there were no domestic springs
of political strength Khanh sought and received
ar Infusion from the United States. His appeal
for a march to the North made a few days
prior to the Tonkin Incident implied massive
United States support if it were to be considered
anything more than an attempt to shore up his
prestige in Saigon. Some credibility was given
to the appeal by the revelation on July 23rd by
Air Vice Marshal Ky (later General Cao Ky)
that South Vietnamese commandos had been
operating against North Vietnaf by land, sea,
and air. The Tonkin Incident appears to have
served the policy of increased American involvement which was already being executed, a
policy essential to the survival of the Khanh
regime.
HARDLINERS WON OUT
There is also evidence that the Tonkin Incident served a related but not. identical policy
which had already been approved: the United
States military policy for Vietnam. In his review essay on Roger Hilsman's To Move A
Nation, John McDermott traces the struggle
within the Kennedy-Johnson administrations
between those who regarded themselves as more
politically oriented and sought to limit American military involvement and those who regarded North Vietnam as the source of aggression and sought a stark confrontation. Hilsman
was assistant secretary of state for far eastern
affairs during 1963 and 1964. Hilsman left the
administration in January of 1964 because the
hardliners had won out. These had been advocating increased military pressure on the North
through gradual escalation, and envisioning
bombing of the North.
Prior to the Tonkin Incident a Harris Poll
indicated that only 42 per cent of the American
people approved of Johnson's Vietnam policy.
Immediately thereafter Harris says the percentage jumped to 72. This is a suggestion of the
role Vietnam played on the American political
scene. The heart of Goldwater's campaign was
the accusation that Johnson was not prosecuting
the war effectively enough to bring it to a conclusion. The Incident provided Johnson with an
opportunity to respond vigorously to an alleged
Communist attack and to obtain from congress
a joint resolution supporting this and, as it
turned out, future action against North Vietnam. Richard Rovere observes that the resolution was diplomatically meaningless or irrele-
vent in that it enables the president to do what
he already has the power to do. It provides that
the president may take all necessary measures
to repel any armed attack against the forces of
the United States and to prevent further aggression. Any national force is expected to repel
attacks without benefit of a resolution and the
reference to further aggression can mean as
much or as little as one chooses. The importance
of the resolution lies in the effect it has on the
domestic political scene. As Rover says of such
resolution: "... their passage, which is always
close to unanimous, put partisan critics at a
disadvantage and enables the president to maintain that he is acting not only under his constitutional powers and responsibilities but as a
faithful executioner of the declared will of
Congress."
DOUBT AUTHENTICITY
The nature of the United States response to
the alleged naval attacks cast further doubt on
the authenticity of the incident. The first encounter on Aug. 2 was regarded as unwelcome
but not especially serious by a pentagon
spokesman. General Khanh reacted differently
declaring that: "The Americans should seize
this occasion to dissipate the enemy's belief according to which the United States is only a
paper tiger." The following day the second attack allegedly occurred two days earlier but
has consistently denied the second clash. Even
if one accepts the American account, the engagement was minor, no damage was suffered
by the Americans, and the Vietnamese losses
would seem to be adequate punishment.
Here again context is important. There had
been a series of North Vietnamese accusations
that South Vietnamese naval vessels under the
protective cover of the Maddox, one of the
American ships involved in the incident, had
been raiding North Vietnamese boats and had
bombarded the islands of Hon Me and Hon Ngu.
The Tonkin area had been reported to be the
scene of South Vietnamese commando attacks
since 1957. It is thought by some observers that
logistic support from the United States would
have been required.
We have attempted to show that the Tonkin
Incident was not an incident at all in the usual
sense. It was not an event which gave rise to
new policies so much as an event that served
to reinforce and to legitimize existing policies.
These considerations together with the testimony of former United States naval Lieutenant,
John W. White, lend some credibility to the
North Vietnamese assertion that the alleged
clash between the United States destroyers and
North Vietnamese P.T. boats on Aug. 4 never
occurred. He maintains that his ship, the U.S.S.
Pine Island, was the first to enter the war zone
in response to the alleged attack, that the chief
sonarman on board the Maddox denied that any
torpedos had been fired, that the chief sonar-
man had consistently reported this to the commanding officer during the attack, and that
a chief sonarman's judgement in such a situation is more reliable than that of anyone else
on   the  ship  including  the   comanding   officer.
TOM NORTHCOTT
at VILLAGE BISTRO
2081 W. 4th
THURS. - SUN.
Reduced  rate for students
8 p.m. till wee hours
WORKSHOP SATURDAY
CcmwHicatbHA
PERSONAL   •    INTERNATIONAL    •    PERSUASIVE
•    COMMUNICATIONS IN BEAUROCRACY    •
LECTURES        •        COFFEE        •        DISCUSSION
SAT., FEB. 3RD
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
todjM-**- ""•"
,W»K>
FEB    16
In The New MUSIC BUILDING Recital Hall
TODAY - 12:30 - UNIVERSITY CHAMBER BAND
directed by  Paul Douglas
music  of  Mozart  (Serenade,  K361),  Weber   and  Donizetti
FEB. 2-8 p.m. - UNIVERSITY CHAMBER BAND
(Program as above.)
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
FILMSOC       PRESENTS
Help-12:30, 4:00, 7:30
Hard Day's Night-2:15, 6:00, 9:15
TODAY FEB. 1 - AUD. 50c
FRIDAY, FEB. 2
Summer Employment
for
Forestry Undergraduates
First, Second and Third year Forestry students are  invited
to discuss summer employment opportunities with Canada's
leading forest products Company.
Interviews will be held on campus on
February 5 and 6
for students interested in work in Forestry Operations or
Logging Operations. Our summer work programs are
organized to provide increasingly responsible duties at
attractive rates of pay.
For further information please contact your Student Placement Office.
AA
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR
#68 GRADUATES IN MATHEMATICS
with the
DEPARTMENT OF INSURANCE
OTTAWA TORONTO and MONTREAL
as
ACTUARIAL ASSISTANTS
$6,375 - $8,034
— and —
ACTUARIAL SUPERVISORS
$5,850-$7,310
Details and application forms available at
your University Placement Office.
Competition Numbers 68-6400 and 68-6401  refer. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 1, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Co-op organizers meet
CO-OP HOUSING
Meeting of all those interested in organizing a co-operative
house today at noon in the
AMS first vice-president's office.
CONSTITUTION   REVISIONS
Committee meets again Friday, noon, AMS first vice-
president's office. All who
have ideas or complaints are
welcome.
DESERET CLUB
Ron Butler speaks on ancient
South America, today, noon,
Ang. 110.
ARTS I
Panel discussion on love
with Jewish Orthodox Rabbi
M. Hier, Dave Ristich of the
International Meditation Society, Oriental Moslem H. Kas-
sis and Catholic priest G. Mc
Guigan,   today,   noon,   arts   I
building.
ROD AND GUN CLUB
Meeting to discuss fishing
trip, today, noon, clubroom.
FUS
National Film Board presentation Helicopter Canada
being shown continuously in
the armory. Worth seeing even
if you don't bleed.
LITERATURE SYMPOSIUM
Meeting of all interested 8
tonight, 1357 West 70th. Applications at AAC office in Brock
ext. or in Ubyssey ad. Must be
submitted with $9 Monday.
COMMUS
Beer night. Third year commerce    students    and    guests.
Cecil Green Park, 7:30.
VCF
Hear Cliff Erickson, western
Canada director of Young Life,
Friday, noon, Ang. 110.
Memorial to train gears
' Limey branch campus
By RICHARD STOKER,
for Canadian University Press
Newfoundland is going to train its engineers in Britain.
Memorial University finds that Newfoundland does not have
the industries where engineers can get practical experience; so
a branch campus has been set up in Harlow New Town, a
small industrial town in Southeast England.
When it opens in 1970, Memorial's campus will be the first
English branch of a commonwealth university. Three American
universities have  British campuses at present.
INDUSTRIAL  EXPERIENCE
Engineering students at the branch campus will be able
to have experience from any of about eighty industries in the
Harlow area, ranging from biscuit-making to electronics. They
include Standard Telephone labs employing 3,000 people; a glass
works employing 2,000 which makes ten million bottles a week;
the research labs of the 3-M Company; and a three-man firm
which makes diamond tools.
Most of them have extremely modern methods and buildings,
for Harlow is a new town, scratch-built since 1952 save for a
tiny old nucleus. It's not like stereotypes, industrial concept
of a grimy British factory town; the technology is among the
world's most modern.
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
The idea of a branch campus in England came from Lord
Taylor, the new president of Memorial. Students will do most
of the usual classroom work and spend time in a plant or in
the field, getting practical as well as theoretical knowledge about
their branch of technology. Waterloo University uses a similiar
system now: students in some areas spend two semesters at the
campus and one on a work term under the co-operative system.
MONEY CRISIS
From Page 1
Dean of agriculture Dr. Michael Shaw Thursday gave the
end of January as the deadline for hiring new staff.
"At this stage we should have them picked out if not
actually signed," Shaw said.
The shortage of funds is also responsible for a critical space
shortage in several faculties.
Healy said Thursday he has asked the board for 60,000
square feet of space by Sept. 1 as a temporary measure until
more permanent buildings are erected.
Scarfe said space was the most serious deficiency in his
department's operations.
"We desperately need more space for our graduate students to study in," Scarfe said.
"But even next year's budget won't help that, unless there
is some provisions for capital funds for construction."
Kenny said the space problem was extremely acute in his
department.
"Our lab courses are in a terribly cramped state," he said.
Shaw said Thursday the space problem is not critical in
the faculty of agriculture, but he predicted future difficulty.
"The time to think about requirements in 1974 is now,"
he said.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
Discussion    of   the   Korean
crisis Friday at 8 p.m. next to
Dante's Inferno on Where Was
the Pueblo?
AQUA SOC
General   meeting   Friday
noon   Bu.   100.   All   members
please attend.
COLLEGE LIFE
Teach-in    noon    today    ed.
1006.   Ken   Berven   continues
his series on faith.
EL CIRCULO
Two movies on Mexico today
noon    in    IH    upper    lounge.
Sun   and  Rust  and  Arts   and
Crafts of Mexico.
FINE ARTS CLUB
An audio-visual review with
Jack   Wise   by   Jan   Wishlow,
All students welcome.  Friday
noon Lass.  104.
IH
Communications workshop
Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Everyone welcome.
Malaysia-Singapore    night
Friday   from   7:30.   Malaysian
food,    dance.    Everyone    welcome.
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
General   meeting   noon   Friday. Bu. 223.
FILMSOC
Beatles today in Help and
Hard Day's Night. Three
double bills noon, 4 p.m. and
7:30 p.m. Auditorium 50 cents.
Also Friday.
TTloM pizza TYloku
Dine In — Take Out — Delivery
Across the street from the
Fraser   Arms
1381   S.W.  Marine Drive 263-4440
TURTLE
NECK SWEATERS
Now in Stock
f w MEN'S WE/
4445 West 10»h Avenue
COLLECT
Your club
fraternity
sorority
dormitory
residence
regiment
or friends
and go to
HALF A
SIXPENCE
U.B.C. AUD.
Feb. 8-10 - 13-17
Students rates
& block tickets
available
Aud. box office
228-3176
FILMSOC      PRESENTS
THE BEATLES
in
HELP-12:30,4:00,7:30
HARD DAY'S NIGHT-2:15, 6:00, 9:15
TODAY FEB. 1
and
FRI.  FEB 2
AUD. 50c
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE WITH THE EPICS FRIDAY,
Feb. 2 at Place Vanier, 9:00-12:30.
Admission $1.25.	
DON'T MISS THE INTERNATIONAL
Ball at the Hotel Vancouver, with
the Trinidad Moonlighters and the
George Cuba Quartet; Floorshow.
Tickets 6.00/couple, 3.25 single, from
A.M.S. or I.H. Friday, February 9th,
nine  p.m.    	
POINT GREY DeMOLAY DANCE
Feb. 3 at Hotel Vancouver with the
Spectres, $4.00 per couple, tickets
BIT  232,   noon  or  733-8897.	
TONIGHT AND TOMORROW —
that fabulous R&B group that played Mardi Gras, Mr. Action and The
In-Tensions at Vancouver's newest
nightclub, "The Lion's Tale" 726
Seymour.
Lost & Found
13
ANYONE FINDING PAIR OF WOOD
framed classes near Angus please
ph. 738-2046 after six (6:00) Reward.
TO BE FOUND AT VANIER, ON
Friday, Feb. 2: The Epics, be there
at   9:00.
BROWN DOG W/WHITE NECK,
foot, tail tip, big ears, med. size.
Reward,   738-5942.   Lost   23   Jan.
LOST: ONE WHITE FUR STOLE
at Mardi Gras Friday, any informa-
tion phone Doug, AM 6-0544 please.
FOUND: PAIR OF GLASSESTn
Parliamentary Council Room, Brock
Extension,   Rm.   363.	
POUND  —   GOLD   RING   —   BROCK
Lounge, claim Pub. off, Brock Hall.
I Rides & Car Pools
14
CENTRAL WEST VAN CAR POOL
needs two more drivers. Please ph.
922-7193.
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
ALL STUDENTS, FACULTY AND
staff are invited to the 3rd Annual
International Ball, Friday, Feb. 9th
at 9:00 p.m. in the Hotel Vancouver,
Trinidad Moonlighters, George Cuba,
Flamenco    Dancers,    Tickets    from
A.M.S.   or  I.H.
I.S.E.P. — ALL   STUDENTS   INTER-
ested in the C.U.S.  scholarship Exchange   Program   pick   up   applications   from   Registrar.    All   applications must be in by Feb. 2.   For further information contact Mike Pearce
(Brk.   Ext.  258)   or 278-2839.
HELP IS HERE TODAY. ALSO A
Hard Day's Night. Aud. 50c. 12:30,
4:00,   7:30.
EVERYONE WELCOME AT THE
Malaysian-Singapore night at International House, Friday, Feb. 2nd
at 7:30 p.m. Malaysian food and
dance.   $1.00  single,   $1.75   couple.	
COMMUNICATE THIS SATURDAY.
Personal—International • Beauro-
cratio • Persuasive Communications. AH under discussion Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at a special
workshop. International House on
West   Mall.   Come.
Travel Opportunities
16
—CHARTER FLIGHT UNLIMITED—
50-seats London — 50-seats Frankfurt
July and August $355.
Phone 738-4721
1490 West Broadway, Vane.  9
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'60 ZEPHYR, 5 SPEEDS FORWARD,
reverse rims, radio, heater, dual
Walker exhaust, metallic blue,
black  sides  321-9673.
1955 DODGE 2 DOOR HARDTOP.
Cheap transportation. $100 or best
offer. Phone Norm 224-7298 after
7:00 p.m.	
PRESTIGE AT BARGAIN PRICES.
1957 Olds Stn. Wagon, Power everything. Unbelieveable performance,
$225.  Phone  224-6325.
Automobile Parts
23
SEE OUR COMPLETE RANGE OF
Sports Car Accessories. 10% discount with AMS card. Overseas
Auto Parts. 12th and Alma. 736-
9805.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
YOU'LL HATE YOURSELF IF YOU
miss Hotel Van Dance, Feb. 3.
Tickets  BU  232   (Noon)   or 733-8897.
ANIMALS!. TAKE NOTE THAT WE
weren't able to rent the truck today, so the mass grab is off. Start
shaking   again   tomorrow.	
BEATLES RETURN TO CAMPUS IN
Help and Hard Day's Night. 3
Shows daily 12:30, 4:00, 7:30 today
aud.   5'0c.
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERT   TYPIST    -   ELECTRIC
224-6129    -   228-8384.
UNIVERSITY TYPING SERVICES,
2109 Allison Rd., 228-8414, around
the corner from World Wide Travel
next to RCMP open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday  to   Friday.	
LET JEAN TYPE YOUR THESES,
term papers, etc. French translating
and abstracting, evenings phone
738-5076.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — Call 738-
6829. Mondays to Thursday and
Sundays after 10:00 a.m.
FOR FAST ACCURATE TYPING
of your essay or thesis. Phone 224-
0593 anytime.	
TYPING—ESSAYS,    THESIS,    STEN-
cils,   etc.   Close   to  University.   224-
0244.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST (in West
End), neat, accurate. Reasonable
rates, essays, etc. Telephone 681-
6878.
"GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing, please
call  277-5640".
ESSAYS. MASTERS & PH.D.'s EX-
pertly typed in form and style as
recommended by Campbell. RE 1-
3700 —  3478 W.   19th  Ave.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Tutoring
84
MATH, PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, Biology lessons given by competent
tutors. First year only, 736-6923.
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY, RUS-
sian, Library Science tutoring given
by  B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.  736-6923.
PIANO AND THEORY LESSONS
Dawne Milligan, B.A., A.R.T.C.
3258 East 45th Avenue, 3878 West
38th   Avenue.   Phone  434-1189.	
ENGLISH TUTORING BY M.A. Experienced in teaching. Undergraduates   only.   Phone   682-5127.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Still a few left
—    BIRD CALLS   —
on Sale at: Publications Office
Brock  Hall  or  UBC  Bookstore
KOFLACK LACE SKI BOOTS. SELL-
ing for $35.00, very good condition,
size 10m, phone Lome 987-6756.	
'65 TELEFUNKEN STEREO MULTT-
plex,  $235.  Phone 434-1814.	
FOR SALE MARCHAL "FANTASTC"
Driving Lamp. Quartz Iodide, pencil
beam.  $17.50.  Phone Alan  Coombes,
228-8897.
VOX 12 STRING GUITAR WITH
case. $275' or best offer. Bill 922-
2450.
SEARS   15W.   AMP.   3-INPUT,   TRE-
melo.  $65.   Ph.   733-5189 at  6:00  p.m.
NEW MAGNETIC TAPES FOR SALE
at International House. 1 mil. My-
lan Acetate. 5" reel for $1.25. Hurry
while  they last. 	
—  OLD   TOTEMS   FOR  SALE  —
1963,   1965  & 1966  issues  50c.
Campus  Life's  25c.   Publications  Off.,
Brock   Hall
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
MOVE ONTO CAMPUS — ROOMS
available (M) 224-9662, $40.00 mo.
2250 Wesbrook. Meal Services close
at hand.
Room & Board
8*
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Zeta Beta Tau. Phone 224-9660 between   5-7  p.m.
COMFORTABLE PRIVATE ROOM
and board for 2 male students in
good home. Single or sharing, 261-
1191.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83 Thursday, February 1, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPORTS  SHORTS
Rain dance means rugby on
RUGBY
Coach Donn Spence has been
doing a rain dance all week to
ensure that he'll get the right
kind of weather for his rugby
Thunderbirds to play in.
So far two Northwest Conference games have had to
be rescheduled because of poor
weather. One of the games, a
Jan. 13 contest against Oregon
State University, has been
given the okay for Friday
starting at 12:30 p.m. in Thunderbird Stadium.
But snow earlier this week
had Spence worried till he decided on the rain dance angle.
The Birds play another conference game Saturday, also
in the stadium. This game
starts at 2:30 p.m.
Having only played two
games in the last two months,
the Birds desperately need the
competition that they'll get
from these two games. The
Birds need to be in top shape
for their coming jaunt to California, Feb. 10-14.
WRESTLING
The UBC wrestling team lost
a pair of contests to American
teams on the weekend, as was
expected.
UBC lost to Western Washington State 31-6 and to Seattle
Pacific College 38-2.
Winners for UBC were Chris
Nemeth, a heavyweight, who
won and tied in two matches,
and 177 pound Les Burgener,
who won one match.
UBC lost 30 points overall
because they couldn't fill
every weight classification.
VOLLEYBALL
The UBC volleyball team
came through with a poor
showing in the Calgary Invitational Tournament last weekend, winning only five of 11
games. However, three of the
losses were close, as the opponents won by scores of 16-14,
16-14, and 15-13. UBC finished
seventh out of 12 teams.
GYMNASTICS
UBC had a good showing
against one of the top American gymnastic teams, the University of Washington, in a
dual meet last weekend.
UBC lost 152-116, getting a
MALAYSIAN - SINGAPORE
NIGHT
at
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
FRIDAY, FEB. 2nd
7:30 p.m.
Malaysian  Food
DANCE
ALL WELCOME
$1.00 Single       $1.75 Couple
TURTLE
NECK SWEATERS
Now in Stock
r¥***
I w MEN'S WEAR
4445 West 1 Oth Avenue
strong performance from Bill
Mackie who won the free exercise event and placed second
in the longhorse. It is expected
that he will soon receive official notice of his selection to
the Canadian National gymnastics team.
GOLF
UBC defeated the University
of Victoria two matches to one
in weekend intercollegiate golf
action, played in 20 degree
weather by 12 UBC and six
UVic golf nuts.
TENNIS
iFour UBC Thunderbird tennis players travelled to Port
land for the Portland Indoor
Tennis Championship to represent B.C. last weekend.
Don McCormick and Vic Rollins won the doubles event
while (Bob and Tony Bardsley
reached the quarter-finals. In
singles, McCormick lost in the
semi-finals to Portland's Tom
Gorman, while Rollins and the
Bardsley brothers all lost in
the quarter-finals.
FIELD HOCKEY
In weekend field hockey,
Braves beat North Shore A 2-0,
Scalps beat Hawks D 3-0, and
Tomahawks lost to Vancouver
A 3-2.
HELICOPTER CANADA
This film will be shown  at random intervals
for remainder of the week in Armouries
Last Chance to BLEED
Literature and
Contemporary Thought
A Relevant SYMPOSIUM Open to Everyone
FEB. 9, 10, 11 (FRI. 5:30 p.m. - SUN 5 p.m.)
ROSARIO BEACH, WASHINGTON
$9 all-inclusive (transportation, food, accommodation)
NAME   	
PHONE   	
Application (plus $9) submitted to A.A.C. Office (Brock Ext.)
by Monday, February 5.
Alma  Mater Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Committee Appointments
Wanted! A Homecoming Chairman!! All those interested
please submit letters of application to Penny Cairns,
A.M.S. Secretary, Box 54, Brock.
A.M.S. Elections
First Slate
Wednesday, Feb.  7,  1968
Second Slate
Wednesday, Feb. 14, 1968
President
External   Affairs   Officer
Internal   Affairs   Officer
Secretary
Vice-President
Treasurer
Co-ordinator of Activities
Ombudsman
Nominations for first slate will open on January 24, 1968
and close at 12 noon on Thursday, February 1, 1968;
for second slate, nominations will open on January 31,
1968 and close at 12 noon on February 8, 1968. Nominations forms, certificates of_ eligibility and copies of the
election rules and procedures are available from the
A.M.S.  Office.
Senate Elections
Nominations for the vacant student seat on senate will
open on January 24, 1968 and close at 12 noon on Thursday, February 1, 1968. Voting will take place Wednesday, February 7, 1968. The term of office ends this term.
Nomination forms and information are available from
the A.M.S. Office.
Whistler unlike Alps'
From Our Skiing Correspondent
On Sunday the UBC Oxford and Cambridge Ski Club
held its annual downhill competition at Whistler.
The Oxford team, captained by Mr. Robert Howell
Griffiths, lost by a narrow margin to the Cambridge team,
led by Mr. Stephen Boys-Smith.
Mr. Boys-Smith commended the Oxford team on putting up such a fine show and said that he looked forward
to next year's competition.
Mr. Griffiths congratulated the winners and regretted
that his team had not been able to reach the standard he
had hoped for. He added that conditions were not what he
had been accustomed to in the Alps.
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
The J. W. McConnell
Memorial Fellowships
for Graduate Study
at McGill University
Varies from $3,500 to over $4,000.
Depending, on need, fees, travel expenses, etc
Value
Fields
of Study
Tenure
Purpose
Eligibility
Application
Deadline
Any department in the Humanities, Social)
Biological or Physical Sciences offering
Graduate programmes leading to the
Master or the Ph.D. degrees.
Tenable from 1 to 5 years (inclusive)
To enable outstanding students to undertake
Graduate Studies, with the ultimate aim of
strengthening teaching and research in
Canadian universities.
Awards will be made to University Graduates
who are Canadian citizens, or who intend to
become Canadian citizens and to remain
in Canada.
1 February.
Application Forms and more detailed
information may readily be obtained by
writing to the Associate Dean, Faculty of
Graduate Studies and Research, McGill
University, Montreal 2, Que., Canada.
KEEP AN EYE ON THE
GUARANTEE
- As well as the price
ASIDE FROM THE ECONOMICAL PRICE
ONLY BAKER OPTICAL CERTIFIES TO
UNCONDITIONALLY GUARANTEE AND
REPLACE LENSES AND FRAMES AT
NO EXTRA COST IF BROKEN WITHIN
ONE YEAR OF PURCHASE.
SIMILAR SAVINGS FOR CONTACT
LENSES
Pake*,
OPTICAL LTD.
888 GRANVILLE   Next to the Orpheum Theatre
2nd FLOOR — ELEVATOR SERVICE
688-4601 Page 8
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, February 1, 1968
—  derreck webb photo
FRANK ROTERING (44), with seven points in the fourth
quarter, led the Birds to a 92-84 victory over the Korean
national team  Tuesday.
Fourth  quarter  fizzle
enables  Birds  to  win
After watching his South Korean national team fizzle in
the last five minutes to drop a 92-84 decision to the UBC Thunderbirds Tuesday night, coach Jeff Gausepohl sat back and
reflected on the carnage wreaked by two Canadian college
teams.
"The two teams we've played so far are the very teams
we should have had no trouble with," he moaned. Monday, the
Asians were trounced 101-85 by the SFU Clansmen.
To be sure, lack of sleep and a grueling travel schedule
undoubtedly affected their play. "Near the end we were five
points up on UBC. If we got one more basket at that time we
could have stalled and won," said Gausepohl.
The Birds shot 50.6 per cent over their shorter Korean
checks and were paced by a standout performance by Ian Dixon.
The UBC ace threw up 20 shots from the field, connected on
11 and finished with 24 points.
Center Frank Rotering clicked for 19 points and snared
11 rebounds for UBC.
Both Dixon and Rotering were overshadowed, however,
by a skinny but tough Korean named Shin Dong-Pa.
Shin treated 1,200 fans to a phenomenal shooting exhibition,
scoring 15 of 26 field goal tries often with two defenders draped
all over him.
Shin led the Koreans with 34 points. The brilliant shooter
scored 40 points the night before against SFU.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967 - 68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS  —
SATURDAYS -
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 to.2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.'
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
♦Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
or UK 1 *)
IN SOCCER
Pros scout UBC team
By JOHN TWIGG
Intrigue is the latest player to join soccer
coach Joe Johnson's Thunderbirds, but unfortunately the new member can't even kick a
lousy soccer ball.
Rather, intrigue is something intangible, yet
definitely there. In a story in yesterday's Province, news broke that a UBC player, defence-
man Jim Berry, had been approached by a
professional American soccer club.
The offer comes from the Atlanta Braves of
the North American Soccer League, whose assistant coach Peter McParland was in town on
the weekend to scout the local soccer hotbed,
the Pacific Coast League.
Surprisingly, the offer to attend the Braves'
training camp was sent to Berry after last
weekend's game, in which he played his worst
game in two years.
Berry declined the offer for the moment,
after contacting Johnson. He still has another
year at UBC before he graduates, and a hasty
decision isn't wise.
Berry right now is sitting pretty, with nothing to lose and everything to gain. Johnson advised him to wait for a definite offer instead of
taking a chance on making a team. And Berry
will get other offers.
But the intrigue involves others than Berry.
It includes Vancouver Royals coach Ferenc
Puskas, Atlanta head coach Phil Woosnam,
Province reporter Jeff Cross and the members
of the Thunderbirds, present and future.
Puskas is the new Royals coach now holding practices in Spain. He doesn't speak English
and has been to our city only once. In short,
he hasn't scouted the plentiful talent here in
Vancouver.
Woosnam  is  involved  in that he has been
invited by Johnson to come to Vancouver to
meet the players. Berry is not the only one to
be approached, as UBC has been scouted since
the end of last season.
And that leaves Cross. As the Province's
soccer reporter, he is attempting to get behind
the scenes of the dealings, but as he has a habit
of giving the Birds bad ink, Johnson is reluctant
to divulge news to him, though everything is
still unsettled.
But Johnson is not in the least worried. He
thinks  pro  soccer  will help   UBC  for   several—
reasons.
One is that the two seasons do not conflict.
A player could play with the Birds until exams,
then join a pro club as an amateur for the
summer league.
With players alternating between a pro team
and university, Johnson sees the possibility of
scholarships or financial grants to athletics,
which can only help UBC improve their status.
Furthermore, Johnson thinks the pro league
has a no tampering clause, which will protect
his players by allowing them to finish university, if they wish, before turning pro.
But what takes place in the future depends
much upon what transpires between Woosnam,
Johnson and eventually Puskas, if he ever
leaves Spain. He is due in town Friday, roughly
the same time as Woosnam.
At the moment, it looks as though Atlanta
and Woosnam have the inside track. Can you
imagine the Birds having an unofficial working
agreement with the Atlanta Braves, right under
the home-town Royals' nose?
It sounds pretty bush on the Royals' part,
just like other recent pro flops in Vancouver,
football and hockey. Are we destined to be
stabbed  again?
Thunderettes hot on cold prairies
The Thunderette basketball
team suffered their first loss
while winning three games on
a road-trip to the prairies for
four WCIAA games.
Last Friday and Saturday
the team got two wins at the
expense of the University of
Manitoba Bisonettes by scores
of 71-37 and 61-38. Monday and
Tuesday the team split two
games with the University of
Saskatchewan Huskiettes in
topsy-turvy games.
Monday's  score  for  the  defending champion UBC team
was 51-31, while Tuesday they
were upset 51-35.
In the four games, UBC was
led by Jan and Judy Douglas,
Angie Radonovich and Janis
Zingrich.
Western
Intercollegiate
Basketball
War Memorial Gymnasium
UNIV. of MANITOBA
BISONS
vs.
UBC THUNDERBIRDS
Fri. Feb. 2 - Sat. Feb. 3
8:30 p.m.
FREE ADMISSION TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
General Admission $1.00
TURTLE
NECK SWEATERS
Now in Stock
/ MEN'S WEA
4445 West 10th Avenue
SUNDAY
FEB. 4TH
INDOOR
AUTO
RACING
North American
Championship
270   miles   of   championship   racing
P.N.E.
AGR0D0ME
Time Trials 1:00 p.m. Races 8:00 p.m.
Adults $1.50,  Students  $1.00
Family   $3.00

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