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The Ubyssey Sep 22, 1967

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Array U8YSSE
out
the
other
Vol. XLIX, No. 3
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,  1967
<*** OF aRHafl ^^
224-3916
BUT STILL  'DISTURBING'
UBC housing situation better
—kurt hilger photo
UBC's HIPPIE TRIBE writhed to the acid-rock sounds of My Indole Ring in Buchanan quad
Thursday noon while hundreds of straight people stood and watched. The dance was one
of  the  free  activities  promised   by  the Arts   council.
Frosh PROBE university:
activists vs. bureaucrats
MATE
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
Frosh discovered what sort  of people own
-, their university Wednesday.
During a Frosh orientation program, Probe,
^Theld at lower mall lounge, three student activists confronted officials of the Alma Mater
Society and explained bureaucratic logic to new
students.
They were Gabor Mate,
Btan Persky and Nancy Corbett.
Ubyssey   columnist   Mate
said the role  of the  student
government is to create an impression of democracy where
_  no real democracy exists.
No  real  democracy  exists
because of the structure of the
university,  he  said.    The  entire  university is
under the thumb of the board of governors.
"The board of governors," said Mate, "are
appointed by the cabinet in Victoria. It is hard
to find one governor who is not a corporation
wheel. Big business executives, whether governors or regents, run universities throughout
North America."
~« Heads of UBC include John M. Buchanan,
board member of MacMillan, Bloedel & Co.
Ltd.; John E. Liersch, director of Canadian
Forest Products; Richard Bibbs,
assijstant to the vice-president
of MacMillan, Bloedel; Walter
Koerner, Rayonier Can.  Ltd.,
Executive; food corporation
heads Allan McGavin, Arthur
Fouks, Q.C., and Donovan Miller; and Einar Gunderson, a
government appointee to UBC,
B.C. Hydro, PGE Railway, B.C.
Toll Bridge and Highway SULLIVAN
Authority.
Others include Stuart Keate, Vancouver Sun
publisher; Dean Walter Gage, acting president;
and Nathan T. Nemetz, B.C. supreme court
justice.
The senate, which decides academic matters,
is not democratic either, as the board of governors decides how the senate is appointed.
"One-half are those who have made a significant economical and cultural contribution to
the province," said Mate. "But particularly
economic."
"The other half are faculty members, but
many of these faculty members are deans and
top members of each faculty, appointed only
with the agreement of the administration.
"And who appoints the administration? The
board of governors."
Therefore, the senate is also under the control of business.
Don Munton, AMS first vice-president, said
students didn't really feel the administration's
hold on student life.
"Why, you don't see their posters up all over
the residence walls telling you what to do?"
he asked.
(Also on the board are a provincial government appointee named by cabinet order, and
some members elected by grads, faculty and
honorary holders.)
Next discussed was the role of student government in furthering alienated business control
of the university.
Stan Persky, president of the arts undergraduate society, said that the fundamental purpose of a central student government is to build
a student union building in which to house
itself.
Mate outlined other functions of the AMS:
(Continued on page 3)
See:  PROBE
Expanding  residences
try freer atmosphere
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Eight hundred persons remain on waiting lists of the UBC
Housing Administration as the campus-wide struggle to expand
housing continues.
This is down about one-third from last year. The figure
does not include families waiting to move into suites in the
delayed Acadia Park project.
Housing administrator Les Rohringer called the situation
"disturbing, but an improvement".
Meanwhile, projects are underway to expand the Totem
Park and Lower Mall residences.
Also, a client's committee with Rohringer as chairman has
been formed to supervise new construction at wireless tower
site behind the traffic patrol office on Wesbrook Crescent.
And the board of governors has approved an architect's
survey for the new complex which will house about 1200 students
over 21 years old.
All construction now underway is to be rented at the same
rates as at Totem Park and Lower Mall. But, said Rohringer,
"that should not mean that we should not have a low rental
project."
The Alma Mater Society is attempting to establish co-op
housing. The New Housing Society, created by council on
August 20, is planning to acquire land and finances to build such
a scheme. Its members include the president, the treasurer,
and the general manager of the Alma Mater Society, plus two
councillors, a faculty member, and one member of the board
of governors.
As for administration-sponsored building, Rohringer said
he had just received a letter from acting university president
Dean Walter Gage (who is also Dean of Student Affairs, to
whom the Housing Administration is responsible) saying that
he had "appointed a committee to deal with problems and
policies with respect to future student housing".
Called the Committee on Housing, it consists of the Direcibr
of Residences; the Director of Physical Plant, James Turner,
or his nominee; the Bursar, William White, or his nominee; the
Dean of Graduate Studies, Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan; the Dean
of Women, Mrs. Helen McCrae, and four students to be appointed
by student council.
There is another committee—the Committee on Residences
—dealing with present housing, Rohringer said.
It has three divisions—five student representatives, five
members of the Housing Administration, and five advisors. The
latter are Dean Gage as Dean of Student Affairs; the Dean of
Women; Dr. A. Johnson, Director of Student Health Services;
Ruth Blair, the Director of Food Services, and E. F. Shirrar,
the Director of Student Services.
Of the five student representatives, one is appointed every
year  by the  councils  of  each  residential   area—Totem   Park,
Lower Mall, Fort Camp and Acadia Camp.    The fifth member
(Continued on page 3)
See: HOUSING
— george hollo photo
FAMILIES WAIT while construction  plods slowly along on
the new Acadia married students housing units. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  September  2-t   1967
<• j-
ANTI-CALENDAR  .  .  .
GOOD  THING
Comment changes arts
Great changes are occurring in the faculty
of arts following the wave of comment on
courses and professors in the arts undergraduate society anti-calendar.
For example, John Doheny who's been an
English instructor for the last seven years
and used unorthodox teaching methods has
been promoted. A faculty grievance committee was formed to look into the matter and
recommended to a special committee of the
department that Doheny be promoted. Perhaps the response of his students in English
429, published in the anti-calendar, influenced
the committee.
Doheny "teaches this class seminar style
with the emphasis on class participation,"
says the anti-calendar.
Anticipating the inability of some students
to work in such a framework, another wrote,
"There are those who are unable to work in
a creative manner, outside the spoonfed
dictation system."
For inviting discussion one student charged
Doheny with being "a rebel against the
existing organization of UBC."
"The complaints are really a reflection on
a university system that produces a senior
student who recoils in horror when asked
to think for himself," the anti-calendar says.
Another change is voluntary language labs
for French 210 and Spanish 110 and 210.
Hispanic Studies department head Harold
Livermore said the Spanish labs were made
voluntary because compulsory attendance
didn't work well.
"Students now can come when they're
able to and work on their own," he said.
200 years has been dropped from English
200. Students this year find the course outline starts from Spencer and the Elizabethan
era and not from Chaucer and the fourteenth
century as in past years.
All professors in the sociology and anthropology department issued course outlines
and statements of the course aims to students
— something not done before.
And the psychology club is planning an
extensive evaluation of the psychology department to be distributed to all psychology
majors.
Club president Fred Madryga, arts 4, said
the report will also be summarized for the
arts anti-calendar next year.
But valid criticisms of the anti-calendar
abound.
One member of the faculty of arts suggested that the anti-calendar could have published the questionnaire used and the percentage of students responding from each
class.
This kind of direct communication, though
intended in the anti-calendar can probably
be improved for the next edition.
When  requested for a statement on  the
anti-calendar, Professor G. H. Durrant, head
of the English department — which was the
most extensively reviewed department—said:
"I wish to draw attention to the following   sentence   in   the   "anti-calendar":   'A
lot of people are probably badly treated
by the anti-calendar:  we advise them not
to jump out of windows.' I think students
would do well to give careful thought to
the implications of this statement."
— kurt hilger photo
DO NOT mutilate this picture or classy computer #589476 will reject the new Saturday
lecture-less program.
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Saturday classes
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By LUANNE ARMSTRONG
Saturday classes, every student's nightmare, are no more,
thanks to a kind-hearted computer.
Last spring, the computer gulped days and places from sii
faculties and disgorged a timetable with (oh, joy) no Saturday
classes at all and which even tried to keep Thursday noon hours
free for student activities.
"Many departments had already succeeded in eliminating
these weekend classes," said R. F. Scagel, assistant dean of
biological science and chairman of a presidential committee
which studied this problem.
But, he said, attendance at the remaining Saturday classes
was less than desirable. In addition, many university services
needed for experimental work were not available on Saturday.
Scagel hopes that next year will see all the departments
included in this system, instead of just six major ones.
PURE VIRGIN WOOL
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When you build a wardrobe, it's so much
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If you want to be well dressed for any occasion
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The Woolmark on the Cambridge label assures
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'W
UTO
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AM  1-2750
CS8-1-OTW Friday, September 22, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
^p — kurt hilger photo
THIS IS WHAT must serve as an ambulance for UBC's 30,000 students and staff members.
Equipped to administer only rudimentary first-aid, patrol men can only stand around helplessly awaiting professional aid.
'Governors playing up to
minority group — Sullivan
The Board of Governors was charged Thursday with giving in to endowment land ratepayers on the issue of the Student Union Building access road.
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan charged that a bad precedent would be set
if the B of G decides in favor of the ratepayers.
v "I appreciate the board's problems with the
ratepayers, but they've got to stand firm," Sullivan said.
Sullivan said the university administration
and the AMS approved a Y-shaped access road
off University and Chancellor Boulevards on
Wesbrook Crescent in July 1966.
He said since then the 450-member association has made repeated protests to the B of G,
because of expected increased traffic and noise
on Wesbrook.
This July the B of G released plans for a
new road curving west towards SUB with only
one access, he said.
Sullivan said the second road would be totally inadequate for the number of cars expected to use it.
"If the second planned access road is built,
much more traffic will use the residential
streets east of Wesbrook to get to the access
road," he said.
The board has deferred decision on the road
until November to give the AMS time to prepare a report on traffic conditions on university access roads.
WAITING FOR AMBULANCE
UBC man unaided,
bleeds 20 minutes
A UBC student who was seriously injured Wednesday in
an automobile accident on west mall waited 20 minutes for an
ambulance.
William J. Oldham, 19, was struck by a car driven by
Wendy Nixon, 18, at west mall and agriculture road.
Oldham, with a broken jaw. multiple fractured, bruises and
contusions, waited, according to three estimates, about 20 minutes
until an off-campus ambulance arrived.
Ken Dawson, a graduate student who witnessed the accident,
said Oldham had to wait 26 minutes — from 3:40 p.m. when
the accident occurred.
Constable John Poews of the university RCMP, who attended the incident, estimated the wait as 20 minutes and the ambulance company (Metropolitan) said they took 17 minutes.
Oldham is in satisfactory condition in Vancouver General
hospital.
UBC patrol has not an ambulance, but a "first aid patrol
wagon". Last year, according to university RCMP, there were
15 serious accidents — two involving deaths — which required
an ambulance.
The patrol wagon attended 71 incidents last year. Three
persons required treatment at downtown hospitals..
Sir Ouvry Roberts, head of UBC traffic and parking, said
Thursday the patrol wagon "is justified on the basis of the number of serious accidents."
HOUSING
(Continued from Page 1)
is Miss Blaize Horner, appointed as residence representative
by the AMS, who acts as a coordinator.
The Committee on Residences is an advisory group. According to Rohringer, it  works.
"We are trying a new approach in residences — asking
students to do their own management.
"We've had a positive reaction," he said. "These students
are grown up and should be responsible enough to perform a
critical experiment in civilized living.
"They are bound to make mistakes, but if a student must
be expelled from residences, he will be expelled by his residence
council.    The dons are now strictly advisory."
SIMM
"TmiB /N?AN#J-PAW' rWSl- 23
ftoMCH APPEMlEO LA$7 VBAR, ANP *jmo/ WBoPV
( KEnerteem - Bur uill be fwiMeo r»/i ve**;
V TTW   ATTSAT/0/V/
IT IS SAID THAT THE ACTIONS OF
HUMArtlTV tW MOVE THE HEAVENS TO
LAUGHTER, AND THAT MEWS ATTEflPTS
TO ACT A5 Q0DS MV CAUSE THE
SKIES TO WEEP. LET US HOPE THAT
THE TALE HERETO SET FORTH (JILL
W5PIRE COSHtf mRTW.ANDTOSOriE
MEASURE POT AN END TO THE TEARS.
ttawfmms of evewone uws sue-
HE'S RIGHT, 15 INVITEDTO VISIT BUGO-RUty
NOT 0NLV TW, BUT WWM-PANftO IS CW/OED.'
A RE0 LINE RUNS DOWN "WE MIDDLE, AND LOUER
Wi6O-0W4O 16 RULED BY fWNO KM/
JU£Nl0NE[WlA8La$
IS SLEEPING ON THE
LINE...
HE SEES THE AWZMJ 8L0&S. NATIVES OF
p-r, whoseaviyAcmm is pushing boiled BEETS UITH THEIR NOSES.
EACH SIDE ACCUSES THE
OTHER OF /WlTRAT/OM—
1 AHPl^g jg Pec2aRgj/.» 3£"
ffijjgS A NOSITTHM SOU DOrWIDI
BARDONMEItl.afE. OF THE TOP BLORGS,
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SO L0VAL ROYAL TROOPS ARRIVE,
SINCE THE BLORGS AREN'T Too HOT
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AND nORALMAN, OF COURSE,
SUPPORTS THE  (JAR.
Into this stow of gloom uil
 COflE ALBERT! h LOVELY BOY;
7ffiwzgy ■Au*vrj*s&s}iwi MAY I COfinEMT THAT,-^
SINCE THE INTRODUCTION UAS *
WRITTEN LAST JANUARY, MORE
MEN HAVE CAUSED MORE TEARS:
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY. —
THANKS. LOVE ToVOU--
STORV   JSTART5 MEXT A/££X/ '
PROBE
(Continued from Page 1)
It creates an illusion of
democracy The fallacy of the
illusion is well illustrated by
the Persky/AMS fee increase
fiasco where the votes of the
students became irrelevant, he
said.
,fPeople who want to act,"
he said, "are sucked into AMS
and powerless committees.
And then we have a UBC delegation to the CUS conference
which can announce that "Students should not be concerned
with humanitarian issues, just
committees and dances."
Another purpose of the AMS
is to destroy any interest which
appears in the apathetic student body, Mate said.
"Student government acts as
a cushion between students
and administration. The students are the fist, and the
administration is the face. The
cushion is there to protect the
face, not the fist."
Other illusions to student
power are the advisory committees, said Mate. The administration points to these committees, claiming proletarian
democracy, and then announces an 11-cent per dollar
food price increase, which was
effected over the summer
without student consultation.
"Student council is very concerned! about the way this decision was made," said Sullivan.
"What does 'We're concerned' mean?" asked Mate. "You
don't go to the students to explain and do something. Nothing is done about the fact that
the committee is a farce."
"We're still concerned," said
Sullivan. •
THE WSStY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press, Underground Press Syndicate. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized second class moil by Post Office
Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and* review. City editor,
224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loe.
24;  sports,  loc.  23; advertising,  loc. 26.  Telex 04-524.
SEPT. 22, 1967
Bells
Some students do not have places to live.
Many students are in accommodation so poor it impairs health and hinders study.
Discontent over overcrowded classrooms, the lecture
system, and grading techniques steadily swells to massive proportions.
The library has no room for its books and no seats for
students to read them.
The campus—a community of 30,000 people—has no
properly-equipped ambulance.
Sleepy-eyed student masses slowly—but steadily—
awake to the realization that there is no law of nature
saying universities must be governed by an imposed
clique.
They become aware that four student senators are
an insult, not an improvement.
Research-oriented faculty become more and more
unhappy about heavy teaching loads.
And other profs who can teach but don't publish see
deserved promotions perish.
So what do the powers above see fit to do about all
this? What else but announce construction of a 140-foot
tower near the library equipped with 355 bells which
will ring every hour?
The first ringing of the bells will bring forth visions of
sprightly members of the board of governors shinnying
up the tower to ring the pretty bells while the campus
explodes.
This is progress of a sort. All Nero had to fiddle with
was a fiddle.
Ban the bushes
Capital cities in North America are usually isolated
from main centres of population. The idea seems to be
to remove elected politicians from the evil influence of
the people.
In B.C., the same notion in reverse has been applied
to universities. In locating UBC and Simon Fraser,
rural-dominated provincial governments have followed a
plan running something like this: "Stick those wierdos
out behind some bushes or up on a hill." The hope was
that the wierdos' crazy ideas wouldn't contaminate
normal minds.
It hasn't worked. The university's influence, whether
bad or good, has managed to seep its way out through
the endowment land bushes.
The publicly-stated rationalization for the endowment
lands was that they were to provide money for higher
education. But since 1908 they have produced hardly a
nickel—in some years the lands have cost money instead.
With the endowment lands a failure both as barrier
and moneymaker, The Ubyssey suggests they could be
put to a better use.
Let's replace the bushes with students.In houses.
Owned and run by the students.
There is no justification for 1,700 acres of unused
land when large numbers of students live in substandard
accommodation far from the university. And when the
university continues to build uninviting dorms without recognizing that different types of people need
different types of homes.
With only a small part of the 1,700 acres made available to students on long-term dollar-a-year leases, student
money — now largely wasted by Alma Mater Society
misspending — could be made useful.
(■&»■   - -    - -- . , - " \ >     ;    - -<
NFWSHJBC m MlRAUFROr. CHS.
'Two separatist movements in B.C.? Socred  bleull"
GAME TIME
Let's play segregation
UJhai do aoo vneaayau
were pl&uina wrih Gabriels ham •■
By JOHN MATE
Hi there. Why do you just
sit there? Get that ape look off
your head and be bored no
more, for game lime is here.
(Cue for trumpets, bugles,
drums, and go-go girls.)
Too many of us do not enjoy university life enough,
simply because we don't have
fun. Yes, fun. Today we are
going to have fun, fun, fun,
playing game, game, game.
Our motto is, 'We are game to
play the  game.'
Now repeat the motto and we
guarantee that by following
our simple instructions you
■will turn your long and dreary
hours of cafeteria life into
short and happy hours of bliss
and contentment.
So, without further hesitation let us start playing 'Segregate Your Campus'. (Cue for
violins, harps, basses, and go-
go girls.)
Do not be alarmed at the
name of our game. We are
not racist, we have never been
and never plan to be. The
game is innocent, so please
don't walk away in your
liberal disgust. You should
never judge a game by its
name. (Cue for judges, attorneys and go go girls.)
CLIQUE. CLIQUE
The reason for the name is
simple. We, 18,000 of us, are
all in favour of and have been
adhering to segregation. We all
belong to a certain clique on
campus, and our whole life
revolves around and within
that clique. We eat, drink,
walk, talk, sleep and other
things. (Cue for go-go girls)
with members of our clique,
and we despperately strive to
segregate ourselves from outsiders, intruders, inferiors.
Although, most of the time
we succeed in our desperate
strife, we do sometimes make
mistakes (we are only human,
you know) and eat, drink,
walk, talk, sleep and etc., with
those whom we would not
otherwise   etcetera  with.
The purpose of the game is
to train us to spot, at a glance,
the various members of various campus cliques so that
we won't have to go on making the mistakes we have been
making. Thus we shall have
the   final   solution:   complete
segregation. (Cue for one roll
of the drums, for all used
furniture salesmen, caravan
leaders, bare horse-back riders and go go girls.
JOE HIPPY
Let us show you what we
mean by spotting a various
member of a various campus
clique.
For our first example, let
us pick on that various looking gentleman over there. No,
not that one, the one beside
him. Yes, the one with the
bushy but balding head, Stalin
mustache, side burns, and generally a cool look about him.
If only we could get a bit
closer . . . why, of course, now
we recognize him. That's none
other than Joe Hippy. His
name is well known to all of
us. We remember Joe Hippy
from last year, the year before that, and before that.
Who could forget good ole'
Joe.
He has caused too many
sensations to toe simply forgotten. Besides, he is easy to
recognize, he always has a
gimmick. His gimmick is his
sex-appeal, and it is a sure
give away, unless it is hidden
In case it is, say a few words
to him and he will reveal his
true head immediately.
"It's a nice day today, hey
Joe?"
"Yes, it makes the grass
grow high." (Cue for Timothy,
all acid, pot, and egg heads,
Lyndon and Lady Bird.)
JOE LIBERAL
Now, that you see what we
mean, the game becomes simple. Just detect your clique,
and segregate.
For our second and last example, we shall select that
young looking young man,
that fine and upstanding epitome of our society, the pride
of our city, our province, our
country, the pride of his
mother, Mr. Joseph Liberal.
Mr. Liberal may be found
all over the campus. He outnumbers all the others, he is
the most popular student of
his professors, he has no gimmicks, he dresses neat, his
face is clean, and he is as liberal as can be.
SWEET SMILE
Why, he  is so  liberal that
not only would he not express
an opinion on any major issue,
but he will also maintain a
blank expression on his face *
to show that he isn't prejudiced. His expression is so
blank that we can only detect Mr. Liberal by his ever
lasting, sweet but phoney smile
for everyone.
So, to spot Mr. Liberal just
look for a blank look, and a
sweet but phoney grin. (Cue
for snakes, rats, houndogs, and
ironing boards.)
We hope that you -will try
out the game, and that you
won't forget our motto, "We
are game to play the game."
Happy segregation.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News      Susan Gransby
Managing       Murray  McMillan
Photo    Kurt  Hilger    *-~
Associate    Al   Birnie,   Kirsten   Emmott
Senior  .....  Pat  Hrushowy,   Bill  Miller
Sports     Mike Jessen
Wire      Charlotte  Haire
Page Friday  Judy Bing
Ass't.  City    Boni   lee
Glancing casts around them, they
lovely,    lovely    metre   made.    Jade .
Eden   glowered   and   Irving   Fetish -*-
cowered.    Paddy    Connor,    Richard
Easton,     Wendy     Carter,     Luanne
Armstrong   and   Gigee   Toth   broke
187    pencils.    Norman   Gidney   took   „
a  lot  of  ribbon,  as did  Pat  Walsh, -fi
Pamela   Mutch,   and   Steve  Jackson.
As Jock Washerman can't attend
the vital editorial board meeting
Friday, it was postponed 'till Tuesday noon.
Chris Blake wrote poetry In the
darkroom. The man-and-wlfe team
of George Hollo helped, too. Left
out? Oh.  pf
KELSEY CONQUERS CUS CHAOS
SEPTEMBER 22,  1967
On the cover:
Arnie Saba goes
psychedelic
editor: judy bing
co-editor: Stephen scobie
assistants:  bert hill
dave welsh
pix:  kurt hilger
arnold saba
gordon fidler
The Happy Centennial
sign on the Granville street
bridge is looking decidedly
the worse for wear; and a
photography shop on
Broadway is running the
slogan "Think Negative."
At a guess, we'd say that
winter is icumen in.
So    welcome   back,   or
forward, students new and
old.   This   here   is   called
. Page   Friday,  and   this  is
what it's all about.
Our purpose is to stimu-
; late the cultural life of
UBC campus. Having said
that, we know that words
mean nothing and big
words less than nothing.
However.
To be more practical:
we see no use whatever
in reviewing something
that happened last week
that five people went to,
but we see every use in
previewing something that
twenty-five might go to
the next week.
We want to interest arts
students in science faculty
lectures, and versa vice.
We want to wake the campus out of its socio-political inertia. We don't want
a single empty seat in the
Freddy Wood all season.
We believe in arts 1 and
the Persky People as the
two best new things on
campus this year.
We point our great big
Kitchener fingers at you,
and say we want you to
write for us. Anything. We
will publish poems, short
stories, drawings, even
musical scores if we can
talk our printer into it.
And if you don't know
what to write, come on
down and we'll tell you.
So much for statements
of purpose. Here endeth
the first lesson. After this
bout of pretentiousness,
we shall retire and meditate upon flowers — till
next Friday. — S.S.
>.^^;V/
By JOHN KELSEY
A great, free-standing bulletin
board was the state-of-mind barometer at
the tenth Canadian Union of Students
seminar.
The ten-day conference started on
Aug. 20. After six days, the following
scream was pinned up.
"On the spot report on the  CUS
seminar:
"The whole crowd has gleefully involved itself in voyeurism
human relationships — playing
freely and pretending to know
people. Meanwhile people's souls
die, and a girl cries alone for an
hour and a half, and drunks insult
singers, and people spread beer
over someone's room and disappear
leaving the mess, and Mrs. Pap
runs around the lounge trying to
clean up and saying we are the
messiest people around, and the
intellectuals run their vacuous
ideas over the minds of the immature and hope to leave a dent
for the party, and we need more
structure. We need structure because people need ideas to go out
and do things, to go out and change
the world — what the fuck world
are we changing to?
"Oh, but we have gone through
the human thing, that's all over,
everybody (anybody) loves everybody now and we are ready to act.
To think, at least.
"I  propose a  plenary;  I want
to hear those who have the nerve
to justify their humanity speak."
The note, signed Rick, described the
situation   at  its   worst.   It's  not  talking
about the whole seminar, nor was it a
universal   view   at any   time.   But   each
participant has his own version of what
happened.
At best, some serious work was done
on the topic, "Academic Reform: Facelift or Major Surgery?" Or, at best, some
people learned about how their souls
relate to other souls. There are 140 other
on the lawn
by the trees
the feelies
did their thing
KELSEY
bests, one per delegate. This account is
not an at best or an at worst. Some of
the names are real and some are not.
WHEELIE (noun) —A person who is
concerned with political action and organizing, with power and functional
change in society; a political strategist;
adj., as in "the wheelie approach."
FEELIE (noun) — A person concerned
with the individual liberation of people
and one-to-one human relationships; a
CYC volunteer; adj., used to define the
character of one's "thing".
The seminar was agendaless, as was
the ninth seminar at Waterloo. That
knowledge created a universal idea at the
start: "I'm not going to be blown by an
unstructured situation. I heard about
Waterloo."
There was a structure, the physical
plant of the University of B.C.'s lower
mall residences. Between Sherwood Lett
house and Kootenay house, a concrete
plaza is flanked by measureless lawns.
Across the road is the Ponderosa cafeteria
and regular meal times. Along a covered
walkway, the common block lounge and
Mrs. Pap's snack bar. Across the lawn
and road the other way, down Lover's
Leap trail, a virtually inaccessible, log-
strewn, rocky beach. Sunshine every day;
and a couple of city sight-seeing tours.
And the bulletin board.
The Ponderosa has an outdoor south
balcony where, the second day, a middle-
aged professor and a predominately maritimes group tried to define education.
Their definition included all the standard
notions of creativity and intellectual
awareness, leading to the expanding horizons of a man's knowledge. A gaggle of
Vancouver hippies and a man in a red-
andjblue jester's costume jingled in.
"Every man is a fool and I am the
biggest fool of all. Are you a man or a
fool?" he said, jangling his fool's bauble.
"Well, I'm going to university to try
to learn to be something other than a
fool," one replied.
"Umm. It is a wise man who knows he
is a fool. I myself have a bachelor's degree. Have you heard about humpty
dumpty?"
•
And while one fool expounded political realities to the professor, a beautiful
blonde and beaded CYC volunteer spoke
of the human soul and the need to be
free, to do your own thing.
Three days later, the wheelies spoke
with Blonde Beads in a lounge, long after
midnight. Part of the recurring Russell-
Warrian thesis on the future of 20th century man speculated on how people become politically active. "If one man is
unemployed, that's a personal problem.
If 15 per cent of the work force is out,
that's a social issue. How are the connections made?" asked Russell.
Blonde Beads left the room, and the
wheelies talked of the need to form political movements. When she returned, the
problem was re-stated: "A man with three
kids and pregnant wife is out of work and
just evicted. He sits with his suitcase on
the sidewalk. What would you urge him
to do, or what could he do?"
She chewed her hair, thought a bit,
and talked about the empty beaches on
Texada island where one could live on
oysters and maybe find an abandoned
farm. For the wheelies, the feelies were
thus made useless. But as Howard said
earlier, wheelies are necessary to make
the world safe for feelies. And, as somebody else said at the same plenary, what
does it mean to foe a wheelie and a feelie
anyway, and what the hell, the categories
are meaningless. People changed sides
a lot, and many never took a side.
About here a medical student donned
a string of blue beads and began to do
his thing with the feelies. But he didn't
know whether he could wear them back
to anatomy class, and he rather doubted
it. In question was whether or not people
could learn ideas in an artificial seminar
environment and still find them meaningful upon returning to the world. The
question was not solved.
Down in beery room nine, the wheelies
plotted world revolution, and on the lawn
by the trees the feelies did their thing.
Interlude. "I really feel out of place
here — we don't have any problems at
our university."
"You mean the administration and
the students always agree? On everything?"
"Sure. They're working in Our interest, after all. The only thing people
get worked up about is dormitory hours,
and the system isn't too restrictive."
Interlude. "The administration on our
campus has responded to student complaints toy forming a batch of advisory
committees. Our problem is what to do
now."
"Sit on them and get the changes you
want made, made."
"But they're stacked with administration people."
"So sit on them and work to expose
them as powerless."
"That's what we tried to do, but they
instituted a pile of minor reforms and
claim to have okayed all our demands."
"Why don't you go back to the protest
forms of action and force them to do
what you want?"
"Yes,   but   that   didn't  work   before
either.  We just don't have the student
support."
"Why don't you get out and build th^(
support,  then,  with issues the students"
. can be concerned about, such as classroom
content?"
"Yes, but we don't have the time.
We've got to devote so much energy to
our present programs and now to the
committees."
In four days, the non-structure broke "
down. Everyone went swimming, or t«
Simon Fraser for the day, or downtown.
Perhaps a dozen people languished
around the residences, and two days later
Doug Ward called a plenary to determine
What Is To Be Done.
Ward's plenary was upstaged by a
host committee plenary, which opened
with a speech about why nothing had
happened so far, why nobody had evolve**
the concrete action plans. The wheelies
and the feelies took hard sides this time:
to structure the remaining three days or
not to structure and continue the same
way. Alphonse the nihilist, the man with
the thick rimless glasses and the thin
black beard, became chairman by making
a speech about the continuing unwillingness of the people to stick to any singl»
topic. The roomful dwindled from 80
people to 40 people, and a committee to
organize topical lectures was not struck.
The committee organized anyway.
Twenty people flew back to the maritimes; the sun shone regardless. Meanwhile, the wheelies continued to gather
in room nine to plot the revolution and
on the beach below Lover's Leap the
feelies did their thing.
•
In the middle of a discourse on phenomenology, a scruffy man with a huge
blue duffle bag sauntered in. He grinned
at Doug Ward, who grinned back and
leaped from his chair. Steve has just
hitch-hiked from Ottawa and while he
showers, Doug explained: "He's a poet
who came to the last few days of the
Waterloo seminar. Last week he called -
the office and asked if he could be a
resource person since the Carleton council wouldn't make him a delegate. I had
to tell him no because we'd already spent'
the budget. 'If I get there on my own,
can I find food and a place to sleep?' he
asked, and I told him he probably could.
Then he walks in here."
The discussion, still with 30 people in
the room, returned to consciousness and
the problem of how people unlearn what
society tells them, how people unlearn
irrational and unconscious behavior patterns. Steve isn't mentioned again that
evening.
Later, Steve returned to the lounge
and explained how he'd given up writing
poetry because the perfect poem is ak
blank sheet of paper. Then you take away
the paper. "Grow your words before you
pick them," he said. And when a newborn feelie talked about striving to be
open and free, Steve said, "You can't tr£
to be open. Instead, you try not to be
closed." Then he played a wooden flute
until dawn.
After the What-Is-To Be-Done plen-
aries, and after the notices for new meetings on specific topic and exact times'
went up, and after those meetings weri
held, the people who wanted the structure
to help them find the right way to run
their campuses were happy.
•
Was the seminar a success? 140 di#
ferent answers. Certainly, it didn't light
the way for major academic reform or
facelifting. It did open a lot of questions
for a lot of people, even for the man who
didn't have any troubles on his campus—w
he went home with a bibliography of left-
wing literature to ponder. Some of the
new feelies took their beads with them,
and a CYC volunteer contemplated leaVr
ing the company. For some, a condemnation of unstructured seminars, for others,
a triumph. *
Down in room nine, the wheelies
plotted the revolution, and in the lounge
some people danced to Stevie Wonder.
a
Friday,  September 22,   1967 ■EAF*!
fmtimisrmMtwm
Page Friday proudly resur-
~^ rects (under a temporary title)
"* that 1965 bonbon, This Week
Has Two Columns.  A contest
is hereby called to rename it.
-,Send  your suggestions to the
Page Friday editor.
Well, now that we're all
back In the crib, complaining
C3» about the dehumanizing jobs
we had to work at all summer
and forgetting about the mil-
^ lions who are mired in those
jobs for life, shall we mourn
for a few missing landmarks?
Ex-president   John   Barfoot
Macdonald   got   married   this
-.j. summer.  Bet you didn't  even
know he was divorced.
Ex-housing czar Malcolm
McGregor is in Greece, where
rhe should be feeling right at
home, and housing's new director, Leslie Rohringer, is
said to be human. Rohringer
must not know about the vol-
■„ unteer police force being organized in Lower Mall girls'
dorms to discipline rowdy
frosh ...
Ex-King  of  the  Hairy  Red
Blorgs,   Eric   Newell,   B.A.Sc.
*" '67, has won an Athlone Fellowship for  two years  study
in England, believe it or not.
Alumni Association leader
Tim Hollick-Kenyon has resigned and so has the editor
~v of the Alumni Chronicle. Let's
hope a permanent editor is
found soon: the Chronicle is
thinking of devoting an entire
issue to the financing of higher
education.
More   scandals:    informed
-' sources say our dean Ian Mac-
Taggart-Cowan   (an   ecologist)
failed organic chemistry twice.
Shudder, you life scientists in
Chem    230;   there's   only   one
\    zoology prof on  campus who
,_  made the course the first time
around.
Our old friend WP 120 S6,
funniest book in the Woodward library, is not on the
y shelves, but lab workers are
still emptying their teapot
onto the charred spot beneath
one of the engineering annex
windows.
Topnotch genetics prof
., David Suzuki lectured the first
day of classes wearing sandals,
a paisley shirt over a turtle-
neck, an ankh symbol on a
leather thong, and a three-
inch-wide belt with a gigantic
,_* buckle. And, of course, pants.
Suzuki plans to continue his
Thursday-night seminars at
the Fraser Arms.
Can   UBC  architects   count
-*'   up to three? Maybe not. They
misnumbered the   elevator  in
the new dentistry building so
that to get to the third floor
*   you push button number 2.
And a note to whoever lit
». up a joint in Freddy Wood
- Theatre Wednesday; one of
the undercover narks on campus goes by the name of
"Dizzy". Don't say we didn't
warn you.
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filled with joy
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ooooooooooooooooooo
"TALKING" BY MICHAEL MORRIS
GARY LEE NOVA'S SNAKE-LIKE NEON. "HASH CANNON"
By STAN PERSKY
A stoned voice comes out of
what looks like five pinball
machines, intoning, "Touch
. . . touch . . . touch me." It's
broken up by bits of street
sound and ragas. The battery
of machines flicker on and off,
lighting scenes of comic book
art.
In front of you is a six-foot
high, nine-foot long, snake-
green object that ends in an
arrow; it fills your eyes with
blinking blue neon. The arrow
(Hash Cannon) is by Gary Lee
Nova; the machine-eum-sound-
track-message is Audrey Dor-
ay's creation.
These are two of 46 pieces,
characterized by brightness,
illusory shapes and action,
that director Alvin Balkind of
the UBC gallery assembled
for a summer show called
Joy and Celebration.
Perhaps it's not really joy
and celebration, but it's certainly fun. To look at and be
with. Toys. A sense of playing
and humor.
Though closed to the public now, Balkind has left Joy
and' Celebration up so that
western museum directors,
who are meeting here for   a
Flower children wilt
By SCOTT LAWRANCE
The hippies, the flower children, the love
generation, whatever you, or the mass media
wish to designate them have passed thru a
crucial stage the summer of 1967.
The kids that were out on the street for
the summer only, the would be juvenile delinquents of an earlier time, have largely returned
to their homes. Some still hang on, in the hopes
of eking some sort of existence out of the winter
streets. Most of the high school age group have,
or will return, with varying degrees of adjustment, to their schools. But they will remember
the summer and may return to the various hippy
communities next summer, or when they leave
the educational system for good.
The hippies, and I speak here of the older
generation, have seen fond hopes wilt. The
projected abolition of the consumer-oriented,
status-seeking, coercive society through a dropping out from that system no longer appears
likely.
The summer witnessed the increasing commercialization of the hippy "movement".
Examples of this have been seen in the rapid
incorporation of the hippy subculture by pop
culture as expressed, condoned, and perpetrated
by Life, Time, and Newsweek, as well as other
conservative arms of the mass media; the growing number of profit seeking hippies, among
both those on the street selling dope at ridiculous
prices, and those in the stores selling the latest
fashionable psychedelic trivia.
The average kid on the street is missing the
point. He is remaining as unliberated, untrust-
ing, unloving as the "straight" that he puts down
with such readiness.
This is not to put down the hippy philosophy,
presuming that there is such a thing. Rather,
I have come to the realization that the hippies
lack nothing but a direction for all their energies.
They have solved the dilemma of a rotten society
for themselves, but they leave the vast majority
of people, either more ignorant than themselves,
or more resigned, wallowing in the filth of a
decadent civilization.
It is up to the students to provide some sort
of direction for society.
$^^-V ♦"?<'»_?!. .'*''T^>   - '      s   ,™; "T*
It is up to the university to take up where
the hippies refuse to keep going.
A society must be created in which the ideal
of each person being capable of developing to
the fullest of his potentials is the reality, a
society which is noncoercive, where freedom is a
reality, not a figment of bourgeois imagination.
To these ends then, students must work on
all educational levels, but presumably beginning
in the universities, to democratize and to create
for themselves institutions which are once again
human and educational, institutions which regard the student not as a number, a cog, or a
pawn, but which are concerned with the individual's concept of himself, his relation to the
world, and his own, not society's happiness
(though the latter would follow logically from
the former).
There are steps being made in this direction.
Hopefully, the arts 1 program is one of these,
and it must be commended. Good luck to all
involved.
However, it is not enough. As students become more and more aware, more responsible,
they should demand a stronger and stronger voice
in control of their institutions. All of us should
work toward realization of an ideal educational
system. All should work toward a breakdown
of the old structures which inhibit true education, such as the lecture, grade, and examination
systems, and such bureaucratic, meaningless
structures as the AMS, to name only a few. All
the time, the goal must be kept in mind. This
is the same goal as the hippies have ultimately
realized, a society in which people can talk
together as people, in which people can relate
to others, in short, a truly human society..
This column will act as a forum for complaints, ideas, and recognitions. I would like
to note here a step in the right direction. The
arts undergraduate council is opening a free
store in Buchanan lounge in the near future, in
which money will play a negligible part. Free
tea will be served as will free rice (the latter only
once a day). It will be a continuing center for
free exchange of thought and goods, a microcosm
of the future society. Money for such projects
may be forthcoming to any interested in action.
conference, can get a look at
it.
Balkind is currently busy
working on the gallery's first
show for 67-68, an exhibit of
prints and drawings that will
open October 11.
The gallery (along with the
overcrowded UBC Library)
will probably be among the
intellectual issues students arc
going to fuss about this year.
As Miss Suzy Creamcheese,
Arts 1, said, "The gallery is
important. It should be five
times bigger. Why don't they
give Mr. Balkind a decent
amount of money?"
More authoritatively, Art-
forum editor Philip Leider,
writing in the July issue of
Arts Canada, put it this way:
"Perhaps the most knowledgeable and supportive figure on
the current Vancouver scene
is Alvin Balkind. Thoroughly
conversant with what is happening among the younger
artists in Vancouver as well
as everywhere else ... if there
is a single archive of the art
history of the present and recent past in Vancouver, it is
in the head of Alvin Balkind."
Leider cogently describes
the problem here. "Balkind
works with the impossible
handicap of an absurdly small
budget; many of the important
arts events that occur (with
remarkable frequency) at the
university gallery go without
documentation, publicity, or
extensive notice outside t he
local art community."
■i\'t^
f { 3hree
'• V-sx.3
Friday, September 22, 1967 film
•-.'   i;' •■• ^'fh'Y^tr".
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
(1) Where To Go.
You'll find that all the commercial films hit
downtown first and seep out to the suburbs.
There's no hurry to see anything: even if you
do miss it at the Odeon, in a
year or so it'll show up at the
Hollywood or the Colonial, and
what's more they charge less.
A film over in Park Royal
will usually get a downtown
showing too, but if you're nervous by all means cross the
bridge, the seats are comfortable.
SCOBIE For "art" movies you rely
on the Varsity at the top of Tenth. Be wary
about going in the first week: there, a film can
equally well last one week or ten. The public
is funny.
On campus, Cinema 16 provides a movie a
week, with high standards and low prices. See
them about it at Brock 357. The Film Society
also runs shows in the Auditorium on odd Thursdays; first one due in this year is Zorba the
Greek.
And if you're desperate, you can always hire
a projector from Audio-Visual Services in the
Extension Department. . . .
(2) What to See.
Far and away the best film in town right
now is Milos Forman's Loves of a Blonde, chez
Varsity. It's got a nice blend of realism and
comedy, which looks easy but is in fact very
difficult to achieve. What makes it go is its
absolute truthfulness; what makes it great is
the astonishing artistic tact of the presentation.
Be sure not to miss the Burton-Taylor-
Zefferelli Taming of the Shrew at the Stanley.
That ancient Elizabethan swinger, Willy Shakespeare, would have loved it. So, at a guess,
will you.
Idealists in the Department of Education are
well served with Up the Down Staircase and
To Sir With Love, warm-hearted homilies of
Good Teachers making astonishing progress with
Misunderstood Kids.
Sidney Poitier, every whitey's idea of what a
blacky should be, is also on benign view at the
Coronet in The Heat Of The Night, a murder
mystery directed by Canadian Norman Jewison,
which exhibits remarkable traces of intelligence.
The Lyric is burning virgins again.
The Capitol is due to start up good ol' Dr.
Zhivago for the first time at normal prices
hurray.   Yon David has a Lean and hungry look.
And finally, just in case you are tempted
to dismiss The Dirty Dozen as a rather sadistic
and highly commercial war film, let me assure
you that the whole thing is really a cleverly
disguised parallel to the life of Christ, with his
twelve disciples. In fact, in one key scene there
is a direct reproduction of the seating arrangements of the Last Supper.   Isn't that something?
. ..•«*■ w. ryft-ff '<m*^/-**yvv<c " ■>
S
It
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE1
THE YEAR'S BEST TRIP
VOLPONE
(THE FOX)
by Ben Jonson
with Derek Ralston and Lee Taylor
directed by Donald Soule
designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
Sept. 29-Oct. 7
Student Tickets 75 cents
(available for all performances)
Special Student Performances-Mon., Oct. 2, 7:30 p.m., Thurs., Oct. 5, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre — Room 207 or 228-2678
SAVAGE     •     GROTESQUE     •      HILARIOUS
THE FIRST AND GREATEST BLACK COMEDY
SUPPORT  YOUR  CAMPUS THEATRE
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- books —
Frozen folk poet
grooves on tundra
By ROY STARRS
A true folk poet is a rare
thing.
Of older poets, Robert Service qualifies. The evidence
was in recent beer ads. He
wrote of the Canadian North,
like a new poet, Alfred Purdy.
Purdy is the Bob Dylan of
the Eskimos, and doubles as
their Wordsworth. Wordsworth in the Arctic? It's an
absurd proposition, but, goddam it, something in the desolate tundra grips Purdy between his balls and his eyeballs.
It might be an Eskimo
female, but, then again, it
might be an Arctic river, or a
dwarf tree, or the ghost of an
old explorer.
Look here
Yottve never seen this
country
it's not the way you thought
it was
Look again.
This simple directive serves
as an invitation to Purdy's
new book North of Summer,
written on Baffin Island  in
the summer of 1965.
So vast a subject as the
Arctic is difficult even for the
poet's mind to encompass.
Purdy approaches it with a
mixed sense of wonder and
absurdity.
He marvels at the life
which can survive sub-zero
temperatures. Flowers, for
instance, the "small purple
surprises".    And the people:
These unknowable human
beeings
who have endured 5,000
years
on the edge of the world
a myth from long ago.
But again, he may invoke
quite another vision:
Sometimes in summer
when it rains
mud and garbage
the shore awash with
blood and stones
slippery from rancid blubber
I think of the whole Arctic
as a used sanitary pad
thrown away
by a goddess.
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Friday,  September  22,   1967 jKywv
*}$ Afv/t?
politics
THE JUNE WAR:
A case of Zionist aggression
MATE
By GABOR MATE
The roots  of this summer's  Middle East crisis
reach far beneath the surface of recent events and
slo complete understanding of it is possible without
an extended discussion of the birth of Zionism
and of the Jewish state in Palestine, the reasons
for the Arab hostility towards Israel, the interests
and respective roles of Russia and the West in the
^Middle East, the Arab refugee problem, and the
nature of Arab-Israeli relations since the creation
of Israel. Lack of space, of course,
prevents   such   a   discussion   here
,but before we look at the recent
crisis some historical background
is necessary.
The three major causes of Arab
hostility are:
1. The fact that a country with
Aan overwhelming Arab majority,
was, due to the interference of
foreign powers transformed into a Jewish country.
In 1917, when Britain "promised" Palestine to the
Jews — thereby contravening her promises to the
Arabs — Palestine had a Jewish population of fifty-
thousand while there were over six-hundred thousand Arabs. What right, the Arabs asked, had
Britain to promise an Arab country to anybody?
Unless two thousand year old claims are to be
recognized the world over, the Jews had no right
to Palestine. It is true they have suffered much,
but, writes an Arab, "The Western sense of guilt
for what happened to the Jews in the West by
Western hands cannot be relieved by helping poor
Jews in the home of poor Arabs. The Arabs should
not be expected to pay for the crimes of Hitler."
Gabor Mate, arts 4, volunteered for Israel in the
Six Days War. But preliminary research since expanded changed his mind on the realities of the war.
This is a precis of a forthcoming pamphlet by
<f Gabor, at one lime the leader of a Zionist youth-
group in Vancouver.
2. The war which resulted in the consolidation
of the Jewish state in 1948 also resulted in the flight
of   ovej^ a  million   native Arabs   from   Palestine.
sc&
Jewish  terrorism  and   coercion  is   at   least  partly
responsible for this flight, but the Zionists have
maintained that the refuge problem is exclusively
the responsibility of the Arab leaders. But no matter
who is responsible, why should the Arabs not be
given back their homes, the land, their businesses,
"■ and their right to live in the country of their birth?
Writes Eric Fromm, the famous Jewish psychiatrist:
"Just because the Arabs fled? Since when is that
punishable by confiscation of property and by being
barred from returning to the land on which a
people's forefathers have lived for generations?"
As early as 1949 the UN called upon Israel to
allow the refugees a choice between repatriation
or compensation, but Israel has always ignored this
demand — repeated several times since then. In
fact, Israel has ignored more UN resolutions than
any other country. Of the over ninety resolutions
dealing with the Palestine question since 1949 only
,-,one has been directed against the Arabs and all the
others against Israel — in many cases charging
Israel with aggressive actions.
3. The Arabs consider Israel a constant threat.
If it seems unimaginable that a small country could
pose a threat to her larger neighbours, we must
remember that often in the past the Middle East
has been conquered by small but determined and
well-organized groups of intruders. As the recent
crisis made obvious, Israel is definitely in a position
to coerce her weak, backward, and disunited neigh-
_, bours.
The immediate causes of the latest war — or at
least the ostensible immediate cause — was the
growing tension on the Syria-Israel border, due to
two factors; increasing Arab terrorism from supposedly Syrian bases, and military clashes between
Syrian and Israeli forces on land and in the air.
*%Both of these factors must be examined.
"In the most immediate sense", wrote Newsweek
on June 5, 1967, "the crisis had begun with Israel's
farming operations in early April." What was at
issue here?
"In 1949 when the fighting between Israel and
the Arabs ended,"
writes the New York Times,
"Syrian troops held the southwest comer of the
(Huleh) Valley.  It was agreed during the armistice talks that the Syrians would withdraw and
the area would be made a demilitarized zone."
The armistice agreements did not specify future
ownership of the area, and subject to further talks
the zone was to be a no-man's land. The Israeli's,
however, proceeded to establish settlements there,
thus laying a claim to possessions which the Syrians
have  never accepted.  This year  the  Syrians went
beyond verbal denunciations and occasionally shelled settlements in the  disputed zone and fired on
agricultural workers plowing the fields. The resulting incidents were described by Israel as aggression,
"Unless two thousand year-old claims are to
be recognized the world over, the Jews had
no right to Palestine."
but who is the aggressor in the case? Israel who
illegally occupies and cultivates the demilitarized
zone, or Syria who refuses to accept this as a fait
accompli?
On April 7 one of these border fights "escalated"
into a major air battle in which Israeli planes pursued Syrian MIG's sixty miles into Syria, as far as
Damascus, and shot down six of them. This is how
Itzhak Rabin, Israel's Chief of Staff, described the
incident:
"The Air Force was authorized to patrol a certain
distance inside the Syrian border, but if they
made contact with the MIG's they were under
no restrictions—they could go to Damascus."
Who would be judged the aggressor if Russian
planes were authorized to patrol "a certain distance"
inside American territory and if challenged by Am-
reican fighters they would be "under no restrictions",
they could go to Washington?
While stressing its right to oppose Israeli occupation of the demilitarized zone, the Syrian government has denied all responsibility for the terrorist
raids by Palestinian refugee commandos on Israeli
territory. These raids, the desperate attempts of the
refugees to avenge the loss of their homeland —
increasing in frequency in the first months of this
year — were carried out by a Palestinian refugee
organization, El Fatah, and its military arm, El
Asefah, The Storm. According to a report by UN
Secretary General U Thant:
"Although allegations are often made, to the best
of my knowledge there is no verified information
about   the   organization,   central   direction   and
originating sources of these acts. . . ."
The New York Times reported that
"In the past, Syrian Governments  tried  to step
in and exercise firmer control over El Asefah,
but the organization resisted and reliable sources
report   the  present  regime  has  made  no  such
attempts."
Israel,   however,   held   the   Syrian  government
responsible for all acts of terrorism, thus continuing
the policy she has pursued since 1949. Her policy
"The Arabs should not be expected to pay tor
the crimes of Hitler."
has been to charge the neighbouring governments
as the aggressors in each case of revenge terrorism
by displaced Palestinians, and to launch massive
retaliatory raids on her neighbours' territory. The
UN has on numerous occasion condemned Israel
for such raids, the last one taking place in November
of 1966 on Jordanian territory.
In April and May of this year Israeli leaders
began to make statements which convinced the
Syrians, and many people elsewhere as well, that
Israel was preparing for a major attack on Syria.
The fact of an impending Israeli attack on Syria
cannot  be  overemphasized,  for  it was this threat
which set off the chain of events leading to the
actual outbreak of war. The Israeli threat to Syria,
therefore requires some documentation — all of it
gathered from pro-Israel Western sources.
Newsweek, May 29, 1967:
"We are able to strike back at a place and by a
method of our own choosing," declared Israeli
Prime Minister Levi Eshkol. And through foreign
correspondents gathered in Jerusalem for 'backgrounders'. Israel disseminated the tough message
that it now considered massive retaliation the
only answer. . . .
New York Times, May 13, 1967:
"The comments being heard (in Israel) in recent
weeks  and  especially  since  last  weekend,  are
stronger than those usually heard in responsible
quarters."
Time. June 2, 1967:
"Stung by these (terrorist) attacks, Premier
Eshkol made the second error by threatening war
against Syria to stop them."
New Republic, April 15, 1967:
"All reports from Israel supported the view that
next time the retaliation would be full-scale,
aimed not only at destroying a Syrian fortification on the border, but at finishing the Syrian
government."
Newsweek, June 5, 1967:
"Israel's Chief of Staff, Gen. Itzakh Rubin, publicly
observed (on May 12) that the time might have
come to seize Damascus and topple the Syrian
government."
U   Thant   had   this   to  say  concerning   the   Israeli
threats to Syria:
"In recent weeks reports emanating from Israel
have attributed to some high  officials in  that
state statements so threatening as to be particularly inflammatory."
And,  predictably  enough,  the  Syrians  did  not
view with complete equanimity the prospects of an
"Nasser has no desire to take on the powerful
Israeli army."
Israeli seizure of Damascus. George Tomeh, Syrian
ambassador to the UN, said that the Israeli statements "contain a very clear threat of the use of
force against Syria."
The Syrian government called upon Egypt to
fulfil her commitments under the Syrian-Egyptian
mutual defense pact, signed in November of 1966.
Egypt complied. On May 17 the Egyptian army was
placed on alert and from Cairo came reports of
troop movements towards the Sinai. .Wrote the New
York Times correspondent from Cairo:
"The alert here came after Israeli officials made
it known that they had decided that force was
the only way to- curtail terrorist attacks."
(We must remember here that according to the
UN Secretary General there was no proof linking
the Syrian government with these attacks. In any
case, a full scale war is hardly the way to deal with
terrorism stemming from the Israeli refusal to
comply with the UN resolutions on the refugee
problem.)
Clearly it was not enough for Nasser to move
troops into the Sinai. As long as the UNEF remained
between him and Israel, his promise of support for
Syria in case the latter was attacked by Israel was
just empty words, incapable of being fulfilled. Thus
on May 18 U Thant announced the UNEF withdrawal from the Egypto-Israeli border, in accordance
with the wishes of the Egyptian government. It
must be emphasized that Cairo had a perfect right
to demand this withdrawal, for the Emergency
Force was based completely on Egyptian territory,
subject to the agreement of the Egyptian government. It was Israel, we must remember, who had
refused in 1957 the stationing of UN peace-keeping
troops on her territory. With the removal of UNEF,
wrote the New York Times, Nasser
(Continued   on   pfG)
\
Friday, September 22,  1967 Nasser would negotiate
JORDANIAN REFUGEES
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Across from the Village
10 a.m. - Worship 11:15 a.m. - Worship
(Pearson officiating) (Fox officiating)
ALSO ON WEDNESDAY - 10 P.M.
One Performance Only
"A WHITE RABBIT MULTI-MEDIA PRODUCTION"
BOSK
*"""""
mnatcBto tickm stats. 1
t
Atitj      MBma _.TOftR__
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TOWM  AMD fcouMttftV     BliEfcttB-OllttSl
I KBMUSDflliB    Mlb     MCHMOMD   B.6.
Lights by:
MAGIC TANGERINE FLORAL LIGHT QUASAR
(Continued from previous page)
"Erased one of the most persistent and irritating goads directed against him: the charge
by Jordan that Egyptian forces were hiding
behind the UN's skirts . . ."
We   see,  thus   that   Nasser   in   placing   his
troops on alert was no more than reacting to
the bellicose Israeli threats against his Syrian
ally. From all accounts it is evident that once
Israel had advertised to the world her intention
of attacking  Syria,  Nasser  had  no alternative
but to act to protect the Damascus government.
Wrote Time on May 26, 1967:
"Nasser has no desire to take on the powerful
Israeli army, which he knows is more than a
match for all the Arab armies combined. His
military interests, furthermore, lie not in
Israel but in Yemen and in the South
Arabian Federation, which is due to receive
its independence from Britain next year.
Despite his reluctance, however. Nasser
had no choice but to respond to the Syrian
SOS "
And Time again, on June 2, 1967:
"But Nasser still had one out: the presence
on his border with Israel of a small UN
peace-keeping force—which he had often
in the past used as an excuse for not acting.
With Israel threatening to invade Syria, he
could hardly use the excuse again. . . ."
On May 18 Israel announced a partial call-
up of her reserves, and in succeeding days the
Arabs an ostentious—but as subsequent events
would reveal completely false—show of unity.
Jordan placed her army under Egyptian command (although this remained merely a paper
agreement),   and   Algerian,   Iraqi,   and   Saudi
Arabian   troops   were   flown   into   Egypt   and
Jordan.
"Israel's claims to Elath are
somewhat dubious"
The next "escalation" of the conflict came
with the reimposition of the Egyptian blockade
of the Straits of Tiran, following the UNEF
withdrawal from Sharm El-Sheikh—the military position commanding the Straits at the
southern end of the Gulf of Aquaba. On May
22 the United Arab Republic announced that
no Israeli ships, nor any ships carrying strategic
materials to Israel, would be allowed to pass
through the Strait. Said Nasser:
"The Jews threatened war. We tell them:
You are welcome, we are ready for war,
but under no circumstances will be abandon
any of our rights. This water is ours."
Let us now examine the rights and wrongs of the
dispute over the Egyptian blockade.
Until the Israeli invasion of Egypt in 1931.
Egypt had prevented Israeli shipping through
the Straits of Tiran. The arrival of UNEF, which
replaced the Israeli occupation troops, kept the
Straits open until the recent crisis. It is the contention of Israel and her Western friends that
the Straits of Tiran is an international waterway
through which many goods essential to Israel's
economy, particularly oil, arrive at the Israeli
port of Elath at the other end of the Gulf of
Aquaba. It is surprising to find, however, that
Israel's claims to Elath itself are somewhat
dubious.
r
"Nasser had no choice but to respond to
the Syrian SOS"
Until 1949 what is now known as Elath was
a small Arab village, called Om Ramrash. The
1949 armistice agreements placed it outside
Israeli territory. After the withdrawal of Egyptian troops from the area, however, Israel, occupied
Om Ramrash and declared it part of the Jewish
State. Listing the achievements of Israel's first
year in his 1950 Independence Day broadcast
David Ben-Gurion, Israel's first prime-minister
said:
"We enlarged our bounds, even to Elath and
the Red Sea. . . ".
But even if Israel's possession of Elah was
indisputable, her right of passage through the
Straits of Tiran is not. For if Egypt is granted
what most maritime nations claim for themselves, a twelve mile or even three mile territorial limit, then the waters of the Straits are
clearly within Egyptian territory. Only Saudi
Arabia, on the opposite shore, could challenge
Egypt's claim but the Saudi government allowed
the Egyptians free reign in the handling of the
blockade. If the U.S.., Canada, Russia, Sweden
and all other maritime nations can regard as
their own waters washing their shores, cannot
Egypt do the same?
Egypt cannot, argues Israel and the U.S., for
the fact that the Straits connect two oceans
makes it an international waterway. But what
about the Panama Canal, which also connects
two oceans — is it not also an "international
waterway," And yet Cuban and Chinese shipping is not permitted through the Panama. The
argument is, of course, that the Panamanian
government can deny passage to anyone, for
the canal is within Panamanian territory.
Granting this argument, as the U.»_4tdoes in
the case of Panama, who could deny the sam£
right to Egypt? Another example is the Bosporus, connecting the Black Sea with the Mediterranean. Despite the fact that the Bosporus
is Russia's only outlet to the Mediterranean,
because it flows within Turkish territory the
Russians must seek permission from the Turks
"Hap*'
fny '-.f^i "*"J*S7'
PURPOSE:
WHO IS
ELIGIBLE:
THE
PROGRAM:
YOUNG ALUMNI CL
gUM_*< «»*»«. wNivei-jWTv or aRmsM colomwa
The Young Alumni Club is an organization to provide a medium
for the younger graduates of the University (those who have
graduated since 1957) to retain their ties with the campus and
at the same time foster and develop their spirit and understanding
of the University, its aims and goals.
(1) members of the 1968 graduating class
(2) alumni (ie. URC graduates) presently on campus
(faculty and students)
(3) alumni working off campus
The club hosts regular "TGI'F" sessions at Cecil Green Park from
4 p.m. to 8 p.m. each Friday. Commencing in November, special
emphasis will be placed each week on a different faculty. It is
hoped that members of the faculty will come down and meet
informally with these students.
The first regular session of "TGIF" will be held Friday, September
22nd at Cecil Green Park from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. (Cecil Green Park
is located below Fort Camp).   Please bring identification.
Friday, September 22,  1967 but Israel attacks first
if they wish passage for their ships. Such a case,
interestingly enough, occurred during the recent
crisis. But has Egypt not the same rights as
^.Turkey? Clearly Egypt's actions have ample
legal precedent in current international practice.
But why did Nasser reimpose the blockade,
*, knowing as he did that Israel—regardless of the
rights and wrongs of the case—would not accept
such an abrupt change in the status quo? The
immediate  reason   was   simply that with   the
.. evacuation  of  UNEF   troops   from   Sharm   El-
■v. Sheikh he had no excuse NOT to reimpose the
blockade. We must remember that it was only
the presence of UNEF after the Israeli occupation in 1956 that made possible Israeli passage
-r through the Straits. With the departure of UNEF
Jordan immediately asked publicly what Nasser
intended to do about Israeli shipping in Arab
waters. Still, it wasn't an easy decision to make
and not until five days after the departure of
**- UNEF did Nasser announce the blockade.
"Israel wished to provoke a major war"
But there was a further, more important
reason for Nasser's announcement of the blockade. Having been forced into a situation in
which he had to act as the defender of his Syrian
". ally, Nasser still wanted at all costs to avoid
an armed conflict he couldn't win. It is important to note that at no time during the crisis
did Nasser threaten to attack Israel. Instead,
K reported the UN Secretary General,
"President Nasser and Foreign Minister Riad
assured me that the U.A.R. would not initiate
offensive action against Israel."
Israel, on the other hand, never made such
a commitment. The most provocative statement
*►. attributed to Nasser is that in case of an Israeli
attack his goal would be to destroy Israel, just
as the Second World War allies destroyed Nazi
Germany after Germany had started the war.
Nasser, then, wished to use the blockade as
a   negotiation point   to   avoid   war.   Reported
'   Time:
"From Arab diplomats in both Cairo and
Beirut last week came hints that the crisis
might be negotiated. Nasser . . . does not
want to gamble his winnings by actually
leading them (the Arabs) to war. He is
-v reportedly ready to bargain with Israel for
the lifting of the blockade of the Gulf of
Aqaba."
The price, most likely, would have been an
Israeli compliance with the UN resolutions concerning the Arab refugees, and an Israeli evacu -
ation  of   the   various   demilitarized   zones   she
-^ had occupied illegally since 1949. A guarantee
against an attack on any of Israel's neighbours
would also have been demanded. The fact that
Nasser   was   ready   ^ negotiate   was   further
showed by his agreenK^t to send, in the words
of the New York Times,
"Zakariya Mohiedinne, a Vice-President and
former Minister of the Interior with a reputation for moderation and for getting along
with Westerners, would arrive Wednesday.
Mr.  Mohiedinne,  the third ranking official
in   the   UAR   will  be  the  highest  ranking
Egyptians to visit the U.S. since 1952."
But   negotiations   were   not   to  take   place,
for three days before   Mohiedinne's arrival in
Washington war erupted between Israel and the
Arabs.
Who started the war? It is no longer seriously disputed by anyone that Israel was the one
to attack. For only Israel had anything to gain
from the war, as all Western correspondents
recognized. Wrote James Reston of the New
York Times from Cairo only half a day before
the fighting broke out:
"An alarming fatalism seems to be settling
on this city. Cairo does not want war and it
is certainly not ready for war."
And though Israel claimed when hositilities
began on June 5 that she was under Arab attack, this was nowhere seriously accepted. A
few random quotes from the pro-Israel Western
press suffice.
Vancouver Sun, June 12, 1967:
"But the substance ot  the Egyptian 'agression'   appears   to   have  been   uncommonly
lame—if it existed at all."
Time, June 16, 1967:
"Inevitably the fact that so many Arab planes
were trapped in their parking area—strung
out wingtip to wingtip—suggested that Israel
must have struck the first blow."
New York Times, June 19, 1967:
"The first, and as it turned out, decisive phase
of the battle was the devasting Israel air
attack which all but wiped out the combined
air forces of their Arab opponents."
There is no need here to go into details of
the campaign. Suffice it to say that after four
days of fighting Israel had increased her territory from 8,000 to 34,000 square miles and the
Arab armies were defeated, shattered and demoralized. Why, we must ask, did the war take
place?
The first question that must be answered is:
why did Israel make such widely-publicized
threats against the Syrian government? It had
not been Israeli policy in the past to announce
attack on her neighbours to the world in advance. The previous "retaliatory raids" had always been sudden, swift, and devastating. All
these advantages were potentially endangered
by the bellicose Israeli statements. The simple
explanation is that Israel wished to provoke a
crisis which would give her an excuse for a
major war. She knew that by forcing Egypt to
come to Syria's aid she could provoke such a
crisis. Now we must deal with the problem of
why Israel wanted or needed a major war.
To be continued Tuesday: Why Israel provoked
the crisis and the war
»"Us. o> ' >*■>-;
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It's the urban show with masculine "go". The versatility of the.
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styled to be tried on for sighs. Rich window pane checks or the
brawny breed of the bolder checks designed with a slightly forward pitched shoulder, a diminished middle for the contoured
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the shape you'll like to be seen in. Vests are single breasted;
pants have plain front. And the textures are touchably thick —
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Friday, September 22, 1967
THE^ U BiTSWY
Page 13
JT
M~-g.  ^mmm  mmw    mmm   jMfe.     mutt*"'-'. '■■■- ':||i_|:.'Vd^..      ;   «««_   -«■-:.;»-;.^m _.■.. -""■-■--:^:_______.,v"-.;^^i;-.■"-■.' «» ^mm,.                ■ --■ -
LETTERmmMMMmBmmm
Tragic
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Thursday I witnessed a
tragic event. A young man,
struck by a car on the west
mall, writhed on the ground
in pain and delerium from
severe head injuries a full 26
minutes before the arrival
of a metropolitan ambulance
and a doctor from the faculty
r of medicine. Firemen from
the Morley firehall administered rudimentary first aid.
U1BC  patrolmen,  recognizing
; the inadequacy of their so-
called ambulance, could do
little but direct traffic while
anxiously awaiting professional aid.
I recall the Ubyssey's campaign three years ago to obtain a proper ambulance for
the campus, and the makeshift patrolwagon-cum-ambu-
lance B & G provided under
pressure. We've suffered this
shoddy    treatment    long
y enough. This university community of thirty-thousand
people needs a proper ambulance now. Does the administration need a death to
drive the point home?
KEN DAWSON
grad studies
'Coups?'
-■    Editor, The Ubyssey:
May I suggest an alternative
to the inadequate, unrepresentative, and monotonous
AMS election system? Why
don't we have coups instead
of elections? Not only would
it be more exciting that way,
but we could also be certain
that if someone wanted to get
into   office  ibadly   enough   to
organize a military take-over,
he wouldn't be apathetic once
he was in.
Obviously, such drastic action is only needed to establish the executive. Small day-
to-day matters could be settled
by jousting of council, or by
duels, and council meetings
could be replaced by hand-
to-hand battles on the lawns.
This could save most of us
a lot of time and thought and
trouble in general; besides,
the newspapers would have
some real news to report, and
the participants would gain
valuable experience in revolutionary politics It would provide scope for the power-
hungry, involvement for the
apathetic, and satisfaction for
those who want someone to
tell them what to do.
IHAJ BEHESHTI
Interruption
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Thoughts on your clocks.
Dr. Leon J. Ladner, Q.C.
Sir:
You are indeed correct in
thinking the students of this
university need to be reminded that 'the hours at our university are very precious'
(consult Calendar page A35—
Fees). They need to be reminded that the university is
a place for thought and research which continues night
and day (main stacks closed
10:00 p.m.). Too often they
forget that each lecture is
only an hour (after which they
must race to another). Surely
the hours they spend thinking in terms of time are the
most valuable (getting the
girl out of bed and back into
res.).
With    great   wisdom   you
have decided to place four
clocks at the top of your
tower (building a tower for
itself was rightly rejected as
wasteful). However, there is
one thing you may have overlooked. Shouldn't there be
365 bells (one clang each day
will disturb a class as well as
355. But as you have chosen
355, I trust they will ring out
a tune familiar to all our
ears. (We are, We are the . . .)
Finally, let me congratulate Mr. Griffin for his design which compliments the
angular architecture of the
library. The tower will be a
uniting force rising above all
the buildings and reminding
students and profs alike that
over-due books must be returned (will the individual
who has the timeless work by
Fred C. Crews, The Pooh Perplex, please return it: my
little brother wants to brush
up before applying for a seat
on the Board of Governors;
its the only way he'll be able
to get a doctor of law).
POOHED
Oh  boy!
Editor, The Ubyssey:
So we are getting a $150,-
000 "gift carillon tower"
southwest of the main entrance to the library.
Oh, boy. Every hour students in the library will be
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saluted with a blast of sound.
Carillons are for cathedrals—
and the birds. If the kind
donor wishes to assualt our
ears, could he not install a
piped-in music system in the
library? That would be even
more effective in interrput-
ing studies.
If he wants to remind us
that "the hours at university
are very precious" perhaps
he could buy us all watches.
Has anyone got 18,000
watches wholesale for $150.-
000? Get in touch with Dr.
Ladner quick — before the
bells toll for thee—and me.
LARS JOHNSON
Arts 4
I could have
danced the whole
night through
You could have, too. Only why
did the dance have to he at that
particular time of month ?
Funny how the most important
events in your life so often
happen on the wrong days of
the month. But there's no need
to worry about that any longer.
With Tampax tampons you feel
poised and confident. Worn
internally, they let you fully
enjoy whatever you do. When
you do it. It's the easier way.
With the dainty, hygienic
applicator your hands
never need touch the
tampon, and both
applicator and tampon
can be readily flushed away.
Tampax tampons...thefeminine
way. For a more feminine you.
DEVELOPED BY A DOCTOR
NOW  USED BY  MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE  MADE ONLY  BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE.  ONTARIO Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  September  22,   1967
Instant grog grabs award
Thursday was a great day
in the life of John Whitaker,
science 4.
Whitaker was presented with
the Scienceman of the year
award in a tumultuous ceremony noon in Henn 201.
In the midst of popping
corks, cheers and cries of
"Whit for President", Whitaker accepted the honor from
a SUS representative.
He promised to keep up the
experiments which garnered
the award.
Medics flee to
lofty retreat
Eighty potential bone-crackers will retreat to Whistler
mountain this weekend.
The theme of their annual
medical retreat, held to allow
students to meet members of
the medical profession, is The
Objective of Medical Education.
Thirty staff and faculty members are expected to join the
students for panel discussions,
group activities, and bull sessions.
Ratio of boys to girls is expected to be 10 to one.
(BUDGET
<YOVR
cMONEY,
<BUT cNOT qrOUR
&UNI
Live at One
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LIVE for less money and have
more fun at night and weekends with other single men and
women. Like young lawyers,
secretaries, or graduate students, to name a few.
LIVE for at least $50 to $100
per month less than the cost
for rent and meals in an apartment or hotel room.
LIVE where your staff does all
the caring about grocery shopping, cooking and cleaning.
LIVE where just $95 a month
includes meals by a chef,
linens, maid service, cocktail
parties, dances, color TV,
switchboard and mail service...
AND DATE-ABLE NEW PEOPLE!
Write for free brochure:
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SKI PANTS
PANT SUITS
LADIES' SLACKS & SKIRTS
Pantalones
654 SEYMOUR   ST.
TEL: 68.-86Q1
Op«n Friday 'rill 9 p.m.
Whitaker was the first person this year to set up a work
able still within
chemistry lab.
a  45-minute
BACK-TO-THE-
BOOKS
EYEWEAR
Don't let poor
eyesight hinder
your progress.
If You need
new glasses,
bring your
eye physician's
prescription to
1701   W.   Broadway
731-3021
Hycroft Med. Bldg.
3195 Granville
733-8772
GLASSES-CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
MAKE YOURSELVES AT HOME
at
International   House
ON WEST MAIL PAST THE ARMOURY
HOOTENANNY-FRIDAY        22 SEPT. 8:30 P.M. - 25c
LIVE DANCE    -SATURDAY 23 SEPT. 8:30 P.M.
OPEN HOUSE -SUNDAY      24 SEPT. 3:00 P.M.
LIVE DANCE    -FRIDAY        29 SEPT. 8:30 P.M.
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To complete the pretty picture,
these superbly tailored pure
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Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Election for the Office of AMS Secretary
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her second year or equivalent and is a fully registered student for the 1967-68 academic year. Candidates must have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than 60% for 15
units or more, and 65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.
4, 1967 and will close at 4:00 p.m. Thursday, October
12, 1967. Voting will take place on Wednesday, October 18, 1967.
Elections for the Positions
of Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office
of Student Senator:
1. One student registered in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies to be elected by the students registered in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies only. To be eligible for
election to this position, a student in the academic year
most recently taken prior to the election shall have
taken a full winter session programme of studies at
this University and satisfied the academic requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies; he shall
also have been granted clear admission to, and be
enrolled in, the Faculty of Graduate Studies of this
University as a full-time student.
2. Three students from the student body at large (including the Faculty of Graduate Studies) to be elected
by the student body at large. To foe eligible for election to one of these positions, a student in the academic
year most recently taken prior to the election shall
have taken a full winter session programme of studies
at this University and attained at least a second class
standing; he shall also be registered as a full time
student at this University.
Terms of Office:
1. The student elected by the faculty of Graduate
Studies shall hold office for two years.
2. Of the students elected by the student body at
large, the candidate receiving the highest number of
votes shall hold office for 2 years, the candidates receiving the second and third highest number of votes
shall hold office for one year.
Nominations:
Nominations are open immediately.
Nominations will close on Wednesday, October 4, 1967
at 4:00 p.m.
Voting will take place on Wedesday, Oct. 18, 1967.
Nomination forms and copies of election rules and procedures are available at the AMS office, in Brock
Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 52. For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd vice-president,
224-3242.  Local  47.
Committee Positions Open
Applications are now being accepted for the following
student  administration advisory committees:
Bookstore — 4 students
Food Services — 3 students
Housing — 4 students
Library — 4 students
Traffic & Parking — 2 students
Applicants should satisfy the following rule of eligibility: The applicant shall have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than
60% for 15 units or more, or 65% for less than 15
units. Letters of application should be addressed to
Kim Campbell, AMS mailbox No. 52. On the evenings
when appointments are to be made applicants will
appear at a meeting of Student Council. The dates are:
Bookstore and Food Services: Monday, October 2, 1967.
Housing, Library, Traffic & Parking: Monday, October 9, 1967.
For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd
Vice-President, 224-3242, Local 47. Friday, September 22, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
EXPANSION PLANS
Squash court possible—
but not swimming pool
•  -.-'•,'U*.A::...: ^V >.;dE_A^*..■ »1
*    * •■     it.f - -
By MIKE FITZGERALD
The possibility of a $1,000,000 expansion to
-_the Winter Sports Center was clarified Wednesday by Byron Hender, a member of the center's
management committee.
Unless there is enough money, according to
Slender, expansion plans will only include a
new ice surface for recreation and some squash
and handball courts.
The desperately needed indoor swimming
pool on campus will be a secondary priority.
Hender and law student Peter Braund, both
former Alma Mater Society presidents, are the
student representatives appointed by the AMS
to the Winter Sports Center management committee.
"I would say that the Winter Sports Center
is probably the one thing that brings the AMS
and the men's athletic committee closest to-
* gether," claimed Hender.
"The AMS has a 25-year lease on the building and each year the centre makes a depreciation profit as well as a profit on concessions,
etc.
"The profit made last year and every year
(we expect $10,000 this year) will go primarily
into expansion of the centre and new equipment.
"After that, the excess profit will possibly
•^be used to construct a large indoor swimming
pool and if we don't have enough for that, we'll
build some squash  and handball courts.
"There's only one squash court on the entire campus and with the number of players
here,  the situation is  ridiculous."
Hender said that with the number of groups
and individuals desperately trying to book the
arena, only about one-third are being accepted.
So naturally expansion of the playing surface will have to come first.
"The rest of them will have to grind it out
-.at 5 or 6 a.m.," Hender said.
The board of governors was consulted last
year about expansion and since then have been
studying the possibility of a large indoor swimming pool.
profits last year and this year are not enough,
"That depends on the cash on hand;  if the
then we'll have  to  settle  for squash  courts,"
commented Hender.
Hender would not say what last year's profit
was or when the proposed expansion would get
under way.
Have ball will volley
The UBC volleyball Thunderbirds, who
recently returned from the World Student Games
in Tokyo, will begin their new year on Sept. 26.
Anyone over six feet tall with a good jumping ability is invited to come out to the first
practice at 6:30 in War Memorial Gym on
Tuesday.
While in Tokyo, the Birds placed sixth in
competition with international teams.
They won only one game but have stated
they acquired enough new techniques to beat any
volleyball team in Canada.
The Birds are currently the Canadian champions.
Their present program is geared for the next
world games in Spain in the summer of 1969.
Plans for this year include the setting up
of three teams of different calibre, all of which
will be entered in top tournaments in Eastern
Canada and the USA.
Freshmen needed
All those freshmen interested in lending their bodies to
athletics should go to War
Memorial Gym and join a
Thunderbird team.
Practice schedules and information are available in the
athletic office.
UNRULY HAIR?
Best Men's Hairstyling Service
at the
Upper Tenth  Barber
4574 W.  10th Ave.
1   block from gates
ueekm4 ApwtA
The weekend sports scene is relatively quiet
since most teams are still going through their
practice stages.
The only Thunderbird squads seeing action
this weekend are the soccer Birds and the junior
varsity footballers.
Victoria is playing host to our soccer team
while the jayvees are in Wenatchee, Washington.
Both games will be played Saturday.
THthMCUWH
MbAMXMWH
Sfmi-PAUl
iNMmsFM
/KWM8FCH4l&tmi
Mbit Wbl&Cfi3H9F
WMMltS   .
COLOR
THE
ROYAL SHAKESPEARE
COMPANY
STARTS THURSDAY
1  WEEK ONLY - LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
lifer
4375 W. 10th
9:30 p.m.
Wed like to Club You	
THAT'S OUR BUSINESS
VANCOUVERS   SWINGINGEST  ACTION   SPOT
u O^THE NORTHWEST SOUND O. J^   SHOCKERS
%\m of dak
1275 SEYMOUR ST.     \J MU 1-4010
._
Wednesday Nites
FRATernizing NITE
i> COME STAG (Guys & Gals)
# DRESS CASUAL
ir HAVE A BALL
ACTION STARTS AT 9 P.M.
Admission only $1.00
i-p^-^^^^^^-p*^
■^^■—»^-_»-_i»--»».-»-«-»^-«i
Thurs., Friday, Saturday
ROYALTY NITES
-k GOOD TIMES GUARANTEED
ir GO GO GIRLS
ir JACKET & TIE REQUIRED
ACTION STARTS AT 9 P.M.
Admission $2.00 couple Page 16 '
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  September  22,   1967
'TWEEN  CLASSES
Pub crawlers deadline 12 p.m,
WUS
Entries are still acceptable
for the interpub beer rally
noon today. Winner will receive double his entry fee and
a handsome trophy. Information in WUS office, Brock 257.
VOC
The Splash and Dance featuring swimming in empire
pool from 7 to 9 and dancing
to the Accents from 8:30 to
midnight. Admission $1.25 per
person.
JUDO CLUB
Meeting   today,   noon,   Ma.
232.
IH
Coffee    hour   Tuesday    and
Thursday     a t     International
House, 3 p.m.
PHRATERES
Meeting   today,   noon,    Bu.
104.
AQUA SOC
Meeting of everyone taking
NAVI course,  Tuesday,  noon,
Bu.  2233.
ENGINEERS
Dance to the Nocturnals and
the Night Trains tonight 8:30
p.m. to 1 a.m. in the armory.
Admission: girls $1, guys,
$1.50.
VCF
Meeting  today,  noon,   Ang.
110.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Executive    meeting     today,
noon, Brock 361.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
Volleyball entries due today.
Meeting for all managers Monday, noon, women's gym.
THE BLITZ
Are you free Wednesday at
10:30 a.m.? Phone 988-4564
and leave your name and
phone number (or see your
undergrad society president).
The Blitz needs 200 of you.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE  DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
MASQUERADE   COSTUMES
SPECIAL  STUDENT   RATES
224-0034      4397 W. 10th
Largest Selection of
Classical
Jazz
Folk & Popular
Records
LOWEST PRICES
WARD MUSIC
412 W. Hastings - 682-5288
I
AU OKI ZtMMll
STUDY  CLASS - 9:45 a.m.
SERVICES -   11   a.m.  &  7:30  p.m.
COLLEGE AND CAREER FELLOWSHIP - 8:45 p.m.
WEST POINT GREY BAPTIST CHURCH
224-5311 11 th & SASAMAT
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON ffDRUGS
!
Limited
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
Vancouver - " ,"0751
New Westminster
675 Columbia
I Opp. Army A Navy
HOCKEY
Anyone  interested  in  playing hockey meet today at noon
in  the  Winter   Sports   Center
lounge.
LSM
Discussion of white man's
burden, tonight, 9 p.m., Lutheran  Campus Center.
Discussion of schizophrenic
faith Sunday, beginning with
dinner at 6 p.m., Center.
Discussion   of   Lord   of   the
Flies and the nature .of man,
Monday, noon, Ang. 110.
CIRCLE K
Meeting Monday, noon, Bu.
2205. New members welcome.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting today, noon, Bu.
203. New members welcome.
ALPHA OMEGA
First meeting of the Ukrainian    Varsity    Club    Monday,
noon, Bu. 223.
PRE-LAW SOCIETY
General meeting for election
of executive and suggestions
for homecoming queen candidate. Tuesday, noon, Ang. 410.
IH
Open house Sunday, 3 p.m.
UN CLUB
Discussion group on the
Middle East situation, Monday
noon,IH.
*e
Extension
Phones are
HANDY
PHONES
Save thousands of
steps for only pennies
a day. Get details this
week from —
B.C.TEL&
CLASSIFIED
75*. 3 days $2.00.
$2.50.
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines. 1 day
Commercial—3 lines. 1 day $1.00. 3 days
Rates for larger ads on request.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
TWO   BAND   SPECTACULAR
NOCTURNALS
NIGHT TRAINS
Fri. Sept. 22 8:30-1:00
Girls   $1.00 Guys   $1.50
U.B.C. ARMOURIES
LIVE    BAND   FOR    LIVE   PEOPLE
at I.H.  8:30 p.m.,  Saturday 23rd.
HOOTENANNY—SOCIAL EVENING
at International House 8:30 p.m.,
Friday   22nd.
DANCE TO "THE WEB" IN LOWER
Mall Residence Friday, September
22,  a-l.  Admission 50 cents.
PAPA BEAR'S
MEDICINE   SHOW
By Appointment Only
THREE   BIG   BANDS
Even bigger than last year!
CAMPUS   A-GO-GO
Sat., Oct.  1.  Be there!
Lost & Found
 13
LOST: BROWN LEATHER WAL-
let. Please contact Gerry, Rm. 8,
Hut  40,   Acadia,   224-9826,   reward.
LOST: BLACK SHEAFFER PEN IN
S-Lot, Monday at 4 p.m., reward,
Russ,   922-8673.
5LASSES AND STATISTICS TEXT
placed in wrong brief case, Hut
M-10  on  Wed.   Phone   681-5731.
LOST BLACK WALLET; REWARD;
Phone 736-4942.
LOST  GOLD  RIMMED GLASSES  IN
black case. Phone 278-1337.	
Rides & Car Pools 14
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
SED TEXTS: GEOL. 105, COMM.
190, Ec. 200, Eng. 200. Phone 278-
0853 anytime.
INTRO.    TO   SCIENTIFIC   GERMAN
by Wild.  Phone  Jeanette,  224-9945.
16
17
Travel Opportunities
Wanted—Information
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
MGA — SPORTS — BLUE. WELL
maintained. View at 2250 Wesbrook.
1962 TR-4 WITH OVERDRIVE, VERT
good shape. 4430—13th Ave. West.
Tel.  224-1678,  after 5.
1964    VW    8-PASSENGER   BUS.    1500
cc. engine, 38,000 mis., good condition, city tested. Private, one
owner. Ideal for car-pools, ski-trips,
camping. $1,175. F. K. Bowers 228-
8631   (evg);   228-2653   (weekdays).
1962   TR-4   GREAT   NEW   TOP.   926-
1889   after   six.   $1,000.
MUST    SELL    NEW    TR-4A    $2,800.
596-3595.
Motorcycles
26
1966 SUZUKI HUSTLER 250CC X-6.
Good condition, $500 or offer. Phone
Bob,  266-4419  after 5 p.m.
RIDERS    WANTED   FROM   NORTH
Burnaby.  Monday, Friday for 8:30's.
Phone   299-0721  after  6  p.m.
RIDE      WANTED     8:30      CLASSES,
from   16th   and   Balsam,   K.P.   736-
5809.	
RIDE WANTED VICINITY FRANCIS
and     Heather,     Richmond.     Phone
Sandy,   277-7928
RIDE NEEDED BADLY FROM CAM-
pus to Burnaby via Freeway between 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m.
Thursdays. Please contact Sue at
AM  1-6634.
RIDERS   WANTED   FROM   N.   SUR-
rey via Marine  Dr.   526-4903.
RIDE NEEDED FROM 17th ST. AND
Lonsdale N.V. 985-5748.
RIDE NEEDED THURSDAYS FOR
8:30 classes. Vicinity of 20th and
and Lonsdale  N.V.  Call  Janice 985-
5263.
1966 HONDA 300 SUPER HAWK.
Excellent condition, 4,000 miles,
$550.00.   Call   Jim  at   939-1210.
Help Wanted—Male
 52
2ND OR 3RD YEAR STUDENTS TO
sell advertising for the UBYSSEY&
This is an excellent opportunity to
gain sales experience and to earn
commission. (One salesman's commission exceeded $1,000 last year.)
Must be hard working, well organized and be able to work 8-10
hrs. a week. If sincerely interested
apply to Publications Office. Brock
Hall. After 2 p.m. *
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
BIOLOGY HELP REQUIRED.
Fourth year specialist or graduate.
736-6923, 4:30-6:30 p.m. except Tuesday.
MATHEMATICS      AND      SCIENCE _
tutors    required.    Fourth    year    or
graduate,    736-6923,    4:30-6:30   p.m.,
except  Tuesday.
54
Work Wanted
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
LEARN TO DANCE? AT THE
Grand Mixer and Dance. Friday,
U.B.C.   Armouries,   8:30-1:00.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYLING
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4574 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block  from   gates,»x.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
TWO BANDS FOR THE PRICE OF
one. U.B.C. Armouries. Fri. Sept.
22. 8:30-1:00. Girls  $1.00. Guys $1.50.
IF YOU'VE FLIPPED YOUR WIG
let us replace it. Campus Barber
Shop.   Brock Extension 153.
FOR A CERTIFIED SCUBA DIVING
course less than $10.00 inquire at
Aqua Soc behind Brock under the
Diving Flag. 	
NEXT LEADER. PICK THE MAN
to follow Lester Pearson. Clubs day
Liberal   booth.
RIDE WANTED IN CARPOOL FROM
corner of S.W. Marine and Balaclava in time for 8:30 M & Th; 9:30
T,W,  & F. Returning anytime after
4:30   please   call   Sharon   266-8246.	
WANTED A RIDE" FROM WEST
End  to campus.  Ken,  681-9130.
RIDE WANTED FROM 23rd AND
Cambie.   Phone   Anne   at  879-5000._
PESPARATE NEED CARPOOL TO
Caulfeild,   West   Vancouver.   Phone
Pete   926-1581.
RTDE WANTED FROM WEST VAN.
3640 Westmount. Phone Terry 922-
1902.
Special Notices
_^          15
ANYONE WISHING TO WORK ON
the Special Events Committee come
to Room 255, Brock Extension any
day between  3:30 and 5:00.
THREE    BAND   SPECTACULAR!
CAMPUS   A-GO-GO
Sat., Oct. 7.  Be there!
EXORBITANT BONUS OFFERED
to anyone able to obtain preferred
staff or student parking for my car.
Answers c/o  Publications  Office.
THE BEST SELECTION OF CLEAN,
rebuilt:
washers
dryers
fridges
freezers
ranges
dishwashers vfc
Mclver  Appliances
Sales & Services •  .
3215   W.   Broadway,   738-0021.	
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL DO
essays, thesis, etc. at home. 25c per
page. M. Hay, 3963 Bond Street,
Burnaby,   433-6565   after 6:30   p.nv.
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   EDEC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-6129.
ANYONE WISHING TO WORK ON
the Festival of Contemporary Arts
Committee come to Room 255, Brock
Extension any day between 3:30
and  5:00
SICK OF HAIRCUTS? GET YOUR
hair styled at the Upper Tenth Barber, 4574 W  10th Ave. 1 block from
gates.	
OPEN HOUSE AT I.H. THIS SUN-
day.  Come  with a friend,  3:00 p.m.
POINT GREY FELLOWSHIP MEETS
again at Alma Y, Sunday at 11:00
a.m. Information, phone 876-7204,
224-5637
FOR PEOPLE WHO LIKE THE
best! — Dance every Friday — Two
Great Hip Bands — Lights by the
Magic Tangerine Floral Light Quasar. Kits Theatre. Adm. $1.50. 8:30-
1   p.m.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist.
Reasonable rates.  TR 4-9253.	
TYPING, ELECTRIC MACHINE.
Barbara MacKenzie. Phone RE
8-8139,   after  6  p.m.
PIANO, BENCH, UPRIGHT, EXCEL-
lent strings, felts, 3 pedals. For
someone requiring a good Instru-
ment, 261-6023, evenings preferred.
W. F. LUDWIG SUPER CLASSIC
drum set — complete with cymbols
and cases. Call Earle, 224 - 0073*-
evenings. 	
NEW POLES AND SKIS (185 cms).
Tel.   261-3978  after  6  p.m.  $40.	
2 CHEMISTRY COATS, 2 PACK-
sacks; radio hi-fi combination. Mrs.
P.  Gigvere,  224-7623.	
FOR SALE 2  SINGLE HOLLYWOOD
beds   with   headboards,    near   new
condition.   Best   offer.    Phone   681-„
8751.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS —  ON CAMPUS.  CLOSE TO
Meal   Service.   2250   Wesbrook.   224-
9662. .,
ROOM FOR TWO MALE STUDENTS.
All   facilities,   near   campus.   Phone
224-4788.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE RE-
quires experienced clerk-typist with
some bookkeeping knowledge for
eight months employment per year
(Sept.-April). This fact, plus the
campus location makes the job especially suitable for a senior student's wife (without children).
Preference will be given to a local
resident 21-35 years of age, who
will be available for at least the
next two years. For further information call the Manager of Student Publications (Brock Hall) at
224-3242  loc.   26.
SLEEPING ROOM FOR 1 MALE
student on 29th just off Dunbar.
Phone 224-6129.	
FEMALE STUDENT, SHARE ROOM.^
$25.00.   224-4788,   ask  for  Heather.
Room & Board
82
ROOM   AND   BOARD   FOR   2   GIRLS
sharing bedroom.  38th  and Dunbar^}
266-5696.   $70  permonth.	
Free room and board for
female student in exchange for
light duties. Vicinity 41st & Gran-
ville.   AM  1-3605. .J-
FREE ROOM AND BOARD FOR
female student in exchange for
light duties. Vicinity 37th & Oak.
AM  3-3966.	
FREE ROOM & BOARD IN VICINITY
16th & Granville to female student
in exchange for babysitting & light
house  duties.   136-6940.
83
Furn. Houses & Apts.

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