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The Ubyssey Mar 19, 1968

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 TOO DAMN LAZY TO TRY TO  FIND  OUT
"Students are too damn lazy to try to find out
about committees."
^ Standing near the library in the cold Monday
afternoon air, John Haythorne, a student in the new
Arts I program, wore a frown.
He had just been confronted with a Ubyssey poll
probing the reasons few students have applied for
positions as members or chairmen of Alma Mater
Society committees.
"Students lack the interest," Haythorne said.
"They'd just as soon go to a pub than to a committee meeting."
So far the best response to committee plans has
been 14 applications for positions on the Student
Union Building committee, said AMS co-ordinator-
elect Jill Cameron.
Other applications have only averaged one a
committee, she said.
Last week AIMS president Shaun Sullivan, after
advertisements plugging the committees had appeared
tor three weeks, called the response appalling.
"I wonder if many of the things the AMS is
doing aren't farcical," said grad chemistry student
Colin Byfleet. "And the reaction of students, who
seem aliented from the AMS, probably has something
to do with the university's size."
Carol Sherwood, a grad student in library science,
said students didn't know enough about the committees.
"The whole thing at UBC is that people wait for
events to happen to them," she said. "Students are
completely isolated from their government and administration."
"There's not enough time," said Jim Miller, sc. 1.
"And everyone is down on your neck if you get
involved. Also, I think everyone is a little disgusted
with petty politics in the AMS."
Said Mike Doyle, arts 2: "Students don't know
what they can do or how they can participate. They
think you need all kinds of qualifications."
"I had the impression when I read the advertisements that   the  positions  were  almost paid,"   said
It sounded as if you need
wfctekjyould scare
they hadn't tti#ught^ab
u
-.about
Jacquie Mansell, arts 1.
a lot of organizational^
people off."
Several stud
the committee^ «vcn
One was Handy, Hanger, schlAC*$§ added: "j^ut I
don't think [fit's that t-fsWaeAtt don't wan^to get
involved."    \\     . ,-Js>
The deadl^e^far applications has been extended
to noon today. SMi^arsvho »Fej interest' d in joining a committeecao, erlqtffre at the Alma Mater
Society offices in south Brock.
"What we particularly need is a greater cross-
section of students to sit on the committees," said
Miss Cameron. "Response so far has tended to be
from a narrow area.!'
She emphasized Monday that all applicants to
the committees need is a desire to improve the AMS.
The committees include academic activities, frosh
orientation, Canadian University Service Overseas,
high school conference, intramurals, performing arts,
speakers, symposia, and World University Service.
Broiled
lameduck
TW UBYSSEY
or roast
Mutton?
Vol. XLIX, No. 59
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH   19,  1968
224-3916
Jill  charges  council
with  discrimination
The outgoing Alma Mater Society council was charged
Monday with trying to prevent the co-ordinator-elect from
doing her job.
Jill Cameron, newly-elected co-ordinator, said members of this year's council were trying to keep her from
chairing the SUB managament committee.
The constitution used to read: "The co-ordinator shall
act as chairman of the Brock management committee,"
she said. But this sentence was deleted in a constitutional
amendment passed by council March 11.
"I was told the deletion was necessary because Brock
would no longer be a student building after this term,"
Miss Cameron said. "When I asked to substitute SUB for
Brock, I was told SUB wasn't mentioned in the constitution."
The committee was formed ad hoc because some council members feel she is not up to her job, Miss Cameron
said. Their attitude is partly because she is a woman, she
charged.
The SUB management committee is comprised of two
executive and two non-executive council members as well
as herself. They elect five other students to the committee.
To avoid being disregarded by council, Miss Cameron
said she will ask students for a motion of support at the
general meeting in the armory noon Thursday.
If she gets it, the new executive could confidently
throw out any committee not to its liking formed by
the present council.
Lower boozing age
liquor laws archaic
By JOHN DAVIES
Archaic. Absurd. Insane.
These were sample reactions to B.C.'s booze
laws in a survey of faculty and student heads
Monday.
All those interviewed strongly oppose the
present regulations.
"I think the drinking age should be 18,"
said Dr. William Armstrong, deputy acting UBC
president and dean of applied science.
"The present drinking age of 21 is much too
high. This is the most serious problem.
"I've been on British campuses where they
have pubs in residences. This seems to result
in very few problems.
"The students sit and study with a mug of
beer beside them," Armstrong said.
"This doesn't alarm me at all. I'm not convinced it leads to more drunkenness. It's not a
practical thing at UBC as yet, but the way the
situation is now it's a very unhappy situation,
especially for minors."
"There's a  completely  different attitude to
wards drinking in Europe. It's not something
to hide. It's most unfortunate that pubs here
are so depressing. The whole thing needs much
review."
Acting UBC president Walter Gage said: "I
think perhaps if they have lowered the voting
age to 19, the other amenities should follow. It
doesn't make sense to be restrictive in one area
and give responsibilities in others."
"I would think that the effect of the present
liquor laws on people would be to drive them
away to somewhere like California," said Dr.
Roy Turner, associate sociology professor.
"They're absurd."
"It was sort of a cultural shock to come here
from California. If you want a personal opinion,
I think the liquor situation stinks."
UBC is about five miles from the nearest
pub, the Fraser Arms. Most Vancouver pubs are
in the downtown core, requiring a 30-minute
trip by bus, or 20-minutes by car from campus.
"The liquor laws in this province are ridicul-
(Conlinued  on  page  2)
SEE BOOZING  LAWS
RATHER THAN attend classes
that the school of architecture
thought they should attend,
first year architecture students
decided to build a flexible,
hexagonal, space frame.
They feel this project will
teach them more about structural design than the classes
they have boycotted. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  19, 1968
Brock barber loses lease,
Aussie sharpens SUB scissors
UBC's barber of 22 years has lost his lease to
operate the Alma Mater Society-owned barber
shop.
Peter Van Dyke, Brock barber since 1942,
has been outbid in efforts to operate the barber
shop in the student union building next year.
He is currently operating a shop in South
Brock.
New barber is Paul Deacon who worked for
ten years at the University of Sydney, Australia.
Deacon's bid was to pay the AMS $4 per
square foot per annum for the lease of the building in addition to 10 per cent of his gross income.
"I expect to average about $50,000 a year in
gross income," he told council.
AMS president Shaun Sullivan estimated the
$13,000 building cost of the barber shop will be
repaid in about two years, if Deacon's estimates
are correct.
In answer to questions, Deacon said he would
have to charge the minimum union rate and not
be able to reduce rates for students.
Arts IT proposed
A student-initiated proposal for an Arts II
program received strong support from student
council Monday night.
The proposal, put forth by a group of Arts I
students, calls for permission for 20 students to
organize and participate in an Arts II program
next year.
David Sharpe, one of the organizers, said
Monday the number of students was chosen after
some deliberation and appears to be the only
figure feasible.
The proposal says if permission is granted to
start the program, an Arts I professor has
agreed to teach the course.
The suggestion emphasizes that the Arts II
program will be aimed at fitting in with the
rest of the university curriculum structure so
that students would not be at a great disadvantage when leaving the program.
Sharpe said he will meet with dean of arts
Dennis Healy Thursday to seek approval of the
proposal.
BUILDING  OPENS
B.C. Minister of Health Wesley Black will
officially open UBC's new dentistry building
Wednesday at 11:30 a.m.
The John Barfoot Macdonald building, named
for UBC's president from 1962 to 1967, is located
at the corner of University Blvd. and Wesbrook
Cres. and will be used for training doctors, dentists, nurses and students entering allied professions.
It will house 160 dental students and 20
students of dental hygiene. The faculty of dentistry, which began in 1964, now has an enrolment of 39 students.
Attending the opening will be Macdonald,
UBC chancellor John Buchanan, acting president
Walter Gage and dean of dentistry S. W. Leung.
"I do hope that I will be able to remain
open late at night and on Saturdays. This would
be to the advantage of both the students and
myself."
The shop in SUB will initially have six
chairs, but will later expand to eight. At present, the shop in Brock has four chairs.
Van Dyke was not available for comment
Monday night.
BOOZING    LAWS
(Continued from page  1)
ous, ludicrous, and archaic as hell," said Alma
Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan.
"Why do you have to go to a beer parlor,
sit down and have them flog beer at you? They
should go to Europe and see how it's done.
"All this is geared towards mass drinking.
You can't get out of your bloody chair here
with a glass in your hand or they throw you
out."
The provincial government made $48 million
selling liquor last year, twice the money it spent
operating universities, Sullivan said.
"Engineers drink a lot," said engineering
president Lynn Spraggs.
"I can't see any reasons why we can't consume liquor on campus. It's absolute insanity.
The campus produces future leaders, and if they
can't handle it, who can?"
"I think a pub on campus would be a good
thing purely on the grounds that it's a good place
for people to meet each other," said arts president Stan Persky.
"I just turned 21, so I've switched to the
conservative view," said Kim Campbell, AMS
second vice-president. "I think drinking is just
totally bad, so I've quit."
Apply,   flunkees
Flunking students are advised to prepare now for their second chance.
Applications are now toeing received by
the registrar's office from students wishing to attend the summer session from July
2 to Aug. 16.
Last date for application from students
attending for the first time is April 1. Returning students must register before May
1.
Courses cover both the arts and sciences. Emphasis is on courses in the faculty
of education. About 60 per cent of the
5,500 students expected to attend will be
teachers.
The registrar's office reports computer
science will be offered for the first time
this session and a one month course in
Latin American geography will be held in
Tehuacan, Mexico.
Further information may be obtained
at the registrar's office in the administration building.
27
» FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
ff
Waiting  Jet (joM
xs
**»
by SAMUEL BECKETT
with
Robert Clothier Gregory Reid
Lee Taylor
Directed by Stanley Weese. Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox.
MARCH 22-30, 1968
Student Tickets $1.00
(available for all performances)
— Special Student Performances -
Monday, March 25th    7:30    p.m.
Thursday, March 28th 12:30 p.m.
Sfc
Tickets: Fred ric Wood Theatre Room 207 or 228-26
Support Your Campus Theatre
—^—■■FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE——
r4¥
ROADRUNNER
CARTOONS
WED., MAR. 20
NOON - AUD.
50c
CUBAN FILMS
CHE  LIVES: A Cuban  documentary on  Che  Guevara produced four days after Che's murder. 35 mm. English subt.
NOW: World acclaimed, prize winning (Leipzig festival 1966) Cuban short on the U.S. black freedom
struggle—with  Lena  Home  singing  "Now".
Documentaries on  rural  medicine and  assorted  newsreels
THURS., MARCH 21: 7 P.M. & 9 P.M.
OLYMPIC THEATRE, 2381 E. HASTINGS
ADMISSION: $1.00 - STUDENTS at 75c
Sponsored by Vancouver Fair Play for Cuba Committee
our lapinary compatriot
oreads unpredictably
to _prqs£ress, "We've
■foixMV
like, how she uses
m^ lier new Ti-oe
tjZl'-fac %> °^an       Site Sends out cheques
fnoney to a frie/fA.    -£c%- cme ceivfc -to lief
friends.
so, naturally, all Iter
•friends have to write
her t-aclc fo thank lier
f or Iner unexpected
clenerosity.
and tttm9 of? course,
we send bacl-c all hef
cancelled cHie^ices.
So-
£or every letter -that
l&pmette sends out-,
she receives two i&ak/.
dV seems -lo be a very
cLown-key way -to
attract attention..
it is also a dsamed 4po&
■Way of? Iceeping tradlc
o£ your disappearing"
dougk. °
So maybe you would-
appreciate gelling your
Cheques Jbac3c, too***
past-happiness is
receiving two qp
So; -'r-'  ' A	
tttrz are alternaiive
TneViods tf keeping
'track ofwer money
tafieK it a tatly ,.
tyorlfaj io mention..
oVra6
your vert/ouitt
custom aulojmpMi
TAeetee)
tanltofmontreal
CampusBanK
caiupustenk "branch.
in the Hdminisb-alio-n. building
cj.-f.peir^on, manager
Open. S.rbo -5 Monday to Thursday - 93o-6 Friday Tuesday, March  19,   .?68
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
"THE ATMOSPHERE isn't much to talk about, but the cuisine sure beats what food services
churns out," mumbles Laddy Labb as he survey's the day's refuse before the physical
plant men take it away.
Jock fee  referendum  April  3
A referendum asking students whether they
want to transfer the $5 of their Alma Mater
Society fee delegated to athletics to the control
of the administration has been set for April 3.
Grads vie for seats,
covet exec positions
For the first time in three years, grad students are contesting executive positions in the
grad student association.
Ten candidates are running for the top five
posts to be decided in an election Friday.
John Tilley, grad studies English, and Gerard Mos, grad studies economics, are vying for
the presidency. Candidates for first vice-president are William Reid, grad studies chemistry,
and John Dickinson, grad studies economics.
John Stewart, grad studies chemistry, and
Peter Victor, grad studies economics, are running for second vice-president. Richard Leckie,
grad studies English, opposes Philip Eby, planning, for treasurer. The two nominations for
secretary are Gillian Elliot, ocsanography, and
Anne Roberts, grad studies anthropology.
Three candidates are running for the job of
social officer and two for cultural officer. Five
more positions were uncontested. They were
special services, public relations, sports, club
night, and beer garden offices. They were filled
by acclamation Thursday.
"I think there are so many nominations this
year because people got steamed up at the trend
of no one applying," said grad student association
president Bruce Fraser, grad studies botany.
"The situation's very different from previous years. About 90 per cent of the contestants
used to be in science — botany and metallurgy,
often chemistry and physics."
There will be at least five polls set up across
campus, including in Buchanan, the grad student
center, and the bio-sciences building.
The referendum was set at Monday's council
meeting under the threat that a petition would
force the vote if it was not called for by council.
It calls for the student athletic fee to be collected
by the administration, rather than by the AMS.
Should the referendum pass, AMS fees would
be cut by $5. The athletic fee would be collected
with tuition fees in September.
Andy McConkey, vice-president of the men's
athletic association said Monday night the transfer was aimed at stability in men's extramural
athletics.
"Last year we tried getting our budget approved by council in June. We tried again in
September, but they still wouldn't approve it.
It wasn't until October that we got it.
"We want to know the money is going to be
there if we start spending it April 1."
At present the men's and women's athletic
committees, composed of students and faculty
members, have control over how the money is
spent, but must have budget approval by student
council.
Under the new plan, the approval of council
would not be needed.
A meeting to discuss the proposed plan will
be held Wednesday noon in the gym bowling
alley.
AMS financial advisor Dave Hoye said it
would be very difficult to reverse the decision
later if the referendum passed.
"Referendums changing student fees are subject to the approval of the board of governors.
They're not going to be happy if we pass the
thing and then try to reverse it."
If the vote is in favor of the proposal, further changes in either athletic fees or student
fees will not be possible without a student referendum approving them.
The referendum as proposed is three pages
long and the entire text must appear on the
ballot. However, AMS first vice-president Don
Mutton said it could be condensed in space.
The athletic plan was sent to the AMS lawyer
last week for his consideration.
"The reasons for the plan totally escape us,
and the proposed plan is more cumbersome than
the present constitutional provisions," the lawyer
said.
SAYS LAWYER
Charges null
By NORMAN GIDNEY
The arrest of former UBC arts president Stan Persky March
9 along with 15 other persons in front of the courthouse was a
violation of the Canadian Bill of Rights, civil liberties lawyer
Sid Simons said in court Monday.
Simons said the arrest of Persky violated his freedom of
assembly and association. He quoted sections of the Bill of Rights
forbidding the use of a law to arbitrarily detain an individual
and also forbidding cruel and unusual punishment.
The three-hour trial, punctuated by three adjournments and
by laughter several times from the public gallery, was heard by
magistrate Lawrence Eckhardt.
Eckhardt reserved judgment in the case until March 25.
He attributed the delay to Persky's absence.
The charge specified that Persky was to appear in courtroom 3 in the public safety building at 10 a.m. The case was
moved to courtroom 4. Simons made preliminary objections to
the charges, claiming they were a nullity (without legal force).
This charge, he said, had Persky's name inserted where
none was before and the phrase saying the defendant's identity
would be revealed crossed out.
Eckhardt issued a bench warrant for Persky's arrest because
of his failure to appear. It was served on him in the next
courtroom. Persky finally appeared before Eckhardt at 11:30
a.m.
Eckhardt would not accept Simons' objections.
Proceeding with his argument, Simons challenged the warrants under the summary convictions act which states that no
justice shall sign a warrant in blank and that a warrant shall
name or describe the defendant.
Simons also said the legislation might be ultra vires (beyond
authority of) the provincial government since loitering was already dealt with in the criminal code of Canada.
"The public works act deals for the most part with parking
in driveways," he said. Simons suggested that th° regulation
of the act which deals with loitering deprives persons of their
rights under the Bill of Rights.
He asked the magistrate to squash the informations (charges)
and release Persky.
In reply the prosecution argued that the constitutionality
of the provincial legislation did not apply because notice had
to be given to the attorneys general of B.C. and Canada. Prosecution presented several precedent cases where preliminary objections to allegedly defective warrants and charges were overruled.
The second defendant, Joseph Richardson, who was to appear
Monday did not, and a bench warrant was issued for his arrest.
The other 12 appear today on the same charge. It is expected their case will be set over until after Persky's case is
decided next Monday.
Meanwhile more than 100 lunchtime spectators gathered
at the courthouse square Monday to watch a CBC television
interview with town fool Joachim Foikis, mayor Tom Campbell
and Persky.
They were not arrested for loitering.
'Med students to blame'
A ballot box was not, as charged, withheld from medical
students at Vancouver General Hospital during Wednesday's
Alma Mater Society presidential election, returning officer Chuck
Campbell said Monday.
"The responsibility for picking up the ballot boxes for these
courtesy polls rests with the undergraduate society concerned,"
said Campbell.
A medical student had complained to him that the absence
of a poll there constituted irregular voting procedure.
There are six possible especially arranged polls, at stations
including the B.C. Institute of Technology and Shaughnessy
Hospital.
Only seven or eight students normally vote at the general
hospital. "With such a small number, I don't press them to pick
up a box,'' Campbell said.
Ordinarily, 14 polling stations are located only where 300
or more students gather.
The only exception is the MacMillan building, which is so
far out it would be inconvenient for the students to come in to
other polls to vote, he said. mumssY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page  Friday,  loc.  24;  sports,  loc.  23;  advertising,  loc.  26.  Telex  04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
"/ c/o not mind lying, but I hate inaccuracy."
— Samuel Butler
MARCH  19,   1968
Dry up, drinkers
It was with pounding heart and sagging arches that
we read of noted UBC faculty members and students
opposing the B.C. liquor laws. Incredible. Such pomposity and callow bleating is apparently becoming the
trademark of snivelling members in the academic community jealous of the profound performance of our
magnificent provincial government.
Almost as disheartening was hearing about a few
wheezing young poppycocks in the legislature, including
Social Credit members, yapping for a change in the
liquor laws.
That such discontent should ooze from the very men
who claim to be the elite of provincial circles, is ludicrous. Surely these glory-seekers, living in one of the
richest areas of the world, are not unfamiliax with B.C.'s
incredibly flawless highways or its internationally famous dams. Surely, in the light of the B.C. Hydro dynamos, which are working only to give the working man
his dividends, these usurpers of morality should be
above such petty carping.
This obnoxious pecking from gentlemen who owe the
government almost every benefit they enjoy today, from
the luxury of B.C. ferries to the efficiency of the very
liquor stores they are attacking, is nothing short of
ridiculous. As mothers and aunts, grandmothers and great-
aunts all over B.C. will attest, drinking is one of the
most foul undertakings any civilized man can embrace.
Heaven knows, as does that wonderful old saint in
Victoria, Col. McGugan, that liquor is the ban of all,
especially young 'uns.
The kindly old liquor head's desire to prevent
potential leaders of society from falling into the pitiful
mire of imbibing is heartwarming. Likewise, if it wasn't
for the sweat and tears of that admirable saint, Premier
Bennett, whose experience as a superb hardware merchant has resulted in untouchable management of last
year's $45 million in liquor taxes, the government would
be making even more money from selling the evil stuff.
And that would spark the immense chagrin of every
liquor store supervisor in the province.
Particularly tragic about the criticism from provincial quislings is that much of it comes from academic
circles; from the very fortunates who should be patting
Bennett on the back in gratitude for the huge sums he
has alloted to higher education.
Also, just because over 9,000 UBC students are past
21, several of the more debauched of their number wail
for pubs closer than five miles to campus. Rubbish.
Universities are for burning the midnight B.C. Hydro
gas, and utilizing study spaces at night that are cluttered
by sleeping students during the day.
Rare indeed is the calibre of a government that can
ignore the odious pressure from such culturally backward nations as Britain, France, Germany and Italy; to
invite mass debauchery by making liquor laws as sloppy
as they are in those countries.
And we fully support the provincial voting age of
19, two years under the drinking age. No one can doubt
that the provincial government was voted in by sober-
minded citizens, and to continue its incredible work, it
must continue to have the support of minds untainted
by the stench of French wines or English ale.
— S.E.G.
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman silent. Not a leaf stirred. Far away in
City       Stuart  Cray a  sunny  field  Hansel  shared  ginger-
M_,w< c..<_.  <--._.h_ bread   with   Gretel.   and   Brock   Hall
News Susan  6ransbV made    a    daisy    chain    for    Victoria
Managing       Murray  McMillan Station.
•'note*        Kurt Hilger Eventually,   towards   dusk,   Gutzon
Senior    Pat Hrushowy Borglum arrived  and  chiselled  on  a
Sports                                     Mike   Jessen mountainside as smooth as a sheet of
„,.           _, newsprint,   this   simple   epitaph   to   a
wlre           Norman Gidney deserted   newsroom:    "M.   Finlay,   S.
Page Friday     Judy Bing Jackson,  J. Davies—R.I.P. Lay down
Ass't. City      Boni  Lee J"*"1"  V^s."
Beneath a granite sculptured flash-
"It gets lonely in the woods at this bulb,   he   inscribed:   "L.   Woodd,   G.
time  of year,"  said   Henry Thoreau, Hollo,   may   your   memory   be   fixed
sitting by  a  reed-filled  pond.  Irving forever in this."
Fetish  agreed.  King Arthur  sat  dis- And,    beneath    an   eternal    flame
consolate on a tombstone by the pool, which   burns  in  a  bowl  hewn  from
tossing pebbles into the   calm  water solid  stone, he wrote: "J.  Twigg, B.
and thinking of better days. Rip Van Banno—like   athlete's  foot,  gone  but
Winkle slept on in the shade. Ail was not forgotten."
tv*?>W9"'l'> '■ '  *•--**'      ,    - '-      i-x-r. ^   .
Oh, look ! The National Geographic sent a map of battle
areas of The American Civil War . . . for summer 19681
WmM^iMmm
Grad power
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Militancy has never been a
prominent characteristic in
Graduate Student Association
activities. Now a group of persons has worked out a set of
policies in common before putting their names on the ballot
— policieswTrich will affect
more than the social life of
graduate students. For three
years no one has apparently
felt there were any major policy questions in issue — for
three years there have been
no contested elections for the
GSA executive. This is hardly
to say that graduate students
at UBC are satisfied with their
lot. For many, the working
conditions are atrocious and
remuneration for TA services
are below the subsistence
level. Much grumbling can be
heard about departmental decisions affecting graduate students but made without consulting them. The hope of the
signatories of this letter is
that the gestation period for
these grievances is over and
that they can be clarified as
issues and acted upon. From a
lonely carrel on level 1 of the
stacks, from the inside of a
mass spectograph, and from the
Court House steps comes the
cry GRAD  POWER.
The purpose in clarifying
the issues as we have in the
following list is to demonsrate
to the members of the GSA that
they do have an alternative —
a positive and rational platform, combined with promise
of positive and competitive administration.
We propose: 1. To establish
a labor relations council of
the GSA to pressure for higher
rates of pay in some departments immediately; generally
to make sure that rates are
high enough to meet the needs
of graduate students, and investigate individual grievances.
2. Graduate participation on
departmental committees deciding curricula, hiring, awards,
admission    requirements    and
all other matters of concern to
grad students. There are numerous committees where the benefit of a grad student voice
will be greater if heard before
a decision is made than after.
3. To make a concerted
effort towards establishing
reasonable bar facilities at the
graduate student centre. The
existing beer gardens have
proven to be adequate for only
7 per cent of membership. To
eliminate this bottleneck an
extension of hours, days and
types of service is required.
4. To hold a referendum of
the active membership of the
GSA to settle the question of
admission of associate members
to the GSA. At present, large
numbers of persons holding
university degrees but studying in library science, law or
medicine are deprived of the
use of the grad centre.
GERARD MOS, JOHN DICKENSON, PETER VICTOR.
PHIL EBY. ANNE ROBERTS, ANDREW QUARRY.
ED GREENE.
Lost  vote
Editor,   The  Ubyssey:
Those who claim The Ubyssey's reporting is unreliable
found something else to complain about on Thursday, when
they found out The Ubyssey
can't add either.
You claim in two places in
the paper, that 4,583 students
voted in Wednesday's election,
yet if you add up all the votes
of the five candidates, the
total is 4,683.
What about all the spoiled
ballots? I'm sure many voters
besides myself voted for Stan
Persky, and many of us would
like to know the true results
of the elections, including
write-ins and spoiled ballots.
PETER JOHN
science 1
Big  hairy  deal
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
Hair, like Hare I hope, has
an unsatiable desire to grow
on people — perhaps even on
prime minister Bennett. Although the latter problem can-
ZAP
Once upon a time there was
a chambermaid at the faculty
club. Her husband died —
but she found a new Prince
Charming. A dentistry building was dedicated. And, lo
and behold, the girl who used
to be a chambermaid in the
faculty club found herself ensconced amid the splendor of
the faculty club's executive
suite . . . Carey Linde, AMS
veep-elect, fears he's about to
suffer for his radical doings:
his draft board in Bennington,
Vermont, is about to reclassify
him . . . Annual AMS awards
were released Monday. Winner
of Most Overrated Exec of
Year trophy was vice-prez Don
Mutton, who spent most of his
time whining about The Ubyssey's failure to headline his r>
name every day, every page.
Actually, it says here, Mutton's
efforts got too much attention
and respect from Ubyssey
newside. His housing report
was a rehash of housing reports
for the last five years. Education action program was bush-
league and totally without effect . . .
You thought prime ministerial hopeful John Turner was a
flaming radical? Guess again,
friend. Two of Turner's supporters at the April leadership
convention will be flaming
campus reactionaries Shaun
Sullivan and Mike Coleman.
No, we aren't partisans of guilt
by association — but with
friends like that, to coin a
phrase, Turner doesn't need
enemies . . . Sun's Al Fother- ""
ingham quibbled in his column
with a Vancouver Life feature
on our town's establishment...
That's strange, we say, since it's
said the feature's author — one
James Holt — is really none
other than — you guessed it —
Al Fotheringham . . .
Remember   Brian   Plummer,
last year's special events chairman, who was arrested after
storming the Pentagon in last
fall's Washington demonstration? Plummer's grandfather,
J. Vans Macdonald, died Sunday. He was an active member
of the Anti-Communist League
of Canada . . . Canadian University Press trophy critiques,
released last week, contain
some answers to those whose
favorite sport is bitching about
Canada's best university paper.
Said Pierre Berton, author of
The Smug Minority and a onetime Ubyssey staffer: "The
Ubyssey remains a high quality
campus paper with a great deal
to recommend it." And Hamilton Spectator staff writer Peter
Calami enthused: "Only The
Ubyssey combined the spirit
and verve of university students with a quiet unobtrusive
professionalism.''
not be readily solved, perhaps
the former can. Does SUB
make any provision for a reduced rate barber shop. I feel
confident that the demand for
hair cuts is elastic enough to
enable a student-run barber
shop to cut their prices to $1 .^
and still be able to cover all
costs. I hope the Scalpers
Union won't be annoyed at my
suggestion.
ROSS MITCHELL
comm 1 Tuesday, March 19, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
How it started
'The  desire  to  live won out over obedience to  Ho'
By ALLEN BELL
For centuries Vietnam has been a
feudal nation. Between 1859 and 1954
it was a colony of France, except for a
brief period during World War II when
Japan controlled it. During the war the
Viet Minh, a national communist movement led by Ho Chi Minh, stimulated the
desire of the Vietnamese in general for
for independence, and the desire of the
peasants in particular for an end to
feudalism. These winning issues — independence and the overthrow of feudalism — earned so much popular support
that by January 1946 in nationwide elections involving other nationalist parties
the Viet Minh won an overwhelming
electoral victory.
Despite the popular desire for independence, France attempted to regain her
colony after the war. In 1946 fighting
broke out between the French and the
Viet Mlinh armies. In 1950 the U.S. began
pouring money and equipment into the
French effort to regain her colony, Indo-
China — an effort which had hitherto
been financed by funds diverted from
Marshall Plan aid to France. That Indo-
China should remain a colony was preferable in the view of America's leaders
to its falling under communist leadership. By 1954, against overwhelming
technological superiority, the Viet Minh
had seized control of about three-quarters
of Vietnam, and had defeated the French
forces.
In July 1954 the great powers and
the Indo-Chinese nations reached at
Geneva a set of agreements directed towards the establishment of a peaceful
and independent Vietnam. Article 6 of
the Final Declaration emphatically states
that Vietnam is one country, despite a
temporary military demarcation line
dividing the country at the 17th parallel.
The French and their supporters, including about 900,000 Roman Catholics, withdrew to the Southern half, while the Viet
Minh armies relinquished their control
over large areas and withdrew to the
Northern half of the country. Article 7
provides for "free general elections" to
be held within two years to enable the
Vietnamese to decide peacefully who
should govern the reunified Vietnam.
Article 2 prohibits the entry of foreign
troops or arms into either zone of Vietnam. Article 5 prohibits both zones from
joining a military alliance with a foreign
power.
Although the U.S. was not a signatory
to the Geneva Accord, it did sign an
undertaking not to violate any of the provisions of the agreement. However, it
was clearly unhappy about the Geneva
settlement, and before the terms of the
agreement had been fulfilled the U.S.
decided that abiding by them was not in
her interests. The U.S. wanted a Korean-
type settlement with a pro-western South
Vietnam independent of a pro-communist
North. Accordingly, the U.S. immediately set about building the southern zone
into an independent state under the
leadership of Ngo Dinh Diem.
Diem was an improbable man for an
impossible job. The job was impossible
because the Vietnamese wanted independence, and Diem's power resided in Washington, which had already compromised
itself by backing the French. Many Vietnamese saw in America's policy a submerged form of colonialism. Furthermore,
the Vietnamese, by and large, wanted a
reunified country, and Diem was committed to two Vietnams. Finally, it fell
upon Diem to reverse the agrarian revolution started by the Viet Minh. Thus
almost immediately he ran afoul of Vietnam's most powerful group, the peasantry.
Diem had not only an impossible task,
but he was the wrong man to attempt
the impossible. He was a Catholic in a
predominantly Buddhist country. He was
a mandarin, or elitist, in a land where
a peasant revolution was already underway. He had no standing as a nationalist
because he had sat out the war of independence against the French in Paris
and New York. He talked of remedying
the worst abuses of feudalism by means
of reform, but instead he applied force
to keep the peasants under feudalism.
He talked of achieving unity through
various popular measures, but instead he
went after his enemies with the military
and the police. He used force to defeat
the Binh Xuyen, the Cao Dai and the
Hoa Koa, and he tried to force the mountain tribesmen, the montagnards, to assimilate.
Diem's worst mistakes were his treatment of the small peasants and the montagnards, and his recourse to terrorist techniques. Those who disagreed with him
were 'communists' and were treated accordingly:
"This repression was aimed in theory
at the Communists. In fact it affected
all those, and they were many — democrats,  socialists,  liberals,  adherents  of
the sects — who were bold enough to
express   their   disagreement   with   the
line  of policy adopted  by  the ruling
oligarchy . . ." (Philipps Devillers, "the
Struggle  for  the  Unification of  Vietnam", China Quarterly, Nov. 9, 1962.)
Between   1956   and  1960   many   small
armed resistance  groups  arose.  In   1960
these groups were unified under the National Front for Liberation (NFL).
The policies pursued by Dizm and the
U.S. involved them in violation of all
the major articles of the Geneva Agreement. The very attempt to make the
southern zone an independent state violated Article 6. American arms and military men flowed into the south, thereby
violating Article 2. The U.S. and Diem
formed a virtual military alliance, thereby violating Article 5. They agreed not
to hold general elections, thereby violating Article 7. America's altruistic protestations notwithstanding, the U.S., on
whose support Diem was dependent, encouraged Diem's violation of Article 7
because free elections would have resulted in a victory for Ho Chin Minh and the
Sao Dong Party.
In   his   Mandate   for   Change   Eisenhower writes: "I have never talked or
corresponded   with   a   person   knowledgeable in Indo-Chinese affairs who
did not agree that had elections been
held  .  .  .  possibly 80 per cent of the
population  would  have  voted  for  the
Communist Ho Chi Minh."
This   view   is   also   expressed  in   the
U.S. State Department's 1961 Blue Book
on Vietnam, A threat to the Peace: North
Vietnam's Effort to Conquer South Vietnam.
By 1956, Ho Chi Minh, deciding that
elections were not going to be held, decided to settle for "socialism in half a
country." He was certainly not happy
about this, but he had committed himself to the Soviet global strategy of peaceful coexistence with the west. In the
south, meanwhile, Diem's military forces
were rounding up thousands of former
Viet Minh supporters and killing them
with portable guillotines. Gradually the
desire to live won out over obedience to
Ho, and the communists in the south
joined the resistance movements in the
maquis. The rebellion in the south, it is
fair to conclude, far from having been
fomented by Ho's orders, was not fomented by Communists at all.
However, when the NFL was formed
in 1960, Ho endorsed it, thus sanctioning
a "fait accompli." He began to aid the
rebellion by sending back to the south
former southerners who had gone north
in 1954. But it was not until an indigenous revolution in the south was well
underway that the north became involved
— not until long after the U.S. and Diem
had made it clear that peaceful reunification was impossible.
"A MASTERPIECE. ONE OF THE
ALL-TIME GREATS." ST^r^
"MEANINGFUL AND DRAMATIC
Beautifully made and acted. Mr. Resnais has
done a superb job."
-Bosley Crowther, New York Times
LA GUERRE
EST FINE
YVES MONTAND INGRID THULIN • genevieve bujold
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT ONLY
Varsity
224-3730 •»
4375 W. 10th
SHOW TIMES
7:30   &   9:30
FACTS You Should Know
About Your New Student Union Building
^-nr
It will turn you on
Your new SUB will provide the following cultural facilities:
—Art gallery (on two levels)—with display area.
—Two  music   lounges
—Conversation  lounge (sunken  area)
—Reading lounge and small library (containing magazines, periodicals, etc.)
—Small auditorium (425 seats).
—TV lounge.
For further information, watch for future ads, or
contact the SUB office, 2nd floor, Brock South.
££Any man who hates
children and dogs-can't be all bad. 33
W. C. FIELDS
This immortal phrase was uttered by a man who, long
before the rebels of today were born, attacked everything sacred in the world of mother and apple pie ...
W. C. FIELDS. Today W. C. Fields is a whole new thing
with a world of people who are discoverirjg him for the
first time. They run to see his films-quote him and
imitate him. Fields was a comic unto himself. His red-
light nose was a symbol of the profligate who sneered
at the do's and dont's of the world-and then made
the world howl with laughter. The Fields mystique is
growing and growing. In an effort to keep up with the
demand—we present for a limited engagement—two of
his most memorable classics.
"THE BANK DICK"
"NEVER GIVE A SUCKER AN EVEN BREAK"
SPECIAL LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
STARTS THURSDAY
Hyland
KINGS'Y at KNIGHT
876-3045
SHOW  STARTS
7:30  P.M.
LAST     COMPLETE
fHOV/ING   9   P.M. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March   19,  1968
IH's  Buddy  System
How  to   make  a   foreign   student   happy   in   Canada
By MURRAY McMILLAN
Ubyssey Managing Editor
"If it weren't for the Buddy System, I would
never have come to university in Canada."
That, in the modest words of petite See Kham
Gan, a third-year economics student from Singapore, is probably the best description of what
International House's Buddy System does to
help foreign students coming to UBC.
"I think it is a very useful system to help
foreign students when
they come to a new
country. When you first
arrive there is someone
you can call on, someone
to help you settle down,"
said Miss Gan.
Through the system,
the foreign student is
teamed up with a UBC
student, who becomes his
or her "buddy".
In Miss Gan's case, her buddy was Freya
Meek, arts 3.
"I had applied to many Canadian universities, but UBC was the only one from which I
received any letters.
"Freya wrote letters to me, many letters,
telling me about like in Canada and it made the
place sound very interesting," Miss Gan said.
If it hadn't been for the encouragement the
letters gave her, she would never have come to
Canada, she said.
The situation was the same for Borut Gogala
of Yugoslavia.
It was letters from George Shipley that made
him decide to come to UBC. Both students are
in grad physics.
The Buddy System was started by IH four
years ago, under the direction of the IH program co-ordinator Mrs. Kay Edwards.
Since then, varying numbers of foreign students have been assisted by the plan. This year,
Mrs. Edwards expects about 500 foreign students
will be involved.
That's 500 new students at UBC in September.
That means 500 Canadian buddies are needed
if the plan is to be successful.
That means you . . .
Each spring, students at UBC are asked to
volunteer to be buddies the following September.
Also in  the spring, IH receives a list from
the registrar, naming the foreign students who
have applied for admission to UBC the following fall.
IH's job is to match the list of buddy volunteers and the list of foreign students.
Once the pairing is done, a letter is sent to
the foreign student, giving the name of his
buddy, and also giving the name of a fellow
countryman who has attended and returned to
his native land.
At the same time, the Canadian buddy receives a letter from IH, giving the name and
address of his buddy-to-be and the name and address of a student from the same country who
is now attending UBC.
Through this exchange, the foreign student
is able to contact a former UBC student while
still in his homeland, and find out what problems he is likely to encounter when he arrives
in Canada.
Similarly, the Canadian student can contact
the foreign student already in Canada to find out
what his initial problems were.
With the initial pairing established, the bulk
of IH's work is completed.
It is then up to the Canadian and foreign
students to write each other, explaining to each
other what can be expected at UBC.
As in See Kham and Freya's case, the benefits are obvious.
Often, a single letter from a student far
away is the only human
thing a foreign student
gets from a university
run by computers specializing in print - out
form letters.
The benefits are by no
means one-sided.
/f -  "-»>
MRS. EDWARDS
Often the Canadian
student receives as much
or more benefits through
his introduction to another culture.
If your are interested, and willing to write
a few letters to foster international goodwill,
see Mrs. Edwards at International House.
It's that two-storey grey building on West
Mall, just behind the grad student centre.
The   building   with   friendship
over it.
written   all
GRADS
'68 GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEETING
BU 106
TOMORROW, NOON
THIS IS AN IMPORTANT MEETING TO
DECIDE UPON THE GRAD CLASS GIFT
IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
The
Bookstore
will be
closed
ALL DAY
THURSDAY, MARCH 28TH
AND FRIDAY, MARCH 29TH
FOR
Annual   Stocktaking
THE STORE WILL REOPEN
MONDAY, APRIL 1ST
UBC Political Clubs Present
//
THE BIG DEBATE
n
-   BILL 33    -   ECONOMIC NATIONALISM   -   FOREIGN AFFAIRS   -
THURSDAY. MARCH 19
Noon
OPEN STUDENT MEETING!
Brock
SPEAK  YOUR   VIEWS!
Presented  by Parliamentary  Council with  co-operation of the Conservative, Liberal, NDP & S.C. Campus Political Clubs. Tuesday, March 19, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Strike demands satisfied
CHARLOTTETOWN (CUP) — Students won
a two-day strike for more freedoms at St. Dun-
stan's University here late Thursday.
The academic senate met most student demands including:
• abolition of campus dress rules for women;
• student committees to supervise residences;
• a student seat on the 14-man senate;
• elimination   of   compulsory   class   attendance
rules;
• a mid-term break in the winter.
These concessions cover all but two major
student demands: scrapping of the principle of
in loco parentis, which is the right of the university to act in place of parents in regulating
students' academic and social behavior, and free
choice of courses.
The students agreed to form a joint faculty-
student committee to discuss these two demands
and the wide-ranging changes required to satisfy
them.
Students' council presented a brief of these
grievances to the university but when nothing
came of it they boycotted classes Wednesday
and Thursday. Two attempts to negotiate a
settlement failed before the senate made its
proposals.
In Ottawa Friday, Canadian Union of Students president Hugh Armstrong said he was
pleased the students had broken away from the
attitudes of thp colonized.
Jree JJHMtatfoH
International House Invites Your Participation in a Reception Programme for 400
Foreign Students Arriving at this University Next September.
JOIN THE "BUDDY SYSTEM'7
Inquire   at
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE OFFICE
224-4535   before   May
Students shaft editor,
sure-thing vote fails
CHARLOTTETOWN (CUP) — Ol' Stephen Foster's stuck up
Swanee river and he's right out of paddles.
He used to be editor of the Prince of Wales College newspaper, the College Times.
The last paddle drifted away Mar. 11, when a fixed student
council meeting back-fired and voted down a motion to reinstate him.
Foster's troubles started last month when an advertiser left
the Times. Foster was impeached for impunging the good name
of the school in the community — more advertisers were
threatening to quit, but none did.
He appealed, and won, on condition that a plebescite of
students on campus agree.
Voter could yea for Foster, or nay and give reasons. A
simple nay wasn't enough. Students gave reasons ranging from
because to doesn't reflect students' views fairly.
At Monday's meeting, president Dave Raynor — a Foster
supporter — gave the chair to an anti-Foster councillor so he
could vote. The chair cast the deciding vote anyway, and Foster
went out six to five. His term would have ended March 31.
'Drop  frosh  initiation  rites,
compulsory campus orienta
OTTAWA (CUP) — Freshman initiations should be dropped
in favor of more positive orientation to the university, Canadian
Union of Students president, Hugh Armstrong said Friday.
"Initiation procedures are degrading to human dignity for
freshman, and they have no place in the community of scholars,"
he said.
He said initiations make freshmen second class citizens in
a time when student governments should be breaking down the
pecking order.
He urged those who are organizing freshman orientation
programs now to drop initiations in favor of programs which
give real introductions to the academic community, both as it
exists now and as it should be.
He suggested freshman students be formed into small groups
using a senior student as a resource person. The freshman could
then make their own individual decisions on how best they can
learn about the academic community.
Ten or 15 students with a senior can bash out problems,
Armstrong said, and decide what they want to do on the basis
of their own particular interests.
He criticized student leaders who herd students into large
groups for speeches by deans of men and others.
Open   meets   unrealistic,
says  student   on   board
LONDON (CUP) — The first student on a Canadian university's board of governors wants open meetings.
But, said University of Western Ontario grad Pat Donohue,
it was unrealistic to expect the UWO board to do so.
A theological student at a nearby college and a 1966 UWO
grad, Donohue was acclaimed to the post January and attended
his first board meeting in February.
"You have to work slowly, you can't walk into battle with
them," he said. He said the board maintains a secrecy policy
in an attempt to maintain solidarity.
Donohue said the board is bewildered by student resentment.
"One governor complained to me that their accomplishments
have never been appreciated. The obvious reason is that they're
too secretive about their dealings," he said.
His first board meeting lasted only two hours and nothing
important was decided. "The truth is, I found it boring," he
said.
In June 1967, the board successfully beat down student
pressures in the provincial legislature to change the universities
act to allow a student to be elected directly to the board.
Despite support from the Liberal opposition the student bid
failed.
BUY LINE 6
. . . your direct telephone line to fast, efficient
service for ordering items from Eaton's.
For other store business: Downtown 685-7112,
Park Royal 922-3325, Brentwood 299-5511
and New Westminster 526-6766.
EATON'S
GRADUATE STUDENTS' ASS'N
ELECTIONS
7 Positions Contested!
CANDIDATES:
Pres.: G. Mos (Econ.)
J. Tilley (Eng.)
IstV.P.:
2nd V.P.: J. Stewart (Chem.)    Treas.:
P. Victor (Econ.)
J. Dickenson (Econ.)
W. Reid (Chem.)
P. Eby (Planning)
R. Leckie (Eng.)
Sec'ty.:      G. Elliott (Physics)    Cultural Off.:E. Greene (Pol. Sc.)
R. Roberts (Anthro.) A. Nichol (Hist.)
Social Off.: J. Dolman (Eng.)
G. Murtagh (Hist.)
A. Quarry (Pol. Sc.)
VOTE-THURS.: 11:30-1:30
FRI.:       11:00-4:00
(for the HELL of it) Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March   19,  1968
TAKE a wierdie - be a rd i e,
straight from the hot-bed of
political i n t r i q u e, (that's
Ottawa) and what do you do
with him? Wierdie-beardie
activists are passe now —
there is a new look in student
activism.
— lawrence woodd photo
HERE WE have wierdie-beardie activist CUM student syndicalist ex-Ubyssey editor John Kelsey after campus barber
Peter Van Dyke worked him over for an hour. And it's the
student de combat look of the syndicalist Quebec students.
But a lie has been uttered, Kelsey is no longer a student.
Anyway, that's what a student syndicalist looks like —
before and after the great shearing onward. Well done
Peter.
G
A
y
A
L
C
O
C
K
Piantit (jaife Aiccck
—15 years of age
—Received A.R.C.T. at 13
—Youngest competitor at J.M.C. competition
—Canada's most promising gift to the world of music
Auditorium
Noon    —    Today
He's a master at baiting popcorn vendors
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) — Three slightly warped sticky
licorice blorgs Monday here started a new co-op for retired
popcorn vendors. Their action followed the erection of a fading
yellow castle to house used French waifs.
Pliable sources said if this year's predicted 187 hurricanes
occur, the co-op will have many stormy sessions involving Pango-
Pango liquor czar Col. Piddle McGoogan.
An organizational meeting of the new PROGRAM AND
SERVICE COMMITTEE will be held after dinner on March
20, at which time, long-range planning and the nomination and election of the key officers will take plac-».
The success of the Program and Service Committee depends on active participation from the various geographic
and cultural regions represented on the U.B.C. campus.
If you would like to have dinner at International House
on March 20, please let us know by noon, Tuesday, March
19.  Tickets 50c, (meal passes will be honoured.)
$od& on (Bookb
We BUY and SELL new & used
university or high school text books
hard covers or paper backs
146 W. Hastings St.
MU. 1-4931
across from Woodward's
//
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
//
GENERAL ELECTIONS
Wed., Noon, March 20
in BUCHANAN 202
ALL MEMBERS OF CAMPUS POLITICAL CLUBS ARE
URGED TO ATTEND
THE ECONOMIC SOCIETY PRESENTS
W
GOLD AND THE
MONEY MUDDLE
To be held in Angus 207,
on Tuesday, March 19th at 12:30
The program will consist roughly of the following:
1. Institutional   arrangements   for   international
monetary arrangements up to the present, and
how we got into the mess—John Young.
2. The  nature  of  the present  crisis—David  Bond.
3. Outlook for the future: The alternatives facing
us—John Helliwell.
n Tuesday, March 19, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
33 grants granted
Thirty-three UBC graduate students have received Canada
Council grants.
They are among 145 successful candidates for post-doctoral
and leave fellowships totalling over $1 million. There were 210
applicants for the grants.
"Intended to strengthen research and university training
in the humanities and social sciences, the post-doctoral fellowships will enable recent PhD's to broaden their scholarly experience, and the senior fellowships will make it possible for university staff on leave to engage in dependent research or other
forms of creative scholarship," the Canada Council announcement* said.
Maximum amount for post-doctoral fellowships is $8,000.
Length of tenure for the grants is eight to 12 months. No travel
or research allowance is made.
Leave fellowships are worth up to $7,000 for recipients who
are at least associate professors. Other award-winners will receive up to $5,000, and have their travel and research expenses
paid.
Leave fellowships have a tenure of one year.
Occupation ceases
as  military evacuates
Students who want to be soldiers between classes will be
out of luck next year.
The eighteenth annual Canadian Armed Forces parade held
Thursday on campus marked the end of a half-century of official
military presence at UBC.
The armory, base of operations for the Canadian armed
forces on campus, will be occupied by UBC administration this
May.
The Canadian Officers Training Corps on campus reached
its peak enrollment of 1,750 in 1944. Since then, each year about
50 to 100 UBC students enrolled in the program have graduated.
The corps is being discontinued nationally this summer.
"This is probably due to all the bitching about the national
defense budget," said Cpl. Elliott, an armory staff member.
Students who want to take military training without obligation to serve after they graduate will have to join one of the
reserve units in the lower mainland area, said Chief Lavery, a
navy instructor.
The other campus armed forces program, the Regular Officers
Training Plan, will continue.
"We might have an office on campus," said Elliott, "but
drill training will have to be elsewhere."
Trip, job for essay winner
A free trip to Europe and guaranteed employment are prizes
in a essay contest offered students.
The International Student Information Service, is accepting
essays 100 words or less, titled Why I Want to Work in Europe
for the Summer.
The prize is round trip jet transportation to the ISIS head
office in Brussels, Belgium, and summer work in the job category and language of the winner's choice.
Students may join the organization by sending $1 to ISIS/
ISTC Cultural Review Board, 866 United Nations Plaza, New
York, New York 10017.
Entries must be postmarked no later than April 30.
Spanish club produces play
UBC students are producing a play in Spanish.
They will act, produce, and direct Casa Con Dos Puertas Es
De Guadar, a comedy written in the Spanish golden age by
sixteenth century playwright Pedro Calderon de la Barca.
El Circulo is sponsoring the production, to be staged in
International House Wednesday and Thursday at 8 p.m.
Tickets are available at the Alma Mater Society office,
International House, and the Spanish faculty office, Bu. 266A.
They cost 75 cents for students and $1 for others.
STANFIELD SITS IN MUSIC SEAT
At least one noted Stanfield will sit on the Alma Mater
Society council next year.
He is Norman Stanfield, new president of the musical
undergraduate society.
"All UBC students should be made more aware of what's
happening in the music faculty," said Stanfield, a third-year
student who specializes in the flute.
"This hopefully can be accomplished by increased advertising of all recitals, etc., in The Ubyssey and by my contributing articles about music in general for publication."
Stanfield said he hopes to create a new attitude among the
200 music students on campus.
"The technical and academic aspects of music tend to obliterate the real meaning of music —. to fulfill and reflect love and
life. We also hope to increase rapport between students and
faculty."
Among new officers are vice-president Al Gasser, music 3;
secretary Alexina Louie, music 2, and treasurer Gary Hartley,
music 4.
Qom. Hul qihlA. who know how...
to look their best, act their best, get admiring
glances . . . who move ahead in business,
socially,  likes  herself .  .  .  and  others  more.
Come to the Blanche Macdonald
School of Finishing & Modelling
CafisutiL. qihlA, hjomstmcdwiA, jtssmA....
Express your individuality in *-*V Fashion Wisdom -^ Makeup -jr Walking and Comportment ***fc* Figure Perfection ***^* Social Graces
•jV Speech Arts -jlf* Self Appreciation
You'll  enjoy it  .   .  .   the   rest of  your  life!
Would   you   like  to   model ?  Special   classes   for   Fashion,   Photography   and   T.V.   Classes
now.  Call   685-1244,   today,  for   a   consultation   without obligation.
^^ Budget Terms. Day or Evening Classes.
} SCHOOL OF / FINISHING   •&  MODELLING
630 Seymour Street, opposite the "Boy"   685-1244
SALE
UBC SWEAT SHIRTS
YACHT
V-Neck Styling, Short Sleeves with Knit Trim in Nublue, Maroon
and Maize. Regular $5.95 — Now	
METALLIC
Long Sleeve with a Glistening Metallic Crest in Navy and Silver
Gray. Regular $4.50 — Now -      	
OLYMPIC
Short Sleeves, Contrast Trim on Neck and Sleeve Ends. In Black,
White, Maroon and Columbia Blue.   Regular $4.95 — Now	
OLD ENGLISH
Long Sleeves with Thick Duply Old English Cresting.   In Loden,
Navy and Powder Blue.   Regular $4.25 — Now      	
KODELL
Short Sleeves. Combination of 50% Kodel and 50% Cotton,
Ribbed Neck, cuffs andi Bottom. Colours in Charkol, Kobalt Blue,
and  Kovert Green.   Regular $5.25 — Now      	
CREW
100%   Cotton, Short Sleeves,  Over-Heart Crest.   Colors  in  Red,
Whisky and Gold.   Regular $3.95 — Now __           	
$4 88
$3 88
$3.88
$3.88
$448
$2.88
CRESTED WIND BREAKERS
Cotton   and   Terelyne,   Zipper  Front   with  Cadet   Collar  and
Over-Heart Crest.   Regular $16.95 — Now	
$12.88
College Shop
House of UBC Casual Summer Wear
BROCK EXTENSION
Hard to Find But Worth Looking For — Closes April 11 Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  19, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
A 24-carat discussion
ECONOMICS  SOC
Drs. Bond, Young and Helli-
well speak on the gold crisis—
the international money muddle, today, noon Ang. 207.
PE US
General meeting today, noon,
gym 211.
CONCERT
University of Oregon concert band plays Thursday, 1
p.m., Brock lounge. Admission
free.
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASS'N
General meeting to elect
officers, today, noon, women's
gym.
PHRATERES
Beep,   Beep.    Road   Runner
cartoons   Wednesday,   auditorium. Admission 50 cents.
SOCREDS
Harry Clare, former Socred
Club president, speaks on My
Idol, W. A. C. Bennett, the
Noblest Man in Canadian History. Bu. 106, noon today.
COMPUTER CLUB
Tour of SFU computing cen
tre, Thursday, noon.  Sign list
in computing wing if you wish
to go.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
A forum on psychology with
Andy    Schneider     and     Karl
Burau, today, noon, Bu. 203.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
Debate on Bill 33 — economic   nationalism,   foreign   affairs   —   today,   noon,   Brock
lounge.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
Meeting to elect next year's
executive, Wednesday, noon,
Bu. 202. All members of campus political clubs please
attend.
EDUCATION US
Cameron Craik of the placement  office discusses summer
jobs,    Wednesday,    noon,    ed.
100.
PRE DENTAL SOC
Banquet Wednesday, 7:30
p.m., grad student centre. Admission by invitation only.
COMPUTER CLUB
Annual   banquet   March   30,
Writings on the wall
The writing is on the wall — the exam timetable is up.
Andy Wilson, who directs registration procedure, said Monday that the timetables were being mimeographed and would
be distributed by noon today.
Copies will be posted on 17 notice boards in buildings
around campus and on department bulletin boards.
Exams begin April 16 and continue until May 3.
8:15 p.m., Golden Horseshoe.
GRAD CLASS
Last  general  meeting  Wednesday,  noon,   Bu.   106.   Grad
gift will be decided.
GERMAN CLUB
English  color  film  on  wild
animals in Africa, today, noon,
Bu. 102.
ALPHA OMEGA
Annual meeting Thursday,
7:30 p.m., grad student centre.
ACE
First   year   teacher's   panel,
Wednesday, noon, ed. 201. Non-
member admission: 10 cents or
a children's book.
DESERET CLUB
Mixed chorus from the University of Utah, Wednesday,
noon, Brock lounge.
NDP CLUB
General meeting to elect
next executive, W e d n e s day
noon, Bu. 212.
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Norman Gilbert discusses ontology: the practical approach,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 223.
PRE MED SOC
Film on drugs in medicine,
Wednesday, noon, Wes. 201.
FINANCE COMMITTEE
Applicants for four member-
at-large positions on AMS finance committee will be interviewed, Wednesday, 2:30 p.m.,
AMS office. Letters of application should be submitted to
Secretary, AMS, Brock Hall,
by Wednesday noon.
APPfA/PlWtS   IM   P£RSOA/
1275 SEYMOUR ST.
*^<^** ■ ■■» »» m «■*■■ -**W^p.^ . *v«*»^^^ *. *-w*»*y*n»*^»*>W»
ike-fabulous
OCASTtRS
EAmCOtUMSM^ MOJO
■*W»»*i
f + ^*>**^>0+0*****0^'<**^*>*>^t
MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW-681-4010
_>tsHT-£S   A
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75c, 3 days $2.00.
Com-mercal—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CARL GRAVES AND SOUL UN-
limited, March 23, Kerrisdale Community Centre, 8-12:00, tickets $1.50
BU  232   or   door.
Greetings
12
Lost Ic Found
IS
LOST: BLACK RING-BINDER OFF
Chem. 120 notes. Finder please
phone   325-0608.
LOST:    GOLD    CHAIN    BRACELET,
Fri., Mar. 1 in Chem. Bldg. 736-7063.
FOUND: THREE MEN'S WATCHES
& sev. glasses, identify & claim,
Pub.   Off.,   Brock   Hall.
LOST: MY WALLET! PLEASE PH.
Glen 224-6774 or turn in to Pub.
Off.,   desperate   for   I.D.!
LOST:   BLUE   COAT,   BROCK   SAT.
Please   phone   Barb   224-7030.
LOST: BROWN BRIEFCASE NEAR
Thunderbird Stadium, Thursday,
March 14, reward, phone 255-2949,
after   5:30.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
IS
UBC BEAUTY SALON. EXPERT
styling and cutting. No appointment necessary. 5736 University
Blvd.,   228-8942.
"DON'T PROCRASTINATE . . . SEE
ad in this paper for the Foreign
Student  Reception  Programme."
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
ship execution on skull hill, Hubert
Butcher, BU 100, March 18, 20 &
21   at   12:30.
ATTENTION    COEDS   —    BE    SAFE
and confident in all situations.
Parties, strange cars, automatic
elevators, blind dates, dark streets.
New pamphlet shows how to use
shoes, purse, umbrella or plain psychology to handle jostlers or attackers. The best of judo, karate and
aiki-do plus a new chart of over
40 nerve centres and pressure
points. Easy to read, easy to learn.
Pamphlet plus chart only $1.25. No
C.O.D. Available now through Box
128,   Station G,  Montreal  18,  P.Q.
Travel Opportunities
IS
CHARTER FLIGHT TO LONDON, 2
seats. Dept. July, ret. Sept., phone
738-9643,  5-7 p.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Best prices, Busy "B" Books, 146
West   Hastings,   681-4931.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
SI
'05 ZEPHYR ZODIAC, RADIO VERY
reliable, extra parts, good I ires,
685-4037   after   6:00.
Automobiles Wanted
1%
61-64 6 - CYLINDER AUTOMATIC
station wagon prefered, not necessary, for cash, phone 299-903" Sunday   12-4.
Automobile Parts
23
HARDTOP FOR TR-4 IN VERY
good condition, $125, phone 732-
6315,   between  5:00 and  7:00 p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
UBC BARBER SHOP, IN THE VILL-
age,  open  6  days  a -week.
Scandals
97
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookflnder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
Typing (Cont.)
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — call Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays
after  10  a.m.,   738-6829.
ESSAY   AND    THESIS    TYPING   —
Electric—Campus   pickup,   434-9558.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
•1
Help Wanted—Mala
IS
Help W'ted—Male or Female    S3
BABY    SITTER   FULL   DAY   MON-
day,   mornings    Tues.,   Wed.,    Fri.,
phone   681-3966   after   11:00   a.m.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
BI
WANTED NATIVE FRENCH
speaker for conversation, 1 or 2
hrs. per week; W. Cohn (Sociology)
228-3830 or 263-6372.
Tutoring
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS AND
sciences other undergraduate subjects to fourth year. Canadian Tutorial   Centre,   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
—  OLD   TOTEMS  FOR  SALE  —
1963,  1965 & 1966 issues 50c.
Campus Life's  25c.  Publications OH.,
Brock   Hall
•NEW LINES AT THE DISCOUNT
House' of tape-players, tape recorders, all sizes in transistor and electric radio's, watches, luggage, binoculars, jewelry and gift items: 1500
latest style ladies bathingsuits to
choose from, wholesale prices on all
merchandise. 3235 West Broadway.
Phone   732-6811.
MADLORCAN SPANISH* CLASSICAL
guitar. Tone rated better than $700
Gibson-Goya.  $115.   224-9017.
SEVERAL HAND KNITTED DRESS-
es from $10.00, size 10-14, make to
order, knitted & crochet dresses &
dressmaking — 224-3672, 4689 West
12th  Ave.
BEEP BEEP -
cartoons, Wed.,
50c.
•    ROAD    RUNNER
Mar.  20 noon, Aud.
Typing
40
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING  —   ELEC.   MACHINE
Phone   738-7881
ACCURATE COPY TYPING 30c/
page, phone 274-1075' anytime except
weekends.
EXPERT   TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC   —
224-6129 —   228-8384.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call 277-5640.
SHORT NOTICE TYPING DURING
the day; 25c page; phone Ruth,
RE   8-4410.
\ DMTRAL PORTABLE RECORD
player, $50; electric guitar amplifier, $25; both in excellent condition,   phone   731-2870.
TENOR SAX. BUFFET CRAMPON
metal mouthpiece, accessories, $190
or  offers,   call  Ken,   987-1123.
XKW! 100-WATT TRAYNOR AMP.
Also 2—15" JBL D140F speakers *.n
cabinet, offers,  phone Pete 988-4561.
FRENCH-MADE PUPTENT WITH
built-in groundsheet, flysheet and
poles,    $30.   Please   phone   221-0981.
35MM CAMERA FOR SALE $20, PH.
731-1939 aft. 6 p.m., and ask for
John.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION IN
Toronto from May 8 to Sept. 15.
Single, double, and triple rooms as
low as $65.00 per month (meals included). For information and applications, write to Campus Co-op,
395 Huron Street, Toronto 5, tel.
921-3168.
WALKING DISTANCE TO CAMPUS,
near Village and meal services.
224-9662. $40.00. 2250 Wesbrook Cresc.
Room tc Board
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
student, $70.00 per month. Phone
266-0978  after  6:30 p.m.
Furn. Houses fc Apts.
WHISTLER  MTN.   -
for  rent,   224-7438.
HUGE  CABIN
BUY - SELL - RENT
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, March 19, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
Weekend win makes soccer Birds tops on coast
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds have all but taken first
place in the Pacific Coast soccer league with their convincing 2-0 win over Columbus on
the weekend.
The win put UBC ahead of
Victoria Oaks by one game
and Victoria has two to play
while the Birds are two games
up on Columbus, who have
three to play. The Birds have
finished their  season.
But Columbus and Victoria
must play each other as well
as the tough New Westminster
Labs and it is likely that UBC
will do no worse than a tie
with either team.
UBC
Victoria
Columbus
Westminster
Firefighters
Burnaby
North Shore
W
9
10
9
7
8
4
2
L
4
5
5
6
8
9
12
F     A Pts
34    19    23
1     34    23    21
1    30    22    19
1    27
4
2
24    25
25
22    40
14    31
Coach Joe Johnson is laughing though, because his team
has the best goals average in
the league, which will give the
Birds the title if a tie ensues.
Johnson anticipated the victory, but not by such a wide
margin.
The  score  could have  been
WAA meets
to elect exec
The Women's Athletic Association is holding its annual
meeting today in the Women's
Gym at 12:30 p.m.
All women on campus are invited. The election of officers
is included in the agenda.
STORAGE?
CALL
224-3111
MOORE'S / ATLAS
TRANSFER
VAN  LINES
Also
Moving — Shipping
ARE>OU UPTIGHT BECAUSE
M0 ONE HAS EVER /AADE A
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LAWRENCE WELK «*-
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LET US nAKE ONE FOR XXJ
AS A /*\ATTER OF FACT, WE
WILL. /WAKE ANY BLACK. AND
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SEMOU6 f**Y CLEAR BLACK. AND WHITE
PICTURE: HOaKT-Ve, SI*M**P«H-T OR MM-
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IT TO POdTCR SIZ*
(Ife-xeo" or zoVso-)
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IMA/AD
ADDRESS*
crry* zone-
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please send/%-
G.u«™)/<_*"x 2& f*>ntt®foicyoa.
(««■»«) 2tfx30" PRw*r(») -W--5*00 «**.
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VKHCOOWCR IO, B.C.
—/**U.O*-V TEN OAY& FOR OELH/E&Y—
four or five for UBC, except
for the brilliant net-minding of
Columbus' goalie. As a contrast, UBC's Bruce Ballam had
only two real shots on goal.
"It was Ballam's easiest game
I can recall," said Johnson.
"It's quite a feat against one
of the best teams of the league."
As expected, defenceman
Jim Berry was moved to one
of the four forward positions
and sparked the Birds to two
goals before he was moved
back to defence.
But the conditions of his
move to defence late in the
first half were cause for concern.
Star forward Ash Valdai
sustained a bad leg injury and
Johnson can only wait for the
x-rays to find out if the bone
is cracked.
The injury forced Johnson
to replace a forward and two
new forwards came in. Berry
resumed his old position and
rookie Jim Quinn went to the
bench after performing his
duty well on defence.
Keith   Brookes   also   got   a
concussion  but  will  probably
not be out too long.
Scoring the goals for UBC
were John Haar on a picture
head from a corner cross and
Gary Thompson on a passing
play between Valdai, Berry
and then Thompson.
The Birds can relax now,
though they play the Oregon
Ducks this Thursday at UBC.
AMS GENERAL
MEETING
CME-IAIAICIE-VITE
THURSDAY, MARCH 21
NOON - ARMOURY
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
CLAUDE ST-DENIS - MIME
Claude Si-Denis is Canada's leading 'mime — a
great creator and performer in the ancient art of
pantomime. Born in Montreal, he speaks the universal language of the silent
gesture, the speechless expression — brilliantly funny, wistful, deeply moving.
In 1956 when only 21,
Claude Si-Denis won first
prize in the inter-provincial competition "The Golden Crown" which was
broadcast over the French
network of Radio Canada.
He presented five of his
pantomimes and triumphed
over 600 competitors.
During the next ten years
he travelled extensively in
Canada and Europe, widely acclaimed by audiences
and critics wherever he appeared—either in solo performances or contributing
to shows here and abroad.
In 1965 Claude Si-Denis
created a film which won
honourable mention in the
Montreal International Festival. A year later he appeared in featured mime
and comedy roles in the
first colour film distributed over the television networks of Canada, France.
Switzerland, Belgium and
Luxemborg, and Telscope
of CBC Toronto devoted a
half-hour to Claude Si-
Denis's accomplished art.
WED., NOON-MAR. 27
FREDDY WOOD THEATRE Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March   19,  1968
SPOS TS
— cUrreck webb photo
RUGGED ACTION in this line-out was typical of the game between SFU and UBC which UBC
easily won 18-6. The scoreboard shows SFU leading 3-0 with only 34 seconds gone but the
lead was short-lived. SFU scored first and last while UBC romped the rest of the game played
Saturday in Thunderbird Stadium.
Rugby Birds win game, get boot
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds got a boot out
of swamping the Simon Fraser University Clansmen 18-6 in weekend rugby action at Thunderbird Stadium.
The Boot is the new trophy to be given to
the winner of the annual UBC-SFU rugby game.
It is a gilded rugby boot donated by last year's
Thunderbirds as a memento to former coach
Brian Whightman.
The Birds outplayed SFU the whole game
and SFU was fortunate to score their six points.
The Clansmen capitalized on a Bird error early
kin the first half as they scored a penalty kick
on one of the few times SFU took the ball out
of their own end.
The lead was short-lived though as Don
Crompton booted a penalty kick for the Thunderbirds to make the score 3-3. From then on it
was UBC all the way.
UBC's superior conditioning started to tell
in the second half as Dave Austin went over for
a try on a good team effort. Crompton converted to make the score 8-3 early in the second half.
Austin played one of his best games of the
year as he continually got loose for long runs.
Coach Donn Spence thinks highly of him, saying he is one of the fittest players on the team.
Left wing Tony Hodge scored UBC's second
try on a picturesque 40 yard run. Crompton
then converted.
UBC's final try came on a team effort capped
by a good display of passing.
SFU had finally put on some pressure when
they realized they must score or lose, and had
the Birds on their own five yard line.
But the Birds mounted their own offensive
and worked the ball to midfield where a passing play from Reid Owen to Doug Schick, who
then made a good play to set up Austin, resulted
in the final try of the game.
Crompton added his third convert to make
the score 18-3 before SFU managed a last minute penalty kick to round out the scoring.
In what must be a precedent, the UBC fans
actually beat the SFU fans at cheering. But
then they had something to shout about.
The Birds ignored SFU's defensive style and
scored at will, while not allowing their own
miscues to rattle them.
The downtown papers made a big thing of
SFU's inexperience, but they are wrong. Though
the Clan has only been together as a team two
years, their members are quite experienced
rugby players.
Oni the other hand, the Birds are young and
have been playing under Spence only one year.
"That talk about SFU rugby being a club
sport is bunk," said Spence. "They played well
and the fans know they were tough, but we
just outplayed them."
And the Birds had nothing to gain and everything to lose, to boot.
Future hinges on ifs, buts
By BOB  BANNO
Junior Varsity basketballer Ron Thorsen is
busy cracking the books, Frank Rotering is
mulling over his future and veteran Neil Murray
is debating continuing in grad studies.
So hinges the story of next year's varsity
Thunderbirds.
"If we get everybody back, we'll probably
have a stronger team than we had this year,"
said head coach Peter Mullins. "But you can't
tell who'll take a year out or fail."
If all goes well for Mullins, UBC fans can
look forward to a fast-breaking attack spearheaded by Thorsen.
"Thorsen can probably play U.S. major
college basketball," said Mullins.
He'll team up with smooth-shooting Phil
Langley at guard forming what should be a
strong driving-shooting combination.
Langley averaged ten points a game with
Jus outside shot this year and should be better
next year.
If Murray returns to complete his graduate
degree,   he'll   join   either   Ken   Shields,   Derek
Sankey or Dave Rice at forward. If he doesn't
return, the Birds will lose their most consistent
and prolific scorer. Murray averaged 17 points
a game and nabbed 166 rebounds this year.
Shields started this year as starting center,
Sankey showed good promise when given a
chance and Rice impressed on the boards while
notching ten points a game.
"I'm mainly concerned about center because
I can't count on Rotering to come back next
year," said Mullins. The awkward but effective
pivotman dropped out recently and is thinking
of taking next year out.
Rotering scored 11 points a game and led the
Birds with 204 rebounds as a sophomore.
Jayvee center Terry McKay will be given a
good, hard look-see, but Mullins fears he may
not be ready for starting duty next year.
"He's going to be a good one," Mullins said
of the 6' 6" McKay. "He may see a lot of action
next year."
But Mullins is hoping to find another big
man. "We need a really good center because
we're playing better teams next year," he said.
Grass hockey teams win
The first division Birds tied Pitt Meadows 1-1 on a penalty
flick by Warren Bell. It was the same old story for the Birds
though, as they had 75 per cent of the play, but could only
muster one goal.
The Tomahawks lost 2-0 to India A but this is a good result
because the Tomahawks are a division lower than India A.
Sunday the Tomahawks beat UVic's first team 4-1.
The vastly improved Scalps won two games on the weekend, beating North Shore B and Hawks C of the fourth division
by 1-0 scores.
EL CIRCULO presents
CASA CON DOS PUERTAS
MALA ES DE GUARDAR
by Pedro Calderon de la Barca
Wed.. March 20 & Thurs., March 21
at 8 p.m. — International House
Students  $.75
Upper Lounge
Tickets available at Hispanic office
BU 266A and  I.H. Office
Others   $1.00
YOUR   BEST
CAR   BUY
TOYOTA!
$56 DOWN $56 A MONTH
Buy   a   new   1968   Toyota   Corolla   from   CLARKE   SIMPKINS   (Full  price
$1,858.00   plus   $92.90   B.C.   Sales  Tax   plus   $15.40   1968   licence).    Pay
only   $56.00   Down   end   $56.00   a   month   for   36   months   plus  a   final
payment   of   $580.00.
After 3 years Clarke Simpkins Guarantees to pay off your final
payment of $580.00 assuming the car is in normal operating condition,
replace your Toyota and you continue to pay only $56.00 per month on
the same terms as before. If you decide to keep your car at the end
of 3 years the final payment is your responsibility. You can drive a
new Toyota every 3 years on a similar plan. This includes Clarke
Simpkins' exclusive 50,000 mile "Drive Train" warranty. Your guarantee   is  our  22 years   in   business.
Clarke Simpkins Ltd.
Burrard  (Broadway  to  7th) 736-4282
999 Kingsway 879-5211
Richmond  (836  Granville* 273-3766
Alma   Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Finance Committee
Interviews will be held during the week of March 18 to
March 21 for appointment of members-at-large of Finance
Committee.
Letters of application will be received by the Secretary
of the A.M.S., Brock Hall, until noon, Tuesday, March 19,
1968.
Letters should include qualifications, campus interests,
and eligibility forms.
Public Relations Committee
Applications are now being received for Public Relations Co-ordinators and the Public Relations Committee.
Anyone interested in campus communication or in promoting UBC's image and new SUB facilities, submit a
note with your name, faculty and specific interest, if
any to the Vice-President, Internal Affairs, Box 53,
Brock Hall.
•   •   •
INTRODUCING
NEW POLICY FOR DUNBAR THEATRE
OPENING THURS., MARCH 21
*•*.
ALAN
BATES-
kiN-^HeArtrs
COLOR t, DELUXE
PHILIPPE DE BROCA
PIERRE BRASSEUR
JEAN-CLAUDE BRIALY
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD
ADOLFO CELI
Ounbar
2-4-7T151
DUNBAR at 30lh
SHOW   TIMES
7:30 and
9:30

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