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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 9, 1987

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Array the Ubyssey
CITR Celebrates
50 Years
of Broadcasting
page 8
Turning up
the heat
South Africa the focus
of Parallel Conference
By Tim McGrady
South Africa hasn't been a
Commonwealth member since
1960, but its racial policies remain
a hot topic for debate at bi-annual
Commonwealth conferences, held
this year in Vancouver from October 13 to 17.
To provide an alternative forum,
unfettered by political protocol,
Oxfam is co-sponsoring the first
Parallel Conference on South Africa in the same week.
Oxfam's John Graham, program chair of the conference, said
its goals are "to press for further
sanctions against South Africa
and for further aid to front line
border states in the area?
"South Africa sponsors military intervention in front line
states responsible for $30 billion in
total damages to the region?
Graham said there will be "a
broad cross-section of involvement
by trade unions, churches and
Native groups" at the conference.
On Saturday, October 10 at
the Hotel Georgia key speakers
Shirley Carr, President of the
Canadian Labour Congress, and
Archbishop Ted Scott of the Canadian Council of Churches will
consider the role Canada should
play at the Commonwealth Conference on Saturday.
Canada presently has "limited sanctions on agricultural
imports? said Graham, but his
group is calling for "all trade [to be]
cut off until apartheid is dismantled."
The official Parallel Conference opening is Sunday, October
11 and will feature speeches by the
president of the South African
border state of Zambia, Kenneth
Kaunda, the Mozambican Foreign
Affairs minister and representatives from the African National
Congress. The week will be
capped by a rally at the Vancouver
Art Gallery October 17. All events
during the conference are open to
the public.
Med school repeats
Arts 20 triumph
By Myron Neville
Ideal running conditions and
sunny skies greeted a record 250
teams, totalling 2000 runners, at
the start of this year's arts '20
relay.
The event got off to a fast start
at Vancouver General Hospital
with Commonwealth games gold
medalist Graham Fell towing the
field through the first leg.
At the third leg of the race the
faculty of medicine took the lead
and ran strongly the rest of the
way to a winning time of 31:33.
This was the second year in a row
that medicine has won the Arts
'20.
The centipedes running club
took overall honors this year
sweeping the community men's
and women's categories. UBC
women's x-cross country team won
the inter-collegiate division. It
was the rehabilitation medicine
women's team who came home as
the winner in their class.
lft%A J*   * m, m^      lfc
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LEAD RUNNER FOR the women's cross-country team. Winner of Women's Division Arts 20 Relay.
Party time: CITR turns
50, Great Trek is 75
Dr. Harry Warren, former
participant and this year's official
starter said, "it's good to see the
students aware of the benefits of a
sound mind and a sound body."
In the absence of a wheelchair
team, this year's rehabilitation
medicine team took it on themselves to wheel the course.
"It gave us the opportunity to
understand the obstacles that
people can overcome and the significance of the human spirit?
said one of the participants.
If this year's turnout and en-
thusium is any indication of things
to come, next year's race will be
bigger and better.
For Nestor Korchinsky, th_
director of intramurals, this year's
record turnout was a triumph.
"It has been an incredible
experience that has left me with a
good feeling about the student
body and our university," said
Korchinsky. "I feel it reflects positively on the whole community.
By Tony W. Wong
The sixty-fifth anniversary of
the 1922 "Great Trek" and the
fifthieth anniversary of UBC radio
was celebrated Thursday with a
dinner in the SUB Ballroom. Former and current CITR members
attended this black-tie-affair to
commemorate the "Great Trek".
The trek, starting from what
is now Vancouver General Hospital and ending at the present site
of UBC, was taken by students to
protest the government's failure to
finance education.
This year's receipients of the
Great Trek award were Ernest G.
Perrault and Raymond J. Perrault.
The Perrault brothers worked
diligently in the University Radio
Society in the 1940's. Ernest was
called the Orson Welles of UBC for
the multitude of tasks he performed . Raymond is now a Senator
in Ottawa.
"A Great Trekker is a state of
mind, an attitude? said R. Perrault. He encouraged students to
seek resolutions to their problems.
"'Tuum est'(It's up to you). A spirit
out there will solve these problems," he said.
R. Perrault further encouraged students to "get trekkers
down into 'the field' and get them
involved."
"Politicians should be aware
of the needs of higher education
and better funding. If they don't
invest properly with adequate
funding, the future of education is
very bleak? said R. Perrault.
Of his CITR comrades he
said?I acknowledge that a great
many fine and intellectual people
have given much to our campus,
province, and nation, from the
CITR."
E. Perrault said, "Ratsoc
(nickname of the University Radio
Society) was the cutting edge of
communication. Our radio dramas
are still going through space, and I
expect someday well get a review
from others."
CITR-UBC   radio   station
manager Harry Hertscheg commented on the radio station's role
at UBC. "CITR is very much like
The Ubyssey" in that both organizations are committed to providing current information to the
campus, he said. The CITR station
is always moving forward, and is
currently negotiating an increase
from 49 to 1890 watts with the
CRTC, he said. Ratsoc has come a
long way in fifty years said
Hertscheg.
CITR's origin was a weekly
half-hour show called "Varsity
Time" aired on CJOR in September of 1937. Eventually, Ratsoc
was formed on campus. In 1944,
Ratsoc was pushed out of the Agricultural Building into Brock Hall.
Of the 1950's, CITR alumni
Ron T. Robinson said "The UBC
Ratsoc was our life, faculty, and
laboratory all in one. We were in
Brock Hall with a P.A. system, on
air Monday to Friday and whoever
showed up did the program."
"Ratsoc made my life fruitful,"
said Robinson.
Volume 70, Number-10
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 9,1987 COMMONWEALTH PUBLIC FORUM
ON
SOUTH AFRICA AND NAMBIA
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
NAMIBIA
MUST BE
FREE!
Vekuii Rukoro
• (General Secretary)
South West
Africa National Union
(SWANU)
• United Nations Rep.
and speech writer
APARTHEID
MUST BE
ABOLISHED
Dumisani Mtinkulu
• (Political Education
Secretary)
Black Consciousness
Movement
of Azania (BCMA)
• Graduate Student in
Education
and Economics,
Howard University,
Washington D.C.
Date: October, 13, '87
Location: SUB Auditorium
Time: 12:30-2:30
Everyone Welcome!!
Co-sponsored by:
UBC Students for a Free Southern Africa and the Alma Mater Society (AMS)
Endorsed by:
B.C. Student Coalition Against Apartheid, African Students Association(UBC)
and African Students Association (SFU)
BETWEEN
CLASSES
:■:;:: ™: ^BR; Ww. Jfflfc :■*:!-■::.
JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB iUshi-
Zake Welcome Party, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB Party Boom. More info:
Monica 251-5294.
MUSLIM STUDENTS ASSOC.
Friday lecture and prayers. 1:40
p.m., International House. Non-
Muslims welcome.
OLIVETTI
TOSHIBA
TOSHIBA T1000 Laptop computer
AMS.
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE AN EXCLUSIVE
AGREEMENT OFFERING THIS FRONT RUNNER
AT
$1430.00
PROCESSOR
Position adjustable to 180
RGB colour monitor port
80C88, running at 4.77MHz
degrees
Monochrome composite
IBM PC compatable
IBM Colour Graphics
monitor port
Real time clock/calendar
Adapter (CGA) compat-
External key pad port
MEMORY
SOFTWARE
512KB FtAM, expandable to
KEYBOARD
MS-DOS 2.11 in ROM
640KB user memory plus
Full-function 82-Key
640KB of LIM-EMS
keyboard
STANDARD ACCESSO
256KB oi ROM tor MS-DOS
Integrated numeric key
RIES
2.11
pad
Special Fn key tor
AC adapter/battery charger
DISK DRIVE
extended functions
DIMENSIONS
Built-in 720KB 37.," diskette
12.2"Wx2.05"Hx11.0"D;
drive
STANDARD INTERFACES
fits in desk drawer. 6.4 lbs.
DISPLAY
Parallel printer port
POWER
Toshiba supertwist LCD
RS-232C serial port
Runs up to 5 hours on
display
Expansion slot for 300/
internal rechargable
80characters x 25 lines
1200 bps modem
batteries. AC adapter 108-
640 x 200 bit-mapped
External 5V4" diskette drive
132VAC, 9 VDC output.
graphics
port
CONTACT ERIC ALLAN
TEL: 684-5363
Low battery warning light.
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Wlf
SATURDAY
ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP. Vespers. 5 p.m., St.
Andrew's Hall, 6040 Iona Dr.
CITR RADIO 102. Football
Broadcast - U.B.C. vs. U. of
Alberta. 7:30 p.m.
SUNDAY
ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP. Divine Liturgy. 9:30
a.m., St. Andrew's Hall, 6040 Iona
Drive.
CITR RADIO 102 - Hockey
Broadcast U.B.C. vs. U. of Calgary.
4:00 p.m.
MONDAY
ART THERAPY ASSOC. Tainting
Your Feelings for Women." 7:30
p.m., Weaver Institute, 3309
Dunbar (17th and Dunbar). More
info: Ruth Violet, 228-1218.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
Rates: AMS Card Holders - 3
lines, $3.00, additional lines 60
cents,
Commercial - 3 lines $5.00,
additional lines, 75 cents.
(10% DISCOUNT ON 25 ISSUES OR MORE)
Classified ads are payble in advance.
Deadline is 4:00 p.m. 2 days before
publication. Publications Room 266,
S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
10 - FOR SALE COMMERCIAL	
HELSINKI METHOD.
Hair regrowth; 100% money back guarantee 271-3207.
11 - FOR SALE PRIVATE
1975 DATSUN SEDAN. Rebuilt motor,
excellent condition. "A creampuff." $1500
536-7777 Michael.
IDEAL STUDENT CAR. 1974 Dodge
Dart. 4-dr., slant 6, auto trans, gd.
condition, recently mechanically
upgraded. $450 OBO, 879-8028, eves. &
wknds.
77 HONDA CIVIC H/B,
fair condition, great on gas.
$900. 222-4093.
2 STEEL WINTER RADIAL studded
tires. SizeP195/75R14. $50. Excellent.
Phone 263-1356 evenings.
IS - FOUND	
CHARGE CARDS - in Pit Sub:
R. Bortnick, G. Bulawkia,
K. Brennan, S. Mitchell,
G. Rudolph, G. McKelvey, J. Dewit.
Also watch, silv. pend., keys - "Kempwood
Village" and "Blaupunkt" tags.
Room 230A SUB.
20 - HOUSING	
TWO ROOMS AVAIL, in lrge. hse. Dec. 1,
$325 + util. E 25th, nr. bus route,
TV w/conv. No anal-retent.
Phone 877-0133.
SMALL BASEMENT STUDY-sleeping
room, close UBC and beach, non-smoker.
Share shower etc. Avail. Nov. 1st,
$130/month. Tel. 228-9370.
SHARED HOUSE - 2 women looking for
roommate in large Kerrisdale home.
Large upstairs room, laundry, $300 per
month. Prefer non-smoking woman.
Call Marsha or Laura 261-8953.
30 - JOBS
LOVING CAREGIVER needed part-time
for 1 child, 2-3 days per week, 8-5 p.m.,
your home. Point Grey area. 228-0185.
PART-TIME RETAIL SALES position
available at the Little Ones Childrens
Clothing Store at either Champlain Mall
or Richmond Square. Drop off resume at
store of choice.
MONEYMART, Canada's fastest growing
cheque cashing centr, is accepting
resumes for P/T teller positions. Eves/
Wknds and some day openings. Resumes
to 345 E. Broadway, V5T 1W5.
EXP. NANNY HOUSEKEEPER req. for r
day or 2 afternoons/wk. by UBC gates.
Call 224-3820.
35 - LOST
SEIKO DIGITAL WATCH, silver coloured,
by Osborne Field, Wed. Sept. 23. Sentimental value. Pis. call Dave 929-7733 or
929-1911.
50 - RENTALS
ACCESS COMPUTER RENTALS -
255-7342. We rent IBM, PC and
compatibles. All types of printers, daily,
weekly, or monthly rentals.
70 - SERVICES
SUMMER OF '73 DAYCARE has an
immediate opening for a 3-4 yr. old girl.
228-6406.
THE PENGUIN STRING QUARTET -
Music from Bach to Beatles. Available for
parties weddings.
For bookings call Cam 736-9572.
75 - WANTED	
10 HEALTHY Caucasian Male (20-45
years) Smokers needed for a Pharmacokinetic study involving drug intake and
blood sampling. An honorarium of $210
will be paid for the complete study.  For
detailed info contact
GraceChan, tel. 228-6772
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TUTORING FRENCH or Spanish with
native speaker Ph.D. student/translation
Oscar 738-4102.
PARISIAN FRENCH
Teacher-tutor.
Program conformed to individual.
Reasonable rates.
Serious students only.
Jill 684-7479
85 - TYPING
TYPEWRITING - MINIMUM NOTICE
Bervice, essays & resumes, scripts, proofreading, writing/research help. 327-0425.
ACCURATE REPORTS. Broadway &
Granville. 732-4426. Student rates
available.
JUDITH FILTNESS, 3206 - W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351. Experienced and accurate;
student rates available.
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W. Broadway (Micom & IBM PC), $1.50
($1.75/pg. for Laser print) dble. spaced
text. Equations & Tables: $14/hr.
Photocopying876-5333. Visa/Master.
WORD PROCESSING, Mac Plus. Editing.
Experienced, accurate.
Call Jack, 224-0486.
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS - U
Write, We Type. Theses, resumes, letters,
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Student discounts. 222-2661.
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word proc. & IBM typewriter. Student
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ADINA WORD PROCESSING: Student
discounts. Laser & letter quality printers.
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WP TERM PAPERS, theses, mscripts,
essays, incl. reports, tech. equa., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
TYPING? EXPERIENCED and
reasonable. Spelling & grammar no
problem, APA a specialty. Discount rates,
min. notice. Kits area - June - 738-1378.
The UBYSSEY
is sponsoring a
lay-out and production seminar,
Wednesday, Oct 14th at 3:30
with professional design artist
Kris Klassen
SUB Rm. 241k
Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
October 9, 1987 Interaction
Important in Asia
By Lana Wong^
Canadian business leaders
are looking for individuals "who
possess the competence to interact
with Asiain terms of language and
culture? said Dr. Jan Walls at a
Pacific Rim Club lecture yesterday.
The Pacific Rim is important
to B.C.'s economic growth, said
Walls, a former Chinese and Japanese language instructor at UBC,
and the province is preparing its
students to this reality by introducing Chinese and Japanese language courses in B.C. high schools
in the near future.
This will equip B.C. students
with the basic skills to deal with
trade and business with the Pacific Rim region, he said.
"Japan has become our second
largest trading partner? wrote
Walls in a pamphlet distributed at
the lecture. "Last year, Canada's
nearly $6 billion worth of exports
to Japan were greater than our
exports to our four largest European markets; exports that provided an estimated 225,000 jobs
for Canada," he wrote.
Despite this financial impact,
there is limited reporting by the
media on Asian affairs, said Wilf
Wakely, a UBC law graduate, the
second of the lecturers.
Wakely criticized the Canadian media for not devoting more
time to current Asian business
and cultural affairs.
"Information in these areas are
weak? said Wakely. He went on to
say that Canadian media bureaus
in China and Japan are limited
and Canadians rely heavily on
U.S. sources.
"Canadian perspectives are
needed in reporting events
abroad. We must not depend on
second hand American wire services? he said.
Walls said students currently
enrolled in an Asian Studies program will enhance their degrees
by taking courses in the social sciences, such as economics and political science.
And Asian language courses
will complement programs in
Commerce and the arts, he said.
"In working with Asian companies? said Dr. Walls, "a business
background is not enough?
ITS THE ARTS '20 relay and this is a headless roller skater.
VOLUNTEER OMBUDSPERSON JANICE KING waits eagerly for your patronage in room 100 a behind 6" cast
iron doors
Higher education
suffers in El Salvador
By R.D. Shore.
While North America's students are guzzling beer and fretting over mid-terms, students in
El Salvador are being attacked for
merely seeking an education.
"Fellow students are being
attacked and senselessly repressed simply for striving for an
education? said Rob Clift, spokesperson for the Pacific Region of the
Canadian Federation of Students.
In 1980 the El Salvadoran
military bombed and then occupied the University of El Salvador.
The occupation ended in 1984, but
military night patrols, kidnapping, and murder of students and
faculty continue to this day, said
Canada-El Salvador University
Alliance spokesperson Christine
Lamont.
Lamont said terror tactics are
being used against potential dissidents in the university.
"Just before our arrival last
July, a hit list of students and
faculty was posted by the military
and an economics professor was
murdered."
Although the university reopened in 1984 after president Jose
Duarte came to power, the government has ignored its constitutional obligation to support education.
"The state of education is still
quite grave? said Lamont, "elementary and secondary schools
receive no funding whatsoever
and the university still receives
only half its minimum operating
budget."
Presently, 70 per cent of the
San Salvador campus is in ruins
after last year's earthquake
destoyed much of what remained
after the military occupation, said
Lamont.
She said students andtaculty
are attempting to rebuild the
campus themselves using their
own skills and resources, "but
there are clearly limits to what
they can do without support."
The CFS-PR, sibling organization to the national Salvadoran
student union, and the CESUA
are organizing support locally for
the University of El Salvador. The
first event will be a fundraising
walkathon to be held at 9:00 a.m.
this Sunday starting from Second
Beach, Ceperly Park and continuing around the Stanley Park sea
wall.
U2 tickets going, going, gone
You've been dreaming of the
U2 concert for months. You were
dreaming when most radio stations made that vital announcement. You didn't hear them tell
you to bee-line to the nearest VTC/
CBO for a voucher at 3:00 p.m.
Wednesday. Wake up.
4,000 people have vouchers
which enable them to buy 8 tickets, provided they were present at
the ticket office when their number was called this morning. Ifyou
are a devoted U2 fan, you'll hunt
down one of these lucky people and
beg, steal or sell your mother for a
ticket.
Ifyou have a credit card (ha!),
try charging by phone. But, considering the VTC/CBO phone lines
handle 4,000 calls per hour, by the
time you read this article, the tick
ets will likely be gone. Try
extortion.
The voucher system was designed to eliminate scalping and
camping out overnight for decent
tickets. The announcement was a
surprise and many fans, like you,
are probably disgruntled.
But you have one last hope.
The SUB Box Office has tickets for
sale starting Saturday at 9:00 a.m.
No voucher necessary.
CAN YOU
THAT UP?
Kinko's can. We make two-
sided copies. Whatever
you're reproducing,
Kinko's is behind you.
kinkcs
Great copies. Great people.
5706 L niversin  Blvd.
222-16S.S
M TH 8 9 F 8 6 Sat 10 6 Sun 11 6
UBC Aggies
present
the 72nd annual
*BARN DANCE*
featuring
"THE TIMES"
Saturday, October 17, 1987
8:00 p.m. -1:00 a.m.
SUB Ballroom
TICKETS $5 AMS Box office
- No Minors -
<L       HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
_*..
HILLELS FAMOUS HOT LUNCH
IN OUR SUKKAH
Featuring live music
TiesdayOct. 13,12:30-2:00
HEBREW CONVERSATIONAL CLASSES FOR THIS MONTH
Wednesday Oct. 14
Thursday Oct. 22
Thursday Oct. 29
All classes begin at 12:30 P.M.
for beginners and beyond beginners
******
Above programs to take place at Hillel House
(behind Brock Hall)
Phone 224-4748 for more information
October 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 Quakes threaten
Vancouver unprepared says Vogt
By Deanne Fisher.
Vancouver remains unprepared for the earthquake
that geophysicists claim will
jolt the city within the next 30
to 40 years, a UBC geophysi-
cist says.
David Vogt predicts an
earthquake that will register
nine on the Richter scale, approximately 1000 times the
force of the quake that struck
California last week.
In an interview, Vogt
said many of Vancouver's
older buildings are in
jeopardy. These buildings
include both St. Paul's and
Vancouver General hospitals
and the UBC geophysics and
astronomy building.
?The condition of the geophysics and astronomy building is "particularly embarrassing," said Vogt. Scientists
will be unable to measure and
predict any further quakes or
aftershocks because "all of our
equipment will be in the rubble?
hesaid.
The university has been unwilling to improve the building's
safety standards, Vogt said.
"The main problem in Vancouver," said Vogt, "is we don't get
a series of small earthquakes to
nag you.
"We want a realistic assessment of the hazards." During a
quake, dikes in Richmond may
must prepare for the probable
quake by funding educational
and emergency programs. BC
Tel already devotes a telephone book page to earthquake emergency procedures,
and preparedness programs
are taught in B.C. schools.
"People in Vancouver,
never having experienced an
earthquake before, will panic
first and do something later,"
said Vogt.
The last major earthquake in B.C. hit Comox in
1946.
Vogt admits that seismologists' predictions may be
wrong and that the snapping
"many of Vancouver's older buildings are
in jeapordy. The buildings include both St.
Paul's and Vancouver General hospitals"
break and emergency pumps will
be useless if the power is out.
Telephone poles may dissappear
into the ground.
Vogt  said  the  government
of the earth's plates may not
occurs That "would set a
precedent for the whole
world," he added.
California dreamin'
'bout beating our 'Birds
By Jeremy Fraser_
On October 19, our very own
Men's volleyball team will play
the foremost university volleyball
team in the United States, the
UCLA Bruins. It should be some
spectacular ball.
Last season UCLA was outstanding. Veteran head coach Al
Scates trained a star team to the
point of arrogance. The Bruins
finished an incredible season,
winning 27 straight games. And to
cap it all off, they won the NCAA
men's volleyball title; it was their
12th in 25 years.
Scates was confident that the
Bruins would win the final match
in three straight games. And they
did, much to the chagrin of USC,
Penn State, and Ohio State. Each
respective team expected to win
the championship, but the Bruins
came out on top.
Scates' attitude seems to have
been adopted by the team and the
ease with which they handle their
opponents is a credit to their attitude.
Led by veteran Asbjorn
"Ozzie" Volstad, UCLA has two
other ail-American players, hitter
Matt Sonnichsen, and digger Don
Dendinger.
Although supported by players such as freshman of the year
Trevor Schirman and rookie Jeff
Williams, Volstad is the star of the
show, often hitting with an astounding .526 hitting average
(.400 is considered excellent). He
was also selected as last year's
player of the year.
The Bruins will be digging up
some action against UBC on October 19, 7:30 p.m. at War Memorial
Gym.
SOME ADVERTISED SPECIALS ARE:
TRUCKLOADSALE
Month long sale featuring Zenith computers. We're giving away
free hats & T-Shirts on Oct. 14 and 15! Also pick up a 'Don't Panic1
brochure to find out more about other freebies and a chance to win a
Zenith B/W-4" T.V.! Contest ends Oct. 30th so don't miss this great sales
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• Interface for External 20MB Hard Drive
• Full size 'Supertwist' Backlit LCD Screen
• Battery and AC Adapter/Charger Standard
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• Single 5'i" 1.2 Mb Floppy Drive
• Serial/Parallel Ports Standard
• 512K RAM Standard
• VGA Graphics Board
• XT Size Footprint
• 101 Key Keyboard
• Choice of EGA Monochrome. Colour, or
High Res Monitor
• Tilt Swivel Base
• Disc Caching Available
• MS-DOS 3.2 Included
• MS Windows Included
PACKAGE 5.0:
Z-183 HARD DRIVE
PORTABLE
Mfg. Sugg. Price
$3,249.00
Z-183 HARD DRIVE
PORTABLE
• 4.77/8 MHz Zero Wait State Technology
• Internal 10MB Hard Drive, One Pop-up 720K
Floppy Drive
• 640Kb RAM Standard
• RGB Video Out Standard
• Serial/Parallel Ports Standard
• Interface for External 5.25" Drive
• Interface for External 20MB Hard Drive
• Full size 'Supertwist' Backlit LCD Screen
• Battery and AC Adapter/Charger Standard
• Internal ROM Based Diagnostics Standard
• MS-DOS 3.2 Standard
UBC   $
PRICE
3,162
00
EASY PC
PACKAGE:
7C    One Floppy* TTL Monitor
7.1     Same as above but with 1330 Colour
Monitor
7 2    Same as above but with 1380 EGA
Monitor
Mfg. Sugg.   UBC
Price Price
54 05 00   $3,005.00
55 324   i   $3,368.00
S5 644 00   $3,520.00
PACKAGE:
1.0 One Flopp; Drive
1.1: Two Floppy Drives
1.2: One Flopp/. One 20MB Hard Drive
Compact Integrated System with Keyboard
Easy Setup and Use
PC/XT Compatible
512K RAM Standard (expandable to 640)
14" Page White Monitor
Double Scan CGA Video
3 Models Available
Uses 3.5" 720Kb Drives
Mouse Pol
Parallel Port
Zenith Professional Keyboard
MS-DOS Included with DOS Manager
Mfg. Sugg. UBC
Price Price
S1.299.00 $1,039.00
s1.499.00 $1,149.00
$209900 $1,679.00
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
RED LEAF
Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon -F'i.  11 30 9 CO p.m
CLOSED SATURDAYS
I     Sundays and Holidays
4-00 p m   9 p m
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
Opposite Chevron Siatior
Tony Award Winning
San Francisco
Mime Troupe
presents
a musical farce
THE MOZAMGOLA
CAPER
A wildly satirical look at U.S.
Policy in Africa
Thursday. Oct. 15 - 8:30 p.m.
Old Auditorium - UBC
Tickets $10.00-$8.00
(seniors/students)
VTC/CBO
Benefit for CUSO and OXFAM
for more imforrnation
call CUSO 732-1814
DAR - LELIA
RESTAURANT
Licensed Premises
'iHeOnly
Authentic
Lebanese
Cuisine in
^Ioivn."
Daily
Lunch &
Dinner
Special
10% Off
With
Thia Ad
2523 Alma St. Van.
222-1101
Open Mon. - Sat. 11am - 10pm
Sunday 3:30pm - 10pm
Coupon expires Oct. 31,1987
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Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
October 9,1987 We invite you to
St. Anselm's Anglican Church
University Blvd.
(opposite Univ. Golf Club)
Sunday Services: 8 am and 11 am
Sunday Evening, Oct. 11
7:30 pm Choral Evensong
in Celebration of Thanksgiving
Speaker: Kevin Annett
"Mexico - Haven For Refugees"
For more information call
224-1410 or 224-2568
"Wheelchair accessible"
' LOW LOW PRICES
• SUPER COPIES
NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR
• automatic collating
• 3 hole paper
• standard coloured paper
2nd Floor, 21 74 Western Parkway
(at University Village)
Vancouver, B.C. Tel: 224-6225
Mon-Th8-9, Fri 8-6, Sat-Sunll-6
GMAT      LSAT     GRE
(Graduate Management
Admission Test)
(Law School Admission Test)
(Graduate Record Exam)
WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
University of British Columbia
• Includes Sexton text book, lectures and  ,,p
• One year personalized services. /iVv
n i   • Instructors hold PhD, MBA or LLB.    4>£*
oeXLOn Educational Centers W call
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION
222-8272
rams
rams
UBC COMPUTER
SHOW
OCTOBER 14 & 15,
10a.m. -4p.m.
SUB BALLROOM, 2nd Floor
party a little, party a lot
earl's place
10th Ave/Trimble
tel: 222-1342
fresh, fresh food
partyroom seats 15-40
Sun.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m.-10:00 p.m./Fri. & Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11:00 p.m.
AWARDS
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
FOR 1988
Applications are available from the Awards Office forthe Rhodes
Scholarship, for 1988/89.
Candidates must:
- be Canadian citizens or persons domiciled in Canada;
-have been born between October 2,1963 and October 1,1969;
- be unmarried;
- have completed at least three years of University training by
October 1, 1988.
Successful candidates will have demonstrated literary and scholastic attainments, fondness of and success in Outdoor sports,
qualities of truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and
protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship,
moral force of character and instincts to lead and take an interest
in their contemporaries.
COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY
OCTOBER 23, 1988.
The Awards Office is open on weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Awards and financial Aid -Room 50, General Services Administration Building • Phone:228-5111
Opening beats
imply future treats
The Commonwealth Drum Festival kicked
off Tuesday night at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre with Performances by artists from Ghana, Canada, Australia, India, Sri
Lanka, and St. Lucia.
If the opening night's show was a good indicator of what the rest of the festival holds in store,
than we are a lucky city indeed.
Abraham Adzinyaha opened the first half, dancing into the theatre, beating out a tribal rythmn
while accompanied by Canada's Nexus. The
Ghanian was almost as much fun to watch as to
listen to. He could teach break dancers moves that
would have them listening to African music
instead of Run D.M.O
COMMONWEALTH
DRUM
FESTIVAL
The second performance was by Australia's
Australis, a duo that puts as much energy into
visuals as performance. Colin Offord makes his
own instruments, and they are a spectacle. Many
of these instruments were originally intended as
sculptures, though that didn't affect their ability to
create unique sounds.
His mouthbows enhance the range of his voice
by running it through a reed and resonating it
with strings. Anyone with a taste for the avant-
garde would do well to check out this duo.
Nexus followed this wild example of modern
percussion fusion with a performance of Steve
Reichs' Drumming Part 1.
Minimalist repetition was interrupted by staccatto
blasts, played on eight bongos by four players, creating a hypnotic wall of rythm that the audience
could get lost in.
THE HARMONITES STEEL ORCHESTRA...playing this
Sunday at The Commodore
Two members of Sri Lankas' Kelaniya Free
Lancers opened the second half of the show,
playing a drum battle that was good for laughs but
didn't fully exemplify Sri Lankas' wealth of
drumming. The company is about 100+ members,
and are sure to bring the house down when they
perform in full regalia (for free at the Museum of
Anthropology on Oct 11, at 2:30 ).
Labo Kabwit provided the evenings' rowdiest
set, ripping up the floor with a set of traditional
Carribean music from St. Lucia. Yelling, rapping,
and drumming up a storm these guys are my first
choice for a dance hall band. They'll be at the
Commodore on Sunday, Oct. 11 for a Carribean
dance. Don't miss it.
Indian tabla drum master Pandit Sharda Sahai
followed Labo Kabwit. Playing with Nexus, performing a work written by one of the group
members, he was lost amidst the synthesizers and
vibes. Hopefully his performance at the Cultch on
Oct. 7 will showcase his talents solo.
The evening ended with the mandatory jam
session which maintained a steady beat.
Events will be running for the next two weeks
at various venues, consult the daily papers for
listings.
By Stuart Derdeyn	
October 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 The pen is mightier
than the sword.
Write for the Ubyssey
SUB 241 K
Six characters in search of an author
/ luigi [ilraiidello
directed by Campbell smith
two for ona shows (2 for "7)
oct. 13, 14, 16. IH. 25 anil m*v 1
Vancouver community iwllegs
October 15 - november 1
APPLICATIONS
NOW AVAILABLE
for
THREE STUDENT-AT-LARGE
POSITIONS
on the
UBYSSEY
PUBLICATIONS
COMMITTEE
APPLICATIONS DEADLINE
4p.m. FRIDAY
OCTOBER 23, 1987
FORMS
AVAILABLE
SUB 23S
#VTYC%
c £
UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB
^COVJ^
WEST COASTS BEST
Driving Range Facility
SPECIAL
1/2 price on a
bucket of balls tos
any UBC students
(must show
student card)
• New cover and lights
• Swing lessons with CPGA pros available
• 80,000 sq. ft. of Grass tees
• 10,000 sq. ft. of Bunker
• 100 compression Golf Balls
THE PUBLIC COURSE WITH THE PRIVATE APPEAL!
For further information call: 224-1818
5185 University Blvd.
1/2 PRICE ON ANY SIZE BUCKET OF
BALLS
Present this coupon and your UBC
Students Card. Offer expires
November 1,1987. Limit one coupon
per bucket.
I I
A
visual
bonanza
Multi - Media art event
has a funhouse ambience
The champagne was flowing at Artropolis Saturday night. A crowded, upbeat
opening marked the kickoff of the month-long festival of contemporary B.C. art. Everyone agreed: the thing is a success.
Artropolis is the third large-scale multi-media event organized by the Vancouver
Artists League since 1983. Some 200 works, culled from among 500 submissions, are on
display in the three swanky storeys at 788 Beatty St.
The work is organized-no small feat— along loose thematic lines (e.g. "Self Image-
The Artist by the Artist) by six noted curators. In addition to this deluge of painting and
sculpture, local luminaries will stage music, performance pieces and video throughout
the month.
This visual bonanza celebrates B.C. art in all its mind-boggling diversity. No style or
idea has been neglected here.
VISUAL ART
Artropolis
788 Beatty St.
October 3rd-31st
Performance Pieces on Friday Nights
Video and Music Events
Artropolis' funhouse ambiance intensifies as we make our descent from surprising
floor to surprising floor. It all culminates in that playground of an art gallery which is
Basement Two. Enormous exhibits call on us to participate; instruments beg to be
played. Weird forms float all around, wildly colourful. This is a festival in the richest
sense. What in tarnation is behind it?
This event, rapidly becoming an institution in itself, is commonly understood as an
implicit critique of The Vancouver Art Gallery's policy towards local art. The original
October Show was held largely in reaction to the VAG's 1983 "Vancouver Art and
Artists" show#deemed by many to be biased and over-exclusive.
Artropolis exhibition co-ordinator Sandy Gow resists this definition of this year's
event as reactionary.
"Our purpose is to direct public attention back on the visual arts after Expo? he
asserts. "We're putting the spirit back in the arts community, which was languishing."
According to Gow, the VAG is in a "quandary". It lacks direction, caught between
being responsive to the B.C. community and functioning as an international entity.
"Ultimately I think what this city needs is a new contemporary art gallery? he
states.
Artropolis, then, expresses the need for new artistic venues in Vancouver. The consummate vigour of Artropolis demonstrates that the B.C. art scene is certainly not
suffering from any dearth of talent.
The display is on all month, closed Mondays. A paltry $1.00 is the admisssion fee.
By Justine Brown	
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
October 9, 1987 UDC Rodio
BRAINS &
tfifc
DuNOwfeu
PLAY THE MOST EXCITING
LIVE TV COMPETITIONS
IN HISTORY.
DIAMONDBALL
CHALLENGE
Pit your skills
against the pros in
the League
Championships
and the World
Series. Interact
with the action as it
takes place on the
field.
QB1
For the first time in
history, you can
actually interact with
live TV football
games via satellite
right here.
Bill -k'ntiS;'1 LJC't K;CSl#r-r,ar.
Compete with other
players here and
nationally by
anticipating live
quarterback plays.
<^^%o    University Golf Club
k^'
? , ,£   5185 University Boulevard
y¥   Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1X5
^co^    224-7513
FREE WORKSHOPS
SPONSORED BY
THE OFFICE FOR WOMEN
STUDENTS
The Office for Women Students offers a number of programs and workshops
free of charge which have been designed to address the particular needs and
interests of women students at U.B.C.
Title
ESSAY ANXIETY
MATURE STUDENTS
SUPPORT GROUP
♦ASSERTIVENESS
BASIC
♦AVOIDING
PROCRASTINATION
♦CAREER BUILDING
NOW
♦CREATIVE
TECHNIQUES FOR
REDUCTION OF
STRESS & ANXIETY
Date
THURSDAYS (3 sessions)
Oct. 22, 29 & Nov. 5
TUESDAYS (13 sessions)
Sept. 22 - Dec. 15
TUESDAYS (3 sessions)
Oct. 27, Nov. 3, 10
MONDAYS (2 sessions)
Oct. 19 & 26
THURSDAYS (6 sessions)
Oct. 22 - Nov. 26
THURSDAYS (3 sessions)
Nov. 12, 19 & 26
Time
12:30-l:30p.m.
12:3O-l:30p.m.
12:30-2:00p.m.
12:30-2:20p.m.
12:3C-2:20p.m.
12:30-2:20p.m.
Place
Buchanan
B. 212
WSO Lounge
Brock 223
Brock 106A
Buchanan
Penthouse
WSO Lounge
Brock 223
Brock 106A
*Pre-registration is required at the Office for Women Students, Brock 203.
All enquiries, please phone 228-2415.
CLIP & SAVE ■**••
Page 7
October 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY TEUE.ISIO*
it*
HAZARD
TOIOW
ME-HU.HWi.Tli
JUST MOVED IN - new space in SUB 1969
cinnR
VANCOUVER   BC.
FM102
CABLE lOO
PRODUCTION CONTROL UNIT in Brock Hall
CITR ce
50 bigy
radio bu
CITR-UBC Radio
turned a funky fifty this
year, but the station
doesn't seem a year over
twenty. In the past 10
years, CITR has stayed
young by playing raucous
tunes from garage band
members who were disowned by their mothers.
CITR tapped into this
unexplored area — local,
alternative, music — and
became the patron saint of
Vancouver's avant- garde
music. With its excellent
news, sports and specialized jazz and other music
shows, CITR is a 21 hour a
day power radio station.
Fifty years ago,
though, UBC radio students had to work hard to
receive permisson to
broadcast a weekly half
hour show. Varsity Time,
in 1938, was the University Radio Society's first
radio show. Recorded in
the Agricultural Building's
basement, Varsity Time
was rebroadcast on CJOR.
Not suprisingly Varsity
Time featured the Debating Society, the Player's
Club, the Musical Society
and the Varsity Band.
The 40's were the
golden age for radio drama
at UBC. Thunderbird
Theatre, 13 half hour
drama productions, was
aired in 1946-1947.
Peter Duval was writing drama and winning
awards from CBC. Eric
Nicol, the Vancouver
humorist, and song-writer
Norman Campbell collaborated on Oh Please Louise.
And Ernest Perrault,
called the Orson Welles of
UBC, was producing,
directing and doing everything else possible.
To top the decade off,
Radsoc moved into Brock
Hall in 1948. It was the
first programme producing
centre organized, paid-for
and operated by students
at any university on this
CLUBS DAY IN SUB.   Matt Antilla, president; Peter Davidson, business
manager. September '68
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
October 9,1987 <ssss* - g-2
J
»
lebrates
ears in
isiness
continent.
The 1950's witnessed
the first UBC Digest show.
Launched by URS president Ron Robinson, the
Digest interviewed students and faculty and
analyzed events in B.C.
Digest was so successful
that it was rebroadcast by
eleven radio stations in
the province.
Back at Brock Hall,
Radsoc was broadcasting
close circuit nine to five
weekly. News, entertainment and special features
were the order of the day.
During the 60's, Radsoc continued to grow.
New shows, like Playboy
Jazz and Works of the
Masters, were added but
the prize for outrageous-
ness went to the Twist
Party, where over a thousand people jammed into
the armouries to twist.
That was in 1962. By the
end of the decade, Gip
Forster was reading Jim
Morrison's poetry on the
air.
In January 1969,
Radsoccers threw at least
15 parties to say good-bye
to Brock Hall because the
campus radio station was
moving to the Student
Union Building. The new
name was CYVR-UBC; it
was subsequently changed
in 1974 to CITR.
The highpoint in
CITR's career came in
1981. Going head to head
against CJAZ, CITR asked
for approval for a low
power FM license. The
good guys won, and on
April Fool's Day, 1982,
CITR transmitted from
their spanking new antenna on top of Gage
Towers.
Now, CITR is 50 and
going strong. Happy
Birthday.
By The Ubyssey Staff,
lolanda Weisz, and Harry
Hertscheg
ERNIE PERRAULT, PRESIDENT of University
Radio Society 1947 -1948, was called the
Orson Welles of UBC
THE GANG 1948
SOME RADIO SOCIETY MEMBERS, 1948.   Ernie Perrault lower right  seated
UNIVERSITY RADIO SOCIETY sound car at 30th Annual Homecoming Parade, November 22, 1952
THE GANG 1979
October 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 mark'/ Worts
Wearhou/e
Working hard doesn't mean giving up comfort and style. For
the quality and fit you want, there's only one choice: Levi's Red
Tabs. 501 's for men, 531 's for women. And they last as long as
memories. Mark's Work Wearhouse carries Levi's Red Tabs in
a full range of styles and sizes. And this semester, at any Mark's
Work Wearhouse store, your student card lets you enter to win
one of 20 $1,000 scholarships* from Levi's and Mark's.
Levi's 501's for men. $44.95
Levi's 531's for women. $44.95
* No purchase necessary. See your local Mark's Work
Wearhouse for details.	
$1,000 SCHOLARSHIP DRAW ENTRY FORM
To enter, drop this form off at any Mark's Work Wearhouse store
prior to November 15,1987.
Name	
Address	
More than just great workwear.
Telephone	
University, College or
Technical Institute	
Student I.D.
Draw will be made December 15, 1987. Winners must correctly answer a time-limited skill testing question
Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
October 9, 1987 Wish you were there
Movie charms as it tells tale
of sexual awakening
A SMALL ENGLISH RESORT, 1950's—
Someone here isn't blending in.
Someone here is cutting across the
town bowling lawn on her bicycle, skirt tucked up to
mid-thigh. A shocked bowler protests.
MOVIE
"Wish You Were Here!"
Denman Place
"Up your bum!" replies Lynda cheerfully. It's
her chorus in "Wish You Were Here!", an unsentimental movie about being old in your mid-teens,
and unrestrainable in an English town.
Lynda (Emily Lloyd) has a mouth free of
modesty and tact. When other girls fret in silence
about their development, she says "Have I got nice
pair of tits, or have I got nice pair of tits?"
Before her first sexual act, the hopeful young
man asks, "Do you fancy me?" Her reply is instant
and typical: "Not half as much as you fancy yourself." What follows makes the audience squirm
with mirth.
Another of Lynda's sexual experiences, though,
made some sit silent. Writer and director David
Leland does not flinch from the loathsome, nor does
he milk sentiment like a tear-jerker. Only occasionally does the soundtrack swell to suggest the
expected emotion. Rarely does the camera crouch
low in worship of Lynda or the others:
Mother, lost into memory. Father, impossibly
distant and stern, worried about his Vesponsible
image in the community.' A conformist fink for a
little sister. Dave, her first, vain and faithless.
Eric (Tom Bell), is a seedy bookie her father's age
who also wants Lynda.
She's considering sleeping with Eric. Some
might blanch, frozen between breath-holding shock
and revulsion as their first 'encounter' surfaces like
a corpse. Lynda's character wouldn't go down
easy with everyone, fortunately.
Emily Lloyd, who was sixteen at the time,
seems inseparable from her character as they slide
from the illicit glee of childish profanity and teen
sex, into loneliness, into the fast-aging choice of a
back-door abortion, and on. Tom Bell's Eric the
bookie is ethically thin and "thinks with his
prick? as she says—a man for the 80's. It is
testament to Bell's craft that Eric evokes both
nausea and near-pity.
Before her first sexual act, the
hopeful young man asks, "do
you fancy me?" Her reply is
instant and typical: "Not half as
much as you fancy yourself."
It's tempting to analyze her personality: "Lack
of paternal affection leading to compensation by
engaging     in . . .." The fast and cutting one-
liners form a lonely shield. It's easy to say that
Lynda plays irresponsibility and thoughtlessness
like a drunken driver, and that her alcohol is hyperkinetic youth.
"Wish You Were Here!" occasionally dips into
farce and prompted emotion. The sense of
triumph trumpeted at the film's ending is heavy
handed for Leland, but not enough to blur out the
delight and sadness already inspired.
"Wish You Were Here!" picks out the unsympathetic Atlantic in grainy greys, and the warmth
of a shared bed in the glow of a lampshade. Later,
the sun tracks across the two as they sleep.
Leland's deft biography and Lloyd's artless
charm have me wishing you see this film.
By Sailen Black	
Spicy Knights:
Marlowe comes alive at Freddy Wood
Congratulations are in order for Charles
Siegel's skillfully crafted production of An
Exploration of Tamburlaine, based on
Christopher Marlowe's Tamburlaine and its sequel
Tamburlaine the Great, playing at Freddy Wood
Theatre until Saturday.
The audience sat in a circle on the stage atop
brightly coloured, plush Persian rugs and pillows.
The action of the play takes place around the
periphery of the stage.
Tamburlaine is the story of a fearless, barbaric
general, setting out to conquer the world. His self-
assurance and fierce strength compel obedience
from his followers; he is charismatic and dynamic
but at the same time he is also cold, cruel and '
doesn't hesitate to extinguish the lives of those who
oppose or hinder him, including his own son whom
Tamburlaine deems effeminate.
John Murphy portrayed the pale, hollow-eyed
and somewhat scantily-clad Tamburlaine with an
unflagging, vibrant energy: at the same time childlike and regal.
The other barbarians, especially Techelles,
(Neil Ingram) ingested this force
and were able to return almost
as much in kind, by way of
physical and vocal forms such as
playfighting, howling and
wailing. As well, Mycetes, the
King of Persia and the sons of
Tamburlaine were all portrayed
in a manner that was highly entertaining and believable.
As a group, the cast kept a
constant pace throughout the
piece, especially impressive during lengthy tableaux. In all the
acting was of a high calibre.
Unfortunately, the only female in the piece, due to the
macho nature of the play, was restricted mainly to being carted
about on a wagon, pleading for
the lives of various characters
and providing obligatory love-
interest. This is not to say that
this limitation dimished the
scope of her performance: it
didn't.
The props create an atmosphere of wealth and comfort, and
were also very functional, lightweight and facilitated quick changes between scenes.
The costuming (or lack thereof) indicated the
characters' social status as well as their relationships to nature and the earth. Tamburlaine and
his henchmen are the children of the earth, clad in
very small leather and fur pieces. Symbolic
disrobing occurs as a motif for man's approach to
what is deemed earthly.
The opening and closing music, as well as the
other sounds in the play such as drums, howls,
screams and stamping served to heighten the warlike mood of the play.
The only drawback was that one was constantly called upon to change one's position in
order to be able to observe the action.
An Exploration of Tamburlaine is one of the
rare two-hour productions that doesn't feel like a
two-hour production; it is a truly entertaining
play.
By Melodie Cook	
Presented
by:
/£2h MNslter
JAMIE BINKLEY AND Neil Ingram in Tamburlaine...symbolic disrobing
SKIVISION '87
with GREG STUMP PRODUCTIONS feature film
TH? &O0QJlle Rrty
AMQJTHS GK/AP/Y Receive a
 * 2______i L    FREE DAY
PASS for
WHISTLER
MOUNTAIN
for each
pair of
tickets
bought at
CAN-SKI
while
quantities
last.
One night only! QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
October 15® 7:00 & 9:30 PM
TICKETS at VTC CBO and CAN-SKI
The most exciting and innovative ski film ever made. Door Pries. Exhibits and Displays.
IT'S OCTOBER
The Party's Over!
Except of course at...
Monday:
Hospitality Night
Tuesday:
Draft Night
Wednesday:
Get Schnapped
Thursday:
Animal Night
Friday:
Beat the Clock
Saturday:
2 Fer Night
P.S. Bring your Student Card and
some Valid ID and Tommy Africa's
will give you
free admission any
day of the week during September
& October.
Mon. - Sat. 9 p.m. - 2 a.m.               1010 Beach Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
October 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 "MayB" brings Beckett to life
Last Friday and Saturday at SFU,
The Compagnie Maguy Marin
dance company, from France,
performed the piece which gave the
company its national and international
reputation.
DANCE
Compagnie Maguy Marin
SFU Theatre
October 2nd and 3rd
This work, "May B", based on the
writings of Samuel Beckett, is a mesmerizing, 2 hour dance/theatre epic. The performance, by the 10-member company,
was flawless.
Pure white lights fade in slowly to reveal ten white statues: the dancers are
covered from head to toe in white powder.
The black marlee floor shows the white
tracks that they left, moving into position.
A whistle suddenly pierces the silence.
Several dancers begin to move in stiff,
controlled patterns.
The entire first section was reminiscent of an insane asylum. These people
are totally un-selfconscious. Gestures of
sex, masturbation, and defecation come
and go as naturally as walking. The
power of Maguy Marin's choreography lies
in her ability to evoke haunting images.
The dancers' training was evident in
their timing. An entire group of them
move, stop, freeze, move their heads to
the left and chant together, without any
music. Their control shows in their
stillness and tiny, repetitious movements.
Theatrical and mime gestures and
subtle humour pervade the piece. A
woman suddenly breaks into song only to
be stared at and isolated by her counterparts. The exchange becomes genuinely
funny.
The most striking image of the show
came during the first section. The white
powder covering the dancers had
sprinkled off onto the floor as they
walked, and had risen in puffs from their
clothing and hair each time they moved.
Gradually the dance space above them
filled with a fine white cloud and the
once-black floor was mostly covered in
white. The image invoked was one of
figures moving in a winter landscape.
Section two dealt more directly with
characters from Beckett's plays: the blind
man with dark glasses and cane, the master/slave relationship with one man
having a rope around his neck held by the
other, the man in the wheelchair pushed
by his nurse.
A woman entered with a flaming
birthday cake and the performers became
children as they each got their share or
fought for it. The irreverence displayed
towards the pristine dance space was
refreshing and theatrically exciting. Soon
white dust and cake littered the stage.
Section three was a repeated phrase
which involved at first all 10 of the
dancers, then nine, then seven, five, four,
two, and finally one.
The music was provided by one old
man singing one line over and over, ac-
.companied, gradually, by a cello, then
more and more strings and brass.
This section was beautiful but lost
much of its power because it dragged on
so long. This tendency to stretch material
out often comes from a choreographer's insecurity in presenting a single work in an
evening—a mistaken attempt to stretch a
piece out to fill an "appropriate" time
limit.
This problem with length was the
only flaw in an otherwise enthralling evening.
By Robert Meister	
Punk dream provokes
A Midsummer Night's Dream at
The Vancouver Playhouse is
theatre at its most spectacular.
Director Guy Sprung has thrown subtlety
and caution out the stage door to create a
theatrical extravaganza—and as such the
production is highly successful.
THEATRE
A Midsummer Night's Dream
The Vancouver Playhouse
Till October 30	
However Sprung's approach—a technical assault on the play, incorporat innovative and often startling costumes,
staging, music^ props, and special effects,
is not without its casualities: the power
inherent in Shakespeare's language never
surfaces.
Shakespeare's poetry, which, when
well delivered, dances in your mind,
receives scant attention in this production. The show is memorable but not
moving.
However, the production offers so
much that one can almost forgive it this
flaw. The show is undeniably entertaining and also offers a marvellous example
of a director using all the resources of the
theatre to their utmost potential.
The basic set—a circular ramp which
tilts up upstage where it connects to a
raised platform—is the only simple thing
in the production. Special effects—neon
lig    i, dry ice, fork lifts, weird instru-
m      s, even fireworks—are used liberally.
Ti      ostumes are extravagant: the lovers
in   niny spandex, and the denizens of
fairy world in a sort of post-punk-Mad-
Max get-up.
None of this is gratuitous; rather it
all works to create the sense of dream-
magic that is essential to the play. It is a
contemporary equivalent of what might
have been done in Shakespeare's time.
William Taylor as Oberon, King of the
Fairies, has a great stage prescence. He's
a very big black man with a very deep
voice. He strums an electric guitar as if it
were a magical fairy instrument, and
his singing—a low, bluesy croon electrifies the theatre. Truly an Oberonfor the
eighties. The nature of the production
didn't allow any one performance to stand
out—although all were good. The pacing
was too fast to give the actors a chance
to portray their charcaters in any depth.
The show was primarily a director's
piece and all the actors were subservient
to Sprung's overall vision of the
play. His production simply left
no room for truly great acting.
The extremely rapid pace
of the show also obscured
some of the dynamics behind
certain character's relationships. In particular, the
foundation of the Titania
/Oberon conflict, over a
little boy, is never
clarified, and its
resolution is equally
obscured. Perhaps
Sprung should have
had a boy on stage
to show what is at
stake.
The Playhouse's Dream is an ideal
show for fledgling theatre goers who are
wary of Shakespeare. This is not to say
that it's Shakespeare-made-simple,
with nothing to offer the
sophisticated. Theatre
buffs all overtown are
talkingabout it and,
I imagine, will
continue to
do so for the next
month. It's a
play that
demands a
response.
By Laura Busheikin.
BRIDGET O'SULLIVAN, ANDREW Rhodes as Titania & Bottom in a Midsummer Night's Dream
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For more details listen to:
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KITSILANO • RICHMOND • NORTH VAN. • COQUITLAM  • BURNABY
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
October 9,1987 THAT'LL STOP YOU
N      0
N
R
wmm
Find your way to and from the Canadian without entering the same room twice.
October 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 13 Bill C54
endangers
freedom of
expression
First the bad news.
Being an artist in Canada may take on
dark overtones if the federal government
votes to pass Bill C54 later this year. The
Bill, introduced by Justice minister Ray
Hnatyshyn, outlines stricter censorship
laws in a crackdown on pornography.
But the broad powers of the Bill have
the artistic community concerned. The
definition allows for censorship of anything from depictions of violent rape to the
painting of a breast (female only; male
breasts are not censored). Under Bill C54,
it is left up to a police officer's discretion to
decide what is "art"; the onus falls upon
the artist to defend his or her work.
Sounds like guilty until proven innocent. Paintings can be seized and shows
shut down if the local police don't like
what they see. Talk about a harsh review.
ACTRA, a Canadian Union of performers, writers, and broadcast journalists, has
spoken out strongly against the new Bill
and hopes to encourage public debate on
the issue. Hopefully the MPs will take
note, because the good news is that Bill
C54 isn't yet the law.
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 9,1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and
Fridays throughout the academic year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and not necessarily those of the university
administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is
a member of Canadian University Press. The
editorial office is Rm. 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-
2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Corinne Bjorge tittered with anticipation as
Chris Wiesinger, whose editorial rant she had
just rejected, was hog-tied by Victor Wong and
Ross McLaren, both of whom had suddenly disposed of their principles and appointed themselves Socred Inquisitors (for money and prestige,
they said). Laura Busheikin, Carolyn Sale, and
Melodie Cook looked on with lurid fascination.
Meanwhile, Myron Neville and Deanne Mould
battled viciously for the last bottle of beer, which,
it turned out later, had already been consumed by
Justine Brown, who had refilled it with water.
Robert Meister complimented Justine on her
intelligent use of the "twist-on cap" principle,
which had only recently been developed by Stu
Derdeyne, Jennifer Lyall, and Deanne Fisher,
after long, tortuous mathematical theorizing and
debilitating experimentation. Dan Andrews, Pat
Kirkwood, and Cathy Lu were awestruck, and
stood to the side, watching the action through 3-
D glasses with their mouths agape. The problem
of blue smartie existence remained unsolved.
Sailen Black tapped furiously at his keyboard,
stopping only to demand absolute silence while
Christina Von Bormann showed him where the
"L" was. Steve Chan moved gracefully across the
room to assist Victor and Ross in pushing Chris
into a file cabinet. Corinne tittered. Jeremy
Fraser offered to help with his sledgehammer.
Suddenly — and this was awkward for everyone
— Michael Groberman, Neil Lucente, Chris
Wong, and Svetozar Kontic started filing out of
the cabinet, chanting "Bill's bills have Balls!"
They were quickly pushed back inside. It was incomprehensible, especially to Adam Jones and
Gloria Loree, that the after-life could instill
Socred mentality. Perhaps, Michael J. Bryant
ventured, they had gone to Hell. A hush fell over
the news chamber — until someone turned up the
stereo.
t^TrlE
OAY?
Service
organizations
benefit all
I do not always agree
with the spending decisions
of the AMS. However, I do
not agree with Rick Hiebert
that        each service
organization's AMS funding
should be determined by the
student body at large. As I
see it, there are at least two
problems with Hiebert's
view: one practical and one
theoretical.
On a practical level, the
time and effort required to
collect each student's vote
on each club's AMS grant
would be enormous and
quite prohibitive. I also
doubt whether most students would be willing to
submit thoughtful decisions
on so many issues.
Economic theory suggests people tend to lie about
how much they benefit from
public goods (things such as _
public parks, from which
everybody derives benefit).
Given a choice between
paying $10 per year and
having Stanley Park turned
into a parking lot, most
people would reach for their
wallets. But if one person
chooses not to pay, everybody else would keep on
paying and our friend would
get a "free ride" around the
seawall.
What I'm saying is that
government must tax the
people to finance those
goods and services which at
least theoretically benefit
the public as a whole, or else
nobody would pay for them
at all.
In a representative democracy, those of us who
disagree with the decisions
made by our free-handed
elected representatives get
to vote them out of office
next time we go to the polls.
Perhaps the problem with
the AMS is the relatively
poor information about its
decisions that gets reported
to voters and/or the relatively poor attention paid by
voters to the activities of the
AMS.
Rather than working to
defeat the purposes of representative democracy, those
QUm
of us  who  are  concerned
about AMS spending should
voice our opinions to those
men and women who represent us and who are ultimately responsible to us for
their actions. Jim Tucker
commerce 4
Guard those
anachronisms
Is a 'paycheck' the same
as a 'paycheque'? I think not,
at least not in this country.
In Canada the accepted
spelling is paycheque,
meaning a piece of paper
that is as good as cash, or a
surrogate for the same. In
the United States the accepted spelling is that of
paycheck.
Does the Ubyssey publish by the letter and is so
strapped for cash that cost
saving measures such as
alternate spellings have to
be adopted?
The differences in Ca
nadian and American culture, (which might go by the
wayside, what with free
trade and all) may be as
minor as one letter, but it is
these little anachronisms
that make living here so
interesting.
Donald Patrick Thomas
education 5
Mouth over
mind
Apparently the Ubyssey has broadened its editorial policy to allow not only
homophobic letters, but also
racist and dumb ones
["Freedom Lovers Loath To
Listen", Oct. 6]. The portions of Ron Parks' letter
which are intelligible indicate that i.) he supports
Clyne's views, and ii.) Judge
Clyne's remarks should be
allowed on the basis of free
speech. Sorry, Ron. Your
views are regrettable, but
freedom of expression simply is not at issue here.
Hai Le was merely stating what should be (but
apparently is not) obvious:
that society should be concerned by remarks of that
nature comingfromaman of
Clyne's political stature,
and that Clyne should be
made aware that the sentiments which he expresses
are unacceptable and
wrong.
This is not to say that he
should be barred from expressing them! I confess
that I was unable to follow
the subtleties of Ron's other
arguments(?), but one thing
is clear. Ron's impeccable
logic became offensive by
leaning on that pillar of
WASP racism: someone's
ability to speak English.
How's your Chinese, Ron?
Peter Halewood
law 1
Clyne's vision ''disturbing"
The Immigration Association of Canada, of which
Judge J.V. Clyne is one of
many eminent members, is
of the view that "clumsy and
ill defined federal immigration policies could create a
Canada where the English
and French are minorities?
To address this perceived
threat, the organisation
feels that immigration
should be balanced in order
to maintain "our generations and heritage."
Mr. Clyne and his associates are treading a dangerous path when they
claim that Canada is a
"white" country. Admittedly, Canada is "white" in
terms of the skin complexion of many Canadians. But
culturally speaking, Canada is made up of a very diverse ethnic mosaic. "Our
generations and our heritage" are not only English
and French, but are derived
from countries and ethnic
groups from all over the
world.
Mr. Clyne retracted his
statements about a "white"
Canada and claimed later
that he was speaking in
terms of culture (white Eu-
ropean) rather than race.
Yet the ambiguities persist.
As he is of English ancestry,
is Mr. Clyne claiming any
specific cultural similarities
between himself and the
Irish, French, Italian, Yugoslavian, Dutch, German and
Ukrainian people, to name
only a few?
The answer must
surely be in the negative,
unless one is speaking in
terms of colour of skin. Yet
J.V. Clyne denies that his
comments were made in this
direction. The most disturbing aspect of this whole affair is that Mr. Clyne, and
there are many like him, is
set in his own views of Canada as a "white" country.
Some may claim that
they were here first, of
course conveniently disregarding native Indians.
Many of us may have caught
an earlier boat over, and
many came later by more
modern means of transportation. Despite all of this, we
are all immigrants and thus
in the same boat. We had
better learn tolive with each
other, or else jump off.
Adam Jay Williams
law 1
Science
students can
so write!
Good grief. Professing
that people are "attracted to
science instead of arts because their English skills
are questionable," Ron
Park's presumptuous stat-
ment does gross injustice to
science students, and their
professors who strive to
maintain academic excellence and UBC's reputation
as a leading Canadian research institution.
The notion that science
students cannot write well
is a myth, no more real than
the myth that arts or law
students are lousy at calculus and chemistry. Some
arts students do make it to
medical schools, and the
ability to communicate scientific works clearly and
concisely in plain, written
English is demanded of all
science students.
It is time that - in fairness to all UBC students -
arts, commerce, and science
students realize that they
are not superior to their
peers just because they are
in this or that faculty.
Hai Le
science 1
Page 14
THE UBYSSEY
October 9,1987 Freestyle
FresKtyieS ara opinion or ■pommejvt pieces written by XJbye&ey staff writers. Opinions
' expressed ere thaw of the witer ani not necessarily those of the Ubyasey,
'Opting-in' leaves
students out in cold
Rick Hiebert's Freestyle on
A.M.S. funding lacks understanding of the consequences of "pay as
you play" funding policy.
Firstly, the "opt-in" program
suggested by Rick would result in
the non-existence of most clubs.
The majority of students would
not fund clubs they did not participate in, leaving all clubs with virtually no funding.
Secondly, the A.M.S. is an
elected government, and therefore
has a mandate to spend the budget
as they see fit. "Opt-in" student
programs would be the equivalent
of "opt-out" health, military, and
education programs at the federal
and provincial level. Many people
disagree with the government, but
one can hardly deny them the
right, once elected, to levy taxes
and implement policies.
Finally, Rick fails to see that all
clubs benefit the student populace. The funding of a large number of clubs, as well as student
athletics, CITR, the Ubyssey, and
Intramurals, provides a wide
range of extra-curricular activities for the UBC student- activities that make university life more
thanjustfour years of job training.
Forcing students to fully fund the
activities they participate in
would severely limit their choices,
and the affordability of those programs.
Michael Wilson is a fourth year
engineer who likes to get clubbed.
Perspectives
fS_i
_____
h_ pei-Spectivg column is opeft ia a]} membersflftfie UBC communi ty wbq wish to express
nuptmon. Articles wllteedjledforsejciEtn.raciatn and homophobia. DropofTat SUB 241 k.
Logging Valley
ignores economy
I would like to take this opportunity to express my concern at
the government's recent decision
to log the Stein Valley.
Dave Parker, minister of forests, in Thursday's edition of The
Vancouver Sun (Oct. 1) was
quoted as saying, "This decision
means the preservation of large
areas of one of the most spectacular wilderness areas in our province and at the same time, it recognizes our need to create jobs and
economic activity." Allow me to
address the paradox of this statement and identify the elements of
its mistruths.
This "spectacular widerness
area" is a unique ecological environment of indescribable beauty
and cultural importance. It is the
last watershed of its type in B.C.
and supports and unusual variety
of climate, providing appreciators
with the experience of an untouched river enhanced by mountain scenery.
It is home to an extensive
range of wildlife from goats to grizzlies and harbours many examples of Indian heritage including pictographs from the early
1900s.
As in any untouched wilderness area, the delicate balance of
the natural environment would be
seriously damaged by harsh interventions by man, such as logging.
The government's Wilderness
Advisory Committee in their final
conclusions and recommendations on the Stein Valley concluded that "the whole Stein Valley qualifies as wilderness" and
that "the significant forest and
recreational values are distributed unevenly across the watershed?
In other words, there's no way
logging can take place without
permanently damaging the valley
despite Mr. Parker's counter
claim.
Logging the Stein Valley does
not "recognize our need to create
jobs and economic activity" in B.C.
It's merely a short term economic
intervention on the part of a gov
ernment that lacks longterm
commitments to improving B.C.'s
economy.
It lacks insight into B.C.'s
current economic situation and
the real need to preserve our rapidly deteriorating environment.
Repeated studies have shown
that B.C.'s much touted resource
sector is actually shrinking, both
as an employer of people and as a
contributor in the provincial gross
domestic product.
Within the group of industries
classified by Statistics Canada as
manufacturing, those related to
forestry have shown growth rates
slower than virtually any other
industry.
In the past 20 years, 80 percent of all new jobs in B.C. have
been created in the tourism and
service industries. Why then
doesn't our government investigate the tourist potential of this
area and the possibility of employment and economic dvelopment
also.
The govenment appears to be
postponing the inevitable and
shunning its responsibility to develop longterm solutions to the
economic problems of B.C.
Sadly the government fails to
recognize the Stein Valley for the
important resource potential it
has if left in its current untouched
state.
It should be left as it is for all
British Columbians and visitors
from other countries to enjoy today
and in the future. It's up to the
public to show them their errors
and to change their decision to log
the Stein Valley.
I hope others will join me in
the fight to save the Stein. Any
type of logging wil only result in
the destruction of this unique and
valuable wilderness area, our only
solution is no logging at all.
Annette Garm is a fourth year
nursing student who treats
shingles but faints at the sight of
wood chips.
The
Chronicles-—-
nrmn
FranK Knew the slightest noise
m\qht "tnggfcr the, restiess herd
The GoldenThroat Charmer
October 9,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 15 Songs
from the
satanic pit
Awake, mortals, for Ogre
walks the earth, casting
music like thunderbolts
into the dark satanic pit. The
Helen Pitt Gallery that is, where
they played on Friday night.
MUSIC (?)
Ogre
The Helen Pitt Gallery
Friday, OCtober 2
These guys are more evil
than Satan himself. Their song
"march into the Abyss" describes
them kicking Satan's ass out of
hell. The band themselves say,
and I quote, "If Ogre's sonic assault doesn't melt your snatch
hairs then you're a wuss".
The blistering heat cf the
Ogre set whipped Friday's
audience into an orgiastic frenzy,
leaving tlicm screaming for
more...or perhaps for vengeance.
Songs like "Buckets of Blood",
"Feltching the Pope", "Bowling
with Satan", "Appointment with
Dr. Quincy", and their rock
anthem "Party at the Night"
leave no doubt that these guys
are heavy metal heavyweights.
Ogre's imaginative on-stage
antics and hilarious costumes
elevate this group into the
annals of Vancouver rock
history.
This band sounds like a
mish-mash of Judas Priest, Met-
allica, and the Bay City Rollers.
The two drummers are synchronized and form the pulsating
heart of this evil configuration,
while the ogre, wearing a fur
loincloth, a jason mask, and a
pentagram the size of a hubcap,
contributes a deep steady bass
rhythm. Add to this two lead
guitar machines and a singer
seemingly recruited from the
violent ward at Riverview and
you've got your proverbial "wall
of sound".
They promise that their next
show—at The Venue on October
31st—wil be "the grossest show
ever". Join the madness—ifyou
dare.
By Christina Von Bormann	
Baby boom banal
w
hat happens to a top-notch female
executive who suddenly has a baby
foisted upon her? What does
J.C.Wiatt (Diane Keaton) do when confronted
with the need to play mother - a role that she
has successfully eluded while making it in the
corporate world?
MOVIE
Baby Boom
Starring Diane Keaton and Sam Shepard
Vancouver Centre
The first third of Nancy Meyer and Charles Shyer's Baby Boom had me thinking that I
didn't want to know. J.C's characterless
mate(Harold Ramis), for whom love-making is
a perfunctory four minute act of sexual release, sets the bad tone when he thinks J.C.
maybe considering keeping baby Elizabeth: "I
thought I heard your biological clock ticking."
The plot was instantly predictable:
woman making good in man's world by shirking stereotypical female roles is forced to
admit when motherhood is thrust upon her
that she had been rejecting the role to which
she is most naturally suited, (sic)
Sure enough, when Elizabeth disrupts
Tiger Lady Wiatt's career, the men in her life
act as if this is what they have been expecting
all along. Tiger Lady may be the best man on
the crew but eventually
she, like all women, will
want to play wife and
mummy. It confirms
her boss Fritz's (Sam
Wanamaker) suspicion
that women are happiest
running the domestic
haven. "You've
changed? he informs
her, "gone soft."
Imagine J.C's frustration when these men
refuse her the chance to
do it all, and you will
have a foretaste of your
own frustration watching her be unfairly ma-
noeuvered out of her own
life. Her lover moves out, her boss fails to promote her to partner, and the young man below
her on the clicheed ladder leaps quickly onto
the rung he presumes she must abandon for
baby's sake.
That's just the first segment of the well-
worn path the plot takes. Baby Boom resolves
very patly as comedy will do. Our heroine
finds Mr. Charm amidst a pastoral setting.
Dr. Jeff Cooper (Sam Shepard) 'makes' J.C.
fall for him with a Rhett Butler-like grab and
kiss.   Sleeping Beauty is still dependent on
that crucial bestowal of a kiss to make life
pretty.
No matter how fine the acting, nothing
can gloss over the fact that Baby Boom relies
heavily on sentimentality. J.C's emotions are
so carefully manicured that there's no real
bite to her fight. The cliches and stereotypes
with which it is riddled and its fairytale resolution prevent it from giving serious treatment to the complex issue it raises: why can't
we - both men and women - have it all?
By Carolyn Sale ,	
OGRE...AT THE Pitt Gallery
MR. BOB ONAMI, FUJI PRODUCT MANAGER,
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Page 16
THE UBYSSEY
October 9,1987

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