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The Ubyssey Aug 31, 2009

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 FLASH! KING OF THE IMPOSSIBLE SINCE I918
EAT, DRINK, SMOKE, NAP
ALL THE BEST PLACES
TO BE AT UBC
PAGE 6
^THEUBYSSEYca
YOUR STUDENT NEWSPAPER IS PUBLISHED EVERY MONDAY THROUGHOUT AUGUST • VOLUME 2.6, NUMBER II • ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING • FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
2009
08*31
S-
REARS
PAGE 12
BEERS
PAGE 5
& ENGINEERS
OR EXECS? PAGE 10
THOUGHTS
CATE RANKIN
Residence Life Manager for Vanier
u
The first month fa most students
is getting over anxieties. There are
plenty of resources available to all
students, they just need to take
advantage of them."
BOB ORLANDO
UBC Residence Opening Day Coordinator
u
If you're having trouble fitting it in
your car, then you've brought too
much stuff ...Really all you need is
your clothes, computer, books and
some pens."
U
Don't be a hundred per cent
course-focused...Too many
kids come in and they just do
their classes and they get their
straight A's, but they don't get the
experience. And university is a
really big life experience, and you
have to make sure you get the
most out of it"
U
Send your parents to the parent-
orientation day, because we tell
them things like 'It's not going to
support your kids if you call them
EVERY DAY'" 2/UBYSSEY.CA/2009.08.31
AUGUST 3 Is1, 2009
VOLUME XVI,   N° II
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITORS
Kate Barbaria & Trevor Record:
culture@ubyssey. ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Keegan Bursaw : sports@ubyssey.cza
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Melanson : features@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Kyrstin Bain :production@ubyssey.ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nulti7nedia@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604-822-2301
fax: 604-822-9279
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604-822-6681
fax: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : IsabelFerraras
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the
University of British Columbia. It is published every
Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications
Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run
student organization, and all students are encouraged
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey
staff. They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University of British
Columbia. All editorial content appearing in The Ubyssey
is the property of The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
herein cannot be reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding
principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words.
Please include your phone number, student number and
signature (not for publication) as well as your year and
faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when
submissions are dropped off at the editorial office of
The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by
phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300
words but under 750 words and are run according
to space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to letters
and perspectives over freestyles unless the latter is
time sensitive. Opinion pieces will not be run until the
identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey
reserves the right to edit submissions for length and
clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day
before intended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction or other matter
deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society
fails to publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad
occurs the liability of the UPS will not be greater than
the price paid for the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or typographical errors that do
not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
CONTRIBUTORS
Kyrstin Bain is climbing a Samantha Jung, why is she
climbing a Jung? Vinnie Yuen is climbing a Paul Bucci,
why is she climbing a Bucci? To hug the Kate Barbaria
Envelop that Cel Rince. Hug the Stephanie Findlay.
Envelop that Katarina Grgic. Hug the Gerald Deo. Envelop
that Trevor Melanson. Tara Martellaro wants to make
love to the Kathy Yan Li. Why am I climbing the Trevor
Record? Because I'm Justin McElroy. And the Grace Qiao
is going where no Layne Bruin has gone before.
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \!_\Q
SEPTEMBER
a first-year calendar
[
Sunday    monday   tuesday   Wednesday thursday     friday     Saturday
6
Day after res
move-in. Find
out what your
hangover cure
for the year will
be by trundling
down to the caf
to survey the
slim pickin's.
Coffee and dry.
White. Toast.
BCome
to The
Ubyssey's
production night.
<
O
CO
<
Labour
day. You
know,
that day
where we
celebrate.,
labour,
and, umm,
well, you
get it off
anyhow.
O
UJ
GO
OC
<
UJ
>
<
<
This is no
bueno, but
summer
has to end
sometime,
kiddies.
8
Also, free
BBQ and
$2.50 beer
at the arts
lounge in
Buchanan.
Forget to buy
your books at
the bookstore.
Last day to pay
your first term
fees. Fork over
the dough and
let the suffering/
glory of a real
university
experience
wash over you.
First day of
classes today
too. Go to class.
^f\ Check
f out
the Botanical
Garden. Be
indignant that
free admission
doesn't include
,entrance to the
^canopy walkway, m
Return
at night
to sneak
onto it. ^
14
First Open
Mic Night at
Koerner's
Pub. Get there
early. Rocky
Mountain Lager
jugs on special
for $10.95. If
you don't have
an ID in your
grubby mitts
at the door,
you may have
to investigate
alternative
methods of
entry.
15
to
Your
chance
to live the
movies
and be an
awkward
freshman at
a massive
frat party.
16
Check out the
Pit's Pub Night.
Hit on someone
sexy.
^*f Make temporary friends, get
TS inordinately smashed on
^■J a cheap 2-6 of vodka and
puke over the railing of your
temporary apartment in Gage.
Res move-in
day! Make new
friends and a
few mistakes.
10
Do five grams of
'shrooms. Watch
reality crumble
like a stale
biscuit. Stare
into the face of
death.
17
Head to class
hungover with
a large coffee
and cupcake
from Blue Chip
Cookies. Try to
piece together
what you did
last night with
aforementioned
sexy person.
21
27
Celebrate
your win
_\ (or loss) by
H" checking out
fe 4th Avenue.
Meet The
Ubyssey editors
and decide
to write, take
photos, work
on the website,
or make viral
videos for us.
28
Finally get
around to
buying your
textbooks at the
Bookstore.
22
Go to the
Gallery for
Karaoke night.
After, head over
to Hampton
Place. Make
friends with
the University
Neighborhoods
Association
through late-
night yodeling.
29
Student loan
money now long
gone, resort to
eating ketchup-
based cracker
soup.
23
to
DC
«;
to
to
QQ
<J
Join at
least seven
clubs. Show
up to one
meeting
for three
or four,
become a
dedicated
member of
one. These
are your
friends now,
like it or
not.
30
u
a
to
to
Visit the
University
Village
Medical
Clinic.
Congrats,
you
survived
your first
month at
UBC!
24
Belt-tightening
begins as
student loan
money dries up.
Check out Up!
and Star Trek
at the Norm
theatre.
Last day to
withdraw from a
course without
a "W" on your
transcript.
11
Welcome
Back BBQ.
Cheap booze
and music on
Maclnnes Field.
12
18
Call Mom, leave
out awkward
details of first
week away from
home.
*___    Farmade
^5   2009.
You will
learn the ways of
the force, young
jedi.
Concert: Mother
Mother and Said
the Whale at
your local and
loyal Pit Pub
(SUB basement).
19
Concert: Jon
and Roy & Black
Diamond Bay
play to the dark,
dank Pit Pub.
26
Homecoming
game vs.
Regina.
Be one of
the 20,000
ravenous
football
fanatics at
Thunderbird
Stadium in
your campus
colours.
Everyone
cares about
athletics on
this campus.
We promise.
Volunteer for
The Ubyssey
and take part
in Multimedia
projects...
all year round K
2009.08.31/UBYSSEY.CA/3
the mystical
origins of
r
Orientation Issue
Many years ago, the RCMP and
UBC bigwigs decided to crack down
on drinking on the UBC campus.
One of the new rules they imposed
stated that students could no longer
advertise the availability of alcohol at
social functions.
Under this rule, putting the word
"BEER" on a poster would get the event
shut down. However, the word "BZZR"
was perfectly acceptable, and thus a
tradition was born.
—courtesy of bzzrgardens.com, a site run by
UBC students dedicated to the consumption of bzzr
91 things to do
before you graduate
Our treasured experiences, fondest wishes
and things we wish we could forget
KATE BARBARIA GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
1 Find The Ubyssey office in the basement of the Student Union Building
(SUB).
2 Hotbox an elevator in the Rose
Garden Parkade and scare Chan
Centre patrons as they leave a lovely
evening at the theatre.
3 Enter Norm Theatre sober, leave
Norm theatre drunk (aka. get fucked
up at the feature presentation, or be
a sop at the cinema).
4 Climb one ofthe big blue construction cranes at 3:34am, look death in
the face, laugh.
5 Deface the "E" (engineering cairn
on Main Mall) with your faculty's
colours.
6 Break into the Botanical Garden.
7 Day of the Longboat: "There are
few things better in life than physical exertion in frigid waters while
extraordinarily hungover," were the
wise words of my father. It's a team
building experience. Or something
like that.
8 Explore the steam tunnels.
9 Do it in the Totem music room—on
the piano—'cause your roommate
bolted the bedroom door.
10 AgSci Halloween bzzr garden.
But don't ride the bull topless until
you've had an adequate number of
beverages to quell your memory of
the shame.
11 Wreck Beach. Studying is sooo
much easier without all those restrictive clothes. Added bonus: nekkid
people everywhere.
12 Participate in Koerner's open mic
night on a Monday.
13 A night at Tower Beach. War bunkers and starlight and spray paint,
oh my.
14 Snowball fight. We don't like snow
that much, but if it's there, you might
as well set up a fortress and launch
ice grenades at your mortal enemy
(eg. TA). Don't forget to snag a cafeteria tray and sled down the Knoll,
while it's still around.
15 Got a class near a single-person
bathroom? Proposition the classmate
you've had an eye on all semester.
16 Write or shoot for every student-
run print publication on campus.
17 Make an ass of yourself in front
of everyone in the room at Karaoke
night at the Gallery.
18 No, impress the pants off of everyone in the room at Karaoke night.
19 Jump off the high dive at the
Aquatic Centre...in the middle of
the night.
20 Skinny dip at Wreck Beach in February, in the middle of the night. Do
it drunk, it's far easier.
21 Play ultimate frisbee on the top of
a parkade in the middle of the night,
drunk (I hope you're noticing a common theme).
22 While drunk, take a rock and
throw it through a wind...oh crap, did
you actually just do that?
23 Smoke on the Knoll.
24 Find the Farm (and then help us
find it, if you don't mind).
25 Sleep on one ofthe nasty couches
in the SUB.
26TalktoChairbo.
27 Vote for a joke candidate in the
AMS elections.
28 Storm the Wall.
29 Take a dip in the fountain outside
Irving K Barber.
30 Fall mysteriously ill on Tuesday,
April 20.
31 Be at a party that the RCMP
shuts down.
32 Complain about the RCMP (aka.
"the man") all year.
33 Get slapped with a defamation
suit from "the man."
34 Jump on the bouncy bushes, sober or drunk.
35 See all of the plays at Freddy
Wood.
36 Arrive at an exam late. It will happen at least once.
37 Answer a question for Streeters.
38 Attend an Alma Mater Society
(AMS) Council meeting just for
the free food and leave immediately after.
39 Take mushrooms but don't tell
your friends.
40 Fuck in the bushes.
41 Booze it up at the Graduate Student Society (GSS) meeting.
42 Start a Yoko-Ono-only radio show
at CiTR.
43 Join the ski club and break every
bone in your body. Twice.
44 Take public transit all the way
down to Portland and have the AMS
pay for it.
45 Get a tattoo.
46 Get a tattoo on your ass of a hick
saying, "What a fuck-up!"
47 University is a time for sexual
experimentation. Give a blowjob to
someone in the Pit on Pit Night. This
goes for guys and gals.
48 Change your look from 'Just got
fucked Brittney wannabe" to 'Just got
fucked Emily Haines wannabe."
49 Take a hit of marijuana, freak out,
go to the hospital because you think
you're dying, come down, get drunk,
take off all your clothes, hit on a lesbian without knowing it, and light
your jacket on fire. Yes, that really
happened.
50 Sleep through an exam.
51 Drop acid, run from your demons
and try to put your finger in a light
socket because "that's where you
died." Yes, that really happened.
52 Make a porno.
53 Star in a porno.
54 Find Toope's house.
55 Get your nether regions shaved
in front of all of your friends.
56 Wake up in Totem dazed and
confused and puke on the way home.
57 Wake up in Vanier dazed and
confused and puke on the way home.
58 Wake up in Toope's bed dazed
and confused and puke in his $ 15
million bathroom.
59 Wake up in Chairbo's chair dazed
and confused and puke on the way
home.
60 Become addicted to Facebook.
Have it ruin your life.
61 Find God and start doing interpretive Christian dance to tell the
unwashed heathen of UBC about the
Good News.
62 Find Satan and become the
creepy person who tells strangers
about your career painting portraits
of serial killers.
63 Sleep in MASS (Arts lounge in
Buchanan).
64 Find a secret hole in the bathroom wall when drunk in Buchanan
D. Go down the magical ladder. Sleep
next to a giant machine. Come back
out and continue to drink, keeping
your magical journey a secret from
everyone. Oops.
65 Drink with the Radical Beer Faction to show your solidarity with
the cause.
66 Find a porn tape in the lost
and found.
67 Smoke in the SUB.
68 Get safewalked.
69 Get safewalked drunk.
70 Refuse a safewalk because you're
too drunk.
71 Chat with the homeless guy living
in the SUB and buy him a beer. Everyone loves a beer.
72 Live with six other friends in a big
house just off campus and get evicted
due to high noise levels.
73 Go on a roadtrip with a group of
friends. Try not to die.
74 Stereotype the people you meet
with dreadlocks to be vegan hippies
who only eat locally grown organic
food and have a pet carrot named
Sunshine.
75 Manage to attend all your morning classes at least once.
76 Meet someone on Craigslist. Fall
in love—maybe not.
77 Get those yam fries from
Mahoney's.
78 Get those apples from the annual Apple Festival at the Botanical
Gardens.
79 Get food poisoning after eating
Chinese take-out from the Village.
80 Play bocce during class time on
Main Mall and make as many "ball"
jokes as possible.
81 Get inspired and change your
courses.
82 Get inspired and change your
major.
83 Get inspired and change your
gender.
84 Try out for a Thunderbird varsity
team despite failing to meet all of the
physical qualifications.
85 Learn about equity. Talk to
Tim Chu.
86 Make a YouTube video that gets
you in trouble with the equity office.
87 Label yourself bisexual, tell everyone how bisexual and open-minded
you are, and then never act on it.
88 Sleep with a TA.
89 Find Ron Boring and eliminate
him.
90 Play "Campus Golf."
91 Read every issue of The Ubyssey.
Harhar. vl
KATE BARBARIA GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
The Prez sez
Advice from your
humble student leader
Hello everyone!
I hope that you all enjoyed your
summer and are ready for a new
year at UBC.
I'd like to begin the year by informing you about the Alma Mater
Society (AMS). The AMS is your
student union. For nearly a hundred years, we've been devoted to
improving the lives of students.
We run such programs as the U-
Pass, the health and dental plan,
bursaries totaling over a half of a
million dollars each year, as well as
a multitude of services including
tutoring, Minischool and peer support. Through the hard work and
dedication of students, the AMS
has built this university from the
ground up. Many of the buildings
on campus, including the Aquatic
Centre, War Memorial Gym, Brock
Hall and the Student Union Building (SUB) are the result of student
initiatives and funding. We are
well on our way this year towards
building a new SUB that will meet
the needs of students for decades
to come.
The AMS is also your voice to
the decision makers at the university and the levels of government.
Last year when the AMS spoke out
against the high cost of athletics
fees, the university responded
by reducing them by over 80 per
cent. When we spoke out against
the University's plans for private
retail development in the heart
of campus, they changed those
plans to include a new SUB. When
we spoke out against the lack of
student housing on campus, the
university committed to building
thousands of new spaces. The AMS
is an effective lobby organization
that gets results for students.
As the 100th President of the
AMS, I would like to encourage
you to get involved with your student union. By getting involved,
even in a small capacity, you will
be able to bring your issues to the
table and effect tangible change
at UBC. Students often don't realize that they hold the power in
the decision-making processes on
campus. Remember that this is
our university and we can mould
it to shape our vision for post-
secondary education.
—Blake Frederick
100,h AMS President 4/UBYSSEY.CA/2009.08.31
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send an email to:
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EMAIL SPORTS@UBYSSEY.CA
Wide Receiver Jordan Greive is stopped short of the first down marker against SFU on Saturday, kate barbaria photo/the ubyssey
Birds blown out by SFU in home opener
After close start, Clan pull away in second half
JUSTIN MCELROY
sports@ubysseyca
Losing to SFU at football is becoming
a bad habit for the UBC Thunderbirds. The T-Birds dropped their
opening game of the 2009 season
26-7 to the Simon Fraser University
Clan on Saturday in front of 1100
fans at Thunderbird Stadium, marking the third consecutive game that
UBC has lost to their cross-town rivals from Burnaby.
"We had our chances in the first
half to execute some plays that were
there, and we didn't; and the second
half got away from us. But it's a long
season," said head coach Ted Goveia
after the game. "There were opportunities for us to hang in there and to
take the lead, but we didn't do that."
The Thunderbirds, coming off
a 2-6 season, were considered the
underdogs heading into the game, as
SFU started the season with the same
core group that reached the Canada
West Conference finals lastyear.
Nonetheless, UBC stifled SFU's
offence for much of the first half,
holding the ball for over 18 minutes
of time in the half, and took a 7-3
lead late in the second quarter after a
10-yard touchdown catch by second-
year receiver Jordan Grieve.
It was the only time UBC would
score in the game. As soon as the
Thunderbirds took the lead, the Clan
collectively picked up their game. In
just 4 7 seconds, they completed a 5 9-
yard drive that culminated with a 2 7-
yard touchdown run by Gabriel Eph-
ard to take a 10-7 lead at halftime.
From there, the T-Birds were unable to pressure the Clan at all, unable to string together first downs.
SFU continued to drive the ball regularly into UBC territory, getting field
goals on three consecutive drives in
the third and fourth quarter that put
the game out of reach. Dave Boyd,
who led UBC in rushing with 100
yards on 11 caries, was frustrated at
UBC's inability to convert on offence.
"We had success moving the ball
on the ground but it just wasn't
enough as we couldn't get the points
when we needed them," he said.
SFU head coach Dave Johnson,
who was UBC's head coach in 1998,
was happy with how his team started
the season. "UBC played tough,"
he said. "The score, we leaned on
them a little bit at the end. But I was
so happy and impressed with our
sideline. Some guys making big hits,
everyone hustling, we encourage
ourselves during times of adversity,
and celebrate when good things happen. That's the culture of this place
right now."
Goveia looked to put the loss for
the young UBC team in perspective.
"It's early in the season," he said,
adding, "I thought both teams played
well, and sloppy at times, but that'll
happen in the first game of the year.
But we'll look at the tape [ofthe game]
tomorrow and be better next time."
Game Notes: UBC Defensive Back
Tyler Codron, a Canada West All-Star
in 2008, injured his left knee early in
the first quarter, and did not return.
His status for the rest of the year will
be evaluated early next week...SFU
had 312 total yards to UBC's 229,
andhad 18 first downs to UBC's 16...
Quarterback Billy Greene finished
the game with 14 pass completions
in 2 3 attempts to 118 yards, with one
touchdown and no interceptions...
UBC's next game is on September 4
at the University of Alberta. \3
Storming, boating and cheering
How to get the most out of sports and recreation on campus
JUSTIN MCELROY
sports@ubysseyca
With mountains to the north, ocean
to the west and giant parks dotted
across the city, Vancouver is a paradise when it comes to recreational
activities. UBC? Er, not so much. It's
not that there isn't plenty to do or
watch—it's just that many activities
are either crowded and expensive, or
empty and dull.
TO DO
Day of the Longboat, September
26-27, Price: $8-12
Ifyou're in Vanier or Totem, you
will hear your Resident Advisor
talk about this in hyperbolic tones
so often in the next few weeks that
you might think Day of Longboat is
the source of all power and wisdom
required for a freshman student. In
reality, it's an awesome way to make
new friends, enjoy a day on the beach
and the water and forget about your
upcoming midterms for a few hours
as you paddle 2km with your teammates against hundreds of other
boats for pride and glory.
Aquatic Centre, Anytime, Price: Free
Just last year, UBC students paid
over $200 in athletic and recreation
fees without any real benefits or discounts. But after a campaign by the
student union, fees were drastically
cut for many services. The most notable is the aquatic centre, where you
have access to a pool, sauna and hot
tub simply by showing your student
card.
TO WATCH
Storm the Wall, March 28-April 1,
Location: The Knoll
Chances are that when you were
recruited to UBC, you heard at least
once or twice about the largest intramural blah blah blah. But you know
what? Actually doing Storm the Wall
is hard exhausting work that frankly
The Ubyssey (or at least this specific
editor) has no time for. Instead, if
it's sunny out, we advocate grabbing
a lunch in the Student Union Building (SUB), sitting on top of the Knoll
with hundreds of other students, and
cheering on your team of choice as
they look like fools traversing the big
white wall. You might actually feel
some school spirit.
Men's Basketball, UBC vs. Trinity
Western, October 30, 8pm
Fact: 95 per cent of varsity games
at UBC aren't all that exciting to go
to. Most of the crowd is comprised
of friends and family, and school
rivalries are low-key at best. But if
you want to watch a Thunderbird
game this year that has an American
college feel to it, this is your best bet.
It's the home opener for the basketball team, and Trinity Western is a
big rival that bring a couple hundred
loud and annoying fans to our gym,
and there just might be a beer garden filled with frat guys. It'll be loud,
tense and awesome.
TO AVOID
UBC Tennis Centre, Price: $18-$24
per hour
At the beginning and end of the
school year, you can do your best (or
worst) Roger Federer impression for
free at the courts at Totem and Vanier. However, once the rainy season
starts (and never lets up) in October,
you're pretty much screwed. Being
the only indoor courts in Vancouver,
the Tennis Centre can charge massive fees with no student discounts
and rake in the dough. Enjoy playing
tennis at all times of the year? Sucks
to be you.
Football games in October
We're not saying attending one of
the two home games that the Thunderbirds football team has in October
will be depressing. We're just saying
that you're probably going to be cold
and alone, watching a UBC team that
has lost six straight games, and one
of 400 people in a stadium that seats
4000. Consider yourself warned, va Fine and frugal: food on campus
2009.08.31/UBYSSEY.CA/5
VINNIE YUEN
Contributor
The sheer volume of food choices on
campus can be overwhelming. During your first year at UBC, you can
waste a lot of money eating at places
where the food isn't very good. This
guide should help you to avoid making that mistake.
THE CHEAPEST CHINESE FOOD
Manchu Wok in Pacific Spirit Place
charges $ 7-8 for their meals. I never
finish all my food, and spentmy hard-
earned minimum wage paycheque
really fast there. Try The Moon in
the basement of the Student Union
Building (SUB) instead, whose long
lunchtime line-up is well deserved.
For under $4, you can get one item
with a side of rice or noodle, or—my
personal favourite—a small beef brisket noodle soup. $6 gets you a special
or two items with rice or noodles.
AWESOME COFFEE
We all know and trust Starbucks, but
their French Roasted butt gets kicked
by many alternatives on campus.
The Boulevard, across from the trolley bus loop (next to Shoppers Drug
Mart) serves a veiy high quality of
coffee—although a little bit on the
pricey side. Blue Chip Cookies is a
great place to get good quality fair-
trade coffee, and their mocha is the
best I have ever tasted. They now
have iced and blended drinks as well.
AMAZING BAKED GOODS
Blue Chip Cookies is the obvious
choice for cookies, which are famous
campus-wide. Known for their crisp
crusts and soft insides, the irresistible smell of these cookies will tempt
you every time you walk by them
in the SUB. They also have reasonably priced breakfast goodies such
as apple buns, hot cross buns and
muffins. Tim Hortons, located in
the Forest Sciences Centre, is also
a good bet for easy-on-the-wallet
baked goods, but beware—the lineups can be ghastly.
GREAT BUBBLE TEA
The Little Tea Shop in the basement
of the SUB may seem like your only
bubble tea option at first. Their fruit
slushes are made with fresh fruit, but
their teas are a tad weak. For more
selection and tastier teas, head over
to University Village. Pearl Fever is
an awesome choice, and has a stamp
card so you can get a freebie after ten
purchases. Well Tea, next to McDonald's, is a sit-down restaurant with
decent bubble tea and Taiwanese
food, although it is a bit pricey.
FRESH SANDWICHES
Subway is conveniently located in Pacific Spirit Place, but does not carry
deals that off-campus locations have.
The Delly is a hidden gem in the SUB
basement. Sandwiches in their large,
well-stocked cooler are always jam-
packed with fresh ingredients. Their
prices are reasonable, with a daily
sandwich special for under $5.
THE BEST VALUE ON BREAKFASTS
The Pendulum in the SUB offers large
breakfast portions without breaking
your bank. For under $6, you can get
a full breakfast with a large omelette,
hash browns and toast. Their breakfast quesadillas, veggie birds and
T-Birds are also very tasty. Ifyou're
feeling frugal, grab a bagel toasted
with butter from Bernoulli's Bagels
for $1.30. Sometimes they have bags
of day-old bagels for $2. Snag one
and eat breakfast for cheap for the
rest of the week, tl
There is such thing as a free lunch
KATHY YAN LI
kyanli@ubysseyca
If cheap food isn't good enough, how
about free food? Yeah, you'll probably have to sit around and learn
something new in exchange for it or
else come across as an ungrateful
git...But didn't you come to university to learn?
AMS COUNCIL MEETING (EASY)
Every second Wednesday @ 6pm.
Council Chambers in SUB 2nd floor.
Find out more about the decisions
made by your student government
and get fed.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY (GSS)
COUNCIL MEETING (EASY)
On the third Thursday ofthe month
@ 5:30pm. The GSS Ballroom.
A catered meal available at the
start of the GSS meeting. Expect a
step up from the AMS meeting and
they add beer. 'Nuff said.
SPROUTS (EASY)
Every   other   Friday   at   Sprouts,
ll:30am-l:30pm.SUB66.
Sprouts regularly hosts an initiative known as "Community Eats."
These are free lunches, usually
entirely vegan, that are cooked with
food which would have been thrown
away by grocers due to appearance.
Keep in mind you have to bring your
own plates and utensils.
THE UBYSSEY (MEDIUM)
Sunday & Wednesday night. SUB 24.
We need volunteers. We feed
our volunteers every Sunday and
Wednesday evening. You'll be expected to help with proof reading,
multimedia projects and writing.
Come in—we are nice people,
really.
AMS  FOOD  BANK  (EMOTIONALLY
DIFFICULT)
Mondays l-3pm and Tuesdays 12-
2pm, or by appointment. SUB 58.
This is really an "in-case-ofemer-
gency" option. The UBC/AMS Food
Bank provides emergency relief
to current UBC Students. You can
redeem food up to six times per semester. Bring your own bags.
FILM SETS AND LECTURES
(ADVANCED)
Various times and locations.
UBC is a popular location for movies and TV shows. Where there's a
film set, there is also a huge catering
truck with food for cast and crew.
Look like you know what you're doing, and you can score a free meal.
In addition, the Dean of Arts, Nancy Gallini, provides free pizza on the
first Friday of every month in MASS
(Buchanan D). She wants to chat with
students, so indulge the good doctor
whilst you eat.
If all else fails, get a job in the food
business. They may not pay welLbut
you definitely won't go hungry. vU
Freshmen parties: a brief guide
GRACE QIAO
Contributor
Saturday you meet your roommate,
say goodbye to mom, and more or
less move in to your homey dorm
suite a la shared cubicle. Sunday,
you've got your phone plan and
snacks. By Monday you're feeling
inclined to step out of the dormitory,
meet some new people, drink a little
punch, get a little rowdy, etc.
But where to go, oh, where to go?
The Ubyssey has a brief, incompre-
hensive guide to campus parties
catered towards incoming freshmen.
AMS FIRSTWEEK DANCE
Only first-years have ever attended
this dance in the Student Union Building (SUB) courtyard....A good thing, if
you're looking to meet other people
your age. Just dance with people you
may never see again, except in awkward campus bump-in moments.
Attendees are mostly underage and (semi) sober, and the
party is slow to start, so show up
fashionably late.
FROSH EVENTS
Arts frAUSh: Last year the party was
bumpin'...in the beer garden. Without the right ID, you will be outside
of the beer garden—looking in-
wondering why you misunderstood
"frAUSh" to be a first year event. If
you are 19+, there is bzzr at this Buchanan courtyard event, and no lack
of raucous music and dancing. Sadly,
the party ends at 9pm—alternative
plans are highly recommended.
Commerce Frosh: The rumours
of rowdiness surrounding the party
culmination of the weekend-long
Commerce Frosh are true. It is utter
chaos and a very memorable adventure, with novel topless experiences.
Sadly, it occurs before school begins
(Sept 5-7), is exclusive to Commerce
students, and tickets have sold out
this year. Sucks to be you.
Science Frosh: I hear there is a
boat cruise involved this year. I'm
much too envious to write on...
FIRST-YEAR RESIDENCE PARTIES
Ah, the well-deserved, party-crazed
image of first-year residences. Totem's first annual dance, Meat Market (points for honesty), is notorious
for high meat-finding success rates.
The parties that follow in the year do
a fair job of living up to the original.
Vanier's parties are slightly more
muted, but good times are assured
so long as good company is present.
Be warned: Informal first-year parties often involve underage drinking
and loitering, and the RCMP are
quick to the scene. Roads around the
residences are also heavily patrolled
on weekends.
FRATERNITY PARTIES
Even paying for your friends requires you start going to some
parties.
Open parties: Fraternities hold
open parties in early September.
These include beer gardens, bar
parties, or (frat) house parties. Members of the host fraternity, sorority
women and the general public attend. Tickets are available to anyone,
and ID is required to buy alcohol.
Ask a fraternity member to hook you
up, or just show up and hope tickets
are still available at the door.
Unofficial get-togethers: Often,
fraternities will open their doors
to wanderers in the beginning
of the semester for a few drinks
and a bit of dancing. Galavanting
about between houses is not unheard of. Wear shoes you won't be
upset over if a beer puddle finds
its way to your feet.
Rush events: Wet Rush is invitation only, generally reserved for
gentlemen rushing a fraternity.
There is always a large presence of
sorority women as well, on their best
behaviour, of course, va
WANT TO GET INTO VIFF FOR
FREE? WANT TO SEE THE FILMS
BEFORE THEY SCREEN? WRITE
FOR CULTURE AT THE UBYSSEY
EMAIL CULTURE@UBYSSEY.CA
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8
ORPHEUM THEATRE 8PM
Arnie Roth conductor
Nobuo Uematsu composer
UBC Opera Ensemble
www.ffdistantworlds.co
Presenting the Canadian Premiere o
performance of Nobuo Uematsu's award-winning music
from FINAL FANTASY! This extraordinary concert features
state-of-the-art video projected on screens to showcase the
game's most memorable and thrilling sequences, with music
performed live by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, with
Grammy" award-winner Arnie Roth conducting. This concert
will also feature the North American premiere performance
Tickets online at vancouversymphony.ca
or call VSO Customer Service at 604.876.3434
<J
WOMEN'S HEALTH
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
UBC
m
Research Institute
HEALTHY FEMALE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
FOR HPV VACCINE STUDY
If you are 16-26 years old, you may be eligible to join a
study on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. HPV can
cause both genital warts and cervical cancer in women.
• The study is being done to determine if a new vaccine will be similar to the currently
available vaccine in preventing HPV infection and the development of cervical cancer.
•All subjects will receive either the current vaccine presently approved in Canada for
use in females age 9 to 26 or a new vaccine.
^ For more information please contact
THE HPV RECRUITMENT CENTRE
Phone: (604) ©75-2424 ext 4676 &^&
E-mail: HPVStudy<§)cw.bc.ca 4l4^
The study is being conducted bythe UBC Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Approved bythe UBC Clinical Research Ethics Board
BACK-TO-SCHOOL
MEANS BACK ID WORK FUN!
Back-to-school doesn't have to mean back to boredom studying. At the
Vancouver Racquets Club, squash and badminton season is ongoing just
getting started. On top of our in-house leagues, we also have sixteen mens and
womens teams at every level in the Vancouver Squash League. We also have five
teams in the Vancouver Squash Doubles League as well as in-house badminton
ladders and a city badminton team. And they're all just about to start their
seasons! We also have a full gym and erazy ftm excellent bar facilities as well as
the biggest squash and badminton membership of any club in the city. We have
the facilities, coaches and members to play and learn badminton and squash at
every level from beginner to top-level play.
You can spend every night being a lo3er studying things you hate need to
have to or you can join the Vancouver Racquets Club and meet new eeeete
friends you'll tolerate, ttke, love. At the very least, you'll develop a better great
game. Give us a call at 604.874.0242 or visit our web site, www.vrc.bc.ca for
more details. And if you mention this ad, you don't have to pay initiation fees
for squash. See you soon!!
MB
Vancouver Racquets Club
4867 Ontario Street
Vancouver, BCV5V3H4 0
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Welcome to Canada—now read this guide
KATE BARBARIA
culture@ubysseyca
You're in a different country and
you're noticing that everything is
weird. They cadi soft drinks "pop,"
apologize for just about everything
they do and reference a show called
"Clone High" constantly. Worst of
all, their laws, services and licensing are frustratingly different than
those from back home. You're not
the only one who has gone through
the gauntlet of being allowed to exist
in this city, so too have many of us at
The Ubyssey.
IDENTIFICATION
This]
for most important tilings
alcohol purchases. Don't
passport as a primary piece of ID
when you go out to bars, as it takes
way too much of your time to replace
if you lose it. A driver's licence and a
credit or chequing card with your full
name and signature is a much better
option. Student IDs are only accepted
as secondary pieces in select places
(banks, hospitals, etc.), but not in
bars. Bus passes, while they have
your name and picture on them, are
not accepted anywhere.
MEDICAL
You've heard it all before, but please
please please register for your MSP
(Medical Service Plan, provided to
all BC residents) as soon as you get
to Vancouver. iMed, your temporary
medical plan, is only good for your
first three months here (including
the month of August), because that's
how long MSP takes to activate. It
costs $750 to get in the door of a
hospital without insurance. MSP
costs around $54 per month, but
that's nothing compared to the costs
incurred when you crush your hand
in the cardboard compactor at work.
EMERGENCY CONTACTS
If you do wind up in the hospital,
who's going to be your first phone
call? It's not likely that your mom can
get you from the emergency room
back to your dorm, or rebandage
your broken hand. Until you've got
some friends who'll look out for you,
international advising suggests putting down your RA or res life advisor.
They can help you, and if they can't,
they will find someone better.
WORK PERMIT
The bane of our existence! You can
get an on-campus work permit
fresh off the boat as a full-time student. But if working for the AMS or
somewhere else on campus doesn't
appeal to your delicate sensibilities,
you'll have to get a work permit. To
do this you need to be taking a minimum of nine credits each term, have
lived in Canada for six months, and
be in good academic standing (don't
flunk out of anything). If you move
here in September, you can apply as
soon as March 1.
However, you can apply for a Social Insurance Number (SIN) immediately after moving to Vancouver.
It takes a few weeks for the card to
arrive, but Service Canada will give
you the number when you fill out
their myriad of forms. Everything is
easier with a SIN card—Canadians
will trust you more, it seems.
REAL HELP
You can always call the International House (I-House) if you have
questions. Their most likely response will be to refer you to their
website, as though you don't know
how to use Google. You'll stand a
better chance for real-life, human
answers from international peer
advisors, or other people in your
dorm. Every international student
has experienced the same culture-
shock and orientation process that
you're going through. Even if they
don't have the perfect answer, pooling resources will send you in the
right direction, tl
International (capitalist) banking is all to blame
KATE BARBARIA
culture@ubysseyca
You've just moved to a new city,
maybe a new country, and people
are demanding money from you.
But you don't even have a bank account—just a handful of post-dated
cheques, or the promise of wire
transfers from across the briny blue
sea. There is an extensive selection
of banks and student chequing accounts ten minutes from UBC. To
which esteemed goblin banker shall
you entrust your golden hoard?
CIBC, 5796 University Blvd (next to the
Blenz in the Village), open Saturday
Unless we've been heinously
mislead, CIBC is the best choice for
most students looking to open a chequing account. Their basic student
chequing option is free, has unlimited transactions and no minimum
balance is required. You can screw
up your accounting, go within 85
cents of broke, and the bank won't
demand that you pay them for being
poor. And unlimited transactions ensure that you can buy a girl multiple
drinks in a night, and it won't bite
you in the ass when you want to buy
yourself pity beer a week later. Attention international students: CIBC
has the shortest holds on foreign
cheques. US cheques will be held for
five business days before the funds
are released, while other foreign
cheques will be held for fifteen. You
won't be sweating out the countdown
to tuiton payment.
Vancity, 4545 West IO"1 Avenue (first
B-Line stop), open Saturday
Vancity offers a similar student
chequing deal (free, unlimited transactions, no minimum balance) but
they put any person under the age of
25 in a "junior" category. What does
this mean? Not much, unless you're
over 25. If you are still a student after that (maybe you should consider
graduating soon, buddy), you simply
have to provide proof of full-time enrollment. That wasn't too hard, was
it? Vancity holds all foreign cheques
for approximately three weeks. This
is only a deal-killer if you play Russian roulette with your funds and
need to know down to the day when
all of mummy and daddy's cash will
be available.
BMO, 2142 Western Parkway (next
to BC Liquor in the Village), closed
weekends
Neither miracle workers nor hideously unhelpful, BMO goes middle
ofthe road on all counts: Student chequing is free, but beware! You will be
required to renew your student status every year, or you'll be hit with a
$8.50 fee each month if your balance
dips below $ 1500. They also only allow 30 free transactions per month.
If we all do the math—and hopefully
we can, at this point in our education—that comes to one per day. In a
refrain of their perfectly average service, foreign cheques are held for 30
days. Ifyou're in good standing—and
who knows how that is decided—it's
shortened to 15 days. Go with BMO
ifyou're a cynic who doesn't believe
the promises of unlimited chequing,
and who prefers reliablity to speed.
HSBC, 4480 West 10th Avenue (first
B-Line stop), open Saturday
Probably your worst bet. The customer service agent at HSBC, who
didn't seem too confident with his
information, reported that a basic
student chequing account would
cost $3.97 per month, with 40
free transactions. Who does that?
You could buy a frosty malty grain
beverage for that price. Oh, wait,
you couldn't, your transactions are
limited. There's a 30-day hold on
foreign cheques—no surprise there.
It remained undecided whether a
student card would be accepted as a
secondary piece of ID. If they're this
unclear on basic requirements, who
knows what else we're missing? va
TO OPEN A CHEQUING ACCOUNT
you must provide the bank
with proof of enrollment and
two pieces of ID. If you are
from Canada, this should be no
problem—your driver's licence
and Care Card will do the trick.
As an international student, a
foreign passport and driver's
licence will also seal the deal.
If you do not have a driver's
licence, (not all of us learned to
drive before departing for uni)
your UBC student ID card will
suffice as a secondary piece.  10/UBYSSEY.CA/2009.08.31
Johannes Rebane
VP Academic and University Affairs
GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
SAMANTHA JUNG
news@ubysseyca
Alma Mater Society (AMS) VP
Academic and University Affairs
Johannes Rebane feels that a student's first-year experience shapes
their academic and professional
career.
"I see having a really engaging
first year experience as a really
valuable thing," he said, showing
up to his interview at Cecil Green
House dressed smartly, as usual.
That was exactly what happened to
Rebane. He joined the Commerce
Undergraduate Society (CUS) in
his first year under the advice of
his Frosh leader, Paul Moore, who
was the VP Academic of the CUS
two years ago. From there, Rebane
ran for the position of CUS VP Academic and won.
"I tried it out, it was a long shot,"
he said. "No first-year had ever run
for a CUS position, but I won by the
closest three votes ever, which was
absolutely amazing."
After being elected, Rebane
worked with Sauder School of Business administration, but he wasn't
satisfied. He wanted to make a
difference on a larger level, which
was what prompted him to run for
an AMS position.
Rebane is a third-year student
who hopes to pursue a degree in Finance and International Relations.
He was born in Estonia, a small
country off the coast of Finland.
He moved to Kentucky, and then
to Vancouver when he was five
years old, and therefore has three
passports. He is also the founder of
UBC's International Business Club.
Rebane's duties include liaising
with university administration
and surrounding governing bodies on various projects, as well as
lobbying for students' priorities on
subjects involving academia, development and campus climate. At
the same time, Rebane hopes to develop a first-year seminar program
to enhance TA training at UBC. He
also said that he wants to make
sure development and construction at UBC stays student-focused.
"A lot of times the university
can hinge towards focusing on university town, university community development," said Rebane.
"[I want to] make sure that the
development focuses on students."
Rebane said that Cecil Green
House represents the accomplishments of students. "If you're a UBC
student here, this becomes your
home," he said, "and it represents
the accomplishments of what you
can be."
"That's something that I really
love about UBC, is that we have so
many students, we have been able
to go through the experience and
contribute so much to the community, contribute back to UBC and
the world." va
SAMANTHA JUNG
news&ubysseyca
VP External Timothy Chu had
mixed feelings about heading
back to the Arts One building for his interview with The
Ubyssey. He said that while the
building is old and he didn't
like his professor, he learned a
lot from the class.
"I think [it's] where it all
started for me," he said. "[My
professor] kind of pushed me
to think critically, to write papers differently and do things
differently."
Now in his fourth year at
UBC, Chu is pursuing a double
major in Political Science and
Geography. He began his career in student politics as a
member of UBC's Young NDP
Club, where he met Sam Hep-
pell, a former Arts councilor
for the Alma Mater Society
(AMS). Chu said that Heppell
prompted him to run for Arts
councilor, where he served on
AMS Council for one year before running for VP External.
Chu's job is to lobby for
students' interests to outside
Timothy Chu
VP External
governing bodies. He wants to
focus on improving childcare
services at UBC and improving
the U-Pass. Another priority is
lobbying for lowering the upfront cost of education, which
includes tuition fees and books.
"The upfront cost of education [is] ridiculous and it's
starting to get to the point
where education is inaccessible," said Chu. He plans to do
this through lobbying, public
campaigns and by encouraging students to put pressure on
their elected officials.
Chu also wants to focus on
improving the AMS's ability to
reach a wide range of students.
"It's kind of sad to see that at
the [Annual General Meeting]
that happened last year there
were more execs that showed
up than at-large students," he
said. "And that is just sort of a
testament as to how engaged
these at-large students are with
their student union."
Chu was adamant that his
affiliation with the NDP Club
does not make him partisan.
"It doesn't matter what political stripe a person or a student
L *►
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GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
is when they're trying to access
their education," he said. "If
you can't pay for your education, it doesn't matter....And
that's sort of where I'm coming
from. I don't look at any partisan politics. I am involved but
I definitely make sure I look at
the issues specifically." tl
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GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Pavani Gunadasa
Executive Coordinator of
Student Services
CEL RINCE
crince@ubyssey.ca
Pavani Gunadasa is this year's
Alma Mater Society (AMS) Executive Coordinator of Student
Services (ECSS). Her role is to manage AMS services such as Safewalk
and Speakeasy. She's a third-year
student doing a double major in
English and History.
When asked to pick a place for
an interview, she chose the Nitobe
Memorial Garden for its serenity
and peace. She remarked that it
is a place that easily lends itself to
quiet reflection, in contrast to the
hustle and bustle of the Student
Union Building (SUB). "It's like
I'm walking into a secret garden,"
Gunadasa said.
She normally wouldn't pick one
single AMS service as having the
most significance to her, as they
are all interconnected, she said.
She is very interested in health
and wellness, and feels that each
service contributes to that in some
way. But if she absolutely had to
pick one, Speakeasy is "near and
dear" to her heart—she was a crisis
line volunteer for it in past years.
Born in Sri Lanka, and having
grown up both there and in Canada, Gunadasa said her experience
gives her a different perspective
from the average student.
She said her unique perspective
also helps in her role as executive
coordinator as it makes her sensitive to cultural and language
barriers. "There might be certain
things, cultural barriers, that deter
students from using our services,
that I wouldn't be sensitive to if I
hadn't lived and experienced other
cultures."
In some cultures it is taboo to
talk about subjects like suicide or
counselling. That could turn away
students who would otherwise
seek help, which is an issue she
plans to address. She said she
is part of the Suicide Awareness
Committee which attempts to de-
stigmatise the issue of suicide and
seeking help for depression.
Another issue she plans to work
on this year is an assessment and
potential revamping of current
student services. She wants to get
student input and see if the AMS is
meeting the needs of the student
population.
Gunadasa said she wanted to
take on the role of ECSS because
of her interest in health care. She
wants to go into medicine and
work with health care in developing countries to improve their services. This role, she felt, would give
her experience in finding ways to
improve services and was also a
way to give back to the AMS and
fellow students.
She ended the interview by
encouraging any students who
wanted to get involved with services—or wanted to know more about
them—to get in touch with her. tl
GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
SAMANTHA JUNG
news@ubysseyca
VP Administration Crystal Hon
stumbled into student politics as
a means of making new friends.
The bubbly fourth-year English Literature major transferred to UBC
in her second year, and joined the
Arts Undergraduate Society (AUS)
at the behest of a friend.
"My best friend was tired of me
complaining all the time about not
knowing people so she told me I
should join the AUS," Hon said.
Hon's involvement "snowballed" into her current position
as one of the Alma Mater Society
(AMS) executives. She was previously the Bookings Manager
for the Meekison Arts Student
Crystal Hon
VP Administration
Space, then the VP Internal for
the AUS. Hon said that her experience on the AUS helped her to
have a better understanding of
student politics.
"It was good because it kind
of showed me the structure of
student government," she said,
"and it was also really good that
I focused on the AUS in my first
year and didn't try to juggle [AMS
council]."
Appropriately, Hon chose Buchanan as her special place on
campus, although she talked
about the Pendulum with great
excitement.
"As an Arts student, [Buchanan]
is where you kind of five and
breathe," she said. "Working with
the AUS, Buchanan D is basically
it for me...no thing else on campus
feels quite as right as Buchanan
does."
Responsible for everything inside the Student Union Building
(SUB), Hon's first focus is the
SUB Renew project and negotiations with the AMS and UBC
over financing it. Additionally,
Hon wants to renovate the Copy-
Right space in the basement
of the SUB and expand what
resources the AMS can provide
for clubs.
Hon also talked about giving
students a unique experience
and reaching out to different sections of the student population
"so we can tailor it and make
them feel like this is theirs...the
AMS is theirs." tJ  12/UBYSSEY.CA/2009.08.31
A commuter student's
guide to first year
GERALD DEO PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
Bare it all at Wreck Beach
CELESTIAN RINCE
crince@ubysseyca
You've heard about Wreck Beach,
but you've never been there. That's
the NAKED beach, right? Old wrinkly
guys, ew!
Then comes a warm sunny day
and you feel adventurous. So, you
pack a towel and some sunscreen
and head on down. Trail 6 has 436
stairs and you try to forget that what
goes down must eventually come up.
Near the bottom, you hear the ocean,
people talking and laughing, and
music. You start to get excited...and
then the first thing you see is a sixty-
year-old guy and his junk.
You almost turn around, but the
thought of facing those stairs again
makes you continue on. It's at that
moment you notice something.
There are people who look like your
grandparents, but there are also
families with their children, people
in their 30'st
look college-age.
You set up your towel next to a
group of hip-looking people and lay
back, scoping out the scene, and trying not to gawk but failing miserably.
Some guy walks by you chanting "icy
cold organic soft drinks!" You consider buying one, but then you hear
someone hawking beer. Minutes
after that, someone walks by selling,
wait a minute, did she just say pot
brownies? And exactly what kind of
mushrooms is that guy advertising?
You feel like you're fitting in already,
and make a mental note to investigate further after a nap.
The water looks inviting, so you
decide to take a quick dip. You gasp
as the chill hits you. It's not as warm
as itlooks. Agroup of people are playing frisbee while standing waist-deep
in the ocean; dramatic dives are
frequent. Skimboarders comb the
shoreline, following the waves. You
cheer as one of them catches a big
one and jumps in the air, and laugh
as someone else wipes out.
As you leave the ocean, you hear
the most melodious music. A man is
playing a type of percussion instrument; he tells you it's a hang drum. A
topless woman begins to dance. The
sight of her slow and graceful movements combined with the music is
hypnotising. When they stop, you exhale and only then realize you were
holding your breath.
There are some booths selling hot
dogs and other food. A little bazaar
sells saris and other pieces of clothing; people are walking right up to
try things on without having to use a
changing room. You smile, because
where else would you be able to do
such a thing?
Through some casual conversation you find out that merchants are
beach staples; some of them have
been coming to the beach for years.
They speak to you about the culture
and community of Wreck. Some
come virtually every day to vend,
play music, meditate and socialize.
A few of them even live at the beach,
though it is definitely a taboo subject
that not many are willing to discuss.
You hear of recent crackdowns by
the authorities, which is probably the
reason why.
By this time, you've been at
Wreck for a few hours, and you
suddenly realize that nudity
is beginning to seem normal.
You're not staring in shock and
awe anymore, though you are
definitely still appreciating the,
ahem, natural beauty of the
people present. You think that
maybe next time you'll work up
the courage to take it all off.
It's time to leave, and you cringe
inwardly at the thought of all those
steps. However, you realize those
stairs have a major benefit: it
keeps the beach secluded. Unlike
other beaches, where you literally
turn around and see a Starbucks,
Wreck is a fair hike from civilisation. It really does feel like you're
in a different world, where you
can leave your worries and
stresses topside.
Of course, it would be nice if
they put in modern plumbing, but
you can't have everything, right? va
SAMANTHA JUNG
S> PAUL BUCCI
news&ubysseyca
Do you commute to campus? Are
you worried about adjusting to
student life or missing out on
opportunities? If you want to
make the most of your university
experience as a nomad, follow
our guide.
1 Get involved. A great way to
meet people who share common
interests is to join a club or sports
team. Or take a course with AMS
Minischool or UBC REC, which are
great ways to connect with people. You can choose from classes
which include pole dancing, wine
tasting and breakdancing.
2 Manage your time wisely. Don't
just sit there on the bus staring
out the window; read that novel
or textbook for class.
3 Take advantage of resources.
The Faculty of Arts has a mentorship program called FAACT for
first-year commuter students.
Get involved with your faculty's
undergraduate student society,
check out www.events.ubc.ca for
upcoming events.
4 Make friends with people who
live on campus. By befriending
people who live in residence or
close to UBC, you'll have potential roommates for next year and
will have a place to crash after a
late night of partying or studying.
5 Get a locker. This way you
can leave your textbooks, gym
clothes, etc. at school so you
don't have to lug them on the bus
every day. Also, see 9.
6 Buy bulk and bring snacks.
Campus costs add up quick. A
decent meal on campus can be
anywhere from $4-$ 10. Head to
Costco for some healthy snacks
and buy lots of tupperware.
7 Buy good headphones. Don't
use the earphones that came with
your iPod/phone. In addition to
sounding terrible and marking
you as a target for muggers, their
lack of sound protection causes
you to keep the volume high,
which irritates fellow commuters
and can lead to long-term hearing loss.
8 Be realistic. With a chunk of
your time spent travelling you
won't be able to do everything
without making sacrifices somewhere. If that means taking less
classes, by all means, do so. You
can make it up in the summer, or
go an extra year.
9 Pack carefully. You're going
to be lugging the damn thing
around all day, so get the best
bag you can and don't overstuff
it or your back will hate you later.
10 Plan your travel. Sometimes
you can shave ten minutes off
your commute or increase your
chances at a seat with a little trip
planning.
11 If you don't know how university works yet, take out that loan.
Working 24-7 can be done, but
you'll burn out and turn into a
seething mass of hate by the end
of the year.
12 It's definitely worth it to start
working out for a half hour every other day. Especially if you
take up drinking, which you
will. Twice as much if you pick
up smoking, which you might.
Three times as much if you pick
up smoking pot, as you will eat
three times as much.
13 Seriously consider applying
to the campus housing lottery.
You've got to let go of those apron
strings one day. vl
OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Brock Hall office hours
Labour Day long weekend
The following Brock Hall offices have extended their office hours for the Labour
Day long weekend.
Student Financial Assistance & Awards
Saturday, September 5 and Sunday, September 6:10:00 am-2:00 pm
Monday, September 7: Closed
Tuesday, September 8 to Thursday, September 10: 8:00 am-6:00 pm
Friday, September 11: 8:00 am-4:00 pm
Student Information Services
TUITION PAYMENT AND REGISTRATION ASSISTANCE
Monday, August 31 to Friday, September 4: 8:00 am-5:00 pm
(open until 5:30 pm on Wednesday)
Saturday, September 5: 8:00 am-4:00 pm
Sunday, September 6:10:00 am-4:00 pm
Monday, September 7: Closed
Tuesday, September 8 to Thursday, September 10: 8:00 am-6:00 pm
Friday, September 11: 8:00 am-4:00 pm
For information on our regular office hours and location, please visit
www.students.ubc.ca/current/contact.cfm
Meditcrra
SUB LOWER LEVEL • (604) 221-4044
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• GREEK SALAD
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