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The Ubyssey Mar 22, 1968

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Array — bob brown photo
GEARS   ON  THE  RAMPAGE  after  leaving  the   short-lived   general   meeting   in   the   armory.
Tanking   stunts   'traditional' — Armstrong
Engineering tanking stunts will probably
never be stopped because they are part of
university tradition, acting deputy UBC president William Armstrong, dean of applied science,
said Thursday.
He was commenting on an engineering tank-
in, in which several students were dumped into
a portable tank after the Alma Mater Society
general meeting at noon.
The event culminated in a comic chase scene
at Brock and threats of anti-engineering violence
from bystanders.
"Tanking is too much of a traditional thing
to ever be stopped by the administration,"
Armstrong said.
"Besides, what harm does it really do? It's
an outlet for animal spirit and if it wasn't let
out this way, it would be some other way."
James Dow, arts 4, said the mood of bystanders outside Brock was very ugly.
SPLASH . . . and a floured hippie hits the water.
— lawrence woodd photo
Bank's SUB  rental  to help pay
administration  building costs
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XUX, No. 61
By PAUL KNOX
More than $500,000 in rent for student union
building space is helping to build UBC's new
administration building.
Under a 1965 agreement with the administration, the Alma Mater Society signed away the
money, paid as 35 years' rental of SUB space
*   by the Bank of Montreal.
UBC bursar William White said Thursday
the agreement said the bank was to occupy 3,000
square feet of space in the administration building and 6,000 square feet — two-thirds of the
banks total — in SUB.
However, of the $1.1 million total rent the
bank paid, only $202,000 — one fifth — went to
the AMS. Two-thirds of the $1.1 million would
be a little more than $700,000.
In other words, the AMS is getting one-fifth
*- ^of the rent for two-thirds of the space.
White said the 1965-66 council was given a
choice of several divisions of both money and
space.
"The space in SUB is costing about $20 a
square foot. Six thousand square feet at that
price comes to about $120,000, so the AMS is
getting a good deal."
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 1968
224-3916
"About 14 of us were just waiting for the
engineers to tank one more person before we
went in after them," he said.
About 200 engineers attended the general
meeting, bringing with them a portable tank,
a red BUS car and AMS executives in a wooden
cage.
When the brief meeting ended, most of the
AMS executives were tanked in the armory.
From there, engineers moved the tank outside
the armory and accosted unsuspecting students.
Most of the victims were arts students wearing beards and hair longer than two inches.
Resisting victims were doused with yellow
flour and surfaced to the jeers of "flour power."
The procession was stopped at Brock whe-h
the tank overturned and the EUS car was chased
by a traffic patrol car to the engineering building.
Witnesses said the car was lifted into the
building to escape the patrol car.
A Ubyssey check showed the average cost of
SUB space is $18 per square foot.
The Bank of Montreal was the highest bidder when tenders were submitted for campus
banking facilities. A contract was signed between
the bank and the university, but the AMS had
no dealings with the bank.
White said the original agreement had been
discussed many times. "It was signed by the
student council, which represents the students
who are paying for SUB," he said.
"The university will provide maintenance
and other services for SUB and this is a factor
in the discrepancy between space and rental
payments."
It was also revealed Thursday that the SUB
cafeteria will lack some 800 seats as a result of
a misunderstanding between the AMS and food
services.
The downstairs cafeteria has 1,800 seats and
the upstairs cafe 1,000, but the two are supposed to have the same seating capacity. The
Ubyssey learned the reason is that food services
has refused to pay for an expansion area which
would accommodate the other 800 seats.
If the AMS were to pay for the area, it would
cost more than $90,000.
Annual meeting
folds in chaos
The annual Alma Mater Society general meeting Thursday
disintegrated only 15 minutes after it began.
The noon meeting in the armory was adjourned soon after
200 students left to protest a ruling by outgoing AMS president
Shaun Sullivan that a quorum was present.
None of the proposed constitutional revisions were considered
or passed.
The meeting began traditionally with engineers releasing
previously captured executive members from a cage onto the
stage. But only the minutes were passed before Garth Brown,
arts 4, challenged a quorum.
"I am the chair and I rule this a quorum," said Sullivan.
Outgoing engineering president Lynn Spraggs then moved that
the decision of the chair be upheld.
A quorum is the minimum number of members required
to be present at an assembly before it can validly transact
business. Ten per cent of the total student enrolment at UBC
had to attend the meeting in order to form a quorum. Observers
said the turnout was at least 600 short of the 1,800 students
needed.
Sullivan called for questions, but apparently not seeing
the half dozen hands raised, called for a vote. Two hundred
engineers voted loudly in favor and Sullivan ruled the chair
upheld.
Brown asked for a head count, but Sullivan would not
grant one. As he moved on to non-controversial constitutional
revisions, Brown spoke again.
"This meeting is a farce and the AMS is a farce," Brown
said. "I suggest everyone who is not an engineer leave and
then we'll be sure of not having a quorum."
After some hesitation, over 200 people followed Brown
toward the door. Sullivan advised them if there was no quorum
the meeting would have to be adjourned.
"I suggest you return and participate," he said. No one
did,  despite more suggestions from Sullivan.
Sullivan asked if there' were any more challenges. On his
third question of challenge, Lorenz Vonfersen, arts 4, said he
challenged the quorum.
"Then there's no quorum and this meeting is adjourned,"
Sullivan said.
After the meeting Sullivan hesitated to estimate the number
of people at the meeting.
"I'd say there were more than 1,000 students there. Let's
just say that I ruled there was a quorum present. You always
operate a meeting on the assumption that a quorum is present
until that assumption is challenged."
Sullivan said he may have made a mistake in assuming
students knew how a general meeting operates and not explaining
the purpose and necessity of the meeting before passing the
minutes.
The new AMS executive, in office now that the general
meeting is over, reacted strongly to the failure of the assembly.
They issued the following statement five hours after the meeting:
"Thursday's fiasco is indicative of a trend in AMS general
meetings over the past years. How are we going to reverse this
trend? A few suggestions: a fall general meeting; an active preparation of the students on the part of student council; stress
on informed and rational discussion at the general meeting."
Brown said his original intention in challenging the quorum
was not to have everyone leave the meeting..
"I wanted to find out whether it was going to be a circus
or would allow for serious discussion. I could see that the ruling
was going to be arbitrary when Sullivan declared there was a
quorum without making a proper count.
"I asked people to leave to make sure that this kangaroo
type procedure wouldn't go on. I think it was a good thing
they did leave because there wasn't to be any fair consideration
of the things at hand."
"It would be easy to blame the outgoing executive for the
fiasco," vice-president Carey Linde said. "But the problem goes
much deeper than that.
"It seems that if there isn't a threat to cut the jocks people
just don't give a damn. I don't blame them. We simply cannot
go on year to year expecting the engineers and their cage and
tank to draw a quorum crowd. Hopefully, next October the
general meeting will be relevant to students in some way other
than cutting or increasing fees."
This is it—almost   I
i
As most editors are  behind bars for failing to obey §
green lights, today's Ubyssey is the second-last this year. 1
The last edition of Canada's greatest will appear March ||
29, next Friday. I
Remaining staffers, rumored to be students, claim they 1
need time to discover what courses they're in before exams, j
Meanwhile,  any students insane   enough to work on il
the paper next year are urged to lurch down to the north 1
Brock office and give their names before chaos takes over. J Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 22,   1968
Language requirement gone,
no more captive audiences
The faculty of arts has revised its foreign
language requirements in order to do away with
conscriptive audiences, arts dean Dennis Healy
said Thursday.
"We've been rather uneasy about constraining
students to take two years of a foreign language
no matter what they did in high school."
There have been revisions in the language
requirements every five years for the past 20
years, he said.
A grade 12 standing in a foreign language
will be sufficient to meet arts graduation requirements.
Students to aid
faculty makeover
UBC education students will aid in the reorganization of the faculty, says education undergraduate society president Gerry Olund.
Olund said members of the society have been
asked to form a committee to submit briefs and
recommendations aimed at revamping the faculty.
"It is imperative that a chairman and a temporary committee be formed immediately to
work with the commission over the summer
months," said Olund.
The society will accept written applications
for the committee until Tuesday. Applicants
should be enrolled in at least third year level
courses.
Other positions are also open to education
faculty undergraduates. The night school project, men's and women's intramurals, chalkboard,
Pacific northwest universities, social and special
events groups all need chairmen. Ubyssey and
seminar reps are  also needed.
Applications should be delivered to the EdUS
office by 1:30 p.m. Friday.
Students who this year have fulfilled all but
the language requirements for a B.A. may take
advantage of the revision immediately. They
may proceed with graduation without having
credit for the former language requirements.
Below is the text of the statement issued by
Healy concerning the language requirement
change:
"To qualify for the degree of bachelor of
arts, a student must have attained grade XII
standing or the equivalent in a language other
than English. If he has completed a grade XII
course in language at secondary school, he is
not required to take further work in language.
If he enters the faculty with grade XI
standing in a foreign language, he must complete satisfactorily three additional units of
work in the same language or six units of
work in another language. If he enters the
faculty not having attained grade XI standing,
in language, he must complete satisfactorily
six units of work in one foreign language.
"Normally this requirement will be satisfied in the first and second years, and third-
year standing will not be granted until the
requirement in language has been met.
"Students  should  bear  in  mind  that  for
serious   study in   any  academic   discipline   a
reading-knowledge   of   at   least   one   foreign
language is a sine qua non; and that in most
graduate   programs,   proficiency   in   foreign
languages is not only useful but mandatory.
Students  are  strongly advised,  therefore,  to
continue the study of foreign language at the
university."
Students   who   will   have  fulfilled   all   the
other requirements for graduation with the B.A.
degree may take  advantage  of the revised  requirements in  foreign  language  quoted  above.
All other requirements remain as printed in the
calendar of the  faculty of arts.  Students who
qualify should make application for graduation
through the office of the registrar by March 31.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
No student funds
in  Whig  drive
The UBC Liberal club Thursday denied that
they used student money to print and mail campaign literature for Liberal leadership candidate
John Turner.
The club allegedly used an Alma Mater
Society mimeograph machine to produce 100
letters promoting a reception for Turner. The
AMS executive secretary mailed the letters.
Bob Lewis, president of the B.C. young
Liberals and Mike Coleman, B.C. university
Liberal federation president, who had signed
the letters, said in a letter to The Ubyssey that
Turner headquarters paid for the mailing, and
that no student funds were involved.
"We are led to understand that the UBC
club has been impartial as a body in making
arrangements for various leadership candidates
— as long as they are willing to pay the bills
and ensure that there is thus no misuse of student funds, as was the cast in this instance,"
Coleman and Lewis said in the letter.
— lawrence woodd photo
SULLIVAN . . . like a duck taking to water
Elite an obstacle
In Ghana the wealthy, commercially-based elite are a barrier
to progress, says English prof Fred Stockholder.
Ten students, six of them African, heard Stockholder tell
of his experiences in Ghana in International House noon
Thursday.
Africa's greatest obstacle to progress is the problem of
overcoming the fundamental inequality of a society based on a
heritage of colonialism with its notion of the master, and the
tribe with its notion of the chief, he said.
The shortcomings of the village and racial life of Africa
rest on the notion of the big man.
" 'We're only Africans,' they say to a white. 'You can't
expect us to do things as you would do.' "
"The concept of the big man is antithetical to the process
of development. The elite is not just frequently corrupt. The
relationship of the elite to the mass is a corrupt one, even if
no money is involved," said Stockholder.
"My first disappointment in Africa came when I saw how
many people owned a Mercedes Benz.   And how many didn't.
"As a symbol of wealth, it was pretty impresive. It also
indicated where the wealth was going — to a university chancellor, for example, and to government administrators."
By way of contrast, people in the Upper Volta region of
northern Ghana were so poor they scavenged empty food tins,
he said.
The north American myth of everyone being equal in
democracy is almost unavailable in Africa. Africans aren't
opposed to democracy.
Stockholder said democracy just isn't relevant.
Christ-hippie
likeness held
Parallels drawn between
Jesus and hippies are legitimate, says UBC religious studies head Dr. William Nicholls.
"The reason the hippies are
being persecuted is because of
the features they have in common with Christ and the early
Christians. It's a very neat
idea."
He was commenting on a
CBC television program, the
7 O'clock show, which Monday
night featured opinions on hippies. Interviewed by the courthouse fountain were mayor
Tom Campbell, town fool
Joachim Foikis, and UBC student Stan Persky.
The program closed with a
15-second fade-out shot of a
hippie dissolving into an image
of Jesus Christ.
Following the show, the
OBUT office received about
200 telephone calls protesting
the comparison.
Consequently, the producer
of the show, Ain Soodor, was
removed   from   his   job.
Nicholls said he had seen the
program and was shocked to
hear of Soodor's dismissal.
"The point was legitimate
and well made. Parallels be-
_, tween Jesus and hippies are
being used by many people
today. I've made the point in
some of my own articles.
"I would like to find ways
of protesting this iwhole
phenomenon," he said.
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5754 University Blvd. in the Village    224-3202 TM UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). Th.
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo,
Page   Friday,  loc.   24;   sports,  loc.   23;   advertising,   loc.   26.  Telex  04-5224
Final winner Sou tha m Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
MARCH 22, 1968
;<VV*-V!
Stop the jocks
There is only one issue in the April 3 athletic fee
plan referendum: Should a government elected by students control non-academic fees collected from students?
Or should such money be controlled by an appointed
committee of students and  non-students?
We say — despite our sympathy for the tribulations
of the hard-working mens' and womens' athletic committees — that elected student representatives must
have the final say over student funds. And it is precisely
this final say over student funds which the April 3
referendum wants to remove.
We believe the referendum will prove to be merely
a preview of a broad revision of Alma Ma.ter Society
athletic policies to take place over the next several years.
There is general student dissatisfaction over the basic
premise of athletic financing: that an extensive, travelling
extra-mural program which cannot support itself through
attendance must be financed by $5 collected compulsorily
from every student.
Opposition to this situation, we believe, includes a
substantial majority of students. This majority has not
in the past been mobilized. It will be mobilized in the
near future.
Meanwhile, it is vital that students retain the control they presently have over the money they give to
the jocks: student council must keep the right to veto
the athletic budget.
As former AMS treasurer Dave Hoye has pointed
out, once this control is relinquished it will be almost
impossible to get it back.
In their own interests, students must vote no on
the athletic plan referendum April 3.
Swine
Some of the students in Werner Cohn's sociology
class believe gypsies should be removed from the face
of the earth.
Some students in the same class believe Indians
have no right to live in Canada. If your stomach is
strong, you can read about it in today's Page Friday.
The state of the minds of these students makes us
feel that the splits and quarrels between the many-
colored varieties of socialists, syndicalists, communists,
and liberals are beside the point. These sophisticated
political quibbles pale in significance when one realizes
that in a second year university class there are students
who would kill gypsies because they are different and
expel North American natives from their home.
These sociology students have minds no more
affected than are the minds of swine by the humanity
and culture universities were established to develop.
There are no easy answers to the problem of bigotry.
Some talk about the need for improving pre-university
education. Others suggest compulsory anthropology
courses. These suggestions are valuable. Nevertheless,
those students who have developed a modicum of social
conscience should always be aware of — and ready to
fight — the enemy in their midst.
Punks
Chief John George of the Burrard Indian Band has
expressed scorn for the newly-formed Native Alliance
for Red Power, calling the group's members "y°iing
punks."
Better to be young punks, we say, than Uncle Toms,
a species of which Chief John George is an excellent
example. Radical Indians define an Uncle Tom as one
who has abandoned self-respect and accepted the white
man's view of the Indian. Thus, he sees no need for
radical change — and resents those who do.
It was not until the young punks took over from
the Uncle Toms among Negroes in the U.S. that even
the smallest progress was made. The sa.me will be the
case in Canada. If there are to be any significant changes
in the lot of the Canadian Indian they will be brought
about by the young punks who organize political movements, not by the Uncle Tom chieftains who perform
rain dances for visiting white dignitaries.
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"They're dunking an engineer."
LETTERS  TO   THE EDITOR
A chilling  reminder
Editor, The Ubyssey:
This letter has finally been
written in response to a series
of acts that I've seen on campus. Today I happened to
walk by as a mob of red-coated
people were dunking passers-
by into a portable water-tank.
Each of the people selected for
the bath had long hair and
beards and therefore, as one
engineer yelled, must be a
flower child. I have witnessed
this group injure people while
throwing them into the education fountain, and we are all
well aware of the violation of
Gabor Mate's rights in the
past. Apart from the inconvenience of being soaked (most of
us don't keep an extra set of
clothes on campus) and the
risk of personal injury, I am
appalled that such a group is
permitted to bully any person
or group and to interfere with
the academic or social activities of other non-participants.
I would have expected that if
there was any place in our society where a person could
walk, free of harassment, it
would have been a university
campus.
As a member of society, I
am frightened by the continuation of this "engineering mentality" after university. The
sight of chanting red-coated
engineers at the SFU-UBC football game or marching down
Lower Mall is a chilling reminder that mob violence may
not be unique to Nazi Germany or Mississippi. The kind
of mentality that derives pleasure from molesting people
who dress and act differently
from one's own set of standards results in John Doe warrants for "cleaning up" the
fountain at city hall. This type
of thinking could just as readily select Jews or Negroes or
Japs as the object of its fears
and fascist acts. This behaviour
only corroborates Gene Marine's (of Ramparts) statements
that the engineering profession
is composed of people who act
without regard to society in
plundering and despoiling the
land.
I would suggest that the university faculty and administration as well as non-engineering students are guilty of not
taking   steps   to   prevent   this
type of behaviour. I strongly
request that the dean of engineering remonstrate with his
subjects. I would recommend
that all people who have been
the target of the engineers submit a request to the president
of the university to take steps
for the elimination of these
senseless acts. It would seem
appropriate for the Alma
Mater Society to take action
to deter engineers from this
frightening behaviour. How
long will we continue to provide tacit approval by our inaction?
DAVID SUZUKI
associate professor
dept. of zoology
ftrf Itttk boys
Editor, The Ubyssey:
May I offer my sincere apologies to the victims of that
hideous act Thursday at the
armory. I assure you very few
engineers were in favor of it.
I must point out that in the
faculty of applied science we
have a vast variety of personalities. We have men like Donn
Aven (Alma Mater Society
treasurer), who supply the university with good leadership.
But unfortunately we also
have fat little boys like Vic
Hardy (engineering vice-president) who enjoy sickly little
games.
When the idea of Thursday's
stunt was presented to one
of the large geology classes in
the morning, a large group of
engineers was formed to try
to stop it. Their efforts were
fruitless.
Congratulations, Vic, for
making fools of us all and for
making a bigger fool of your-
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
City        Stuart Gray
News              Susan  Gransby
Managing Murray   McMillan
Photo        Kurt Hilger
Senior              Pat Hrushowy
Sports         Mike  Jessen
Wire ....   Norman Gidney
Page Friday        Judy Bing
Ass't. City Boni  Lee
Johann Sebastian Bach would have
been pleased to see them dancing the
gavotte. As his 20 children came
traipsing through the door, G. F.
Handel turned over in his grave, and
George Phillpp Telemann, the first
ma=s-media communicator, told off
his wife. Mike Finlay spun a yarn on
his spinet, but in the end was left
craving   accord   with   the   rather   de-
self. If this is an example of
your leadership next year, God
help this university. By the
way, Vic, are you planning
anything for Halloween next
year? In case you aren't, may
I suggest burning down the
library — it sure would make
one helluva big bonfire!
BARRY GILL
applied science 1
Editor,  The Ubyssey:
Something should be done
to curb the fascist behavior of
a group of individuals, hardly
individuals, which feels it has
the right to use strongarm tactics on anyone, anywhere, for
any or no reason. I think this
attitude has evolved out of the
lack of punitive action taken
by acting president Walter
Gage. It's about fucking time
that acting president Gage began acting. Boys will be boys,
but when they impinge on
other people's freedoms they
are being oppressive. When
people have to run and hide
from fear of being caged in
for two hours, surrounded by
a group of screaming assholes,
and sprayed by fire hoses
while encaged, it's about time
that someone came to the defense of those people. Since
the RCMP have no jurisdiction in areas where engineers
are being accused, and since
no law exists on campus protecting individuals from oppression, I suggest that those
in the position to stop the oppressors do so.
STEPHEN BLOCK
arts 3
MORE LETTERS
on Page 17
manding clavichord of Steve Jaxon.
Jean Couperin cut a dashing figured
bass as he wove his way among the
haunting contrapuntal recorder music
of Irene Wasilewskiet et al. And the
spirit of Philippe Rameau was with
Paul Knox as he sat dreamily at his
harpsichord editing egregious wire
copy  with   Phil   Ament.
Lawrence Woodd pioneered the
field of engraving in the darkroom.
Bob Brown etched. John Twigg*s
strength was sapped when he tried
to edit the Well-Tempered Clavier.
Michel Jehnsten transcribed dusty
manuscripts of allemandes and
gigues.
All are asked to join the Polesden
Lacey Glee Club today at noon, when
the very baroque Aken Drum song
will be  perfected.  !p£   2WO
Campus patterns of predjudice
Sieg Heil?
By KEN MOSS
and
DWARDU CARDONA
Are you a Nigger-hater?
Or are you, like us, tired of being asked that
worn-out question? — thinking, perhaps, that you're
a broad-minded intelligent Canadian and not a
cotton-raising-gentleman-farmer down in Mississippi.
— Well, think again.
This is Canada but let's not shield our curling
noses behind our aristocratic-looking fingers. As a
nation, we might not be as unprejudiced as we might
want our American neighbors to believe.
An experiment was conducted at UBC in January
of this year, in order to determine what students
thought regarding kinship with any or all of 10
specified ethnic groups: American Indians, Canadians, Poles, Gypsies, East Indians, Chinese, Jews,
American-native whites, Negroes, Englishmen and
Swedes. There were 114 of these students, ranging
in age from 18 to 35, including some female nurses
presently taking an introductory course in sociology
and the humanities. The experiment, conducted by
Professor Werner Cohn, was tabulated in such a
way as to allow each student a choice of one of eight
given statements which would correspond with his
or her own feelings or beliefs (we would like to say
prejudices) regarding each of the given groups.
There was a choice of the following degrees of
intimacy to which the subjects tested could admit
members of the ethnic groups:
to close kinship by marriage.
to my club as personal chums.
to my street as neighbors
to employment in my occupation.
to citizenship in my country.
as visitors only to my country.
would exclude from my country.
would eliminate from world.
NUREMBERG
Who, today, after having perused all that has
been written about Hitler and the Jews, after having
watched the endless parade of boring TV series and
innumerable motion pictures condemning the Nazis
for their atrocious war crimes, championing the various Ari ben-Canaans, the Nuremberg trials and the
justice meted out to these warring criminals — who,
today, would even as much as glance at that last
statement and seriously consider applying it against
any of the ethnic groups in the suggested list?
Well, here are the appalling facts. In the academic opinion of six of these pillars-of-strength-of-
the-Canadian-future, both the Chinese and the Gypsies (obviously regardless of their actual nationalities) should be entirely eliminated (or did we hear
annihilated?) from the face of the earth.
Only six students.  But out of a total of 114, that
makes approximately 5%. Still a low figure; but
would it be unreasonable to assume that the general
population of Canada is as prejudiced as this sample
seems to indicate?
Or are we insulting anybody's intellect? I doubt
that Canada will ever go to war with the entire
Gypsy population of the world but what of the
chances of enmity eventually breaking out with
China? How many rotten apples does it take to
spoil an orchard? What would happen then to those
Canadians who are of Chinese descent? Or who are
we supposed to be kidding? Don't we all, or most
of us, go down to Chinatown now and then for a
plate of chop-suey and don't we actually smile at the
waiters when ordering?
POGROMS
Thanks to our warm-hearted Canadians, the two
most unwanted or unpopular groups in the Western
World were received with open loving arms. Jews
and Negroes strangely missed the annihilation "pogroms" altogether. 17% of the students actually
allowed Jews and Negroes the honor of close kinship
via the nupital bed. The rest, though there were
some who would eliminate the above two groups
from the country, would only go so far as allowing
them to hibernate on the same street.
Canadians and English (naturally) ranked pretty
high. 97 out of the 114 students would admit both
Canadians and Britishers (although no break-up into
Scots, Welsh or Irish seems to have been indicated)
to close kinship by marriage and or to their clubs
as personal chums.
More frightening, the best that 13 students out
of the 114 would do for North American Indians
was to allow them as visitors and visitors only, into
their own country.
When it came to Gypsies, there were 35 students
who would not allow this group, once again regardless of their language or nationality (you've seen
one Gypsy, yOu've seen them all), as immigrants
into the country. In other words, 47% of the entire
class would exclude either American Indians, or
Gypsies, or both from citizenship. But it's quite all
right. We'll all go down to the Queen E. and clap
next time Jose Greco (himself an Italian) brings his
troupe of Spanish Gypsies around for his next Flamenco session.
NO CHANGE
Only eight students stated that they would allow
Gypsies close kinship through marriage. 16 were
kind enough to admit them in their street as neighbors. This made a measly total of 24 (out of 114)
who considered any kind of humane relationship
with this particular group. Yet, upon being asked
how many of them had first-hand knowledge of or
-experience with Gypsies, how many had actually
mixed with or even met Gypsies, there were no
more than fifteen. The majority of the class seems
to have been influenced merely through the romantic
media of movies, TV and Victorian novels. One can
almost visualize these students dreaming of Gypsies
as a bunch of thieving fortune-tellers, with spotted
headkerchiefs, golden ear-rings, sharpened knives in
wide red sashes, and baggy pantaloons.
Professor Werner Cohn says that over the past
seven years, during which he has been conducting
the experiment, there has been no significant change
in the results. It is possible that, sociologically, morally and humanely, we Canadians have stopped
evolving?
BLACK SHEEP
Next time you rave against the Ku Klux Klan-
ners, look around you and remember that every
time you point a finger you have three others pointing at yourself.
Of course, to be entirely honest, without at the
same time excusing anybody, we all know there's
bound to be a few scraggly black sheep in every
you know what.  But when these warped delinquents
VISITING ONLY!!
are to be found in our academic centers of learning
and (supposedly) wisdom, while pursuing studies in
such subjects as sociology and the humanities, we
cannot help but flinch at the horrible irony of it all.
Though they are, presumably, educated members of
society, they are, for that very reason, much more
dangerous.
We wouldn't want to sound unfair so we'll throw
this last statistic in. A maximum of 8 students —
and 8 students only — allowed all ten groups to
close kinship by marriage. In this a slight ray of
hope or a mere residue? Or shall we know better if
those 8 will ever be put to the final test?
Actually we should feel disgusted but, frankly,
ladies and gentlemen, we are terrified.
Pf
MARCH 22, 1968
on the cover:
Wens ley Mole, pf's
candidate for the Liberal
party leadership believes
in bigger Cracker Jack
prizes, stiff upper chins,
and the liquidation of the
Coca-Cola Company. His
platform is number nine.
•
After his successful coup
d'etat, His Magnificence
Andrew Horvat, in co-operation with Quisling
collaborator statesman
Stephen Scobie, set speedily about eliminating the
memory of Judy Bing.
Martyred Revolutionary hero Bert Hill is being
worshipped by Kurt Hilger. Apathetic peasants
were misrepresented by
Arnold Saba.
Lemmings Finnish matches
By DAN SONNENSCHEIN
Today, let us explore one of the strangest phenomena
in the world of Nature. I am referring to the annual march
of lemmings towards and into the sea. These small furry
animals make their way every year at the appropriate time
to the swirling waters that abound — here their inexorable
destinies are fulfilled. Why, we ask — what is the explanation?
To discover the answer, let us recall an old Finnish
superstition — whenever a paper match is lighted, three
(3) lemmings perish. We have no reason to doubt the validity of this belief. Studies indicate that indeed, the consumption of any paper match is strikingly simultaneous with the
extinction by drowning, of three (3) of these innocent
creatures.
At this point, only one major hypothesis has been
suggested to account for this somewhat bizarre correlation
of events. Briefly, the theory states that one (1) lemming
is equipped to receive the cosmic vibrations produced dur
ing the burning of paper matches throughout the known
world. This head lemming dispatches the correct number
of his co-religionists to join the ever-flowing hordes that
move to the sea.
So far, everything is moderately straightforward, but
now, we come upon the most amazing fact of all, something which has only recently been uncovered by dedicated
researchers in the field. Whenever any lemming is destroyed
through unnatural means three (3) paper matches are likewise annihilated through the miracle of spontaneous combustion!
It is still too early to postulate anything definite in
this case, but it has been discussed in the right circles, that
lemmings are developing towards an evolutionary state in
which, for self-preservation, they get the matches before
the matches get them.
This summary of the situation is of course an oversimplified one, but it is obvious that a profound ethical and
philosophical question remains to be solved in the strange
case of . . . the matches and the lemmings.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 22,   1968 LARGE STONE BUILDING,
AVENUE NOTRE DAME DU GRACE
Name this
An old building
Inhabited, perhaps,
By mad women with cats;
Or: a mad building
Harbouring old cats
And stray women.
by GEORGE PAYERLE
Win   ii
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UMBRELLA WANTED
By the light of an eclectic
clock, the slow sounding
of the DEATHwatch bell
devours through mosaic doors.
But then,
it was a summer
afternoon, and we had eaten
too much peanut
butter.
Where
is  the end   of  alf  this  beginning?
by KASA HOSHII
LAST NIGHT
I sit here
Walking Chinese streets
As one by one
The eyes of the hills close.
The easel of light collapses
As I paint one
More false portrait
Of what is not.
What I write
Is a drop
From a sharpened feather
Faltering across a stillness.
A spider landed
On an illusory canvas
Leaves a sign of his death:
A black star stung through a white night
by RED LILLARD
Listen:
Somehow, you'll disappear.
Suspended in this argument:
The past that broke at
Either end,
The present, breaking through the middle of
An empty man.
And nothing now
But the absolute knowledge
Of the ability to kill.
by A. P. SCHROEDER
GILLNET THREE
Strange waters one pilots alone. Consciousness
Unfurls like a ship's colors. Just in time
We misunderstand.
Ruins of wharves, Timbers
Cant at dejected angles. Mosiacs
Where wood has charred.
In thought, nets are always set: somewhere.
Tides rise and fall.
High water fingers its mark on shore.
The struggle between sound and distance
Begins in silence. At length even one's mind
Is bisected by guy-wires.
by MIESZKO JAN SKAPSKI
Friday, March 22, 1968
LOGEXPO
Observe between the houses:
Casual barking and biology of dogs.
Whose laundry do I watch, who watches mine?
This building contains many doors
And people in violent sleep.
I fear bilingual mysteries: darkness and death.
But even in daylight now
They watch me, the blank windows.
The bolted door.
by GEORGE PAYERLE
THE     UBYSSEY PETER SWANN
Director, R.O.M., Toronto
ON
400 YEARS OF TRADITION
& REVOLT IN CHINESE PAINTINGS
Tuesday, Mar. 26-8 p.m.
25 cents
THE VANCOUVER ART GALLERY
■•*. powwfu*. siuof of
IklflK
MAIN
RtSNMS
^
EST ffitt
TODAY'.
Festival of
Shakespeare
SUNDAYS 2 p.m. ONLY
HENRY V
Mar.
LAURENCE
OLIVIER
LAURENCE
Vvsitu
3i HAMLET olivier
ADr __ LAURENCE
T       OTHELLO olivier
224-3730-
437S *»V. 10th
Students   $1.25
IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
The
Bookstore
will be
closed
ALL DAY
THURSDAY, MARCH 28TH
AND FRIDAY, MARCH 29TH
FOR
Annual   Stocktaking
THE STORE WILL REOPEN
MONDAY, APRIL 1ST
By KEITH FRASER
The latest production by the Stage 2 Theatre, Requiem, for a Dinosaur, is tidy and tightly
trimmed under the direction of Jane Heyman.
What is unfortunate is that the quality of the
script by James Cruikshank is not concomitant with her economy of presentation.
Perhaps this new play about an expatriate
writer is so familiar that the frustrated artistic
temperament needs less exposition. Certainly
when spread over three acts it needs a lot
less. That is partly why CBC television will
chop the length of the play before presenting
it on Festival.
Chris (Joel Miller) is an unsuccessful Canadian novelist who has been living in Spain
with his ex-model wife (Linda Sorenson) for
four years. Apparently the woman has needed
this long to discover that her husband will
never make it as Ernest Hemingway. Yet
despite his three rejected novels, Chris believes that an artist's existence here, no matter how unrewarding, is to be preferred to
life in North America which threatens individual integrity. The fact that he once sold
a story to The Tamarack Review1 for five
dollars propels him to keep writing.
But his frustration at having to live off
his wife's money goads him into Albee-like
battles with her, and with Herbert Hoof (Owen
Foran), a mouthy American tourist. In the
end his wife leaves, but not before she assures
him of her tender but incompatible love.
The tension created by the writer has a
sound validity, but his attempt to sustain it
presses too much. It is not necessary, for example, that the revelation of Hoof's past business misdemeanors in the second act take so
long. Better that the final two acts be melded
so the suspense is not sapped from the last act.
Yet the production of the play as it now
stands is one of depth. The actors are in astute
control of their roles, and their projection and
gestures are appropriate for the small theatre. Virginia Harrison as the tourist's wife is
both pitiful and smashingly funny, while
Foran manages to mould the cliche of the
American traveller into an individual reality.
This production runs for another two
evenings at the corner of Dunsmuir and
Beatty.
wines §
By ANDRE  HORVAT
Last Sunday the Vancouver Symphony
presented patrons with three rather musty
labels: a 1780 Mozart, an 1804 Beethoven, and
an 1850 Schumann.
When will the cellars of the Queen Liz
go dry of the vintage stuff the Symphony airs
every season?
Or does the Symphony think it can just
turn on a tap, inundate its guests with a mild
growth from beyond the Rhine (usually far
too old to have the least effect on the patrons),
and consider that it has satisfied the sensibilities of Vancouver connoisseurs? The answer
is definitely in the negative.
While the Mozart passed for an aperetif,
and the Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 4
sparkled from the hands of Stephen Bishop,
the Schumann, hardly a distinguished year
to   begin with,  lacked richness and flavour.
A vinagered work like that should be used to
extinguish the CHQM candlelight.
The nineteen twenties produced some excellent growths. American products matured
in those years.
Sibelius, Dvorak and Bartok, to mention
only a few of the better brands, and Kodaly,
Shostakovich etc. can be obtained in large
quantities at places like Montreal, Toronto,
and New York. The prohibition of exposure
of the works of such men, is insulting to
Vancouver's epicures.
And it's for this reason that I take pleasure
in publicizing the next concert in this otherwise dry season. It is the world premiere of
Ginastera's Esludias Symponicas, on March
30th.
I can only hope that it is an indication of
things to come, and represents a realization
that age has ceased to be the single criterion
for taste.
By PETER LINCOLN
Not too long ago an album called the
Dynamic Duo was put out on Verve featuring
the high priests of the soul stream church of
jazz, Jimmy Smith and Wes Montgomery.
Jimmy Smith had said a few years back,
before the electric organ was given a separate
category as a jazz instrument, that he was
going to surprise a lot of people before he
was through with, it and he has been true to
his word. With his tentacles crawling all over
the Hammond putting down intricate bass
lines, chords and leads he brought the organ
out of the miscellaneous category (along with
paper and comb, and triangles) and into its
own shining column; Jimmy Smith at the top,
head and shoulders and chest and legs above
the rest.
His roots were everywhere from "I'm an
Old Cowhand on the Rio Grande" to bluesman
Willie Dixon's "I'm Your Hoochie Coochie
Man" to the big brass of "Who's Afraid of Vir-
gina Woolf" to his own up-tempo tunes like
"Organ Grinder's Swing". Each song retained
its original flavor and except now you could
handclap, fingerpop and toetap to them. It was
this quality of the roots that disturbed many
people. America's Puritan instinct sensed there
was something wrong with anything that
made you feel so good and there had been
rumblings from the beginning. (But he's got
a growl in his organ . . . ). Finally the feelings burst through when Jimmy issued a few
vocal statements mixed in with his playing
on records like Muddy Water's I've Got My
Mojo Working. The stereo rasp was too much
It rubbed like a sandpaper condom. Their
virgin ears were shattered.
The  more moderate  of the  offended re
garded the singing as an eccentricity that
could be allowed to an otherwise great organist but for others their worst fears had
been confirmed; Jimmy Smith was up-to-
earthy. The latter turned to Guy Lombardo in
desperation. Both however, missed through
their dislike for the quality of the voice, its
excelletn jazz phrasing and improvisatory
qualities. Man, you could play what he sings
on the record and get applause for it. Jimmy
however, holds no grudges so to those listening to the strains of the sweetest music this
side of heaven he says come back and join
his other fans listening to his new album
Respect.
Wes Montgomery played around his home
town of Indianapolis till he was in his
twenties remaining obscure to all expect visiting jazz musicians. Finally Cannonball Ad-
derly managed to drag him down to Riverside
records in 1960. He is now the number one
jazz guitarist of earth.
Like Smith, Montgomery is also in the
soul stream of jazz. His sound and style are
unique. He uses no pick — just his thumb
His tone has a Miles Davis type brilliance.
The structure of the playing is unique as well.
Taking a popular song, he opens with the
absolute simplest statement of the theme
(simple here in the sense of the listener's ears
— the timing and sound not easily
achieved) builds up to the most complex solos
made up of quick penetrating Rollins-Coltrane
type notes mixed in with rich chords and then
back to the "simple" theme. Also like Smith,
Montgomery comes out of many bags and for
some enjoyable and educating proof take a
listen to his albums on Verve, Riverside and
A&!M. His "Day in the Life" is an exceptional
treatment of the Beatles' surrealistic classic.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 22,  1968 pfi   5lve
The war is over: long live the war!
By K. TOUGAS
Resnais' La Guerre Est Finie
has none of the bravado of his
earlier technical and theoretical fanfare, and so cannot be
written about in terms of dazzling feats that strike the eye.
Quiet and subdued, the film is
nonetheless irrevocably successful and powerful. Arguments  that   "modern"   movies
leave the literary far behind
fall very flat, for this film is
effectively but conventionally
"written": the content is the
portrayal of three days in the
existence of a Spanish agitator
acting both in Spain, and from
exile in France.
Emphasized is the "realness"
of the man, and the credibility
of his situation. He is a mili
tant with a sense of duty but
with no illusions of heroism,
living a, life that is somewhat
dangerous, but not overly, who
is rather tired but continues
out of force of habit or "something to do", if for no other
reason. Discouraged with the
futile acts of his organization
— and in turn with himself for
carrying a failing torch all his
YVES MONTAND and INGRID THULIN
life — he attempts in his discontentment to communicate
his impressions of the situation
to his associates, and fails miserably.
His personal life is just as
realistic and confused. He
loves his valiant mistress
(some other word would be
more appropriate), but is also
in other beds ... He wishes
to escape it all, but cannot ....
He refuses to allow Marianne
to join him in Madrid and establish some semblance of life,
then consents  .   .  .
The closing sequence in particular reflects the prevalent
attitude of change and indecision in the movie, for circumstance forces Diego to
leave once more for Spain.
Perhaps he will be arrested or
executed, and then again, perhaps not.
La Guerre Est Finie is so
straight-forward and simple
that other than an accomplished and stylised sequence of
physical and sensual love, and
some twenty seconds of flashing past, present, and "imaginary" thoughts, everything oc-
curing seems almost un-impor-
tant, linked together by an unpretentious plot. In fact, tribute is due Resnais for the
unobtrusive skill that presents with ease this subtle
and complex probing, and
keeps   it   continually   human
and captivating.
And for those who want
more than an effective character analysis, Resnais gently
but succinctly delves into intriguing relationships between
conscience and actuality, politics and love, as well as the
familiar confrontation of the
ages (a man with a long past
and no future comes face to
face  with  a  young  group  of
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD
revolutionists, ambitious in
their expectant future, and
without a past). The war is
over, but continues un-ceas-
ing   .   .
Finally, the nationalistic
types will be overjoyed to discover (if they had not already
discovered in King of Hearts)
that a star is born above the
soil brandishing the Canadian
flag: Genevieve Bujold
(French-Canadian   even!).
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
CLAUDE ST-DENIS - MIME
Claude Si-Denis is Canada's leading mime — a
great creator and performer in the ancient art of
pantomime. Born in Montreal, he speaks the universal language of the silent
gesture, the speechless expression — brilliantly funny, wistful, deeply moving.
In 1956 when only 21,
Claude Si-Denis won first
prize in the inter-provincial competition "The Golden Crown" which was
broadcast over the French
network of Radio Canada.
He presented five of his
pantomimes and triumphed
over 600 competitors.
During the next ten years
he travelled extensively in
Canada and Europe, widely acclaimed by audiences
and critics wherever he appeared—either in solo performances or contributing
to shows here and abroad.
In 1965 Claude Si-Denis
created a film which won
honourable mention in the
Montreal International Festival. A year later he appeared in featured mime
and comedy roles in ihe
first colour film distributed over the television networks of Canada, France.
Switzerland, Belgium and
Luxemborg, and Telscope
of CBC Toronto devoted a
half-hour to Claude St-
Denis's accomplished art.
WED., NOON-MAR. 27
FREDDY WOOD THEATRE
Dance To The
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MOONLIGHTER'S
STEELBAND
FRIDAY, 9 P.M.
75c
AT INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
EVERYONE  WELCOME
Bagetelle
Exclusive design in
Engagement Rings
& Wedding Bands
4410 W.   10th Ave.
Vancouver,   B.C.
Tel. 224-5412
HALF PRICE
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SCREENS
Deluxe quality, glass beaded
and Lenticular Screens, reg.
$16.95 to $59.95. This special purchase lot is now on
sale at HALF PRICE while
they last. Ask to see the
"Half Price Sale" Screens, as
these are not our regular
stock but a special purchase
lot.
KERRISDALE
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2170 W. 41st       266-8381 VILLAGE    BISTRO
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MOTHER TUCKERS YELLOW DUCK
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Tel. 736-9920
Reduced rate for students on Friday & Saturday.
$1.25 Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday
A  CUSO  EVENT
TOD A Y - NOON - BU 104
\\
75,000 FLED
1!
- TIBETAN REFUGEE STORY
by Judy Pullen
—CUSO volunteer 4 years
—Author of upcoming book on Tibet
QhooASL CI CbiamoyuL
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Student*
Convenient Terms Available
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S JEWELLERS
Downtown
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Shopping
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Park
Royal
Interested in SELLING?
Want part-time work
NEXT TERM?
Then why not be an
ADVERTISING
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for the
UBYSSEY
This is an excellent opportunity to
gain sales experience and to earn
worthwhile commissions. Several
second or third-year business-minded
students who are willing to work
hard for about 10 hours a week can
make up to $1000.
If interested apply to the
Publications Office
Brock Hall
^■svorT't'd.v*
V
V-
***-?
■i
pf   6ix
The fuzzy teddy bear
By REILLY BURKE
Have you met up with your
friendly local narcotics agent
yet?
I ran into mine for the first
time just the other day in true
1930's James Cagney style. We
had stopped on Beatty Street
and were instantly surrounded
by this character and his corny
cohorts, all dressed in second
hand Salvation Army casuals.
«      1_   i 5      *, .-■* ***
/ JL--.-•••••-•%    '•*.„.,.*        i
-■ iP SW*- M     A *?'«i
_ Or lufcr'Y    °t/1
,$s*-*
At the time I had no idea
who it was, so when this clown
of clowns approached and asked for my driver's license, I
became instantly hotted up
and retorted:
"Who the hell are you that
you can go around asking
questions like that?"
"City Police," he retorted
with equal vigour.
Being a normal state fearing  citizen whose only police
record is a string of parking
tickets, I knew that cops came
in uniforms wrapped with
belts, badges, guns, and
whistles.
"You could get your face
bashed in if you go around
saying things like that," I replied, confident that this nightclub reject would get scared
and  run away.
Instead he whipped out his
badge and said if I didn't cooperate, he would give me a
ticket for something being
wrong with my truck.
The fantastic dumbness of
his threat made me laugh, so
I did. I had just taken the old
beast of a vehicle through the
city test and it was in excellent working  order.
Waving his badge around,
he again demanded my driver's license. I refused, insisting
that he still hadn't proved that
he was a cop.
"Let's see something with
your picture on it," I persisted.
I was amazed when he dug
into his pocket and pulled out
his identification, so I dutifully handed over my license,
and prepared myself for some
fiendish word games.
Man, what a let-down. The
first question was straight out
of the funny pages.
"Are you a hippy?"
"Don't ask me. You're the
expert," I said.
"Why  do  you  look   like
hippy?"
"Same reason you look like
a dance-hall punk."
Then came the really clever
and crafty questions. Climbing
L
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164  Granville
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into the truck, he came across
my son's teddy bear:
"What's this?" he asked.
"That's my son's teddy
bear."
And then came the most
astounding of questions:
"Do  you  smoke pot?"
What kind of answer do they
expect to hear? Do they honestly believe that I would admit it if I did? At this point
I was on the verge of replying:
THE      UBYSSEY
"No, instead I shoot gasoline
into my eyeballs with an old
fountain pen because it gives
me wierder visions." I thought
better of it; the poor fool was
getting quite frantic by this
time.
If these mental disasters,
with their incredibly stupid
and naive questions, are typical of the growing police state,
I think the citizens have nothing to fear. By using our collective wits in penetrating and
intelligent ways (recall the
Banana Put-on) we could have
these stumbling buffoons
whining for mercy in their
own locker rooms.
Friday, March 22,   1968 pt  7even
/n^ recent exchange of letters in the Ubyssey
/"■WR touched on some familiar themes in American
-*■ -■*• foreign policy. Themes such as the containment of a monolithic and presumably evangelising communism and North Vietnam's aggression
against South Vietnam arrayed against the contention that American actions in Vietnam are unjustifiable. The most distressing theme is that the
North is invading South Vietnam. When I hear that
argument I reach for my New York Times. Vietnam
is one country. We must remember that Indo-China,
unlike ancient Gaul, was divided by the French into
five administrative divisions. Three of these areas,
Tonkin, Annam, and Cochin China (the present North
and South Vietnam) are ethnically and linguistically
separate from the two remaining areas, Cambodia
and Laos. The United States itself has regarded Vietnam as one nation. The U.S. State Dept. Intelligence
Report (No. 3708 Oct. 1, 1949) "Political Alignments
of Vietnamese Nationalists" after expressing some
surprise at the existence of a "vigorous and purposeful" national movement for "independence and
unity," explains that:
". . . the intrinsic strength of Vietnamese
nationalism is drawn from a feeling of identity
shared throughout Vietnam by all classes of the
population. This feeling rests on a common pattern of language, script, literature, religion, art,
customs, social institutions, and government, evolved over a period of 2,000 years. Although Vietnamese civilization includes many elements absorbed from abroad, particularly from China, it
is an integrated national heritage."
CONFERENCE
Early in 1954 the Geneva Conference was convened to deal with two problems: a settlement of
the Korean war and a cease-fire in the Indo-China
war which by then had entered its ninth year. At
this conference all delegations initially were opposed
to the idea of partitioning Vietnam. All Vietnamese
were vehement in their opposition to partition basically because of patriotic sentiments. The French
calculated their opposition to partition on the basis
of salvaging their colony from the Viet Minh.
At this conference on May 12, 1954 the French
cautiously envisioned a withdrawal of Viet Minh
forces into a "Regroupment Zone North" (roughly
the old Tonkin area), a "Regroupment Zone South"
and suggested the establishment of a small French
garrison in the wedge-shaped Hanoi-Haiphong zone.
French Foreign Minister G. M. Bidault acknowledged
that some difficulties beset its implementaton. The
main problem was how to distinguish between Viet
Minh regulars and their irregulars.
$-pon a cease-fire the regulars were to withdraw
an|t^sgroup in Viet Mhih garrison areas while the
Vie*p£i$nh irregulars under the "Bidault Plan" were
to su_*eoder their arms and remain where they lived.
Before tie month was out Bidault registered his
continuing qualms over partition by dissenting on his
own plan when he told the conference that "no
cease-fire most amount to the partition ■^^tetpam."
#.*By the end of May, French opiniotJL? began to
accept.p&rtitio-nu The French confusion was .over
the^Cear gbait the partition of Vietnam,wottid taa&fe
it %*at*-JSsiiig to have £art Of the..J^a$« JftdOtt ;
under ^.international 'guarantee. ,w '• #j#t 'jOtfe&K
hand, if, when the proposed national elections wre-
held, and a single state were to result * wiftk the
Viet Minh in control, France would not wish to have
(as the New York Times put it) "a more or less
communist state" in the French Union.
FAVOR TRUCE
Ho Chi Minh's Viet Minh (Independence League)
regarded partition as an unnecessary encumbrance
to their military success and ultimate political success. The May 2nd, 1954 headline of the New York
Times read: "Viet Minh is said to oppose partition
but favor truce." The general attitude of the Viet
Minh, as expressed through their intermediaries at
Geneva, anticipated a cease - fire and an interim
authority in Vietnam combining French-supported
Vietnamese as well as Viet Minh representatives.
This interim authority would exist only until
the proposed national elections were held. Near the
end of May the Viet Minh under Soviet and Chinese
prodding had submitted a proposal for large "regroupment areas" in which the regular forces on
each side would be assembled. American circles
at the conference objected to this proposal on the
grounds that it amounted to a partition of Vietnam.
On May 1, 1954, a crowd estimated at from 10,000
to 20,000 persons gathered in the heart of Hanoi
to protest any plan that might involve the partition
of the country. Banners bore such slogans as "Respect the Territory of Vietnam," and "We Denounce
Negotiation Plans for Partition of Vietnam into
Many Parts." Even the Governor of Hanoi said
that his anti-Communist compatriots "would fight
if necessary" to keep their country from being split
in two.
After May 7 th when Dien Bien Phu surrendered
to the Viet Minh and a cease-fire was more likely
<even with an 'unthinkable' partition) the French-
supported government of Vietnam in a desperate
flurry of activity published (May 13th) the texts of
the proposed treaties for its "independence and
association with France." Senator Mike Mansfield
(in a report on his visit to Indo-China during the
summer of 1954) looked back to this event of political "publish or perish" and observed that:
"Actual negotiations between France and Vietnam did not even begin until some 8 months after
the July 3 declaration. (On July 3, 1953 the
French pledged full sovereignty for Indo-China.)
It was not until June 4, 1954, almost a year later
that the basic treaties were initiated by the representatives of the two countries. By that time, the
event seemed of little moment and almost passed
unnoticed. What might have been an occasion six
months earlier for rallying of nationalist sentiment
in Vietnam was all but submerged in the loss of
Dien Bien Phu and the negotiations which were
in progress in Geneva."
The New York Times on May 27th reported that:
"The official attitude of the. U.S. delegation continued
to be strongly against any partition of Vietnam."
On July 21, 1954, the Geneva Conference closed
when discussions during the previous night had finally produced the Geneva Accords.
DEMILITARIZED ZONE
"Agreement on the cessation of hostilities in
Vietnam" is the title of one of its nine documents.
Article 1 of Chapter 1 reads as follows:
"Provisional   military   demarcation   line   and
demilitarized zone: A provisional military demarcation line shall be fixed, on either side of which
the forces of the two parties shall be regrouped
after their withdrawal, the forces of the People's
Army of Vietnam to the north of the line and the
forces of the French Union to the South."
The ninth document of the Geneva Accords was
a draft termed the "Final Declaration."  Point 6 of
this document refers to the partitioning of Vietnam
in these words:
"The Conference recognizes that the essential
purpose of the agreement relating to Vietnam is
Vietnam
is one country
Neverthless, the French-Vietnamese Government,
on the basis of these treaties, submitted its own
peace plan at Geneva. This plan ruled out partition,
called for the existing French-Vietnamese Government to preside over a united Vietnam and proposed
free elections under international supervision. The
sincerity of such a gesture is questionable and in
view of the prevailing military and political realities
at the time it appears as a pathetic attempt to salvage the "ancient regime." President Eisenhower
in his memoirs recalls that in an election Ho Chi
Minh would have obtained 80% of the vote and
John Foster Dulles in November 1954 told Gen. 3.
Lawton Collins that the chances of avoiding a Viet
Minh Government were 1 In 10.
CONTAINMENT
-• xIESijs- tv^«®Sy*'«^stive attitude of the, Attericanr ,
d^^ftoN^.ri0«!^|--<Eom th&^edsj^cMl;Yiet;$ii$»h'■<
su&e-ssv iSte ^eriejia doctrine &'e^f*jitifte^.*0t _;■
com^unju^^ackno^legfees the virtue of improving
social cbfldl^t-aas hut steadfastly oppose*-* any mojre-
ment for pael*&ratft«>!*| it .resembles communisia
even if it has great petpuJiarity..
0» May 27, 19S4 the French Foreign Minister of
Vietnam, Monsieur Nguyen Quoe Bfckh, hisisf?et*,that
instead oi the large regroupment attests ptbpemSi
alternatively by the French and Viet Minh repsfeseiv;.,
tatives, the rival forces should be left approximate-jr
where they were. A leading western delegate remarked that "the map of Vietnam is as pockmarked, with
communist centers as a patient suffering from* -a
bad case of small pox." Aside from its maliciousness, the delegate's comment does indicate the "Widespread distribution of the Viet Minh. President
Eisenhower and John Foster IDulles had already
indicated the "unfortunate" popularity of ihe Viet
Minh.
At Geneva on July 18, 1SS4, o» formal instructions, firom the Itoperor Bao J>ai aad. his Chief of
State* $g& Btnh Etfens, the emperor's delegation «dbsv
culat*$d a {WopQsal for SMcease-fire in VJ^totm without .
partition and based 'aa?1ik& prese^Js^Jions of ifcrfr/
opposing forces. .," X      l     *,. ;V. X-.*
The proposal called for regrc^tnent of:-j*$pfMt
into assembly   areas  as  small': m -pm^0et'',»**M|"-i^gf,
disarmament of Viet Minh troops simultanegrut with
the withdrawal of French troops.  The pro^OSatl^jr*I«0
suggested U.N. supervision of the country ari^farmll-'
tice until general elections could be held.   The note .
said that a partition would have disastrous consequences for the people of Vietnam and for world
peace.   On that same day, July 19th,   the French-
supported   Hanoi   Provincial   Council   sponsored   a
demonstration which protested against "all solutions
of peace threatening the integrity of the territory
of the Vietnamese nation."
by Tony Grinkus
to settle military questions with a view to ending
hostilties and that the military demarcation line is
provisional  and should not in any way be interpreted   as   constituting  a   political   or   territorial
boundary.   The Conference expresses its conviction that the execution of the provisions set out
in the present declaration and in the agreement
on the cessation of hostilities creates the necessary
basis for the achievement in the near future of a
political settlement in Vietnam."
By  an agreement in   Geneva  a  population  of
25,0QQ,QQQ Vietnamese was to be temporarily polarized jtfjto "Northern*'" and "Southern" Vietnamese.
The proposed general election ,,iwasJo-Jje held not
Jater than Auly* J956 to allow fr^ expression of tire
nc$
OBMMHflb^''
--$$£ Vie* Minh satisfied the requirement-fer the
withdrawal of their forces. -Viet Minh irsttge £%m
as far south as Point Camau, the southermost part
of Vietnam departed for the "Northern Zone" and
did so before the Geneva deadline for withdrawn. 1
<°Was reached. The Mew York Times on February 3rd,
noted that: "The whole southern part of Cochin
China has been under the Viet Minh since 1947."
The French withdrew their forces in 1936 just
before the deadline for nationwide elections. In
such a situation according to "Cessation of Hostilities" Article 27 the successors of the original signatories were to assume the observance and enforcement of the Geneva Agreements. The Gettleman
Vietnam Reader (p. 170) records that:
"The successor to French power in South Vietnam was the State of Vietnam, ruled until October
1955 by Emperor Bao Dai and bis Premier Ngo
Diah Diem. This Government was bitterly hostile
to the Agreements from the very outset, declaring
that an "agreement" with sruch an adversary (as
the Viet Minh) could only be a fool's bargain."
Tiie genesis of the present war in Vietnam* is
-on one level the result of broken promises. With.the
partition drawn and a military disengagement effected, the sabotage of the 1056 elections intensified
* Ihe uneasiness of the Viet Minh about their futttr-e.
To use the term Viet Minh is to employ a synonym
for the majority of the Vietnamese people. Vt$t
Minh veterans began to return to their villages in
the "South" to give direction and meaning to the
popular discontent with the Diem "government."
This indignant migration was parleyed by the
Americans into an "invasion" of the "South" by the
"North."
Friday, March 22,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY Dr. Marshall McLuhan Says:
" Speedreading Increases Depth
Of Comprehension and Recall"
•s^M&^^asiiab^''
FAMOUS CANADIAN ADVOCATES
FASTER READING METHODS
Emphasis on study procedures is a significant part of Reading Dynamics,
particularly -where doctors, lawyers, educators and other professional people
are brought into a study and learning situation.
OUR AVERAGE  GRADUATE   READS
OVER 1500 WORDS  PER  MINUTE
Dr. H. Marshall McLuhan, considered by many
to be the world's foremost
authority on methods and
understanding of communications media, gave Convocation Address at Simon
Fraser University. In it, he
said: "Reading speed increases depths of comprehension. At high speeds,
the thought form of the author emerges clearly, so
comprehension and retention of data are also increased."
At Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics we are delighted
that a man of Dr. McLau-
han's stature has so succinctly stated a fact that
we have long known to be
true.
To most people, it has
seemed incridible that
reading speeds of 1500,
3000 or more words per
minute were being attained by our students. Skeptics also found it hard to
believe that a majority of
Reading Dynamics graduates actually INCREASE
comprehension and recall.
But, all the claims that we
have made in our advertising are true — just read
some of the students' comments at the bottom of
this ad!
Ladd McGowan, Director
of the Vancouver Reading
Dynamics Institute, has
this to say: "At Evelyn
Wood Reading Dynamics
we feel that our students
must not only develop the
ability to read more rapidly but they must also understand and remember
what they read," says Mr.
McGowan. "Almost all of
our graduates have reported increased comprehension and recall along with
much faster reading rates.
We expect this as an inherent by-product of Dynamic
Reading. Our improved
methods, developed in a
continuing internal research program, give added emphasis to comprehension and recall."
"Tests prove that people
taught with these methods
not only read much faster,
but scored higher on tests
designed to measure com-
Drehension and recall.
M^nv of thos° t-*»pt.ed were
university students and
professional people. They
said   that   their   increased
READ THESE
ENTHUSIASTIC
COMMENTS
BY GRADUATES
Dr. Simon: — Prof. —
"very helpful. I am
reading much more."
Margo Murphy: — student — "very good instructor. Interested in
his students."
Len Polsky: — Law student — "read faster —
get more studing done."
Kendra Law: — Student
— "excellent—-very inspiring."
ability to understand and
remember what they read,
even detailed technical material, was more valuable
to them than their speed
improvement.
"The primary content
and approach of the course
has not changed," says Mr.
McGowan.
"It still involves work on
the basic Evelyn Wood
method. The lesson plans
have been reorganized and
new study skills have been
developed. Additional material on comprehension/
recall, with new hand motions, a key part of the
Reading Dynamics technique, have been introduced.
ANNOUNCING
SPECIAL STUDENTS RATES!
For Spring and Summer Classes
Students will be given 15% discount for registration in classes beginning
April, May, June, July and August IF your registration form and $10.00
deposit is received before May 31st. Take advantage of this opportunity
today. Select the class of your choice and mail to our registrar now.
Last year, our Spring and  Summer  classes were  filled to  capacity  and
some students were unable to obtain a class to fit their time schedule.
ALREADY, STUDENTS ARE REQUESTING CLASSES FOR APRIL, MAY, AND,
JUNE. So that University students may have first opportunity for class
selection, we are listing starting dates through June. Select the class of
your choice and mail to our Registrar today.
r
i
i
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REGISTER BY MAIL
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS INSTITUTE,
Mail this application now to reserve the class of your choice, to:
602—1075  Melville  St.,  Vancouver  5,  B.C.
Please accept my application for admission to the Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics Institute. Enclosed is my deposit (minimum $10) to reserve
space in the class indicated below. (Refundable if class of my choice is
not available.) Please forward to me the standard registration form so
I may complete my enrolment by mail.
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE
towlim  mod READING DYNAMICS DF B.C. LTD.
602-I07& MELVILLE STREET. VANCOUVER 5. B.C.       PHONE 665-237*4
APRIL CLASSES
□
□
□
Monday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
April
April
April
15,
18,
20,
7:00
7:00
9:30
p.m.
p.m.
a.m.
MAY SCHEDULE
□ Monday,
□ Tuesday,
D Wednesday,
□ Thursday,
□ Saturday,
May
May,
May
May
May
13,
14,
15,
16,
18,
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
9:30 a.m.
JUNE SCHEDULE
D
□
□
□
□
Monday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
June 17,
June 18,
June 19,
June 20,
June 22,
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
Classes held in Room 602,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver
1
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FOR FURTHER
INFORMATION
CALL
685 - 2374
or
CONTACT OUR
CAMPUS REPS
PERRY  SEIDELAAAN 261-1809
or leave a message in the Student
Mail Box in the Law Building.
MIKE MENARD 266-5574
JIM RUST 266-0403
They'll    tell    you    how    effective
Reading   Dynamics   can   be.
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 22,   1968 HELD OVER 2nd WEEK
PAULSCOFIELD
A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS
IN    COLOR
Nightly 7:30 and 9:30 Denman 4 Barclay
JhsiTbuvBUY
MU  5-M21
(Sorry, No Passes)
Ipf   9ine
WE'VE RENOVATED OUR SHOP!
Come in and inspect our newly-
renovated shop—We now have more
new equipment as well as a larger
staff so we can continue to be the
most efficient as well as the most
economical V.W. repair shop in town.
(inquire about this week's front-end special)
AUTO-HENNEKEN SERVICE
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine) Phone Hans 263-8121
MM MB -^- aSb _L _& _& -0- _^ -0- ^_U -*E- ____, A. JIL
T^r.'P ^F *P T^ *__* *!_!•* *JP1**T TrT"Pit *P
DANCE,:; FABULOUS
COASTERS
HELD OVER TONIGHT
AND ALL NEXT WEEK
Svttuj of (EUtbs
1275 Seymour St. Reservations MU 1-4010
NOW OPEN 6 NIGHTS A  WEEK.'
4*>^pfc«fr4»4»
NOTICE
to 1968
UBC Graduates
Anyone who has not been photographed
this year may stiII receive their free Grad
photo from Campbell studios - Burrard
at 10th . . . until March 29, 1968.
HOURS ARE 3 TO 5 P.M.
MONDAY - WEDNESDAY - FRIDAY
Ph. 736-0261 for Appointment
(This service is covered by your Grad fees until Mareh29 68)
CAMPELL STUDIOS LTD.
Burrard at 10th Ave. 736-0261
On why Trudeau won't do
even if he wins
Friday, March 22,  1968
By BERT HILL
Newspapermen, especially TV people were
very happy with the Conservative convention
last fall for it had all the crowds, demonstrations, organizers and all the usual stuff that American nominating conventions have every four
years.
But the Liberal convention this spring is unlikely to keep up with the latest innovations of
the Americans. Both LB J and Nixon will probably be nominated by a convention under National Guard. Always the bridesmaid but . . .
Recently the Canadian media have been falling all over themselves endorsing Pierre Elliot
Trudeau as the answer to Everything and Everybody. Some commentators have been so unkind
as to suggest that Trudeau's supporters are less
interested in his 'pragmatic idealism' than in
his appeal to an anti-political urge: an urge to
turn backs on the problems of sovereignty, Canadian unity and social welfare.
A considerable degree of Trudeau's support
stems from his personal charisma: the swinging,
attractive bachelor and his whole grabbag of
charming image building. These same people
undoubtedly have also decided that they can
sneak Trudeau and his radical ideology past the
middle-aged matron delegates by a liberal dosage
of sex appeal. How many of these same ladies
will be symbolically passing Pierre their hotel
key when "they pull the lever to register their
vote? I think that these people are deceiving
themselves. While Trudeau may appear the man
who will keep Canada together and simultaneously begin a program of fundamental social reform
they are deceiving themselves if they think that
Trudeau has any fundamental allegiance to the
set of moral values commonly thought left wing
or left liberal.
As Mike Pearson prepares to take a swan
dive into the ash can of history, we find Pierre
Trudeau (Harlow) and the Canadian Public
(Billy the Kid) squaring off for a fight to the
finish (seduction). The script is lifted from
Michael McClure's play The Beard.
HARLOW: Before you can pry any secrets from me,
you must first find the real me! Which will you
pursue?
The  Kid:   What makes you think I want  to pry
secrets from you?
Harlow: Because I'm so beautiful.
The Kid: So what!
Harlow:  You want to be as beautiful as I am.
The Kid: Oh yeah!
Trudeau was a radical in pre-1960 Quebec
only because he took a position strongly opposed to the reactionary regime of Duplessis.
Implicit in Trudeau's beliefs is a conception of
the political system as equilibrium. Whenever
some element becomes too dominant in his view
he will oppose it. Take for instance this quote
from his just published book, "political freedom
finds its essential strength in a sense of balance
and proportion. As soon as one tendency becomes
too strong, it constitutes a menace."
The Kid: Where did you read it?
Harlow: In a comic book.
A person who takes this view of things cannot be expected to be a major innovator. Trudeau's statements on a variety of topics tend to
'back this up; it is just not merely courtesy to
Pearson when he says that he would not take
a much different path on Vietnam.
Trudeau's conception of the political system
of Canada is that it is made up of a variety of
conflicting interest groups and power blocs
which are more or less equal. This idea called
pluralism rests on the abilities of the prime
minister to mould consensus out of the conflicting bodies none of which can achieve domination. This obviously is a lousy way of defining
public interest and more importantly in reality
it has been shown to be a myth. A more appropriate model is an oligopolistic one with
several large power blocs dominating the political arena, minimizing conflict and maximizing
agreement. This is the power elite model which
has a certain resemblance to the Marxian model.
THE     UBYSSEY
Trudeau will not have a personal power bloc
that will carry him through when the crunch
comes over some major program. His personal
style of shifting alliances will alienate permanent
support and his Quebec base will also be whittle'
away by the growing Independentiste mo1
ment.
Thus Trudeau may even fail at the task th«.
Liberal party has chosen him for: to keep Queber
in Canada. Throughout Canadian history, th
Liberal party has maintained its hegemony o
Canadian politics by co-opting French Canadians-
into the cabinet, then into the justice portfolio
and then into the prime ministership. Never
have French Canadians been given the finance
portfolio as it is traditionally the domain of the
English Canadian establishment who as you
know has effective control and influence over
all of Canada including Quebec. And of course
French Canadians traditionally alternate with
English Canadians for the Liberal prime ministership. That no one has observed the procession
of Pierre Trudeau along this ancient path is a
measure of the distracting value of his personal
ity. I rather doubt that he will be able to overcome the party's opposition to his program by
some mystical process of charismatic renewal.
HARLOW: O.K., what's destiny? (Combing her hair.)
The Kid: It's doing what you want to do. Destiny
is only a word but it's turned into a religion.
Then it's laughed at.
But as I suggested earlier Trudeau's personal
conception of politics it not likely to raise the
issues I have just raised.
So if Canada wants a charming, bilingual,
world travelling, learned MacKenzie King the
Second then they have only to create the bandwagon effect that will sweep the Liberal delegates into the Trudeau camp.
The only candidate who appears to have
sufficient outside party support; an effort to accumulate it, a program with vision and some
idea of the power structure he faces is Eric
Kierans. There are grave reservations about
him: he, made a big mistake throwing Levesque
out of the Quebec Liberals and he appears In
many ways an establishment figure but given
the quality of hacks and schlockmen (like Turner) there is no one else. Kierans is only one
better than total despair. the
COLOUR FRESH Co
It's the reason for all the fashion excitement
around the new "body" dress in the Inner Circle
They're the rib-sticker Fortrel* polyester knits that slide sinuously over your
figure with nary a tuck or dart for shaping . . . the shape's all you . . . and
no man will be able to keep his eye on business when you look so
great. Because these "real girl" minis are knit from 100% Fortre
they wash and dry like your own skin (and you never have to iron
that, do you?). They're absolutely crushless, too. In
fact, two of the styles shown can be worn back
to front for a look-twice look. Picks yours in
clear bright orange, lime, yellow, blue
or white. Sizes 5*13. Each $22.
See these Fortrel" "body" dresses in the Inner Circle, third floor.
1
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 22,   1968 ileven
mmmmmmmm
 Heavens to Betsy! Send it to Heloise.
UflCU    <jorDi£,   MiCLE   4RI-/IE
N
10 fZ$,
C01/511V AL
CAN A CELIBATE SWING ?
Mt: a celibate? Is that what, hangs you up
when you think about the priesthood?
To be sure there are a lot ol way out
misconceptions about this, especially today.
■ Perhaps you ought to talk to a celibate
about celibacy—in tact, have you
talked to any Jesuits lately?
They're celibates and thev swing—--
meaning they're involved in the world,
the up-to-date world, the world of change.
They study, research, work, write —
smack in the middle ol Hie. Whether it's
music, the stars, vouth. the mentally
troubled, culture, scripture or playboy
philosophy, each   Jesuit pursues his own
career and apostolate — that's swinging lor
the people of God. Could be lor you too.
Write Jesuit Careers, 3425 Bayview Ave..
Hooker Strike Ends
And what surprised them most
of all was that ]9-ycar-old Turriff
typist Sheila Cruickshank cooked
as good a *' clootie " as any one.
UTTLI-:   JUO/S
t.n-t/vWiMtt -
Insurance Family
Under-Insured
LONDON (AP) - After her
London apartment was robbed,
21-year-old Rebecca Bowring
checked her insurance policy
but found she wasn't fully
covered.
Willowdale. Ontario.
DISPOSABLE ITEMS
ROME (UPI)-A young businessman leaped to his death
from the top of the Colosseum
Sunday after leaving a note that
read, "being pure and honest,
I have decided to die in the
same place where the martyrs
were sacrificed."
CAN YOU SPOT THESE DOGS!
Start dog spotting right away on the celebrated     -—
pink form (L523) which your teacher can obtain in bundles of 50
(together with free chart in full colour identifying 95 breeds) from :—
R. Harvey Johns, Chief Dog Spotter, 10 Seymour St., London, W.l.
PRESIDENT JOHNSON
"HALF-WAY INTO  THE KINGDOM"
Yasuko, 24, smothered in furs and wearing brown riding
boots, said: "It's just not true. Absolutely not true."
, Mason, 57, said: "We simply like each other."
For using Ms mitts instead
of his mouth Gilbert des Rosier
is awaiting transportation to the
queen's hotel for a three month
stretch. To think it over. It
don't pay to mess up a lady's
face nohow, nowhere or at any
other time.
Recently the Duchess of Kent
has taken to putting on spectacles
when reading speeches in public.
Most of the other ladies of the
royal family have excellent eyesight, although the Queen, the
Queen Mother, and Princess
Margaret all wear dark glasses on
occasion, as a wise protection
against sun-glare.
\\7HEN last  did you have -j,
clootie dumpling?
HOOTS   AND   JEERS
At the stroke of midnight in
Japan bells are tolled 108 times
in Buddhist shrines to drive
away the 108 evil human passions.
r*
NEVER OVER-ALKALIZE   3
ATLANTA. Ga. (Reuters)—W.
D. Tope returned here Tuesday
from a Florida vacation to find
that his five-room house was
stolen.
Pope told police: "I can't find,
it; it's gone."
Retarded Child
Expert to Speak
Police are investigating the
theft of an 18-inch long wafer
shipped by air from Toronto
to Vancouver.
WELL-KNOWN   PEMBERTON
MAN WED
* 11:00 MR. DRESSUP
Mr. Dress-Up performs little pantomimes and Casey guesses what magic
words  should  be  said.
Fua-pSc  Cauliflower
A ll-VLTir-olii gii! jppo.uvd on
ronund at M.inchosk-r ye.s'erd-y
•<ccusi*d of stc.ilin;^ a f*n*r-ye *i *-ol;l
sir!. She was remaiulcil tor a
further three weeks.
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Public Relations Committee
Applications are now being received for Public Relations Co-ordinators and the Public Relations Committee.
Anyone interested in campus communication or in promoting UBC's image and new SUB facilities, submit a
note with your name, faculty and specific interest, if
any to the Vice-President, Internal Affairs, Box 53,
Brock Hall.
At Millers you are assured
of excellent value, superlative styling and fine craftsmanship      combined     with
courteous   service.
o
Convenient Credit Terms arranged with Courtesy Discount
to U.B.C.  Students & Personnel
AT   3   CONVENIENT   LOCATIONS
# 655   Granville   St.,   Vancouver
•§ 47  W.   Hastings  St.,  Vancouver
« 622 Columbia St.,  New Westminster
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT - TRAINING PROGRAM
Boys' Clubs of Vancouver: Students, male/female, who would be interested in a part-time employment-training program during the 1968-69 school
year — working with boys — are invited to contact the Placemen! Office
(in person or phone 228-3811) to arrange an interview for Thursday,
March 28th, 9-2 p.m.
The Largest Selection of
Paper Backs
at
DUTHIE
BOOKS
4560 W. 10th Ave.-224-7012
514 Hornby Street-684-4496
Paperback Cellar - 681-8713
670 Seymour Street—685-3627
100%
HUMAN HAIR
WIGS
21.95, 31.95, 41.95 & 61.95
WIGLETS
$9.95
BEAUTIFUL   FALLS
$29.95
SALES
10%
Discount  to
U.B.C.   Students
& Personnel
SERVICE
"GONE WITH THE WIG"
49 W. HASTINGS ST. STrSv%
Between Woodward's and A. & N. OOO" 1201
UNRULY HAIR?
Best Men's Hairstyling Service
at the
Upper Tenth  Barber
4574 W. 10th Ave.
1   block from gatM
| THE VILLAGE CAFE |
Where Friends Meet & Dine
DISCOUNT ON
PIZZA TO GO
Vx Block East
of Memorial Oym
at 5778 University Blvd.
Phone 224-0640
I
I
I
I
Friday, March 22,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY p£   l2welve
In honor of the W. C. Fields festival now* playing at
the Hyland theatre. Page Friday has commissioned the
following appreciation of Fields.
It was written by MALAHAT P. GRISHNA, onetime
editor of the Tibetan Film Quarterly, whose sensational
erotic documentary "Azimuth" was entered in last year's
Vancouver International Film. Festival. Grishna is generally regarded as the guru of Tibetan cineastes.
The controversy which can arise from a discussion of
the values of Fields' films may reach even those pinnacles
set by the debunkers and committed of Antonioni. But
whereas in the latter the question is intellectual, a true
appreciation of the geist of Fields is indeed a spiritual
incorporation of oneself with a new universe.
To abandon the realm of structural logic and proceed
to a new system of intuitive consequence, to expel those
Freudian shackles of Child- and Mother-domination, to rise
above mind and be, this is to enjoy a Fields film.
Fields presents us a picture of a man set in the world
determined not to be bound by it. He is affected by it,
uses it, is part of it, but proceeds through it of his own
volition.
We see in his films our wish-fulfillment, we stretch
our minds to encompass his world. We have had satisfaction.
Come, throw yourselves at the ramparts of civilization!
Fields lives again within each true Dadaist! Forsake, evolve,
be!
CHANGE THE  CONG
The United States Information Agency is sponsoring
a contest in Saigon for a new name for the Vietcong guerrillas, who are fighting to overthrow president Ngo Dinh
Diem's government.
"Vietcong" is a contraction of "Vietnamese Communist," but the agency does not think it is the type of
name to inspire hatred among the country's illiterate masses.
It asked its Vietnamese employees to suggest "a colloquial peasant term implying disgust or ridicule." A prize
equivalent to $47 will be awarded.
The agency said it wanted to come up with a name
that would influence the South Vietnamee to regard the
Red guerrillas "with contempt."
TRITURUS!  	
Triturus found in San Fran Bay area. March C?
approaches water, skin softens and gland in cloacal area
swell. When mating: £3? approach £ around or in
water, struggles as o attempts to roll % on back
C?1 rubs skin w. mucus ^ tranquillized and takes
position behind £•?* with nose to (•/• cloaca; <■*■? deposits spermatophore; (j? walks over it and picks up w.
cloaca to be stored until laying of eggs when used in fert.
—R. T. McFetridge
TURTLES!
A Question-
concerning the love-life of the species Chelonia.
Why  does the
turtle
neck?
by Stephen Scobie
IN BROCK
DANCE
IN BROCK
to
The ORGANIZATION
Mar. 23 from 9 to 1
$1.25 per soul
Presented by UBC Radio-CYVR
rOf
Radiant $200.00
with larger diamond $325.00     gold.
BUDGET TERMS AVAILABLE
3
fr/ocUrn
(oriaei-to-be
this enchanting diamond
ring has an irresistible
appeal for the young
about-to-be-engaged —
and married ... In
eighteen   karat   white
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
GRANVILLE AT PENDER SINCE 1904
NOW IN
THE UBC
AREA
TAKE-OUT and
HOME DELIVERY
* Chicken * Shrimp *  Ribs
*   Fish   *   Pizza
| 736-9788 j
CHICKEN
DELIGHT,!
I        3605 W.  Fourth Ave.
*,_,_,—_ _—«—,^,«-.^-<*-.
&
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE,
»
"Waiting ?<w fnfrt
by SAMUEL BECKETT
with
Robert Clothier Gregory Reid
Lee Taylor
Directed by Stanley Weese. Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox.
MARCH 22-30, 1968
Student Tickets $1.00 - sPedal s,udent Perf°rmanees -
Monday, March 25th    7:30    p.m.
(available   for   all   performances) Thursday,  March 28th  12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Fredric Wood Theatre Room 207 or 228-26
Support Your Campus Theatre
■——FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE—..——
1
4¥
HELENA TESSAROVA - ALTO
ONE OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA'S LEADING SINGERS
LOUISE FORAND - Pianist
HELENA TESSAROVA
LOUISE FORAND
BROCK
TUESDAY    —    MARCH 26    -    NOON
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 22,   1968 Friday, March 22,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  17
MftBF  IFTTFPS
IrlxJKC   LC I I C iw
Jocularity
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The story in Tuesday's Ubyssey about the athletic fee
transfer referendum to be held
April 3 missed several important points:
• An opinion referendum in
1966 asking if students agreed
with the idea of transferring
the athletic fee from the Alma
Mater Society to the university
was passed by a 77.7 per cent
majority.
• A petition with 1,500
names asking that a fee transfer referendum take place was
presented at the AMS council
meeting two weeks ago.
• Students would not be losing control of athletics because
both the men's athletic committee (M.A.C.) and the women's athletic committee
(W.A.C.), who control the athletic programme, will have
student voting majorities under the conditions of the fee
transfer.
• Any increasing of the athletic fee will have to be done
by student referendum.
• Because of the 1966 referendum, student council is
morally bound to effect a fee
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE
CENTRE
SERVICE  -  PARTS  -   ACCESSORIES
3627 W. Broadway 731-7510
Dance To The
TRINIDAD
MOONLIGHTER'S
STEELBAND
FRIDAY, 9 P.M.
75c
AT  INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
EVERYONE WELCOME
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
* 2,500   GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE FROM
* Full Drew (Tails)
* Morning Coats
* Directors' Coats
* White and Coloured Coats
* Shirts and Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623 Howe 688-2481
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
224-4144
4393 W. 10th Ave.
STORAGE?
CALL
224-3111
MOORE'S / ATLAS
TRANSFER
VAN LINES
Also
Moving — Shipping
transfer. However, the administration, according to ex-president Macdonald's letter of
Feb. 21, 1967, would accept
the fee transfer only if "it is
clearly understood that the
university will not undertake
to raise the amount of the athletic fee at any time unless the
AMS takes the responsibility
for such an increase."
The intent of the referendum April 3 is essentially the
same as the one passed in
1966. The difference is that in
order to make it legal and
binding on the AMS several
lengthy clauses had to be included in the present referendum. Therefore, because of the
problems involved in having
AMS approval of the athletic
budget and because of the results of the 1966 referendum,
I urge students to vote yes on
April 3.
ERNIE "T.J." YACUB
ex-great while prez. PEUS
Timid studiers
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Although I frequently study
in the library, I have never
yet observed more than about
three quarters of the study
desks occupied at any one
time. Some students seem to
search for desks that are not
only unoccupied but also
empty of books, notebooks,
lunches, briefcases, etc., although it is very little trouble
to push these aside so that
their owner may collect them
at his convenience. I presume
it is these timid students who
complain about a shortage of
study space, so I would like to
offer a suggestion. Students
leaving books on a desk would
write the time of their expected return on a colored slip
of paper, available at the entrance, so that others could use
the desk in the meantime. At
an English university I attended, where the situation was
more critical than at UBC,
this system was found preferable to one in which desks
could be reserved for 15 minutes (sufficient to find a book
or answer a call of nature) by
leaving a slip stating the time
of departure.
J. G. YOUNG
arts 4
DO YOU HAVE A CANADA
STUDENT LOAN?
IS THIS YOUR LAST YEAR
OF FULL TIME STUDIES?
If the answer is yes to both questions, you
would be well advised to consult your Bank
Manager regarding your loan before the end
of the academic year.
He can advise you of your rights and obligations and you can discuss with him a mutually satisfacory repayment program.
GUARANTEED LOANS ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA
IVOR WILLIAMS
SPORTING GOODS
4510 W 10th
224-6414
EXPERTS
in
Tennis Restringing
and Repairing
We carry a complete line of Tennis Racquets and Clothing.
All Prices for ALL Types of Players
Pay us a visit and see for yourself.
YOUR VARSITY
SPORTING GOODS STORE
Just two blocks from the gate.
ABSOLUTELY NEW FOR
SPRING
-"Fisherman
m^f    Knit'
'? SWEATERS
Picture yourself in this
delightfully chunky
"Fisherman Knit" pullover
(or cardigan.) So
casually smart, and warm
as only a Kitten can be,
this long sleeve. 100%
pure Irish wool sweater is
full-fashioned, and
features a zippered mock
turtle neckline, raglan
shoulder. Continental
band and cuffs. In a rich
cream shade only to
complement perfectly any
of your Kitten slims or
skirts. A MUST for
every wardrobe. At
all fine shops
everywhere.
Without this label
*£2jjj£J* jSSJ    it is not a genuine KITTEN.       | §
The Bold New Stream Prints
Wild florals, soft swirls, art nouveau prints explode all
over Eaton's Fabric Boutique this Spring! Come out in
cool  cottons  or sizzling  silks,  all  f—  at/> i   ITC*
designer fabrics, individually yours. lZ./\ I \*S I N O
Fabric   Boutique,   Dept.  233,   Downtown   Only. Page 18
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 22,   1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Escalation analyzed
Anthropology prof. Dr. William Willmott speaks on Politics of Escalation, Tuesday
noon. Wednesday noon, a
panel of five of on Prospects
of Peace in Southeast Asia.
SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Sociology prof. David Aberle
debates magistrate Gerald
Levey on the moral issues of
the U.S. war in Vietnam,
Unitarian center, 49th and
Oak to night at 8:15. Students
welcome.
POLESDEN LACEY
GLEE CLUB
Come to The Ubyssey noon
today for another performance
of the Aken Drum song.
CUSO
Judy Pullen speaks on 75,-
000 Fled — Tibetan refugee
story, today noon in Bu. 104.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Pastor Sharren presents the
Christian and his Conscience
in Nazi Germany tonight 8
p.m. in music room at St.
Mark's.
SQUASH CLUB
Elections in squash hut
Thursday noon.
GERMAN CLUB
Wir   diskutieren   den   Festa-
bend   Dienstag  mittag   in   IH
402.
EIC
Engineering physicist Dr.
Auld speaks on UBC's TRIUMF
project noon today in Eng.
201.
TEACHER'S  COMMITTEE
ON VIETNAM
Important meeting for all
members and those interested,
ynnidA pizza mok&
Dine In
— Take Oul —
Delivery
Across
the street from the
Fraser   Arms
1381   S.W.
Marine  Drive
263-4440
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedos, tails, white dinner tickets, morning
coats . . . complete slxe
rang*.
We   also   make   made-to-
measure suits.
10%   U.B.C.   Discount.
McCUISH   FORJVUkLWBA*
Mon.-Sat. 9:00 to 5:30
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
BOOKS
* Hardcover   books
* Textbooks
* Paperbacks
* Review    Notes
* Study   Guides
If   you   are   looking   for   a    required
text   or   for   casual   reading   *ry:
Village Book Shop
5732   UNIVERSITY   BLVD.
228-8410
Open 10 a.m.  to 9 p.m.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
MASQUERADE   COSTUMES
SPECIAL STUDENT  RATES
224-0034      4397 W. 10th
Friday, March 22, noon in Bu.
102.
CLASSIC  CLUB
Prof. E. J. Kenney speaks
on current developments in
English Classical Education at
8 p.m. tonight., 4155 West
12th. Kennedy also speaks on
Understanding Lectures, noon
today in Bu. 100.
EDUCATION US
A PTA representative will
speak and answer questions on
the role of the association
noon, today in Ed.   100.
DANCE CLUB
Friday — novelty dances,
Saturday — pin presentation
and social-mixer at lounge,
8:30 p.m. with Mr. Pedersen's
studio.
COLLEGE LIFE
CAT-GIF at 5832 Walker,
Burnaby 9 p.m. tonight. Special film Love Thy Neighbour.
VOC
Exchange with IH tonight at
IH.   All   VOC   members   welcome.
MUSSOC
Spring Banquet 7  p.m.  Saturday at the Wayen, 158 East
Pender. Sign list in clubroom
today.
JUDO CLUB
Annual spring election meeting Monday 4:30 p.m.,  apparatus gym.
NDP
Extremely important general meeting to elect new executive noon, Friday, Mar. 29,
Bu. 212.
CAMPUS CLASSIC
The natural shoulder, patterned or plain,
in one, two, and three button styles
RICHARDS & F1IIISII LTD.
786 Granville
and THE COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
802 Granville
for all your clothing  requirements
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75c, 3 days $2.00.
Commercal—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CARL GRAVES AND SOUL UN-
limited, March 23, Kerrisdale Community Centre, 8-12:00, tickets $1.50
BU  232   or   door.
A GIANT  DANCE TO THE ORGAN-
ization.   Mar.   23,   from   9   to   1   at
$1.25/soul.
Lost b Found
It
FOUND: THREE MEN'S WATCHES
& sev. glasses, identify & claim,
Pub.   Off.,   Brock   Hall.
LOST: MY WALLET! PLEASE PH.
Glen 224-6774 or turn in to Pub.
Off.,   desperate   for   I.D.!
LOST: MY SHOE! BLACK LEA-
ther Slingback between Acadia and
Library. Please phone Blaize at 224-
9835.
REWARD: WOULD THE PERSON
who took my leather jacket and
sweater from the rack outside Chem.
370, Tues. afternoon, please return
the glasses from the pocket to the
Publications Office.
LOST — PAIR OP MALE GLASSES,
Black frame. Near Geol. Building.
During Day Hut M 15A Room 10.
LOST — BLACK LINED NYLON
jacket. Left outside gym Fri. 15.
Phone   224-7909.
LOST — PURSE, WITH GLASSES
and I.D. Phone Celia, 224-9973, Rm.
No.  57.
FOUND-WOOD FRAMED GLASSES.
Claim Pub. Office,  Brock Hall.
REWARD FOR PURPLE AND GOLD
striped dress left in Mildred Brock
Wed. A.M. Phone Katie 921-7589.
Rides & Car Pools
14
TWO LAW STUDENTS DRIVING TO
Ont. April 28th. Have room for two
female passengers 228-8096 after 7:00
p.m.   Tonite.
Special Notices
18
UBC BEAUTY SALON. EXPERT
styling and cutting. No appointment necessary. 5736 University
Blvd.,   228-8942.
SOUL TIME: THE ORGANIZATION
comes on strong. March 23 from 9
to   1   at   $1.25/Soul. 	
EXAMS NOW AVAILABLE — COM-
plete set of exams—1965-66-67—set
of 3, 25c—on sale daily at noon in
Hennings lobby or in Science Common Room, Math Annex — Chem.,
Math, Physics, Zoology, Geology,
Microbi, English, Economics, Computer-science.
Typing
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis  typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING —   ELEC.   MACHINE
Phone   738-7881
EXPERT   TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC   —
224-6129  —  228-8384.
SHORT NOTICE TYPING DURING
the day; 25c page; phone Ruth,
RE   8-4410.
TYPING. PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00 TO
5:00.  266-6662 after 6 o'clock.
EXPERIENCED   ESSAY   TYPIST,
reasonable  rates.   Phone 683-2859.
ACCURATE SECRETARY WISHES
typing at home. Please phone "Bonnie": 253-1191 — S:30-4:30 — 876-0784
after  6:00.
TYPING — ESSAYS, THESES, ETC.,
Please keep this No. to call any
time 6 8 4-57 83.
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED. MRS.
Hall   434-9558.
EMPLOYMENT
Help W'ted—Male or Female    S3
BABY   SITTER   FULL   DAY   MON-
day,    mornings    Tues.,    Wed.,    Fri.,
phone   681-3966   after   11:00   a.m.
EARN $50.00 PER DAY WITH
YOUR NOSE!
Short-term summer employment on a
medical research project for person
with exceptionally keen sense of smell.
If you think you can identify individual persons easily by smell, please
phone 228-2575 for appointment for
odour testing. Successful applicant
must demonstrate superior ability to
identify trace amounts of pure chemicals by their odour.       	
ITALIAN SCHOLAR TO RESEARCH
ZUST automobile. Possibility of free
trip to New York this summer. MU
4-7994.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction  Wanted
81
Tutoring
M
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS AND
sciences other undergraduate subjects to fourth year. Canadian Tutorial   Centre,   736-6923.
GRADS OF KILLARNEY GRAD RE-
union March 28, 7:30-11. All grads
and former teachers are invited.
DANCE WITH THE TRINIDAD
Moonlighter's Steelband Friday 9
p.m. at International House. Everyone   welcome,   75c.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
fl
Travel Opportunities
IS
CHARTER FLIGHT TO LONDON, 2
seats. Dept. July, ret. Sept., phone
738-9643,  5-7 p.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Best prices, Busy "B" Books, 146
West   Hastings,   681-4931.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
11
'55 ZEPHYR ZODIAC, RADIO VERY
reliable, extra parts, good tires,
685-4037   after   6:00.
EEYORE FANS — '54 AUSTIN GOOD
condition. $50. Phone 681-0558 after
5:30 p.m.
1966 MGB SPORTSCAR. EXCELLENT
condition; radio; wirewheels; new
tires;   $2,250.00.  Russ,   922-4935.
1959 MORRIS 1000. GOOD CONDI-
tion. New Brakes and Clutch. Asking $425.  AM 1-4600.
Automobiles Wanted
61-64 6 - CYLINDER AUTOMATIC
station wagon prefered, not necessary, for cash, phone 299-0932 Sunday   12-4.
Automobile Parts
23
HARDTOP FOR TR-4 IN VERY
good condition, $125, phone 732-
6315,  between  5:00 and 7:00  p.m.
Motorcycles
28
'66 HONDA 50,  4,000 MILES—$125 OR
nearest  offer—Call   685-6795.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
 32
UBC BARBER SHOP, IN THE VILL-
age,  open  6  days  a week.
37
Scandals
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
BIG   BAND   BLUES!   YES   MARTHA
the Organization will be here Sat.
NEW LINES AT THE DISCOUNT
House' of tape-players, tape recorders, all sizes in transistor and electric radio's, watches, luggage, binoculars, jewelry and gift itemsj 1500
latest style ladies bathingsuits to
choose from, wholesale prices on all
merchandise. 3235 West Broadway.
Phone   732-6811.
SEVERAL HAND KNITTED DRESS-
es from $10.00, size 10-14, make to
order, knitted & crochet dresses &
dressmaking — 224-3672, 4689 West
12th  Ave.
ADMIRAL PORTABLE RECORD
player, $50; electric guitar amplifier, $25; both in excellent condition,   phone   731-2870.
NEW! 100-WATT TRAYNOR AMP.
Also 2—15" JBL D140F speakers in
cabinet,  offers,  phone Pete 988-4564.
HELP GUNVOR AND GRAHAM Escape. Auction and sale of antiques,
furniture, paintings, oriental house
fixtures, 55cc Honda, Girls Bicycle,
Record Player, Records, Books,
Clothes ad infinitum. March 20th -
30th.   2097 West  6th, No.   4.
WET SUIT COMPLETE FOR ABOUT
5'7" 150 lbs., gloves, boots, hood.
Phone  Kim   evenings,   921-7049.
PENTAX SV1.8 LENS. CLIP - ON
meter case. Excellent condition.
$135.00. Phone AM 6-0874, ask for
Dwigrht.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
UBC GRADUATE MAN REQUIRES
unfurnished suite or furnished small
suite or room with light cooking facilities. Separate entrance from May.
Prepared pay six months advance
rent. Phone 733-0767 or 254-7184.
FURNISHED ROOM IN BASEMENT
for gentleman, linen supply, shower
and private entrance. $45. 4387 W
16th. Tel. 228-8814.
FURN. ROOM AVAIL. IMMED. KIT-
chen fac. Bath shared. $40. 4467 W.
16th.  Call 224-4921.
LIVE ON CAMPUS THIS SUMMER.
Delta Upsilon Fraternity Bouse. For
details   phone  228-8051.
Room 8c Board
MOVE ON CAMPUS FOR EXAMS.
Good meals, quiet study space.
Males only. 224-9665 after 6 p.m.
YOU CAN MAKE GREAT MONEY
this summer with Kiss Cosmetics,
the distributor with a difference.
"75,000   FLED"   HEAR   JUDY   PUL-
len Friday, noon, Bu. 104.
S.S.W. AND KQM: SEE YOU THERE
about that time. Remember, Passion
is the true Aphrodisiac (Must be
played in the dark.) B.Y.O.G. Gemini and  MDS.
YOUNG LADY — ROOM & BOARD.
J80.00. Refund of $50.00 for evening
babysitting   May   to   Aug.   incl.   731-
5946.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
83
WHISTLER   MTN.   —  HUGE   CABIN
for rent,  224-7438.
SENIOR STUDENT WANTED TO
share large house. Dunbar district.
Available immed. Phone 738-8400 after   6   p.m. 	
WANTED 3 OR 4 GIRLS TO SUB-
let West End Apt. May 5 to Sept.
7. Phone 681-8404 after 5:00. Education
for
Leadership
Are you the young man who can accept a challenge? If you want a University
degree, and if you have the desire and determination to excel in studies, sports, and
personal development you will find that challenge at one of the Canadian Military
Colleges.
The Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP) is your opportunity to achieve your
education goal, with all expenses paid, and to become a career Officer.
Go with us. The Canadian Armed Forces. Page 20
THfe     U BYSSEY
Friday, March 22,   1968
SPOR TS
Fewer winners left
as finals draw near
The B.C. high school basketball championships continue today in War Memorial Gym with games from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.
At press time, the scores of yesterday's games were Prince
George 41-Windermere 69, Rutland 64-Cowichan 39, Queen Elizabeth 57-Trail 40, Surrey 74-37, and Prince Rupert 32-David
Thompson 36.
Burnaby Central and North Van hadn't yet played and the
Vancouver College-Sentinel and Oak Bay-Abbotsford games were
later that night.
Oak Bay will likely reach the finals but their opponents
could be one of four teams. One thing is sure though, anything
can happen.
For example, North Surrey was first in the Fraser Valley,
while Vancouver College was second on the mainland. But last
night Vancouver College beat Surrey in a surprising turnabout.
Oregon Ducks
playing soccer
Throughout recent history,
ducks have had trouble playing soccer and the Oregon
Ducks are no exception.
The Ducks from the University of Oregon lost 4-0 to the
UBC Thunderbirds Thursday
afternoon in Thunderbird
Stadium.
For the Birds it was a
"comedy of misses" according
to coach Joe Johnson. The first
half ended with the Birds and
Ducks tied 0-0 as Oregon de-
fensemen stopped numerous
sure Bird counters and the
Oregon crossbar got in the
way six times.
The second half saw the
Birds come on and the Thompson brothers, Gary and Wayne,
Jim Berry and Jim Briggs
scored UBC  goals.
The   Birds   have   two   more
have trouble
with Birds
games coming up, one on Saturday at 2 p.m. in Thunderbird Stadium against Eldor-
ados in Province Cup action.
And next Thursday the
Simon Fraser soccer club has
challenged our Thunderbirds
to a game. It will begin at
12:30 p.m. in Thunderbird
Stadium.
This weekend
these sports
These sporting events
will take place between
today's Ubyssey and next
Friday's issue, the final
one of the year.
RUGBY — McKechnie
Cup match this Saturday
at Brockton Point. The
Birds take on Norwest
Reps at 2:30 p.m.
TRACK and FIELD —
Spring Mixer relays this
Saturday at 1 p.m. on
Harry Logan track in
Thunderbird Park.
ARCHERY—B.C. Championships this Sunday in
the UBC armory. For
further information contact Dave Roberts at 255-
0321.
BASKETBALL — B.C.
high school championships
today in War Memorial
Gym and Saturday night
in Pacific Coliseum.
SOCCER—the Thunderbirds play a team from
SFU next Thursday in
Thunderbird Stadium.
Kickoff is 2 p.m. in the
Province Cup match.
fAM0US ARTISTS ITD
OVERSEAS AUTO PARTS
12th and Alma
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
APRIL 2 TO 6 AT 8:30 P.M.
SAT. MATINEE AT 2:30 P.M.
,#S?"*i#!
,r
W$
THE SOVIET NAVY
ENSEMBLE
singers   "dancers*   musicians
PRICES: EVES.: 6.00, 5.50, 4.50, 3.50, 2.50
MAT.: 5.00,4.00,3.00,2.00
Tickets available in the Bay Box Office,
Main Floor at the Bay — Daily 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Phone 681-3351.
You don't have to
run all over
VANCOUVER
to get out of town.
The world's largest
travel company
is represented
ON CAMPUS
Here's what you can do in one visit to our office:
1. Choose from over 1,000 American Express tours
—with guaranteed accommodations around the
world I
2. Protect your travel money with American Express Travelers Cheques!
3. Charge your travel expenses with your American
Express Credit Card (or apply for a Card) 1
AnrtERICAIM e^pjIess
THE COMPANY FOR PEOPLE WHO TRAVEL
5700 University Boulevard
224-4391

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