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BYSSEY
UBC'S OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER
Vol. LXXXIX No. 28 I www.ubyssey.ca I January 8th, 2008 I since 1918
Activists vandalize Ponderosa Complex
i
fwBte^^^
OKER CHEN PHOTO / THE UBYSSEY
This stitched photo shows where workers have taped around the multiple holes in the Ponderosa building in preparation for repairs. Most of the vandalism occured at the rear ofthe building.
by Brandon Adams
News Editor
A group referring to itself as the
"Wreath Underground" has declared war on the UBC administration, vandalizing several University buildings at last term's
close.
In an e-mail received by the
Ubyssey on December 20, the
group claimed responsibility
for several acts of vandalism on
campus which occurred earlier
that week.
"We, the warriors of the
Wreath Underground claim responsibility for the recent targeted acts of vandalism on campus,"
states the e-mail, which goes on
to claim specific responsibility
for acts of vandalism on both the
Ponderosa complex and the Old
Administration building.
"The first of these attacks hit
at the Old Administration Build
ing where the Board of Governors and higher administration
have their offices...Our second
target was the central building
in the Ponderosa complex where
the Board had its last significant
meeting."
Immediately after the attack,
the Old Administration Building had several boarded up
windows. The windows at the
rear of the Ponderosa complex
still bear signs of vandalism: the
large panes of glass are peppered
with over a dozen golf ball sized
holes.
In their e-mail the group
points to a lack of student consultation regarding development on
campus as one of their primary
motivations for their vandalism.
"We signed petitions. They
were trashed. We laid grass and
built ourselves a paradise. It was
paved over and SUVs stand on
Trek [Park's] grave," the e-mail
states, continuing, "We put on
a festival and invited President
Fucker but he never showed. And
we tried to play their game. We let
them suck us into their process.
We went to their consultation sessions. We sat and we waited our
turn to speak. It never came."
The e-mail's authors demand that the administration
"refinance",    "reconsult",    and
see "War" | page 03
Trek Park bulldozed
by Paul Bucq
News Staff
Last month, as students were
busy writing their exams, the Trek
Park protest was demolished and
reverted back to a parking lot.
"I came to work one day and
it wasn't there," said Doug Singleton, Director of Campus Security.
"One can speculate all one wants
as to what happened to it. All I can
say is that Campus Security had
no hand in the removal of it."
The circumstances surrounding the removal of the park are
mysterious, to say the least, as
the two sides tell vastly different
stories.
"We looked outside and it
was gone," said Stefanie Ratjen,
a key Trek Park activist. "What
happened was, during exam period, when students were not on
campus as much at the end ofthe
term, the powers that be went to
the Trek Park area, and demolished it."
The park has stood in the
parking lot south of the the SUB
since the beginning of the year
as an 'alternative' protest against
the way the University's administration has been handling the
U-Boulevard development plans.
Over the semester, those involved
laid down sod, painted a checkerboard, set up tents, put on a
concert, and attempted to create
dialogue about the development.
There were minor skirmishes
with the administration, however, Ratjen claims there was an
understanding between the activists and the University that the
park was to be allowed.
"The precedent with the park
is that every time they've wanted
to do stuff, they've contacted
us...[This is] a shift, a transformation. Maybe within the ranks of
the administration they've made
the decision to take a totally different approach, and it is pretty
aggressively anti-student, or anti-
Trek Park...That's a conscious
shift in pattern."
"There was no notice given at
the Trek Park site that the area
was going to be attacked," said
Ratjen. "Trek Park was allowed to
be there because the University
respects student's right to protest. Demolishing a park without
any kind of notice or consent or
communication before, during,
or after is not in accordance with
respecting a right to protest in
any shape or form."
Disturbingly, this is in direct
contrast to what was told to VP
Students, Brian Sullivan. He
stated that Land and Building
Services claimed to have been
see "Trek" | page 02
Lethal corner near UBC keeps claiming lives
Flowers and posters adorn a metal pole at 4th and NW Marine where two se
by Boris Korby
News Editor
Two fatal accidents in less than
three weeks at the intersection
of 4th Ave and Northwest Marine
Drive have police warning drivers heading to UBC to slow down.
On November 20, a red Honda Civic travelling west toward
UBC at 1:45am struck the light
pole on the centre traffic island
at the intersection between West
4th Ave and Northwest Marine
Drive. The car then cleared the
island, crossed the eastbound
lane of NW Marine, struck the
curb, and traveled west along the
north sidewalk of 4th Ave before
coming to rest after striking a
second large metal pole. The 36-
year-old male driver was three
times above the legal alcohol
limit. He died on impact, while a
dog in the rear seat survived.
Then on December 8, a 24-
OKER CHEN PHOTO / THE UBYSSEY
perate fatal car accidents occured.
year-old male in a 1998 silver
Volvo S-70 also heading west
toward UBC struck the same centre island pole at approximately
3 am, splitting his car in two and
sending the front end 34 metres
through trees and a fence before
it came to rest on the fence line
bordering Northwest Marine.
The driver died on impact. Toxicology results on the driver were
see "Speed Kills" | page 02
Calendar
email us events at feedback@ubyssey.bc.ca
08
TUESDAY
Democrats Abroad Vancouver
Where: St. Pauls Anglican
Church, 1130 Jervis
Time: 7:00pm
Cost: Free
09
WEDNESDAY
First Pit Night
Where: Pit Pub
Time: 4:00pm, Friday, Ja
11,2008
Cost: Free
THURSDAY
Beer Olympics (
Where: MASS. (Buclt
room 140)
Time: 6:30pm -10:30pm
Cost: Small cover at the d
11
FRIDAY
Hey Ocean!
Where: Pit Pub
Time: 8:00pm,Friday,Janu
11,2008
Cost: $10
Q
CO
A Message from Vandals I page 03
UBC's Future Foretold | page 05
Get off your laptop | page 06
Bballer's head south over break I page 08 2  | News
ThSIJbyssey I January 8th,2008
'. Crash # 2
.^-c
( December 8th
Went went through trees
24-year old male Driver died on impact
Volvo S-70
Car split in half
Toxicology reports
inconclusive at press time
4th Ave
Crash #1
November 20th
36-year old male
Honda Civic
1:45am
	
Struck centre pole
Jumped curb, struck 2nd pole
Driver died at scene
Three times over alcohol limit     Dog in back seat survived
I
GOOGLE EARTH
Speed, alcohol blamed for two fatal accidents in last weeks of 2007
from "Speed Kills" | page oi
incomplete by press time.
The intersection has developed a reputation in recent
years for taking lives. In 2000,
28-year-old Arron Fediuk died
after slamming his Porsche into
a pole at the same intersection.
"Abigpartofitisthatpeople
can really get going, it's a long
straight stretch," said Constable
Tim Fanning of the Vancouver
Police Department. "A number
of us have been there on other
fatalities over the years.
However Fanning said
speed and alcohol, not the intersection were to blame for the
fatalities.
"We'll look to see if there are
any sort of engineering issues
that are contributing factors,"
said Fanning, "but at this point
it doesn't appear to be a problem. It's a well lit intersection,
there's a light there already...
I don't know what else can be
done. I mean I know what else
can be done—people can drive
responsibly."
According to ICBC statistics
from 2005, drivers aged 16-25
were the most likely demographic to engage in high-risk
behaviors that cause crashes. In
terms of gender, male drivers
were twice as likely as female
drivers to engage in high-risk
behaviour.
"Again it's a tragic reminder
that people shouldn't drink and
drive, people shouldn't speed.
Those things that can sound very
boring and mundane that have
been drilled into our heads...
that's how most people die in
this city," said Fanning. vi
Students: "bulldozingdemocracy"
from "Trek" | page oi
in contact with key Trek Park
organizers, who had requested
their help to remove decaying
park elements, and other debris.
He also mentioned that Land
and Building Services believed
that there was an understanding
that the park was now defunct,
therefore they were justified in
satisfying complaints by removing the debris.
AMS President Jeff Friedrich
also seemed to have been left out
ofthe loop.
"I think it's unfortunate that
the park was taken down without notifying any ofthe students,
and I also think that it's unfortunate that what's there now has
returned to it's previous use as a
parking lot," said AMS President
Jeff Friedrich. "I'm not sure that
we're really enhancing the level
of debate or discussion on campus...that's what the park was
doing quite well, it was a good
space for debate and dialogue."
"[The park] wasn't really the
entire point," said Ratjen. "It
was, Took, there are alternatives,
let's use it for what it is while we
can, when there isn't a shopping
mall being built, when there isn't
a 40 million dollar underground
tunnel being built that will be
rendered obsolete in 2020.
"Trek Park is definitely not
dead. It's coming back, maybe
in another form. The ideology is
still there, and maybe it's stronger because ofthe incident." vl
News Briefs
□
UBC Law gets $1 million gift
On December 11, the UBC
Faculty of Law got a $ 1 million
stocking staffer from law firm
Davis LLP and Irwin Davis,
grandson ofthe firm's founder
Edward Pease Davis.
The gift will aid in funding the faculty's new building,
which is set to break ground in
2009 and be completed over
an approximately 18 month
span. The new building will
replace the current facilities,
which first opened in 1944.
It will provide space for more
than 60 faculty, 600 undergraduates and 100 graduate
students.
The gift comes less than
three months after Vancouver
law firm Richards Buell Sutton donated an equal amount
toward the project, and is the
fourth $ 1 million contribution
towards the facility since the
UBC Law Faculty kicked off the
building campaign in September 2006.
This gift will be matched
by the Law Foundation of BC,
which has committed to match
up to $6 million in donations.
William Sauder, 81, dies
Dr William Sauder, for whom
the Sauder School of Business is named after, died on
Wednesday, December 19
2007. The cause of death was
complications arising after a
heart attack the previous weekend. He was 81 years old.
Sauder had a long history
with UBC. He graduated with a
Bachelor of Commerce degree
in 1948, and later served on
the Board of Governors, and
as Chancellor. In 2003 Sauder
donated $20 million to UBC's
business school, which was
subsequently renamed after
him.
Before serving at UBC,
Sauder created and managed
International Forest Products.
The company was highly
successful and influential
in stimulating the growth of
British Columbia's secondary
manafacturing industry.
"Bill's contributions to
education and health research
at UBC are almost immeasurable," said B.C. Premier Gordon Campbell.
Funding for drugs
The Canada Foundation for
Innovation has committed
$26 million to fund six UBC
research projects in the new
year. The funding comes
as part of a $422.3 million
investment in various university projects across the
country.
Among the UBC projects
being funded is the Centre
for Drug Research and Development, which will receive
$8 million to help commercialize research by maturing
pharmacutical projects into
candidate drugs that will attract investors. The University will also receive $6.4 million for a Quantum Materials
Spectroscopy Centre which
will use synchrotron light
technology to examine matter
at the atomic level. It will be
located in Saskatoon. \a
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theIj
BYSSEY
January 8th, 2008
Vol. LXXXIX N°28
Editorial Board
coordinating editor
Champagne Choquer
COORDINATING@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
news editors brandon adams &
Boris Korby
NEWS@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
CULTURE EDITOR PAUL BUCCI
CULTURE@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
sports euitor Jordan Chittley
SPORTS@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
features/national editor
Matthew Jewkes
FEATURES@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
PHOTO EDITOR OKER CHEN
PHOTOS@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
production manager
Kellan Higgins
PRODUCTION@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
copy/letters/research
Levi Barnett
FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
volunteer coordinator
Stephanie Findlay
VOLUNTEERS@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
WEBMASTER JOE RAYMENT
WEBMASTER@UBYSSEY.BC.CA
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of
British Columbia. It is published every Tuesday and Friday by The
Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organisation, and all students are encouraged to
participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe Ubyssey staff. They are
the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not necessarily reflect
the views of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of
British Columbia. All editorial content appearing in The Ubyssey is
the property of The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words. Please include
your phone number,student number and signature (not for publication) as well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office of
The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone/'Perspec-
tives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space."Freestyles"are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to letters and perspectives overfreestyles unless the latter istimesensitive.Opinion pieces
will not be run until the identity ofthe writer has been verified. The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before intended
publication. Letters received after this point will be published in the
following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matterdeemed relevant bythe Ubysseystaff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad occursthe liability of the UPS will not be
greater than the price paid for the ad.The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes ortypographicalerrorsthat do not lessen the
value orthe impact ofthe ad.
EDITORIAL OFFICE
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
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tel: 604-822-2301
fax: 604-822-9279
web: www.ubyssey.bc.ca
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advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604-822-6681
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ad traffic Jesse Marchand
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The first daily meeting of iPod Addicts Anonymous commenced under the
watchful eye of Dr. Brandon James Adams, Esq. Unlike the video game addicts of China, these Bedlam residents suffered from an excess of personality.
Trevor D'Arcy and Justin McElroy had nearly caused each other skull fractures
in a disagreement over the merits of My Fair Lady vs The Sound of Music
soundtrack within 3 minutes. Luckily, David Zhang entered the fray screeching
I know How to Save a Life! At this point, Champagne Choquer felt the need
to counter the warm fuzziness that was diffusing through the room courtesy
of Laura Moniser's ever sarcastic Weird Al's Canadian Idiot by blasting Marilyn
Manson from a horribly over-priced docking accessory. Her flagrant violation of
the group's rules against such temptations precipitated the police being called
to restrain the other participants but by a shocking"accident" involving salad
tongs and Victoria'sSecretmerchandise,Sting showed up instead,much to Kellan Wiggins' delight and Goh Iromoto's disgust. Boris Korby and Joe Rayment
had to physically block Celestian Rince from licking the shoes of Pat Benetar
who wasa little-known Sting stalker and came breezing in. Ms. Benetar unceremoniously body-checked Stephanie Findlay for coming within 10 metres of
him. Lucky this drowned out Paul Bucci, the singing nuns strangled-cat strains
of'How do you solve a problem like Marie Burgoyne?" However, everything
froze when Levi Barnett escorted Steve Jobs into the melee in order to gleefully declare that the troubles were over. Apple, together with Bush, Inc. were
ceasing production ofthe iPod and pouring the manufacturing investment into
the next big thing, the iRack. No music portability means no disagreements.
Unfortunately, the resulting assertion that Mad TV is prophetic revamped the
situation, this time regarding TV tastes.
EDITORIAL GRAPHIC
Michael Bround
V
Canadian   Canada Post Sales Agreen
University  Number 0o40878022
Press January 8th,2008 i The Ubyssey
News |  3
'We will push these fuckers until they concede every
inch. This is our declaration of war.'
OKER CHEN PHOTOS / THE UBYSSEY
The spidered window panes recently vandalized by the'Wreath Underground'at Ponderosa.
from "War" | page oi
"rezone." They finished by saying: "we
will push these fuckers until they concede
every inch. This is our declaration of war,
declared here in public."
Trek Park organizers Stefanie Ratjen,
Jasmine Ramze-Rezaee, and Nathan
Crompton, said that they did not know who
was involved in the vandalism, but while
they indicated that they were somewhat
concerned about Wreath Underground's
decision to vandalize University property,
they agreed with the group's demands.
"The 'refinance', 'reconsult', and 're-
zone' is something that the Trek Park protesters have been advocating for for some
time. The rhetoric used is a bit stronger,"
said Stefanie Ratjen, who emphasized the
University's role in the conflict.
Nathan Crompton also said that the
attacks needed to be taken in context, say
ing that the University became the first
aggressor when it demolished the 'Trek
Park' which had been built by students
near the Grassy Knoll.
"The University, in its own way, has
kind of launched into a type of war against
the park in destroying [it]," said Crompton, "I hope that if this is at all depicted as
a form of violence or something, that it's
done in the context ofthe University's own
aggressive bulldozing ofthe park."
While UBC Campus Security was not
available for comment before press time,
Staff Sargent Kevin Kenna of the UBC
RCMP detachment said that the incidents
were being investigated.
"We're investigating this and we intend to follow up as far as we can," said
Kenna. "Currently we don't have any suspects, however if anybody out there in the
general public has any information we'd
appreciate hearing from them." vl
The Declaration by the Wreath Underground
We, the warriors of the Wreath Underground claim responsibility for the recent acts
of targeted vandalism on campus. To avoid UBC Security deeming these actions
random violence, we will declare ourselves here, our ethos and our aims.
The first of these attacks hit at the old Administration Building where the Board of Governors and higher administration have their offices. We demonstrated that we are absolutely
prepared to take this fight to the bastards' front door. Toope and his cronies do not speak for
the students or listen to them; they are leaders in a system of oppression.
Our second target was the central building in the Ponderosa complex where the Board
had its last significant meeting It was there that they refused entry to student representatives
and without dissent, approved a $400,000 increase in spending for development purposes.
We spray painted both locations and busted the windows in the latter. Our reasoning was
simple. Close the door on us and we will find another way in.
And that idea is us in a nutshell. We will always find another way in. We signed petitions.
They were trashed. We laid grass and built ourselves a paradise. It was paved over and
SUVs stand on Trek's grave. We put on a festival and invited President Fucker but he never
showed. And we tried to play their game. We let them suck us into their process. We went to
their consultation sessions. We sat and waited our turn to speak. It never came.
We now turn to the logical next step, direct action. As other groups have arisen from the
peaceful campaigns of resistance, ours has been born in fire. We are those students who are
tired of suppression. As they have tried to silence us, we will scream. As they have strived to
pave over us, we will pave over them.
Our demands are threefold
Refinance—We will not pay for their development because we do not want it. We will not
pay for the underground bus station and its mall or for the destruction of our knoll. We have
little to gain from the former and the latter breaks our hearts. We will not pay for the Olympic
skating facilities at school. We oppose what the games have done to our city and we will not
let them turn students into Olympic hosts. We will make you realize how inconvenient a
source of funding we really are.
Reconsult—Do not presume the right to tax us without representation, without allowing
us a voice. Thus far, consultation has been a joke, limited and non binding. We recognize that
this failure to listen is influenced by not only the pigheaded personalities of many members
ofthe board and administration but the inherent lack of democracy in the system. We therefore demand mechanisms be put in place for current and future students to direct the affairs
of their campus on at least an equal level with other interested parties (note: these parties
with legitimate interest do not include developers).
Rezone—The plan is a lie. It has been from the beginning. If any constructon is going to
take place on campus it needs to backup to ground zero. The minor concessions given after
the last official "consultation" campaign are not enough. The project cannot be improved. It
has to be torn down and rebuilt. The plan is an anachronism. An underground bus station is
nothing less than a crime if the skytrain is indeed coming to campus in the next few years.
Go back to square one. Give us our seat at the table and let us write something that satisfies
those parties the project really effects.
We will push these fuckers until they concede every inch. This is our declaration of war,
declared here in public.
This declaration was sent to the Ubyssey verbatim as shown above to explain
the actions and motivations of the Wreath Underground.
What's YOUR
New Year's Resolution?
Get involved
in your community
Register Online    w
UBC
Learning Exchange
Trek Program
THfJjBYSSEY
News | Sports | Culture | Features
Someone vandalized our
beautiful campus to protect
the beauty of our campus.
What do you think?
WRITE US A
LETTER or GO TO
OUR WEBSITE
AND SHARE YOUR
VOICE.
Speak directly to your fellow
peers through the media of
newspaper
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News | Sports | Culture | Features
-.Write for i
News 4  | National News
ThSIJbyssey I January 8th,2008
LEGAL NOTICE OF CLASS ACTION CERTIFICATION
If you paid a parking or towing fine to the
University of British Columbia,
you have legal rights in a class action lawsuit
WHAT'S THIS ABOUT?
The British Columbia Supreme Court has certified a class action
lawsuit about the parking and towing fines that have been collected by the University of British Columbia. The Court authorized this Legal Notice to guide you on the steps that you may
need to take, if any.
The lawsuit claims that UBC has unlawfully collected parking
and towing fines and must repay all of the parking and towing
fines that it collected during the period of September 1, 1990 to
September 30. 2007. UBC denies any wrongdoing and will
defend the lawsuit. The Court has not yet made any decision on
the merits ofthe claim or the defences.
WHO'S INCLUDED?
You are a Class Member if you paid parking and towing fines to
UBC between September 1, 1990 and September 30, 2007.
WHAT TO DO IF YOU LIVE IN BC?
If you are a Class Member who lives in British Columbia, you
do not need to do anything to continue to be included as a Class
Member at this stage ofthe lawsuit.
If you do not want to be a Class Member who is legally bound
by this lawsuit, you must exclude yourself by August 31, 2008.
To learn how to exclude yourself, contact the lawyers who represent the Class Members, Camp Fiorante Matthews, whose address is below.
If you exclude yourself by the deadline it means that you can
bring your own lawsuit. It also means that you cannot collect
any money that may ultimately be paid to Class Members as a
result of this lawsuit.
WHAT IF YOU DON'T LIVE IN BC?
If you do not live in British Columbia and want to participate in
the lawsuit, you must take action to include yourself by August
31, 2008. To learn how to include yourself, contact the lawyers
who represent the Class Members, Camp Fiorante Matthews,
whose address is below.
If you do not include yourself by the deadline it means that you
can bring your own lawsuit and will not be bound by the result
in this lawsuit. It also means that you cannot collect any money
that might ultimately be paid to Class Members as a result of
this lawsuit.
WHO PAYS THE LAWYERS?
If the lawsuit is not successful, you will not be responsible for
any lawyer fees and costs.
If the lawsuit is successful, the lawyers who represent all the
Class Members have an agreement with the representative
plaintiff that allows them to be paid a percentage of the total
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Province, bars crack
down on fake IDs
by Adrienne Murdoch
Nexus (Camosun College)
VICTORIA (CUP)-Bar owners
and the provincial government
are cracking down on underage
students using fake identification in British Columbia.
Since June 2007, minors
using fake ID to get into bars
and nightclubs are having their
fake ID confiscated and getting
slapped with a $ 115 fine.
Additionally, bars and liquor
stores caught selling to underage patrons now face a ten day
licence suspension or $7500
fine.
Now, bar owners are banding
together to pool their resources
against underage patrons.
According to Lucky Bar manager Liam Lux, some club owners in Victoria, BC have formed
the Victoria Cabaret Association
to brainstorm solutions.
"We need cash to stay alive,"
said Lux. "We cannot afford to
be shut down because minors
are on the premises."
Lux estimates about ten minors a week attempt to use fake
ID at his bar.
"Usually groups of people
will try to come in, all with fake
ID from a different state."
Once an ID is confiscated,
bar owners forward them to police who treat them as lost and
found. If a card is not retrieved,
it is destroyed or returned to
the Insurance Corporation of
British Columbia which administers drivers' licenses in the
province.
Criminal charges can also result from using fake ID. Minors
can be charged with "uttering
forged documents" or "personification", according Victoria Police constable Bob Isles.
An employee of a Victoria
liquor store said that he confiscates at least two fake IDs
a night. He said that the store
motto is "your night of fun isn't
worth us being shut down."
Camosun College student
Elise McCaugherty admitted using both a friend's ID and her
own homemade ID to get into
clubs.
When she attempted to get
into the city's Sugar nightclub
with three pieces of a friend's
ID, the club turned her away and
kept the cards after she couldn't
tell bouncers the correct eye colour on the card.
Acquiring a fake ID, though,
is getting easier with better
technology at lower prices.
"The guy downloads a template from the Internet, steals
Starbucks prepaid cards, runs
them through a laminator, and
cuts off the edges," said Emma
Barnes, a Camosun College student. "They are cheaply made,
but it worked for me," said
Barnes, who paid approximately
$30 for her fake ID.
We cannot afford
to be shut down
because minors are
on the premises
Liam Lux,
Lucky Bar manager
Ashley Brown, also a Camosun student, had her friend's
entire ID collection confiscated
by a bouncer at Barcode, another Victoria club.
Brown said that she was
scolded for putting the staffs
jobs in jeopardy.
Some Victoria clubs are now
keeping updated books with
sample IDs from every country
asking for three pieces of ID,
and may also ask for a signature
check.
"On a busy night we get half
a dozen fake IDs, mainly from
girls," said a local bouncer who
wished to remain nameless, vl January 8th,2008 i The Ubyssey
Culture |  5
New Year. New You?
by Stephanie Findlay
Culture Staff
Holiday gorging has left us resolving to lose weight, increase
fitness, and "firm up". Despite
exercise centres on campus experiencing a dramatic increase
after New Year's, resolutions are
rarely successful.
Chris Tsao, general manager
of Gold's Gym on the UBC campus, says that the New Year is
the "second best season of the
year," following September's
start of school. The new year
sees attendance at the gym typically increase by 50 per cent.
But Tsao warns against the
"eager beaver" factor, explaining
that "resolutions put too much
pressure to lose pounds in a certain amount of time. People that
don't see results after the New
Year's resolutions will drop off
after the first sixty days."
Leslie Grundy Program Coordinator for the UBC Aquatic
Centre, witnesses the same
phenomenon at the UBC Aquatic
Centre, saying that it is "very
busy for the first three weeks of
January and usually by the end
of January the attendance starts
to drop off."
Problems for students include funding and time management. Grundy notes that it is
hard "finding time to have a balance in life between recreation
and school. Papers, exams, midterms probably take precedence
over exercizing."
However, the benefits of
a healthy, balanced lifestyle,
including increased energy,
better sleep, and a fit bod, are
undeniable.
Grundy says,  "I would say
it's definitely important to stay
fit and focused with an exercise program. Staying healthy
definitely helps people achieve
academic goals as well as health
goals. ...This is my own personal
view, but I tend to think that they
are smarter."
Associate Director for Intramurals and Recreation at UBC
Rec, Micheal Tan, conducted a
research project to determine
whether there was a correlation
with the participation in UBC
Rec events and GPA. Itwas found
that those that had participated
experienced an increased GPA,
albiet a small one.
/ would say it's definitely
important to stay fit and
focused with an exercise
program. Staying healthy
definitely helps people
achieve academic goals
as well as health goals...
This is my own personal
view, but I tend to think
that they are smarter.
Leslie Grundy,
Program Coordinator for the UBC
Aquatic Centre
Tan says that UBC Rec does
not experience the same sort of
rapid population shifts as the
gyms. "There is a consistent demand and interest in the sports
and events with an estimated
75 per cent of participants that
have been previously involved
with UBC Rec." Tan gives encouragement to those who
make resolutions, but stresses
to keep the goals "realistic and
measurable."
As reported by the BBC, UK
psychologists claim that chances
of boosting your resolution success are increased for men if
they set specific goals, and if
women tell others about their
resolution. Vague plans are
cautioned against and specific
realistic goals were shown to be
the most successful.
Adam Maclntyre-Smith
volunteers at the UBC Wellness
Centre, a health promotion program offered by UBC. He says "a
focus on wellness and balance
leading to happiness is behind
our workshops."
Maclntye-Smith points to
the high demand of nutrition
classes offered by the centre as
evidence to conclude that a happy life is dependant on a healthy
lifestyle.
Despite being strapped for
cash and laden with homework,
the UBC student has the tools
to make a successful transition
to a healthier life. Currently the
Thunderbird gym, the Aquatic
Centre, and UBC Rec are offering free classes for students to
try out. To help with your diet,
Health Canada offers a comprehensive website including a
customizable nutrition planner
as well as clear and helpful guidance for deducing appropriate
amount of physical activity for
your lifestyle. Relevant educational links are provided, including a video tutorial offered
by the Alberta Centre for Active
Living, which teaches yoga you
can do at your desk.
Ultimately Tan raises the
most compelling advice for
resolution success: "You've got
to keep it fun." \a
Next year at UBC, according to our resident psychic
by Paul Bucci
Culture Editor
This year, we at the Ubyssey
thought the best way to make
sense of the series of cascading
events here at UBC would be to
call on the help of someone who
had more foresight than the University Square planning committee, but with just as much personal connection to the spiritual
world. We called on the help of
psychic numerologist Cassandra
MacLeane to help us find clarity
in the future year. Here are her
words, paraphrased, for your
enjoyment.
Jeff Friedrich, AMS President:
Jeff finished a cycle in this last
year, so 2008 is the beginning
of a whole new chapter in his
life. Confusing, sometimes, but
he will be motivated to come up
with new ideas, not only for his
own life, but for any organization
he might be involved with. It's
also a year of relationships. It's
also very much about responsibility. What comes up around
him is art and science. He has
lots of charisma, and this is all
without our psychic seeing him.
People are drawn to him.
Narduar the Human Serviette,
Music Icon, CiTR personality:
He is a very interesting person.
The cycle he is going into is a
four-nine, so it's the end of his
cycle. It's the end of a nine year
chapter of life. He's going to
have to make lots of decisions
about where he is going in his
life. He's extremely bright. He's
actually very intuitive. He's a
born achiever. It's a time when
people re-evaluate what they
want to do with their life from
this point on. It's the end, the
last few pages ofthe chapter. The
chances of him moving on are
quite strong. I'm going to take a
risk and say he's in a period of
spiritual and emotional growth.
He could become a little disenchanted with the way that people
receive his work. He's associated
with California, not LA, but more
northern California.
Carl Wieman, Nobel laureate
physicist, UBC Professor:
He has gone through a lot of
changes in the last two years. He
knows how to play the game. He
probably will come into a bit of
conflict. He's not ofthe establishment though he knows how to
play the establishment. This year
coming up is quite an interesting
year for him. He does manage to
bring some kind of balance to the
organization he's been involved
with. He's an extremely compassionate person, which is unusual
for someone in the sciences.
He does open new fields, and I
would say there are two paths
that he will investigate, two ways
he is going to take himself. I'm
going to say he will make a dis
covery that is quite unusual. He
overcomes, don't forget.
David Suzuki, Environmentalist,
Great Canadian:
This nextyear is a new beginning.
It's a time where he wonders
where he'll be going. An identity
crisis. He does experience some
very important rewards this year.
He begins to see some of his work
take hold in the consciousness of
the public. He experiences hope
and fulfillment. He has a book
coming up, his most successful
yet. He may not have brought it
into form yet.
UBC, the University:
It's a year of changing ideas.
There seems to be a lot of growth.
The images that are coming up
are very feminine. World stage.
Emphasis on spirituality. Ask me
a question.
the Ubyssey, the newspaper:
What will happen in terms of conflict
over student voices being heard?
There will be a lot of conflict, but
it will lead to a better understanding. You know how conflict with
students is quite destructive? In
this case, the more conflict there
is, the better it is for the University. It becomes a model for
cooperation on the world stage.
The students do prevail in the
end. Students must continue to
protest. And it sounds as if there
is someone who comes up as a
leader, a voice for the students
who doesn't have too much self
interest. It does feel as if there
are very strong feminine leaders. And it's not like [former UBC
president Martha Piper], she was
more like Margaret Thatcher.
There is a very strong feminine
voice. Strong in the way of
Amazon. And Amazon
voice     evolving,
without cutting off the breasts.
But definitely a strong feminine
energy as warrior up front, vl
(Editor's note: Cycles are 9
years in duration, and every year
has a different energy and a different purpose.) 6  | Editorial
ThSIJbyssey I January 8th,2008
Quiet Talking Girl With
A Million Questions
Obvious Sleepers
he guy who thinks he is funny
and the argumentative girl
Facebookers, Talkers,
Crossworders. and Sudoku-ers
Learners, Doodlers,
and Sleepers.
Uber-Keeners and
Damn Dirty Seat
Savers.
Prof
MICHAEL BROUND ILLUSTRATION / THE UBYSSEY
Depending on whether you bring your laptop to class, we have designed a seating chart to maximize learning for those who
wish to learn and extra-curricular events for those wishing to partake in those.
Laptops may distract, but are here to stay
While the days of the plucky student
setting off on a learning adventure
equipped with only pen and pad are
hardly gone, more affluent UBC students are increasingly replacing ink
and paper with laptops and power
cords on classroom desks.
Certainly, for interested students,
laptops in the classroom can provide
a number of significant advantages:
accessing, modifying and retreiving
digital notes is easier than leafing
through a binder of papers. KeyNote
and other note taking software allow
students to structure notes in ways
that you can't on paper. And there is
nothing quite like looking up something you don't understand on Wikipedia, or fact-checking an offhand
comment on Google.
But while daydreaming and
distraction with the classic pen
and paper leads to little more than
dubiously artistic doodles, students
on UBC's wireless network have far
more access to non-curricular activities: Facebook, instant messaging,
web surfing, and solitaire.
This is why professors across the
continent, from Carleton to Columbia,  are responding to laptop use
with in-class bans. Some professors
cite student complaints of flashing-
light-distraction, while others are
"concerned about students' learning
environment."
Laptops raise a number of issues about the state of university
classrooms. The fact that so many
students are using laptops to distract
themselves in class tells us about
the current learning environment.
Students are bored, or at least easily
distracted.
As economics professor Jean
Boivin of HEC-Montreal stated, "Banning the computers has the benefit
of pressuring the faculty into delivering a better course."
Perhaps professors should learn
from industry professionals; at many
tech conferences these days, attended by attention-deficit web addicts,
giving a lecture is seen as a sort of
test. Attendees have laptops and chat
with neighbours during a presentation. A lecturer therefore has to be
engaging, topical, and, above all,
interesting in order to lure attention
away from the glowing screens. But
when attention is given it is full and
rapt.
So, why should students put up
with this ban on their classroom
liberties? If students wish to waste
their money and score lower on
their exams, why should professors,
or anyone for that matter, ban an aid
that could help their schoolwork?
We're living in a technological age.
Portable computers allow students
to record information faster, and organize and archive course materials
in ways that used to be impossible.
Many UBC courses have embraced
technology with PDF and PowerPoint
lecture outlines, including graphics
and diagrams that are difficult to recreate by hand. Embracing laptops
in the classroom allows students to
make better use of course information and should be seen as a way to
further engage students—not just as
a tool for playing StarCraft.
As the old saying goes, if you can't
beat em, join em.
If students insist on bringing computers to class, professors should use
this to their advantage. The laptop
is here to stay, and acknowledging
this fact will allow courses to evolve
and grow with the opportunities that
technology allows, vl
ilTREETERS
See all their full comments online at www.ubyssey.ca
How would you react if laptops were banned in classrooms?
Streeters is a twice weekly column
in which students are asked a
question     pertinent     to     UBC.
Sherina Kanani,
Sociology 3
"A lot of professors
talk too fast so you
need your laptop...
they can't expect you
to write by hand if
you can't keep up."
Brittany Tyson,
Poli Sci & Econ 5
"I think it's distracting when students
have laptops in class
and they are playing video games or
MSN...it's difficult
to focus on a professor, but at the same
time it's convenient
having your laptop
in class."
Clayton Mollica,
English Lit. 4
"I think it's a good
idea, I think laptops
should be banned
from classrooms
because there is a lot
of extra-curricular
activities going
on on them and I
personally find the
typing sound really
annoying."
T«^   V*T\
Anthony Gador,
Pharmacy 3
"As far as I'm
concerned, I'm
paying money to
be in the course,
that is what my
tuition is for and I
should have all the
equipment at my
disposal."
Aly Lalani,
General Sciences 4
"I would tell the
professors to get
out ofthe stone
age and to adapt
because technology
is a growing animal
and you can't
stop technology...
banning them in not
the solution."
-Coordinated by Jordan Chittley & Joe Rayment, with photos by David Zhang January 8th,2008 i The Ubyssey
Sports |  7
UBC, SFU win on road to split home-and-home series Up Next:
FRIDAY
THUNDERBIRDS
81
62
by Justin McElroy
Sports Writer
After a split of their two-game
series against SFU last weekend,
the gap between the top two
women's basketball teams in
Canada isn't as big as it might
have seemed 10 weeks ago,
when UBC was schooled by the
Clan 73-41.
However, SFU is now on top.
It may not have seemed that
way Friday night in Burnaby,
when the 'Birds silenced the
roaring SFU crowd with a 81-62
victory that had as much to do
with the Clan's poor shooting
as it did with the Thunderbirds'
inspired play. But on Saturday,
both teams showed up knowing that their most important
regular season game of the year
was upon them, with the winner
in firm position to gain home-
court advantage throughout the
Canada West Playoffs.
Both teams shot well. Both
teams battled consistently on defense. And yet SFU came out with
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRDS
62
65
the victory. And while the final
score may show that UBC only
lost by a scant 3 points, it hides
the fact that UBC never held the
lead in the last 16 minutes ofthe
game.
Watching the contest, one
couldn't help but note that SFU
was also a tad more aggressive,
and had a slightly stronger bench
than the Thunderbirds. At this
stage in the season, it's clear that
while UBC possesses a very good
women's basketball team, SFU's
is just a small cut above.
A large part of this is due
to the clear advantage the Clan
enjoy in the post. Between six-
foot-four Laurelle Wiegl and six-
foot-two Kathryn Hole, SFU has
two premier centres who can
put their back to the basket, wear
down the opposition, and get
a whole lot of easy baskets for
their team.
And though the 'Birds have a
few players who can play down
low quite well, chief among them
Leanne Evans, by and large they
aren't as tall, and aren't as strong
OKER CHEN PHOTO / THE UBYSSEY
T-Bird guard Candace Morisset fights for the ball against Clan defender
Matteke Hutzler during Saturday's game at War Memorial Gym. After the
weekend split,theT-Birds are still one game behind SFU in Canada West.
as those on the SFU side—and
when two teams are as evenly
matched as these two, that can
make all the difference.
Now, one can't read too much
into one loss, especially in early
January. Nonetheless, coach Deb
Huband certainly knows that this
team has another level that it can
reach, and you can be sure that
she'll be pushing her squad to
get there over the next six weeks.
Come February 22, when (in all
likelihood), they meet back up
with SFU in the Pacific Division
Final, hopefully we'll all have a
sense of how good this UBC team
can be. Xi
Men's Basketball
Jan. 7
at Simon Fraser @7pm
Jan. 11
vs. Brandon @8pm
Jan. 12
vs. Regina@8pm
Women's Basketball
Jan. 11
vs. Brandon @6pm
Jan. 12
vs. Regina @6pm
Men's Hockey
Jan.11-12
at Regina
Women's Hockey
Jan.11-12
vs. Lethbridge @7:30pm
Men's Volleyball
Jan.11-12
at Regina
Women's Volleyball
Jan.11-12
at Brandon
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(v.
'<* 8 I Sports
ThSIJbyssey I January 8th,2008
Basketball teams travel south to train, compete
With two national titles after trips to
Hawaii, coach Hanson looks for a third
by Trevor D'Arcy
Sports Writer
With an entire month off from
conference competition in the
middle of their season, the UBC
basketball teams took off across
the border for a week of training, competing, and sunshine.
Exam period poses a bit of
a challenge for most students,
but it is also a nuisance for varsity basketball teams. December
lands smack in the middle of
their season, and teams struggle
to maintain intensity and training through the stress of exams
and the lull of holidays.
To combat this, the UBC
teams took a week from their
holidays to find basketball sanctuary on American soil. The men
flew to Hawaii while the women
ventured to California in order
to compete in tournaments, get
some intensive training, and
bond as a team.
For the women, it was not
only their first time in California, but the first time going
abroad during the December
break.
"We've had teams travel out
here in the past," said coach Deb
Huband. "This year we decided
to do something different...it's
a good opportunity for our athletes to travel and see the rest of
our country or to go outside our
country."
Between     Christmas     and
New Year's they were in Santa
Clarita and Santa Barbara playing in the Golden State Athletic
Conference Challenge. The conference is part of the National
Association of Intercollegiate
Athletics (NAIA) and UBC found
itself playing Biola and Azusa
Pacific universities, and West-
mont College.
The American teams provided strong competition, and
after beating Biola handily, UBC
lost clinchers to Azusa and West-
mont. Overall, the trip had the
desired effect and brought the
team up to speed for the second
half of the season.
"The teams in the states really put a lot of pressure on defence," said Candace Morisset, a
guard for the Thunderbirds. "It
got us back into game shape...
we're getting used to playing
again."
The men's competition was a
little less formulaic because the
Hawaiian National Collegiate
Athletics Association (NCAA)
teams were unable to play Instead UBC played an exhibition
tournament against a club team
of former NCAA players and Alberta's Grant MacEwan College.
UBC beat the team from Alberta, but split their two games
against the Hawaiian teams.
Thunderbird guard Chris Dyck
described the Americans as "a
bunch of really athletic players,"
but said the loss  came  after
Friday Preview...
LEVI BARNETT PHOTO ILLUSTRATION / THE UBYSSEY
a couple of UBC players were
injured.
Dyck also described the trip
as more than just off-season
court time, but a good opportunity for team bonding.
"We got a chance to go snorkelling and hike up Diamond
Head [volcano]," he said. "When
you're at home and just constantly practising, it can be a
drain on you."
It is not unusual for the
men's team to travel during the
December break, but they usually stick to eastern provinces and
play other Canadian schools.
According  to   coach  Kevin
Hanson, the successes of the
last few seasons meant this year
deserved a change.
That, and Hawaii also happens to be a part of his decorated history.
"I've taken three teams over
there in my coaching career
and the trips have been an unbelievable experience," he said.
"[After] two of those trips we
were fortunate enough to win
national championships."
Time away from Canadian
soil also allowed the team to develop some new set plays. Hanson hopes this will give them an
edge because other teams can't
prepare by watching game tapes
from the first half of the season.
Hawaii and California may
seem extravagant, but Hanson
said December trips down south
are a growing trend among
Canadian basketball teams. According to him, eastern teams
now travel to Florida while UVic,
Simon Fraser, and Trinity Western all went down to California
this Christmas.
The same might not be said
of women's teams, however. Huband said that a trip to California in December is "not within
the norm for university sport in
Canada." tl
Friday January 12,2008
After more than a decade,the popular show American Gladiators has been revamped and kicked
up a notch. Pick up the Ubyssey on Friday to read about the evolution ofthe eliminator and why
Sports Writer Justin McElroy still enjoys this guilty pleasure.
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■ Carleton
eg
^P      UNIVERSITY
Canada's Capital University
Walk-In Clinic
604-222-CARE (2273)
©
University Village Medical/Dental Clinic
Walk-Ins and Appointments
Serving UBC and surrounding area                <
6 days a week
,                        during the Winter Session                      j
www.universityvillageclinic.com
Conveniently located in the UBC Village
above Staples, #228-2155 Allison Road,
Vancouver, BC V6T 1T5
/T
If you are suffering from neck pain,
back pain, headache or fatigue...
www.vancouverspinecarecentre.com
Broadway at Pine 604-873-6029
"\
^
PREFERRED FEE SCHEDULE FOR UBC STUDENTS
Dr. Dean Greenwood Dr. Richard Hunter
CHIROPRACTORS
J

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