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The Ubyssey Aug 16, 2011

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Array He was a figment of your imagination, Vijay SINCE 1918
August 16,20111 vol. XXVIII iss. VIII
UBC
OPTS
OUT OF
COPYRIGHT
AGREEMENT
UBC ends partnership with Access
Copyright over costs and surveillance P3
NO DATE
SET FOR
KOERNER'S
OPENING
AS SUMMER
ENDS
Graduate Student Society faces
legal action from workers'
union P3 21 Page 210&16.2011
What's on
This week, may we suggest..
P&Y Volunteer Night: 6-9pm @ The Bike Kitchen
The Bike Kitchen's Pink & Yellow Volunteer Night is a truly magical experience. You descend into a subterranean lair peopled by fierce, mounted
warriors. In exchange for a few hours of menial labour in their smithey,
you are granted a magical key which allows you to access any of the
golden steeds in the realm. Spending some time here will pay serious dividends when you need to get across campus in a hurry.
WED
farm:
Fermentation Workshop:
6-9pm @ The UBC Farm
Learn to make your own pickles,
kimchi and sauerkraut at the
UBC Farm. Tickets start at $50,
so make a cost-benefit analysis
based on your consumption of
brine-based vegetables before
signing up.
THEATRE»
Party this Weekend: 8pm @ 518
Kaslo Street
Site-specific theatre with a boozy
twist. Follow around one of four
characters in a dramatic retelling
of a house party. The audience
makes up the attendees. Tickets
start at $15. Bring extra for beer
Terror at Rock Out Beach: @
Waterfront Theatre
Terror at Rock Out Beach bills
itself as a 'burlesgue strip-sical,'
which we assume means a
burlesgue show with musical
numbers. Or perhaps it combines
scantily clad women and delicious frozen treats. Either way. the
press release promises tentacles.
See screamingchicken.net for
more info.
BIKES AND FARMS:
Cycling Resource Centre: 9am-
1pm @ UBC Farm Market
We seem to notice a bike/farm
theme developing on this week's
What's On. If you've had issues
with your brakes rubbing, or if
you've noticed your rear derailleur
is shifting kind of weird, stop by
for a free Bike Co-op tune-up.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
THEUBYSSEY
August 16,2011, Summer volume XXVIII, No. VII
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
dinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
j rinted ito r@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
we bed ito r@u bysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writer
Taylor Loren
tloren@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
sports@u bysseyca
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
features@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@u bysseyca
Web Writer
Andrew Bates
abates@u bysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
joel@u bysseyca
Webmaster
Jeff Blake
webmaster@ubysseyca
Interim Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@u bysseyca
BUSINESS
Business Manager
Femie Pereira
business@ubysseyca
Ad Sales
Alex Hoopes
advertising@ub,
CONTRIBUTORS
Will McDonald, Catherine
Guan
CONTACT
Business Office: Room 23
Editorial Office: Room 24
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official stunt newspaper cf the University cf
British Columbia. It is published every Monday and Thursday by The
Jbyssey Publications Society. We
are an autonomous, democratically
"un student organization, and all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chcsen and written
oy the Ubyssey staff. They are the
expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey F ;aticns Society
or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing
n The Ubyssey is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories, opinions, photographs and
artwork contained herein cannot be
reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUPs guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be un-
der300w( 'deyour
Print Advertising:
604.822.1654
Business Office:
604.822.6681
advertbing@ubyssey.ca
pihonem 3; stud ernt n urn ber an c
signature (not for publication) as wel
as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked wher
submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey. otherwise verification will be done by
phone. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit submissions for length
and clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before
intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction
or other matter deemed relevant
bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS will not be greater
than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
Our Campus
One-on-one with
the people who
make UBC
>]
During last weekend's convention, Greg Neher sits next to fellow Cos & Effect director Dan Barbier (right).
Greg Neher: uniting the geekdoms
GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Jonny Wakefield
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
Greg Neher is about to take the
stage in front of a very tough
crowd. Darth Vader is in attendance, as well as a recent-crucified
Jesus Christ. A group of Final
Fantasy heroines stand in the
wings, swingingtheir blades and
occasionally pausing to adjust their
gravity-defying cleavage. Some
girls dressed in Victorian era finery
twirl parasols in the aisle.
Neher is building an army. An
army of steampunks, furries,
otakus, lolitas and gamers of all
stripes. He is reaching across the
geekdoms and creating a force
of unstoppable power. When he
stepped onto the SUB ballroom
stage last Sunday, he did so with a
bit of a swagger.
Neher, creative director of last
weekend's Cos & Effect cosplay
convention, is an unlikely King of
the Nerds.
Born and raised in Vancouver, he
labelled himself a recluse growing
up. He finally broke out of his shell
by donning costumes and attending anime and cosplay conventions.
Sudoku by KrazyDad
"Cosplay is short for costume
play," explained Neher. "It's the act
of dressing up as a character and
then acting in character. People
just want to dress up as their favourite character and do something
silly and hang out with friends.
"People were very friendly, and
[the conventions] were filled with
people who have not always gotten
the most acceptance from society."
Neher has been attending conventions since 2004. He worked
his way up from an attendee to a
volunteer, and eventually began his
own production company in order
to run this year's event.
When he's cosplaying, Neher
embraces everything pompous. His
favourite characters include the
bumbling Zapp Brannigan from
Futurama and Bandit Keith from
Yu-Gi-Oh! who he admires for being "kind of an ass."
"I enjoy Zapp Brannigan because he's almost a polar opposite
to my personality," said Neher. "So
I can be silly and be that character and explore that side of things
without really being like that.
He's kind of incompetent and he's
always hitting on women. He's
definitely a very silly person in a
real life scenario and I enjoy that."
"In real life" is a distinction
Neher makes often. Neher's production company, which he runs
with fellow "Evil Overlord" Dan
Barbier, bears the same name—In
Real Life.
It's an admission that eventually
the costume must come off. In real
life, Neher sells recordable media
and AV equipment. "It's my hope
that one day I'll be able to quit my
dayjob/'hesaid.
For now, Neher is happy just
to be putting on the events that
helped him find acceptance. "Now
I just feel like I'm giving back," he
said. 13
Greg Neher
•>3
Occupation
Creative Director of IRL Events
UBC Connections
UBC Anime Club
UBC Wargamers Club
Favourite cosplay charcters
Zapp Brannigan
Bandit Keith
Chester Cheeto
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COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
08.16.20111 3
KOERNER'S SHUTDOWN »
No date to reopen Koerner's Pub as union files labour board action
Will McDonald
wmcdonald@ubyssey.ca
It's been one headache after another
for Koerner's Pub since itwas shut
down for the summer in May. Little
progress has been made towards
gettingthe pub up and running
for the new year, and the union for
the pub's staff has taken legal action against the Graduate Student
Society (GSS).
GSS VP External Jamie Paris said
that there is no set date to reopen the
pub, but the GSS is negotiating with
third parties who could help run the
pub and share the financial risk.
"These third parties would be
outside businesses," Paris said. "The
GSS would hope that they would
take on all ofthe liability ofthe pub,
and would allow us to consult with
them to make sure that the pub
keeps its current look and feel."
Paris was clear that it would be
GSS Council that would make the
final decisions on any options they
are now considering.
"We're still just accepting initial
offers. Everyone who's pitching
[ideas] is pitching a different vision
of how to make sure that the pub
stays student-run in terms of focus,
but not necessarily student-run in
terms of man-hours and cost," said
Paris.
Paris declined comment on the
pub's former staff, who were suspended after it shut down in May.
"We've gone above and beyond to
respect the labour rights of all the
employees," he said.
"Obviously, whenever you do this
kind of shutdown, things happen.
But we're currently negotiating with
the union...we feel bad for the staff in
this situation."
David Lance, vice president of CUPE 116-the union
that represents Koerner's
employees—believes the GSS has
not met its obligations to staff
members.
According to Lance, CUPE
116 has filed submissions to the
Labour Relations Board "to compel resolution ofthe issues, both
in terms ofthe closure ofthe pub
and in terms of redress to make
sure that the individual members
concerned and affected are compensated properly."
Paris said lie hopes the workers
will continue to work at the new
pub, but Lance was not optimistic.
"There could have been consultation and dialogue with the union.
Neither of those things happened.
As a result the staff feel marginalized and disenfranchised," he said.
"The main issue is communication. And ultimately we believe that
is symptomatic either of respect for
your employees or a lack of respect
for your employees." tH
COPYRIGHTS
Copyright now responsibility of UBC-AC dropped
Sarah-Nelle Jackson & Micki Cowan
news@ubyssey.ca
UBC is opting out an agreement
with Access Copyright (AC), a
Canadian licensing organization
that facilitates compensation to
publishers from universities who
use their works. In a broadcast
email, the university stated that
the proposed cost increases, as
well as AC's surveillance of institutional copying activities, were
unacceptable.
Now, the university will no
longer rely on agreements fleshed
out and maintained by AC, but deal
with publishers directly under
Canada's copyright laws.
Last year, AC proposed a
308 per cent increase in the fee
universities pay for its services,
which in part motivated several
other universities—among them
Queen's, Waterloo, Athabasca and
Saskatchewan—to also opt-out of
licensing agreements with AC.
According to AC, the price increase is meant to reflect growing
rates of digital copying of materials.
Under the Access Copyright Post-
Secondary Educational Institution
Tariff, the total fees for UBC would
have risen from $650,000 to $2 million from 2011 to 2013. This would
have translated to a fee increase per
full-time student from $3 to $45, if
the tariff were to pass its current
review by the Supreme Court of
Canada.
Paul Smith, UBC's associate VP
academic, said that the increased
costs would not have been a worthwhile exchange for the benefits
received from AC, and that UBC
already has a stock of independent
licenses.
"We have many license agreements with publishers, something
News briefs
AMS calls for UBC governance
review
The AMS has asked the province to
initiate a governance review of UBC
after a motion at Council last week.
"We began a governance review last year," said AMS President
Jeremy McElroy. According to
McElroy, the provincial government
dismissed the council working on the
project. "We'd like to see it resolved."
UBC currently functions without
an elected body. UBC pulled out of
the Greater Vancouver Regional
District in 2010, leavingthe campus
without municipal representation.
VP External Katherine Tyson
said that discussions with Premier
Christy Clark revealed that she was
largely unaware ofthe issue.
like $10 million dollars worth.
Those cases allow copying under
the copyright act."
"There's a residual number, often
smaller publishers or journals, and
that's what AC was covering. As the
years go by, we'll take up more and
more licenses as we realize where
the money's best spent. The component that AC is covering is goingto
get smaller and smaller," he said.
As for new coursepacks, Rebecca
Irani, UBC Bookstore's marketing
and communications manager said
that the bookstore "will ensure that
all copyright clearances are obtained
for the material.
"This process may take a bit
longer as the store will be clearing
copyright using a different process
which will include working directly
with publishers."
Smith said that paying copyright
fees to the smaller publishers will not
amount to more than the $650,000
that was paid to AC to cover them.
However, the cost to students is yet
to be determined.
For universities who stay with AC,
experts say that students will likely
be footingthebill if the new tariff is
passed.
"Ultimately students will pay the
cost ofthe increased fees," wrote
Michael Geist, University of Ottawa
law professor and Canada Research
Chair in Internet and e-Commerce
Law, in an email to The Ubyssey.
Geist added that the cost increases aren't necessary.
"As [alternative] licenses have
expanded in recent years and open
access has grown, it seems to me
that the tariff should be going down,
not up," he wrote.
But upped-fees aren't the tariff's
only point of controversy.
Section 6 ofthe tariff would require institutions to deliver monthly
UBC to host Special Olympics
Canada Summer Games
UBC will be the primary venue for
the 2014 Special Olympics Canada
Summer Games, accordingto a
statement issued earlier this month.
Athletes will come to Vancouver
from across the country to compete
in 11 sports, including basketball,
bocce ball, golf, swimming, bowling
and track and field.
The Special Olympics are open
to athletes with mental disabilities.
UBC hosted Paralympic sledge hockey in 2010—an event for elite athletes
with physical disabilities.
UBC first hosted the games in
1990. Accordingto the release, some
residences will be used as the athlete's village.
V t \
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Custom
se Materials
COURSE
ANY
SECTION
ANY
INSTRUCTOR
ALL
TERM
2011 ONWARDS
IIJI.IJI:U,ll:UU;l»liJ!l!llgaa
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERS1TVOF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Coursepacks may be delayed as UBC sets agreements with individual copyright holders
logs of all "Digital Copies emailed
by or on behalf of a Staff Member."
Links to copyrighted material such
as blogs count as digital copies.
"There are two trends that I see,"
said UBC professor Mira Sundara
Rajan, Canada Research Chair in
Intellectual Property Law. "One
tries to make people pay more for
U-Pass opt-out a possibility for
distance ed students
Distance education (DE) students
will be included in the U-Pass
program for the first time this
September—but some don't live in
the Lower Mainland.
As new fee-payng members of
the AMS, over 1300 DE students
will now be added to the U-Pass
program.
Due to contractual limitations
for the U-Pass, only 400 opt-outs
can currently be granted in a
school year—which may not cover
all the DE students who wish to
opt out if the AMS were to allow it.
Council passed a motion to
review policy to see if exceptions
can be made.
uses of digital information...because
our economy's digital dependence is
growing. The other is in higher education in this country, demanding
higher and higher levels of payment
from students.
"That is the really undeniable
trend ofthe past 10-15 years: students pay more." tH
Inception spoof gets two
students a phone call with
Christopher Nolan
UBC students Yuri Cabrera and Ian
Holliday got to chat for ten minutes
with their idol, director Christopher
Nolan, after their Inception parody
won a contest hosted by cellular
company WIND Mobile.
"He told us to enjoy filmmaking
while you're in a situation to be free
to film-make, because once you get
in a studio and big budget movies,
while they're bigger films, you're
also fighting to have the freedom
you had when you were a student,"
said Holliday.
Nolan donated $100 000 from
WIND Mobile to the Canadian Film
Centre in Toronto. 13
UNIVERSITY POLICY »
UBC asked to
review safety
abroad policy
NDIANAJOEL ILLUSTRATIONATHE UBYSSEY
Conrad Compagna & Kalyeena
Makortoff
news@ubysseyca
The AMS has asked that the university review one of its major travel
policies for students abroad, which
allows UBC to restrict travel to dangerous countries.
Policy 69 was most recently used
by the university to call back all students after the Japanese earthquake
back in March, which was followed
by a number of student complaints.
"There was a well-publicized
student backlash towards Policy
69 after the incident at Fukushima
because there were a few students
that felt that Policy 69 infringed on
some of their rights and abilities to
make their own decision," said AMS
VP Academic Matt Parson.
"It is written in a way that UBC
doesn't necessarily consult with the
students."
Contention was also raised over
the punishments for students who
ignore the policy, which includes
discounting research and class
credit. The AMS also questioned
whether faculty sponsors of student
travel were the best judges of dangers abroad.
Go Global, which runs the travel
abroad program, research and
exchange programs at UBC, gives
the final word on travel restrictions and evacuations. Tlell Elviss,
Go Global's manager for Safety and
LearningAbroad said liability was
not at the "core ofthe policy," and
that "from a Go Global perspective, the implementation for the
policies has been quite successful."
He added that students needed to
follow the office's instructions for
their own safety.
Parson said that despite the
university's concern over student
well-being, the policy is "something
that's separate but not very supplementary" to Canada's program to
inform and evacuate all citizens in
case of emergencies overseas under
the Department of Foreign Affairs
and Trade. 13 Cnltnre»
08.16.20111 4
Editor: Ginny Monaco
Hope: dark roast with cream
UBC filmmaker tells story of one Japanese professor's caffeinated tsunami relief
Catherine Guan
Contributor
Hope can take some pretty strange
forms. In BFA film production student Mackenzie Sheppard's new
documentary, it trundles along in
the form of a hot drink delivered
by a vintage yellow Volkswagen.
His film, Yoshi's Blend, follows Nagoya University Professor
Yoshiharu (Yoshi) Masuda and
his mobile HOPE Cafe as they
transverse the earthquake-ravaged landscape of northern Japan.
Masuda's mission: to rebuild communities with judiciously roasted,
rigorously brewed coffee.
Yes, that's right, coffee.
The idea of doing a feature on
Masuda had been percolating in
Sheppard's mind. "I've always
thought he was a fascinating character and person," confessed the
filmmaker.
But it wasn't until the devastating earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Japan
last March that the project
took off. Masuda, in partnership with HOPE International
Development Agency—an international non-profit based out of New
Westminster—started serving
free connoisseur-grade coffee to
survivors.
The disaster had a particular
flavour for Sheppard, who was
raised in Japan from the age of
five. "Japan is so small [that] the
physical urban landscape feels the
same in most cities and towns,"
he said. "It wasn't hard to feel the
fear that the locals there must
have been experiencing."
Accordingto Sheppard, filming
has just wrapped in the tsunami
zone.
"Things have improved a lot.
But besides the debris trucks and
diggers, the coastline is a ghost
town at the end ofthe day," he
said. "There is deep mistrust ofthe
government now, as to how much
is being revealed to the media and
public."
Nevertheless, hope remains.
"You can still feel the communities holding themselves together,"
Sheppard said. "The one thing I
was aiming to capture ... was the
happiness that Yoshi was bringing
to people in the tsunami zone."
Over the two month shooting
period, Sheppard has seen how the
professor's elaborately prepared
brew restores a sense of normalcy
for the locals. A day in the coastal
area of Babanakayama was particularly memorable.
"When we got there, much of
the debris was still visible outside
and the atmosphere was cold and
bleak. Yoshi set up the cafe in the
fisherman's gazebo beside the
water, and within minutes ofthe
fisherman drinking the coffee, the
place was cheery and warm. It was
a great moment."
The coffee that Masuda serves
is from HOPE'S organic learning
farm in the Philippines. With his
brew, Masuda wants to build a
partnership between coffee growers and the Japanese, both struggling to return to self-reliance.
YURI KOOKABURRA/FACEBOOK PHOTC
Mackenzie Sheppard's film follows Professor Yoshi Masuda, whose mobile cafe brought fresh coffee to tsunami victims.
Yoshi's dream, the director explained, is to motivate the locals
in the area to take over the cafe.
"[It would be a] new job to start
their lives off of," he said. With
his "cafe start-up kits," people
are given the tools to operate a
cafe and can repay the costs once
they start showing a profit. Or, as
Sheppard calls it, "coffee micro
credit."
The art of coffee-making, accordingto the professor, serves as
a metaphor for life. Coffee beans
undergo the ordeal of roasting,
grinding, boiling, dripping and
steeping. Agonizingly long pulls finally extract a few drops to reward
the palate.
Amidst the complex aromatics
of Yoshi's Blend, perhaps there is
the taste of hope. tH
MORE INFO
►>J
• Yoshi's Blend was shot on a
strict budget of $4,650.
• The film will be completed
October 22nd. 2011.
• 15 per cent of money raised
will be donated to Professor
Masuda's coffee van.
UBC
a place of mind
W
S
ams
Come early for
your U-Pass
Starting August 25, you can get your
U-Pass at UBC Bookstore.
Get it by August 31 to be entered into a draw for
a $100 gift card to the Bookstore.
You will not be mailed a U-Pass so you must pick up your
pass in person at UBC Bookstore.
Write for news
Kayleena Makortoff and Micki Cowan
news@ubyssey.ca
Your campus radio station
with online streaming
and podcasts
Visit upass.ubc.ca for details.
CiTR
101.9fm/CITR.ca
OWN YOUR  FREQUENCY
and
publisher
of
H^«#M=H Sports»
08.16.20111 5
ON THE COVER »
GEOFF LISTER^HE UBYSSEY
Rebuilding a winning program
Drake Fenton
sports@ubyssey.ca
"Training camp is kind of like
Christmas morning for a coach,"
said Shawn Olson, the head coach of
UBC's football team.
Though UBC's training camp,
which begins August 18, may remind Olson of Christmas morning,
it should remind him of Easter.
This year is a chance for rebirth.
"We have some veteran guys
that have been through some lean
years," Olson said. "They are excited for the prospect of making the
playoffs and to start fulfilling the
aspirations they had when they first
came here."
UBC finished with a 2-6 record
in Olson's first year as head coach.
The program has been stagnating
since 2006, the last year the team
made the playoffs. In 2009 former
Coach Ted Goveia managed to lose
the confidence of his locker room
before being shown the door. When
Olson was brought in last season, he
was tasked with reinvigoratingthe
program and creating a football culture that players would buy into.
Though the 'Birds didn't win
many games, Olson felt that he took
the first steps towards re-establishing a winningtradition.
"I think that we have a group of
guys that have bought into what I
am preaching," he said. "You need
to work hard and you need to be
consistent."
The team's mentality is ostensibly in place, but whether or not that
translates into wins will depend on
the arm of fourth-year quarterback
Billy Greene. Greene's athleticism
and ability to move the chains with
his feet has never been an issue,
but his consistency in the passing game has perennially been a
question mark. Last year he led the
team in rushing with 668 yards,
but he only completed 53.8 per cent
of his passes.
"[Greene] has been a guy to this
point who has been physically very
blessed and he has gotten by at being a very good athlete at this point
in his career," Olson said.
efficient with distributing the ball."
Greene's maturation as a quarterback will be aided by the bevy
of weapons at his disposal. Eight
starters will be returning from last
year's offense, including fifth-year
running back Dave Boyd. Boyd
spent the majority of last season
hampered by an ankle injury and
was only able to compile 186 yards
rushing, a far cry from when he led
the team in rushing the previous
season with 816 yards.
A healthy Boyd will go a long way
I think that we have a group of guys
that have bought into what I am
preaching. You need to work hard
and you need to be consistent.
Shawn Olson
UBC football coach
Olson said that Greene has been
working hard this off-season on
improving his timing, footwork
and consistency. That, paired with
the bonus of having been together
for a full year, has Olson believing that this is Greene's year to
blossom.
"I know him a lot better now
and I know where his strengths
and his weaknesses are, so we will
structure things offensively to work
towards his strengths," Olson said.
"I am expecting a big year from
him, and maybe that means him
scrambling less and gaining fewer
yards with his feet and being more
to help establish Olson's offensive
philosophy.
"I believe it is important to run
the football and I believe that is
something that sets the table for the
whole offense," he said. "There is a
physicality that is important to have
to run the football effectively and
that is something we are going to
commit to."
An improved offense will undoubtedly help the 'Birds gain
ground in the Canada West, but
if their defence is unable to slow
teams down, or at the very least
keep games close, UBC will have
little chance of returning to the
playoffs. In the 2010 campaign they
ranked dead last in the Canada West
in total defence and second last in
run defence.
"Defence is one area we are looking to improve," Olson said. "I think
we are going to be slightly different,
a little less complex and be in a position to just let our guys play aggressive in the scheme."
Defensive end Serge Kaminsky
is a player Olson expects to lead the
defence and play with the aggressive attitude needed to shut down
an opposing team's running game.
The fourth-year, six-foot-three, 245
pound Kaminsky will be asked to
anchor the defensive line from the
weak-side defensive end position,
and help mentor the host of younger
linemen that will be receiving minutes in the rotation.
If things click duringtraining
camp, Olson feels like his team will
be able to make some noise in the
Canada West.
"I think we are going to be a
team that is going to surprise some
people," he said. "I think we are going to be a team that is going to be
competitive every single week. We
are going to work hard and we have
more talent than we've had in past
years."
Whether or not the 'Birds will
make the playoffs, Olson wouldn't
say. He has high hopes for the team
and the direction they are heading, but right now his focus is on
training camp and the 100 players
expected to be there.
UBC's first game ofthe seaso n
will be September 2, on the road
against the University of Regina. 13
By the numbers
»1
2-6
UBC's record last
2006
The last time
UBC made the playoffs.
bW*K UBC's points
per game average last season,
second to last In the conference
i9A*^7 Average amount of
points UBC conceded per game
last season, second to last in the
conference
^ri9*^# Quarterback Billy
Greene's completion percentage
last season.
65
Quarterback
completion percentage Coach
Olson wants Greene to have this
year.
3912
Total amount of
yards gained against UBC last
season, the most conceded in
the Canada West.
100
Amount of people
expected to attend UBC's
training camp.
Video content
Check out the premier of The
Ubyssey Weekly Recap today @
ubyssey.ca/multimedia.
Tofino twice a day... Every day...
Call 1.866.986.3466
or book online and Save!
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Island Express Opinion »
n Editor- Rrian Piatt
08.16.20111 6
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VIRGINNE MENARD ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Koerner's goes from bad to
worse
Back in May, when the Graduate
Student Society (GSS) decided in
a two-week span to shutdown
Koerner's indefinitely, fire the food
and beverage manager, engage in
a public showdown with a union
upset that jobs had suddenly been
terminated—all while promising
to bring back the pub as soon as a
sustainable business model could be
developed—we did our fair share of
mocking and predicting Koerner's
would never come back. GSS executives countered by applauding their
own leadership, promising the pub
would return and downplaying the
rift with the union.
So GSS, how's that working out
for ya? Because right now, as far
as we can tell, there is no date to
open up the pub—only a vague hope
tliat someone will take financial
liability while keeping it "student-
run in terms of focus" and no end
in site to a dispute with CUPE 116.
The bumbling would be hilarious
if it didn't mean that the chances of
Koerner's returning is disappearing
faster than a $12 pitcher of Hachet
at Mahony's.
Happy trails, Mr Tompkins
The student government at
Kwantlen University is currently
embroiled in a massive scandal that
involves identity cover-up, million-
dollar lawsuits and shady firings.
It's a reminder that for all the occasional screw-ups of our AMS, it
hasn't had the type of idiocy that
causes permanent damage to its legitimacy in representing students.
Part ofthe reason for this is that
for many years, the AMS has had
a speaker of council who takes no
bullshit, has no dog in any fight,
knows his way around Robert's
Rules of Order and can diffuse
a tense situation with jokes that
always come close to the line, but
rarely cross it.
His name is Dave Tompkins,
and sadly for our student government, he'll be moving to Ontario
next week to take a teaching job at
the University of Waterloo. To say
whomever replaces him will have
a tall order in front of them is redundant—no one will immediately be
able to fill his sizeable shoes.
London and Vancouver
rioters birds of a feather
The riots in London were sparked
by the death of a man at the hands
ofthe police, which is certainly a
more serious issue than the local
hockey team losing a big game. In
that sense, the London riots are a
very different phenomenon than
the Vancouver riot in June. But in
both cases, an inadequate security response to a few incidents of
street violence gave large numbers
of people the opportunity to smash
and steal with impunity.
Despite the dissimilar initial
circumstances, it didn't take long
for the London riots to become just
as meaningless and tragic as the
hockey riot was here. Looting and
destroying the shops of innocent
people is never a necessary or reasonable response to social issues,
regardless of how compelling those
social issues are. The London rioters, as with the Vancouver rioters, are not deserving of anyone's
sympathy.
AMS frosh kits unrealistically
expensive
The AMS is expecting students to
fork up $80 for a frosh kit this year.
That's eight pitchers on a Tuesday in
the SUB.
And while it includes admission
to First Week events, a $20 ticket
to whoever is playing on Friday
night and may just be the snuggliest
frosh kit you'll get this year, expecting students to fork up that much
money for what is essentially AMS
advertising is unrealistic.Students
receive free or steeply discounted
frosh kits from their faculty and
that is what students identify with.
The AMS should focus on supporting students and throwing events
during First Week.
Besides, no one actually buys the
AMS frosh kit.
Taking UBC governance off
thebackburner
Last week, the AMS made a essential move towards having a stake in
the long-term governance at UBC,
asking for a seat on any review body
created. Of course, that means the
province actually has to create one.
The university has been in limbo
since 2010, when the province put
UBC in charge of its own land use.
This was intended to be an interim
solution. But here we are 18 months
later with little more momentum
towards a long-term solution.
The fact is, between cabinet
reshuffling, ministerial overturn
and a new premier, UBC's lack of
municipal representation has faded
to the background. And the distance
between UBC and the province is so
large that the government will probably end up taking direction from
the university with few questions.
However, the AMS has rightly
tried to ensure that, somehow, the
46,000 of us can have our say—that
is, if the province remembers that
we still exist.
Cheaterville.com is sick and
twisted
Cheaterville.com has recently become
available in Canada. The website
allows individuals to go online and
post photos and information about
a former partner that they believe
cheated on them. The caveat is
that there is no way to know if the
person whose reputation is being
threatened actually cheated or not.
A guy can be made to look like a pig
and a girl can be made to look like
a slut—all on the whim of a person
that's pissed off that they have been
dumped and have gained five pounds
from eating ribs and ice cream in
bed. Undoubtedly, there will be some
people on the website that actually
cheated, but is a website like this really necessary? Do people's private
lives need to be made this public?
Where do we draw the line? To avoid
being slandered on the internet, we
suggest you avoid dumping someone
via Facebook chat after you have just
slept with their best friend. 13
Solving conflict through film
Perspectives
» By Kyle Farquharson
I am far from a professional actor.
My most substantial role occurred in my graduating year, during which I graced the stage in a
spoof of Shakespeare's Hamlet.
I portrayed the evil Claudius, and
am still amused at having been cast
in such a diabolical role.
However, when I turned up for
the pitch session for participants in
Peace it Together (PiT)—a filmmaking program designed to encourage
cooperation and dialogue between
Israeli and Palestinian youth—a
rookie filmmaker from Tel Aviv
pegged me as his ideal leading man.
With a healthy dose of skepticism, I
considered his offer, and ultimately
agreed. After all, the opportunity to team up with an Israeli,
a Palestinian and a Canadian of
Iranian descent for a film project is
one that surely doesn't present itself
every day.
In all, 30 university students from
Israel, the West Bank and across
Canada came to Vancouver to discuss their fears, ambitions and perceptions of life in the Middle East.
"Sometimes, I feel like making
a film that simulates the [Israeli-
Palestinian] conflict," said the
26-year-old filmmaker Shoni
Aronovich. "You could present it
like: 'We've got this situation, nobody planned it like this, we're kind
of stuck in it and we need to find a
way out of it together with the materials we have.'"
Aronovich had to deal with
producing a film with no budget,
in a matter of days. Add to this
generations of animosity between
Israelis and Palestinians, and you've
got a volatile combination.
The students were separated into
teams with one representative from
each nation, and pitched ideas for a
series of short films.
"We had lots of conflicts during
the editing," Aronovich added. "But
sometimes, we know we just have to
put aside all that separates us."
Yet somehow, we all got through
the filming process unscathed. Even
more impressively, our relations
remained amicable, and we're all
satisfied with the product—a film
depicting the tragedy of a life cut
short by war.
"Filmmaking is a stress-filled,
sleep-deprived, caffeine-injected
enterprise," said Aronovich. "It
demands much more ofthe students
than basic civility."
Amal Adawi from Bethlehem
said that before PiT "I had never
seen any Israelis outside ofthe
checkpoints...or when they would
attack my house." Virtually every
day, she passes through checkpoints, making travel through her
homeland arduous. Her father has
been arrested by Israeli authorities.
She says she is accustomed to living
in fear.
PiT does not pretend to advance a solution to conflict in
the beleaguered Israel-Palestine
region. There are too many unhealed wounds, too many puzzles
of autonomy and citizenship and
too much ongoing turmoil for one
single organization to resolve. But
in the peaceful surrounds of UBC,
far from the disarray that mars the
Holy Land, a multinational group of
student filmmakers has taken a step
in the right direction. 13
New VP Students, same questions
Editor's
Notebook
Justin McElroy
Should you ever be masochistic enough to delve into the inner
workings of power at UBC, you'll be
disappointed when you realize that
President Stephen Toope and his
merry band of vice presidents don't
really have much to do with your
university experience. The decisions
they make won't really affect you
over the course ofyour degree unless
things go terribly wrong. They're
too focused on the macro, not the
micro, and the choices they make go
through any number of committees
and deans, and committees of deans,
before reaching any student.
Except for the VP Students department. Focused on the "student
experience," ifyou do something
at UBC that has nothing to do with
taking a class, that department
is probably behind it. Enrolling
at UBC, usingthe SSC, living in
Totem, going to a T-Bird game—all
are ultimately overseen by the VP
Students. And now, for the first
time in 11 years, we'll be getting a
new one.
Louise Cowin, formerly ofthe
University of Toronto, was appointed the new VP Students last
month and will be taking over the
position in October. In the world of
university administration, it's a big
deal. Anytime somebody new comes
into a job where they're in charge of
hundreds of millions of dollars and
the experiences of 45,000 people,
things change, priorities get shifted
and causes get championed.
But the delightful thing is that
right now, none of that is known.
We don't know who Louise Cowin is
and what she will bringto the position. Will she wear a bow-tie on her
first day of work? As supervisor of
housing, will she mandate that every
Friday in Totem Cafeteria be Haggis
Day? As supervisor of athletics, will
she advocate that UBC become nationally competitive in croquet? We
are waiting for Cowin to speak. To
date, she has been silent.
Okay, those were jokes and poor
ones, at that. What isn't a laughing
matter, though, are UBC's results
in the National Survey of Student
Engagement, where we rank seventh-
worst in the country in creating a
"supportive campus environment." It
isn't a laughing matter that housing
on campus is so expensive—despite
UBC being the owner, developer and
manager of every property here—that
many would consider staying at home
with parents or finding a basement
suite on Main rather than applying
to live here. It isn't a laughing matter that UBC puts millions of dollars
into financingthe most competitive
university athletic program in the
country, while putting profit margins
above public access for most of their
fields and gyms.
That isn't to say that Brian
Sullivan, who was VP Students from
1999 to March of this year, did a poor
job—far from it. But no executive is
perfect, and a new pair of eyes guarantees a new way of thinking and
a new set of priorities. Either way,
her first steps will be intriguingto
watch. 13 » 81 Games 108.i6.20n
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1- Publicity
4- Cavern
10- Cairo cobras
14- Anonymous John
15- Fame
16-Singer Amos
17-Where it's at
18-Functional
20- Actress Gardner
21-Org.
22-Fish
23-Admit
25-Kind of kitchen
28- Fish appendage
29 - Spahn teammate
30-Ancient
31-Em, e.g.
32- Uneasy
35- Fair-hiring abbr.
36-Be human
37-Additional
44-Football kick
45-Make into law
46-Specks
48- Japanese sash
49-Hiding place
50- Outer coat of a seed
51- Golden Horde member
53-Bristle
55- Hesitant sounds
56- Requiring an acidic environment
59- the season...
60-Actress Gershon
61- Consecrate
62- Calendar abbr.
63- Nervously irritable
64- Playground retort
65- Dash lengths
Down
1- Standards of perfection
2- Recently created
3- Insoluble protein
4-Moan
5- Workout count
6-Ego
7- Violent whirlwind
8-Defunct airline
9- Mich, neighbor
10- Lots and lots
11- Melodious
12- Sugarcoated almond
13- Soundless
19- Author Fleming
24- Commence
26- Thrice, in prescriptions
27- Purpose
30- Beaten egg dish
31- Scrape off
33- Alley ___
34- Illustrative craft
37- Slightly sour
38-Unific
39-Bambi'saunt
40- Bulky and heavy
41- Level of command
42- Floral ornament
43- Rare metallic element
44-Thick soup
47-Talks back to
49-Hit sign
50- Be silent, musically
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54- Bandleader Puente
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