UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 21, 1978

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126084.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126084.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126084-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126084-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126084-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126084-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126084-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126084-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126084-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126084.ris

Full Text

Array Faculty plans SA protest
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
UBC economics students and
faculty are protesting a visit to
Vancouver today by South African
ambassador John Becker,
economics graduate student Terry
Heaps said Monday.
Heaps said the protest will focus
on Becker's luncheon address at the
eighth annual "Outlook" conference of the Association of Professional Economists of B.C.
Students will stage a demonstration outside the Bayshore Inn,
where the conference is being held,
said Heaps.
He said they will also hand out
leaflets asking delegates to boycott
the luncheon speech.
"We want to show that South
Africa does not deserve a
respectable forum to represent its
views," he said.
Heaps said 39 students and 17
faculty members signed a statement
condemning the association for
inviting the ambassador, which will
be read to the delegates by UBC
economics professor Ernst Berndt.
Berndt is scheduled to speak on
economists' employment opportunities.
Berndt said when he originally
agreed to speak at the conference he
was not aware that ambassador
would be speaking.
He said he will open his address
by reading the statement from UBC
economists, although he is not an
expert on South Africa.
"I know enough about it to be
outraged," he said.
Berndt is slated. as the last
speaker before the ambassador's
luncheon speech, but said he will
boycott the lunch to protest the
presence of the ambassador.
Conference  organizer James
■%^mm
MISGUIDED ALIEN ATTACKS metal crab sculpture at MacMillan
Planetarium Monday night after beaming down to earth from disabled
spacecraft. After melting crab, relieved alien told observers he was Dork
from the planet Nurd and has come to study human lifeforms. Dork, who
—kerry regier photo/graphic
announced intention of applying for Canada Council grant to fund project,
said reaction to sculpture was involuntary, as crabs are serious problem on
home planet. Dork did not elaborate. According to astronomer I. C. Stars,
planet Nurd is in Hershey galaxy.
Hacks reluctant to throw hats into ring
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
It's election time at UBC again
and as usual candidates are hiding
behind well-guarded statements
waiting to see who will be the first
to declare his or her candidacy.
According to Alma Mater Society
sources, only one person has taken
a nomination form for the two student board of governors' positions
and there is no word yet on the
senate race in the still-born campaign.
Although no one has officially
declared candidacy, Glenn Wong,
Bruce Armstrong, Arnold
Hedstrom, Dave Coulson, Brian
Short and Chris Niwinski have all
expressed interest in the board
seats.
Armstrong, a former AMS president, said he has taken nomination
forms for both senate and board
positions, but added he is unsure if
or for what position he will run.
Armstrong made a name for
himself earlier this year as one of
the prime movers in starting UBC's
bus pass program.
Wong, current AMS finance
director, said he will have to
carefully assess how a board post
would fit in with his present position, before he will consider running.
The two positions would overlap
for a few months and Wong said he
wants to be sure he can still do the
best job possible as finance director.
"My first commitment is to being
the director of finance," he said.
Student senator Coulson said he
too is an undecided board candidate, but added that he sees certain issues as necessary parts of any
board campaign.
Tuition fees and student accessibility to board members will be
the big issues facing candidates,
predicted Coulson.
He said he is completely opposed
to tuition fee increases and as a
board member would remain accessible to students.
Coulson has been involved in
AMS constitutional reform this
year and is one of the authors of the
"presidents' constitution."
Engineering undergraduate socie
ty president Short said he is not a
candidate "at this time" for either
board or senate. But Short said he
would like to see the senate, particularly the student senators'
caucus, become more active.
"They don't seem to that effective, but that may not be their
fault," he said.
Short has been very active this
year in constitutional reform.
He predicted tuition fees and a
new math program will be major
campaign issues.
Student senators Hedstrom and
Niwinski were not available for
comment, but both have been
rumored to have their eyes on board
seats.
Hedstrom has participated in
university politics for over two
years, including a stint as AMS
secretary-treasurer and a previous
term as student senator. He reorganized several AMS committees
over the summer, including student
programs, teaching standards and
housing.
Niwinski has been described as a
political moderate leaning to the
left-of-right with pro-EUS tendencies. He has been a competent, but
unspectacular, senator.
Anyone interested in running for
either senate or board can contact
the registrar. The deadline for
nominations is Dec. 20 at 4 p.m.
Elections will be held Jan. 16.
Angus said the speech gives
Vancouver people a chance to hear
something they do not ordinarily
hear.
"I thought it might be interesting
to hear what he (the ambassador)
had to say on the economics of
South Africa," he said.
Angus said he does not think the
ambassador Should be judged
differently from any other speaker
at a luncheon.
"I can't understand why people
are getting so upset," he said. "A
little controversy is good for
people."
Another UBC professor accused
Angus and the conference
organizers of condoning South
African policy by inviting the
ambassador to speak. Stuart
Jamieson said UBC economists are
horrified at the thought of being
associated with South Africa's
racist policies.
"We (the UBC economics
department) damn well wouldn't
have got on the (conference)
program if we'd known he (the
ambassador was going to be on the
program," he said.
Jamieson said he does not agree
with Angus' statement about giving
South Africa "equal time" because
no one in South Africa opposed to
apartheid is allowed to voice his or
her opinion.
Angus said the association is not
condoning apartheid by inviting the
ambassador. It is not the association's position to condone or
support any of the guest speakers it
invites, he said.
Penn Stafe
§© become
new Kentt
PHILADELPHIA (CUP) —
Shades of Kent State? Campus
police at Pennsylvania State
University recently acquired a
new piece of regulation
equipment — guns.
The acting university
president, Edward Eddy, agreed
to let the police routinely carry
.38-calibre weapons because he
felt the campus needed armed
officers familiar with the
university environment and its
residents.
Previously, the university did
not allow the police to be armed
at any time. According to Eddy,
however, "the students and
others who utilize the campus
deserve the protection of people
who know the campus and its
style of life."
He said the police would only
be allowed to use the guns "in
defence of life and only after aU
other means have been attempted and failed."
On May 4,1970, the National
Guard was called to Kent State
University, Ohio, and opened
fire on a crowd of students protesting the war in Vietnam.
'I need you to test my IUD' says MD
Two new studies into advanced
birth control methods for women
are in urgent need of student
volunteers, Dr. Robin Percival-
Smith of UBC health services said
Monday.
The two studies, begun in
September, involve research on a
new estrogen pill and an improved
active-copper intrauterine device.
The oral contraceptive program
now has about 25 volunteers and
needs about 50 more, Percival-
Smith said.
A further 20 are needed for
research on the IUD.
The new pill experiment is an
attempt to find an estrogen dosage
and schedule with minimal side
effects.
"We know the low-dose estrogen
pill will prevent pregnancy," said
Percival-Smith. "The study
consists mainly of a diary kept by
the woman of every side effect
experienced during the test
period."
He said the study will last a year
and will include blood tests at six-
month intervals to help determine
the pill's long-term effects.
Side effects should be minimal he
added.
Preliminary results from the first
three months of UBC testing and
from a parallel study in London,
Ont. indicate very few side effects
for a hormonal contraceptive,
Percival-Smith said.
Side effects are reduced, he
added, because estrogen and progesterone dosages are varied
through the pill-taking schedule to
match the body's normal hormonal
changes. This matching of doses to
the menstrual cycle lessens the pill's
impact on a woman's system: and
allows less estrogen to prevent
pregnancy, he said.
He added that every major study
of oral contraceptives' side effects
stresses the ratio of estrogen dosage
to incidence of side effects.
Making pregnancy less likely and
the method more pleasant is the
purpose of the new IUD design
Percival-Smith said.
He listed the new design's
following aims:
• To cut down the number of
pregnancies    by    more    easily
See page 2: UBC Pag* 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21, 1978
UBC IUD may be OK
From page 1
penetrating    the    reproductive
system;
• To eliminate the sharp edges
on conventional designs which
irritate the cervix wall, causing
bleeding and pain and making
removal of the IUD necessary;
• To lessen the chance of expulsion by the body.
The new IUD resembles the
common Cupra-7, which disperses
copper ions as a spermicide and
retards the ovum's activities.
The study, Percival-Smith said, is
a random one, since the doctor
inserts the IUD without knowing if
it is the new design or a Cupra-7.
The effects of the two types will be
compared later, he added.
So far, the IUD has been tested
by volunteers for 8,000 months and
has resulted in six infections,
Percival-Smith said. Five of these
occurred in the first month after
insertion when risk of infection is
high and the other case involved
venereal disease, he said.
The two studies are not the first
contraception tests at UBC.
Research into a "morning-after"
pill for women has been going on
for four years, and Percival-Smith
said the study is "progressing
well."
He asked that women, wishing to
volunteer for the studies should
contact him at 228-2151 or see him
at student health services.
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
Tuesday
JAM NIGHT with DON OGILVIE
Wednesday
WESTSIDE FEETWARMERS
Thursday
ALL THAT JAZZ
Friday
DAVE ROBERTS JASSBAND
Saturday
4th Annual HOT JAZZ Festival
TUES/WED/THURS — FREE for Members
LIVE—NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broadway — 873-4131
_    YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS - S3.00   __
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
ESS&v
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
To Manage Or
To Be Managed?
The Department of Management Sciences in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Waterloo offers
programs leading to the Ma Sc and Ph D for engineers,
scientists, and mathematicians who want to plan their
progression to management.
Start Managing Your
Career Now!
Go to room 1210, Civil-Mech. Eng. on Wednesday,
November 22 from noon to 1:00 p.m. Prof. Tom Janz
will talk about how our graduates managed their careers
and to answer your questions.
That's    Room    1210,    Civil-Mech.
November 22, from Noon to 1:00 p.m.
DONT MANAGE TO MISS IT!
Eng.
Liter White Magic—Magic Flute
UBC
Evening Credit
Courses
January-April 1979
For an Extra-Sessional Studies calendar
describing courses and registration procedures,
write or telephone:
Office of the Registrar (228-2844)
Office of Extra-Sessional Studies (228-2657)
The University of British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C. V7R 3X9
Evening courses usually meet one evening a week for three
hours. Courses begin January 2 with last day for registration
January 5.
Students interested in off-campus courses in the Province
should contact the Office of Extra-Sessional Studies for a listing
of locations and courses scheduled to begin in January.
Course # Section #
Title
Evening
AGEC 401/001 (1M>)
Extension Methods
M
CIVL 492/001 (1)
Prestressed Concrete
M & Th
COMM 315/004 (1)
Quantitative Methods - Statistics
W
COMM 316/004 (1)
Quantitative Methods - Algebra
M
COMM 317/004 (1)
Introduction to the Computer in Business
Th
COMM 323/004 (V/2)
Introduction to Administrative Studies
T & Th
COMM 352/004 (V/2)
Managerial Accounting
M & W
COMM 361/004 (V/2)
Merchandising and Distribution
T & Th
ECON 302/031 (V/2)
Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
M & W
EDUC 317/901 (V/2)
The Exceptional Child in the Regular
Classroom
T
EDUC 373/001 (V/?)
Topics in Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers
M
EDUC 379/001 (1!/2)
The Education of Immigrant Children
M
EDUC 381/901 (1'/2)
The Library in the School
M
EDUC 390/901 (V/2)
Selected Topics in Special Education
Music Education for Handicapped Children
Th
EDUC 415/001 (V/2)
Optacon Reading for Teachers of the
Visually Impaired
W
EDUC 418/001 (1H)
Career and Alternative Educational Programs
for the Handicapped
W
EDUC 419/901 (V/2)
Introduction to Speech and Comm.
Disorders in Children
M
EDUC 420/001 (1'/2)
Education of the Moderately Intellectually
Impaired
T
EDUC 421/001 (1'/2)
Provisions in the Education of the Visually
Handicapped
M
EDUC 424/001 (V/2)
The Stimulation of Language Development
in Exceptional Children
Th
EDUC 428/002 (V/2)
Mental Health in the School
T
EDUC 429/901 (V/2)
Education of the Mildly Intellectually Impaired
W
EDUC 434/001 (Vh)
Precision Teaching and Behaviour
Management
T
EDUC 448/001 (V/2)
The Education of Children with Multiple
Handicaps
M
EDUC 477/901 (V/2)
Special Topics in Reading
Th
EDUC 480/002 (V/2)
Advanced Studies in the Language Arts in the
Elementary Grades
T
EDUC 481/002 (V/2)
Intro, to Research in Education
W
EDUC 484/001 (V/2)
Nonparametric and Related Statistics
M
EDUC 485/001 (V/2)
Mathematics History for Teachers
T
EDUC 486/002 (V/2)
Oral Language Development
W
EDUC 496/901 (V/2)
Motion Picture Production in Education
W
EDUC 501/002 (V/2)
Fundamentals of Human Learning & Motivation
W
EDUC 508/118 (V/2)
Guidance and Counselling
T
EDUC 509/001 (V/2)
Organization of Special Education
T
EDUC 526/001 (V«)
Seminar in Specific Learning Disabilities
W
EDUC 530/001 (V.)
Seminar in Education of the Hearing Impaired
Th
EDUC 544/001 (V.<)
Theoretical Bases for Reading Research and
Practice
W
EDUC 547/001 (V2)
Mathematics Teaching in the Elementary
School
Th
EDUC 555/001 (V /)
Educational Finance
T
EDUC 557/001 (V ■)
Administration of the Elementary School
Th
EDUC 558/001 (V2)
Administration of the Secondary School
Th
EDUC 565/192 (V2)
Special Course in Reading Education
W
EDUC 573001 (V.)
Advanced Seminar on Research in Exceptional
Children
M
EDUC 580/161  (V.)
Problems in Education - Computer Science
M
EDUC 586/001 (1/)
Philosophy and Educational Policy
Th
EDUC 598/201 (V.)
Field Experiences - Secondary Science
M
ARTE 302/002 (3)
Painting I
M & W
EDUC 465/918 (1'2)
Technical Problem - Industrial Education -
Basic Machine & Handcrafts
T
ENGL 206-701 (V.)
Introduction to Drama
W
ENGL 207/014 (1'2)
Introduction to the Novel                                    M, w & Th
ENGL 301/702 (V:)
Practical Writing
T & Th
ENGL 316/701 (V.)
Studies in Literature and the Other Arts
W
ENGL 318/703 (V2)
Children's Literature
W
GEOG 200/901 (V2)
Introduction to Cultural Geography
Th
HIST 104/901 (V2)
Medieval Trade and Towns
W
MATH 101/092 (V2)
Calculus II
VI, T & Th
W & Th
MINL 573/001 (1)
Treatment of Mineral Industry Effluents
Th
PHIL 363/001 (1'2)
History of Modern Philosophy
M
PHIL 534/001 (1'2)
Problems
M
PHED 460/003 (V2)
Administrative Practices in Physical Education
and Athletics
M
PLAN 522/002 (V:)
Local & Regional Planning & Administration
S
POLI 201/006 (1=)
Foreign Governments
T
PSYT 511/001 (1)
The Neurological Basis of Human Behaviour
M & W
RELG 306/001 (1'2)
Archaeology and the Bible
W
Information on Directed Study Abroad courses in England and Italy is now available
at 228-5472 or 228-2657 Tuesday, November 21, 1978
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 3
Wards war
rages strong
By TOM HAWTHORN
The battle for area representation
in Vancouver is still raging strong
despite last week's ward system
plebiscite.
Mayor Jack Volrich said Friday
the 51 per cent vote margin in favor
of a ward system for electing
aldermen was not enough to
warrant a change in the current at-
large system.
But Bruce Eriksen, an unsuccessful aldermanic candidate for
the Committee for Progressive
Electors, said Monday he will
directly petition the provincial
government to change Vancouver's
charter and implement wards. (The
city charter is an enactment of the
Victoria legislature.
"I think the mayor is making a
really large mistake," he said.
"Those people who voted for him
had the opinion he was a
democratic person because he said
if a majority of voters were in favor
of wards, he would implement
them."
In last Wednesday's election,
46,525 voters, or 51.5 per cent,
voted in favor of changing Vancouver's current at-large system of
electing 10 city aldermen in favor of
a system based on area representation. Volrich, who ran as an independent candidate with Civic
Non-Partisan Association support,
campaigned vigorously against the
change.
Seven of the 10 aldermen also
have publicly stated their opposition to the implementation of a
ward system.
Eriksen, who is also president of
the Downtown Eastside Residents
Association, said he will ask an
NDP MLA to present the petition
to the provincial legislature when it
next meets in January.
The petition in part says "that
the democratic expression of the
voters of Vancouver is likely to be
ignored by the newly elected city
council which has a majority who
are opposed to the implementation
of the electoral reform requested by
the majority of Vancouver voters.
"The petitioners humbly pray
that this honorable house may be
pleased to amend the Vancouver
city charter to provide for the
election of city councillors, and
parks and school board members
by neighborhood wards or areas.
Eriksen said he recommends
adoption of the Area Representative Electors Alliance's 13-section
ward system format. Wards would
contain between 24,000 and 35,000
voters under the AREA plan.
"It is up to the candidates who
ran in favor of wards to campaign
for them," he said.
"Council has already voted that
if the ward plebiscite passed, then a
committee would be appointed and
a ward election be held in 1980, but
with the present council that
probably won't happen."
Eriksen added that council had
put advertisements in newspapers
promising a ward system if the
majority of Vancouver voters
supported it, and said it was against
the law to place false advertisements. He said he might take the
issue to the provincial ministry of
corporate  and  consumer   affairs.
"People voted for them (the
current aldermen), believing they
would implement the ward system
and not waffle.
"The NPA council is sure to self-
destruct anyways."
Darg Bell-Irving, one of AREA's
founding members, has said he did
not expect Volrich to implement
wards even if the vote margin was
larger.
Aldermen who have announced
their support for wards are Michael
Harcourt, Darlene Marzari and
Harry Rankin. Those opposed are
Don Bellamy, Helen Boyce, Marguerite Ford, Bernice Gerard, Warnett Kennedy, Doug Little, George
Puil and mayor Volrich.
If '  ',Mv>* ■ -■$■■
—bob fuhr photo
HE USED TO BE disgusted, now he tries to be amused for Coliseum crowd on Friday night. Elvis Costello treated
new wave fans to neurotically intense show that would have delighted psychiatrists. Costello jerked his way
through hour-long set before taking Valiums and calming down. The Costello/Battered Wives concert is reviewed
in special Page Tuesday on page 12, along with more photos.
UBC to research coal goal
Only the announcement of
federal funding is stalling the
completion of a coal research
laboratory at UBC, administration
president Doug Kenny said
Monday.
Kenny said he expects the
university will receive $250,000 to
purchase equipment for the research laboratory from the federal
government "any day now."
"I'm hopeful we can get some
monies from the federal government for laboratory facilities," he
said. "I'm very optimistic we will
secure research capital equipment
funding."
The building of the $1 million
research facility will complete a
move by the university to develop
coal research, Kenny said. The
Universities Council of B.C. has
already funded $114,000 for the
current university budget to finance
a fourth-year optional coal
engineering   program,   he   added.
He said the remainder of the
laboratory project costs will be paid
for by operating surplus money.
"The     faculty     of    applied
engineering has identified coal
engineering as a high priority. Coal
production is a major Canadian
export and no other university in
Canada trains coal research
scientists and engineers."
Kenny said B.C. has enormous
coal deposits and added that UBC
should be involved in developing
new techniques to study coal
resources.
The federal science and technology ministry provides research
funding for universities of high
academic standing, he added.
Study bares hidden biases about rape
By MAUREEN McEVOY
Canadian University Press
Rape.
It's an ugly crime.
And its aftermath can be even worse.
In a recent report, submitted to the
Donner Foundation of Canada, two
criminologists, Lorenne Clark and Debra
Lewis, destroy some long held myths about
rape, reveal some surprising statistics, and
lay bare the hidden biases of society towards
this largely unreported crime.
For instance, a commonly-held myth
about rape is that it is usually committed in a
dark, isolated spot by a total stranger.
According to the Donner report, though,
more than 75 per cent of rapes in Vancouver
occur in some form of private dwelling, in
either victim's or rapist's home.
The average Canadian rapist is not a
strong, muscular he-man type but rather,
according to this study, is about 5'8"-5'9,"
from 25-29 years old, white, a Canadian
citizen and weighs 150-169 pounds. Clark
and Lewis point out that much of the information about the rapist is gleaned from
victims' reports to the police and the records
of arrest and they caution it is often
unreliable.
Society holds many of these myths up as
gospel truth and because members of society
from the jury that will pass judgment on an
accused rapist, police and Crown prosecutors
tend to pander to those myths. Thus, out of
all the rapes reported in a given year, (and it
is assumed that only 25 per cent of all rapes
are ever reported), a filtering process begins
so that out of an estimated 1,512 rapes only
54 will go to trial and only 27 will be convicted.
Clark and Lewis examined both the police
data and court data and found that rapes
that have certain characteristics are more
likely to proceed along the justice system
than rape cases that lack these qualities.
It is the police who first deal with a rape
complaint and their initial reaction sets the
tone for the entire proceedings. A case will be
classified "founded" not only if they believe
that the complaint is genuine but if they
believe the case will be fairly easy to
prosecute and reasonably sure of victory.
Cases that seem to be difficult to prosecute
will be classified as "unfounded" and little
further investigative work is carried out.
The age of the victim is one of the most
important variables in police classification —
the younger the victim, the better the chances
of having the case classified as founded.
Those under 14 years of age are triple-star
witnesses, those from 14 to 25 are good
witnesses, those over 25 are less credible, and
those from 30 to 34 years of age are least
credible. In fact, dependent children under
parental control are clearly the most favored
complainants.
Being married in Vancouver is not in itself
a variable conferring more or less credibility
on the victim but separated, divorced,
See page 9: BUREAUCRACY Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21, 1978
Bets are on
Politicians in Ottawa and Victoria are not the only ones afflicted with election fever this season. Alma Mater Society
hacks have caught the bug and candidates for the annual
election for student board of governors reps are itching to
begin campaigning.
Students will trek to the polls soon after the Christmas
break to put two students on the board, the senior governing
body on this campus.
Although students have minimal representation on the
board, being only two of 15 members, experience since 1974
(when student representation was first granted) indicates the
right kind of student representatives can be effective in communicating board matters to the university community.
As the terms of the current student board members are
almost over, it is appropriate to evaluate their performance on
the board over the past year.
If accessibility and keeping students informed about board
affairs is in any way important, Basil Peters' term of office has
been a failure.
To say he has maintained a low profile the past year is an
understatement. The clean-cut former gear has yet to make a
single appearance at a student representative assembly
meeting — one of his obligations — since September.
One wonders why the silent Peters ran in the first place.
Paul Sandhu, the other board member, has had a better
year. Although not as vocal as former student board
members Svend Robinson and Moe Sihota, Sandhu has
generally been available to students, other AMS politicos and
Ubyssey reporters.
The greatest fault of the UBC board of governors has traditionally been its distance from the rest of the university community. If next year's student board members are outspoken
and accessible, UBC students will be the real winners.
r
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 21, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays'and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
"Piss, shit, fuck," yelled Scum Rawporn. "That asshole Sheath Deflowered puked on me again." "Quit your fucking bitching," Slob Fuehrer
ejaculated. "And as for you, Virgin McDroog, get off Leather Cant. She's mine!" "Hey, that Bongo Balls Tailman's a pretty heavy motherfucker,"
Dung McTireiron said as he pissed on Puke Spillsome's foot. "Yeah," growled Puke, "I bet he's tougher than that shithead Spike Banking. Even Hairy
Scraghair's got more balls than he does." "Has anybody see Cramin McGroin?" interejaculated Rash Bullshit. Prick Menstruate stopped eating his
shit sandwich long enough to spit out, "Sure. He's out baiting fucking jails again." "Hey, jerkoff," Grope Feeltightsaid. "Whaddayawant, fuckup?"
answered Keepin Fingerin. "How's about you'n me splittin' this scene? These fucking punk parties such like sock hops." 'Nuff said.
Letters
Nuclear article misinforms public
The misleading and in some cases
erroneous statements in the
November 16th article on the
nuclear industry, (by Maureen
McEvoy of Canadian University
Press) described by the author as "a
simple lesson in physics," is such a
travesty of responsible reporting
that even the thought of trying to
comment on all the errors drives me
to despair.
If the media are to help the public
participate in the increasingly important energy debate, they do have
some responsibility to simplify complex technical matters relevant to
that debate. It is particularly unfortunate then, when this opportunity
FUS responsible
The Ubyssey doesn't always get'
delivered as far as the MacMillan
building and I am sure the editors
have never been inside the front
doors. The H. R. MacMillan
building, built by and named after a
famous forester, is not solely the
faculty of forestry's building.
Along with forestry, it houses the
faculty of agriculture.
Furthermore, forestry occupies
less than half of the building and
currently has a smaller student
body than agriculture.
Concerning the fee referendum,
the forestry undergraduate society
did not take a strong position. We
just left it up to the individual. The
reason being, we wanted more
information on the use of the
additional fee. Agriculture on the
other hand, decided not to support
the fee referendum.
The F.U.S. is quite concerned
about the future of clubs and such
activities as the intramural sports
program. If we could be given a
written guarantee that a large
proportion of the fee increase
would go to worthwhile clubs,
activities, and programs, we would
give the fee referendum one
hundred per cent support.
Turkeys you might call us, but we
feel responsible enough to vote and
responsible enough to want to
know where our money is going.
Also I might add, any turkey knows
the law of supply and demand; sell
beer for $1.10 a shot means closing
down the Pit and forfeiting a
$30,000 profit.
Harvey T. Kirk,
forestry 4
is used to distort or select the facts
so as to overdramatize one extreme
view or the other one.
The resulting polarization makes
it difficult, if not impossible, for
the public to get an overview of that
interesting process by which some
consensus is reached between different, and often opposing interests, in any democratic society.
In my opinion McEvoy's article is
a genuine, but far from simple, appeal concerning current social
dilemmas that have little to do with
academic lessons or with physics
and a lot to do with suspicions
about high technology as well as
with fears related to the uncertainty
of our times. It is both sad and inappropriate when such genuine feelings are deflected into narrowly
focussed technical concerns, which,
when taken out of context, often
produce more fear rather than
understanding.
My response to your editorial
"Bad Dream" on the same subject
(Nov. 17) was one of annoyance.
How long must we put up with this
"editorial pontificating?" Your
statement that "only in recent years
have the incredibly damaging effects of accidental exposure to
radiation been made public" indicates a profound ignorance of
about 80 years of gradually increas-
ing understanding and research on
the medical uses and hazards of
ionizing radiation from both x-rays
and radioactivity. New results or
changes in regulatory standards
have been introduced from time to
time. Single events in this continuing process are occasionally
distorted into "dramatic
breakthroughs" by the media, only
interested in the immediate "now,"
or by propagandists jumping on the
current bandwagon, with no interest in historical perspective or accuracy.
If I had my way I would make
you read through at least one foot
of the books and reports on this
subject among those on my shelves
before letting you write another
editorial on it. On the other hand, if
through some pedantic oversight I
have failed to recognize that your
word "incredible" was to imply
that those reports of "damaging effects" were so exaggerated that no
one could reasonably believe them,
then I would be happy to retract
and treat you to dinner at a place of
your choosing.
Geo. M. Griffiths
physics professor
Alternative sexuality
-go© ^Ms^^M^mw^^
Peter Menyasz's feature on sexuality (Ubyssey, Oct. 31) seems to
imply that much of the gay community at UBC is interested in actively supporting the gay rights'
movement, but are held back by
fear — "fear is a key word."
Eradicate this fear and "1,000 gay
students at UBC" would attend
Gay Peoples' weekly meetings.
Although I believe that fear may
be a favorable condition in this instance, the writer has failed to note
one observation — that there are
members of the gay community,
who because of religious convic-
tions, or the conditioning that
society has imposed upon them, are
attempting to disengage themselves
from this sinful lifestyle. Instead of
going for help to Stevenson, et al
(who are looking for converts), I
would suggest that these people
who feel uneasy about their condition seek advice from any of the
chaplains, preachers, etc. on campus.
I'm certain they won't "preach"
and they will give helpful advice
concerning this matter — there exists an alternative!
Name withheld
  arts 4
c'e$r Hoi our Vou$ &-ojt
'JLS"£$S4fo|TDE WOUS W-
US  HEiiietf ?A\R£ PES
(
Iff
4.
<* F "ft at Tuesday, November 21, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Society spiritually broke
The* "Land and People" conference that
was held during Nov. 3-4 at the Lutheran
Campus Centre with Bernard Daly, researcher for the Canadian Conference of
Catholic Bishops, deepened my understanding of the now-cliched spiritual impoverishment so prevalent throughout both our
western society in general and our university
community in particular.
Daly opened the conference with a noon-
hour lecture during which he presented the
c
By HEATHER BRYAMS
)
basic notion from which he would be
working: we, as individuals, give shape to the
social institutions to which we belong. As an
extension of this notion Daly challenged the
audience to employ its hitherto
unacknowledged power in an effort to
construct an imaginative alternative model to
the one now practised by various Canadian
institutions. Daly stated: "We must understand how our country works; there are
very few people deciding the shapes of our
cities." If we, as members of this society,
complain silently of the oppressive omnipotence of our social institutions, we are
not taking responsibility for the power which
we hold, and, thus, we are just as responsible
for our own oppression as are the institutions
into which we project our power. If, on the
other hand, we do acknowledge and practise
this power, we can shape our society in a
manner which reflects our presently-muted
interests.
At a later stage of the conference, the issue
of land use in Canada was addressed directly
by a representative of The People's Food
Commission, a member of Chilliwack's Save
Our Soil Committee and a worker of the
Inter-Church Development Conmittee, all of
whom are active in expressing the grievances
and interests of society members.
The People's Food Commission presently
is conducting a national inquiry into various
concerns of food producers, consumers,
workers and Third World people. This
inquiry will be staged at approximately 65
communities across Canada, and, once the
inquiry is completed, a report written by the
attendant commissioners will be submitted to
all participants, supporters, interested
community groups and relevant government
departments. The purpose of this report is to
synthesize the material gathered during the
inquiry and to make recommendations for a
people's food policy. This report will serve as
a "working document" for the participants
Power is not some
abstract unreality,
but is very much a
reality manifested
in concrete terms.
of the inquiry who again will gather in their
various communities to identify common
interests and to explore the ways in which
they will implement the recommendations
for a people's food policy.
The strategy of the People's Food
Commission is one which acknowledges,
nourishes and utilizes the power of our
society members. The commission, by
conducting a national inquiry at the community level, gives participants a sense of
power which they otherwise would not experience had the inquiry been conducted at
the national level alone. The commission,
therefore, counters that feeling of
powerlessness which, when faced with an
amorphous body of institutions, overwhelms
us to the point of paralysis.
A similar strategy is practised by
Chilliwack's Save Our Soil Committee. This
committee opposes the Township of
Chilliwack's plans to exploit the reserve of
1,800 acres of prime farmland for industrial/urban development. Of B.C.'s five
per cent arable land, this reserve represents
two per cent. Thus, the spokesman of the
committee stated: "Our top priority is to
save the land."
The committee advocates, as one alternative to the reserve development, the
hillside development of Chilliwack Mountain. "Now council is recommending that
only one per cent (of the reserve) be
released," explained the committee member,
"and I think our group had an influence on
the change of decision."
For the members of this small but effective
committee, power is not some abstract
unreality, but is very much a reality
manifested in concrete terms. The Save Our
Soil participants, like the members of the
People's Food Commission, employ their
power in the effort both to identify their
interests and to structure these interests
within a model which ultimately will shape
our society.
Wes Maultsaid of the Inter-church Development Committee drew some connections between Canada and Third World
countries. He pointed out that if present land
use trends continue in Canada, by 1985 our
country will be primarily a wheat exporting
nation. Not only will this situation prove to
be economically tenuous for Canadians, but
it will also prove to be oppressive both to our
own people and to the people of the Third
that we, as individuals, exist in relation to a
complex human and natural webbing. For
us, the word "solidarity" contains no
meaning. Consequently, we fail to take
responsibility for the actions of the various
institutions to which we belong. We cannot
see, for example, that we are indeeed
responsible for the oppression of Canadian
and Third World people.
If we are blind to our relationship with
those institutions which oppress both ourselves and others, how can we ever hope to
shape our society in a manner which reflects
our interests? We need to both acknowledge
and practise the power which we hold as
members of our social institutions. Only then
will we be able to formulate our interests
within a working model alternative to that
now employed by the few people who are
shaping our society.
It is obvious that we have lost faith in
those institutions which, in the past,
provided a structure with which we could
orient our lives. Such institutions, be they of
World countries; we of this country, by
importing foods from the Third World, will
both terminate the livelihood of Canadian
non-wheat farmers and threaten the existence
of those Third World people who need the
food for their own sustenance. Maultsaid,
like Daly, shares the view that we, as individuals, give shape to the institutions of
which we are a part. Thus we, as members of
the Canadian society, are responsible for the
oppression of both Canadian and Third
World people.
Maultsaid recounted an event in his life
which marked his acceptance of this insight:
When he was working in Belize, British
Honduras, he would walk down the street
and hear a black citizen call after him with a
biting sneer: "Hey, white Christian!" This
daily taunting continued for quite some time,
and Maultsaid, knowing that the man
wanted to discuss something more than the
weather, did not stop to invite a conversation
with his taunter. Finally, the man came to
Maultsaid's residence and complained that
he had seen children eating out of Maultsaid's garbage box. Maultsaid denied this
charge, knowing that he and the people with
whom he lived never threw out any food.
Then the man said: "I suppose you see
yourself as a good Samaritan." Maultsaid
oscillated somewhat and finally blurted:
"Well, if that's the way you see me, I guess
that's what I am." To this, the man shouted:
"I don't see you as a good Samaritan at all! I
see you as a bloody robber! You've continually robbed us!" Maultsaid attempted to
explain to the man that he, personally, had
never robbed the people of Belize and that he
therefore was not guilty of such an accusation. But the man continued to perceive
Maultsaid as a robber, and he walked away
leaving Maultsaid to grapple with the
meaning of the word "solidarity."
Maultsaid, after this event, recognized the
fac't that he, as an individual who is both
white and Christian, belongs to a community
of people which is composed of "white
Christians." Thus Maultsaid, as a member
of such a community, is responsible for the
actions of the "white Christain" body.
Part of the malaise that plagues our
present condition is our failure to recognize
the traditionally-considered religious or
secular realms, now fail to offer a model that
accommodates the present complexities with
which we are faced. As a result, we turn to
simple models, imported models, exotic
models, in the hope that we will find a
structure by which we can make sense of our
fragmentary lives. It is true that many of
these alternative models respond to our gut
cries of confusion, insecurity and loneliness;
they offer a sense of meaningfulness,
stability and community, but they do so
within the form of a narrow world view,
which in itself is a reaction to the widespread
pluralities, of our time. Thus, these models
are inadequate in that they fail to
acknowledge and give form to our pluralistic
world. This inadequacy leads us to perceive
the world from a limited perspective, which,
in turn, yields a destructive chain of
disillusionment, bitterness, cynicism, apathy
and despair.
We embrace the
psycho therapist
as the priest
of our day.
The search for an element of constancy
amid this tumultuous time of change finds
many of us turning inwards and becoming
excessively introspective in the hope that at
least the psyche will provide a kernel of
stability. Such is not the case, as we are
discovering the myriad facets of the inner
realm, yet we continue to plant the Self as a
constant within the delusive dichotomy of
self and society.
This world view, based on an either/or
dualism, is equally as destructive as are the
narrow world views offered by the various
alternative models to which we are turning.
All these models fail to accommodate the
plurality of our present world, yet they indicate our need for a sense of meaningfulness, stability and community. Of
course, there are many outer forms that these
primal needs may assume, but if we look
inward to the very root of these needs, we
find a craving for power: power in the sense
of belonging to, interacting with, and pervading upon a meaningfully-structured
community. We presently do not experience
a sense of such power, because, while living
within a complex matrix of multiple systems,
we do not see the direct effects of our own
actions. Consequently, we feel powerless and
we express this feeling in a variety of ways.
Notice, for example, the signs of anxiety and
frustration, so prevalent in our society, that
ultimately erupt in the form of violence, be it
action breaking the boundaries of the social
structures, or action, while socially sanctioned, nearly breaking these boundaries of
our structures. Punk rock and the veneered
violence of the disco scene present two forms
of socially sanctioned and even socially
cultivated, violence.
Yet violence is not the only expression of
our feeling of impotence. Many of us, when
faced with the overwhelming mass of social
institutions and systems to which we
somehow but confusingly belong, freeze.
This inaction may be confused for apathy
and indeed it may become so when the
Punk rock and the
veneered violence
of the disco scene
present two forms of
socially sanctioned
violence.
paralysis extends over a period of time, but
initially this inaction is an expression of our
feeling of powerlessness when confronted
with the convoluted complexities of our
world. We retreat from the world. We
operate on the self/society model and deal
with only the self aspect of the dichotomy.
We become highly individualistic, introspective, and consequently, inactive. We
see no relation between ourselves and the
society in which we live and we therefore take
no responsibility for the power which we
hold as members of this society. We do not
embrace our power; that power which
belongs to us and with which we can shape
the future in our own interests.
What we need, then, is a world view that
accommodates and gives form to the
pluralities of our time. We need a cubistic
world view, one that is multi-faceted in
dimension, one that gives a structure to the
complexities, contradictions and ambiguities
with which we must deal if we are to live in
this world.
To whom do we turn for such a vision?
Where are the poets, prophets and priests of
our age? Ironically, they are not to be found,
today, within those institutions which apparently provides figures for spiritual
leadership. Because of the nature of institutions, a time-lag exists between the
conception of a vision and its institutionalized birth. For the conception of
the vision that we now need, we must look to
the periphery people, to those who are on the
edges of institutions, to those who are both a
part of and apart from the institutions
which, hitherto, have fostered spiritual
leaders.
If these institutions wish not to be left
behind in the continuing myth of our
spiritual development, they must break their
archaic boundaries, transform their structures and grow with the growth of our myths.
Such is the paradoxical relationship between
destruction and creativity, and such is the
nature of our present society. It is true,
therefore, that our age is one of much
destruction, but it is also rich in creative
possibilities.
To hope is to affirm life as pregnant with
creative possibility. Such affirmation, expressed simply and sincerely in daily tasks, is
the organismic sacrament that saves the
world.
Heather Bryans is a fourth year engineering student. Perspectives is a column of opinion open to anyone in the university community. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21, 1978
Gaels beat UBC in grid final
By PAUL WILSON
A strong offensive effort by the Queen's
University Golden Gaels and two unfortunate fumbles in the second half of Saturday's College Bowl gave the Gaels a 16-3 victory over the Thunderbird football team and
the Canadian collegiate championship.
The game, played at Varsity Stadium in
Toronto before over 19,000 mainly Queen's
fans, was UBC's first appearance in the national final since it was instituted in 1964.
The teams were tied 3-3 at halftime but
UBC fumbled twice on punt returns in the second half to put Queen's into good scoring
position.
"We certainly could've played better,"
said UBC head coach Frank Smith Monday.
"Our special teams just broke down. In
covering kicks and returning kicks we just
didn't play well at all."
The first fumble on a punt return by 'Bird
safety Eric Ford put Queen's in excellent
field position. But the strong 'Bird defence
held the Gaels and forced them to settle for a
field goal by Blaine Shore which gave them a
6-3 lead.
The second fumble occurred with just over
three minutes to go when Jack Hirose dropped a punt return on his own four-yard line.
This set up a touchdown by Queen's Dave
Marinucci to give the Gaels a 13-3 lead and
seal the 'Bird's fate.
Smith, named Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Union football coach of the year last
week, says his team had few excuses.
"Queen's is an excellently coached football team. Their offence is very good and
they are great on defence. We got beat by an
excellent football team. There's no doubt
about it."
UBC's defence played well during the
game effectively neutralizing Queen's leading
receiver Bob O'Doherty. It also held quarterback Jim Rutka to just five completions in
18v passing attempts. Hirose, especially, had
Rivalry hotter
An old football rivalry will be resumed
Saturday when the UBC Thunderbirds meet
the Simon Fraser University Clansmen at 8
p.m. at Empire Stadium in the Shrum Bowl.
All the proceeds from the game, to be
played under Canadian amateur rules, will
go to the United Way Fund. And the old
Shrum Bowl trophy, emblematic of B.C.
collegiate football supremacy, will be
brought out of mothballs and presented to
the winning school.
The rivalry itself dates back to the late 60's
and early 70's. The two teams played five
times between 1967 and 1971. SFU won four
and the other, the infamous Mud Bowl of
1969, ended in a tie.
The main reason the games were stopped
was that UBC was just not competitive with
SFU. In the five games, UBC was outscored
168-32 and public interest in the games all
but died.
But time has changed the situation. The
'Birds are finishing their most successful
season ever, with a 9-3 record so far. They
also made it to the Canadian final College
Bowl in Toronto dropping the game 16-3 to
Queen's University. The modern version of
the 'Birds is probably the best team they've
ever assembled and definitely much improved over their late 60's predecessors. No
one could doubt the competitiveness of this
team.
The UBC squad includes two all-
Canadians, running back John Mackay and
middle linebacker Kevin Konar, and one of
the best quarterbacks in the country, Dan
Smith.
Every coach the 'Birds have played against
this season has singled out their defence as
one of their strongest points. Most notably,
the members of the defensive backfield have
given quarterbacks across the country
problems.
SFU has not had a good season. The Clan
lost four of its last five games and ended the
season with a very mediocre record. But last
Saturday they finished the season on a
positive note, downing the Western Montana
Bulldogs 49-19.
Two Clan standouts in that game were
an excellent game, though marred by the
fumble, intercepting two of three key Gael
passes.
But the 'Bird offence could not capitalize
on the Golden Gael's mistakes. In the fourth
quarter UBC kept Queen's deep in its own
end but could not put a scoring drive together
to put themselves back in the game. Many
promising 'Bird attacks were killed by turnovers and dropped passes.
Star running back Gord Penn, who did
everything for the 'Birds in their 25-16 victory over the Wilfrid Laurier Golden Hawks
Nov. 10, rushing for 145 yards, scoring two
touchdowns and catching four passes, had a
bad game, dropping four key passes and
fumbling once.
Smith agreed that Penn had a bad day but
felt the loss was due to the team and could
not be put on any individual's shoulders.
"We lost the game as a team and only as a
team. In Gord Penn's case, he's the reason
we got where we are. So you have to look at
his overall performance over the four years
he's been with us. He's a great all-round
player, there's no doubt about that."
Queen's controlled the ground during the
game. Rookie Queen's punt return specialist
Tom MacArtney set a College Bowl record,
returning 12 'Bird punts for a phenomenal
159 yards. The Gaels' Tony Manastersky also
ran up an impressive 100 yards rushing.
But UBC's quarterback Dan Smith again
had an impressive game in the air, completing
18 of 35 despite the Gaels' excellent rush and
pass coverage.
Due to injuries suffered in the Westerr
Bowl against Wilfrid Laurier and also ir
previous pllay, the 'Birds played withou
several key players. All-Canadian runninj
back John Mackay could not play agains
Queen's. Dave Singh had to remain ir
hospital in Vancouver after suffering a bruis
ed kidney. And defensive back and punter A
Chorney could complete only his kickin;
chores in Toronto due to a knee injury. Penr
had also been injured in the Western Bow
and could not practise last week. But manag
ed to play in Saturday's contest, althougl
bothered by his strained left knee.
"We don't use injuries as an excuse," saic
coach Smith. "We've had a long season anc
played well and now maybe the games an
taking their toll. But we lost the game fairl;
to an excellent team."
Queen's ended their 10 game seasoi
undefeated. But UBC has played 12 games si
far in their best football season ever (9-
record), and have one more game, Saturda
night's Shrum Bowl against the Simon Frase
University Clansmen.
In CIAU football award balloting, coac;
Smith was selected college coach of the year
Middle linebacker Kevin Konar and bac'
Mackay were chosen All Canadians
Mackay, Konar and tight end Chris Davie
were also selected to the Can-Am Bowl team
University of Western Ontario's quarter
back Jamie Bone was selected Canada'
outstanding player. 'Bird quarterback Smiti
was in the final balloting   for the award.
quarterback Nelson Martin, who rushed for
77 of SFU's 503 yards of offence and
completed seven of 10 passes, and wide
receiver Walter Passaglia, brother of B.C.
Lion Lui Passaglia. He carried twice for 86
yards, caught five passes for 99 yards and
scored two touchdowns. Like his brother, he
kicks and kicks well.
See page 10: CROSSTOWN
—peter menyasz photo
COACH SMITH. ERNIE AFAGHANIS . . . eastern broadcaster pesters CIAU football coach of year
Ruggers
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
For many spectators and players at th
rugby match Saturday at Thunderbir
Stadium between UBC and the UBC Ol
Boys, the Thunderbird 11-0 win was not e
important as the mere fact the game wj
played. The fifth annual Moore Mug classi
underlined the success of the attempt si
years ago to develop a club in which UB(
graduates could continue to play the free
flowing style that is characteristic c
Thunderbird teams.
Barry Legh, a former Thunderbird and a
initiator of the Old Boys team, explained th
frustration UBC players had felt in having t
play the slower, more physical style of th
other Vancouver Rugby Union teams.
Along with two former 'Birds, Jack Sha'
and Spence McTavish, and with the help c
assistant athletic director Buzz Moore, Leg
approached the VRU in 1973 with a proposf
to have a UBC graduate team play a
exhibition schedule against first-divisio
teams. The VRU was adamantly opposec
since an exhibition schedule was unheard c
and all clubs enter the system by playing i
the third division and working their way up
This would be patently ridiculous for th
Old Boys, who already had many of the be;
players available. After several other ai
tempts fell through, Legh went back to th
VRU with an ultimatum.
"The Vancouver league was quite wea
Jock Shorts
Women kickers out cold
Well, the basketball 'Birds came up a little
short in Calgary on the weekend, losing a
doubleheader 97-76, 78-66. But this weekend
UBC is back on home turf, hosting the
University of Alberta at 8:30 p.m. Friday
and Saturday in Canada West league action
at the War Memorial Gym.
*    *    *
Francis Sloan of the UBC fencing team
won the women's individual foil title at the
University of Washington open fencing
tournament in Seattle Saturday and Sunday.
Jane Milton finished fourth in the foil and
Marianne Mortensen was fifth.
In the men's foil, Craig Bowlsby finished
third. The winner was U.S. foil champion
Michael Marx.
Other  UBC   performers   were   Jurek
Kaminski, who was sixth in the sabre, and
Rob Margolis, who was seventh.
*    *    *
The men's volleyball team goes to Edmonton this weekend to attend the first of
three tourneys which will determine the
West's representative to the March nationals.
Other schools hosted by Edmonton include
the Universities of Victoria, Calgary and
Saskatchewan.
Playing Sunday morning on a frozen field
doesn't appear to appeal to UBC's women
soccer team as they dropped a 6-1 decision to
Blue Mountain in a Vancouver Women's
Soccer League game on Maclnnes Field this
weekend.
Blue Mountain scored four minutes into
the game on a 15-metre shot from the right
side and then withstood a strong UBC attack
that held the ball in the visitor's end for more
than 10 minutes without scoring.
Shortly thereafter, Blue Mountain got the
ball to an unattended forward at midfield
who raced in and hit a chip shot over the
UBC goalie's head. The Thunderettes wei
forced to press forward and continually le
holes in their defence for Blue Mountain t
exploit. UBC gave up another goal an
trailed 3-0 at the half.
In the second half UBC continued to b
hampered both by a lack of teamwork an
the strange bounces of the ball on the froze
turf, and most of the play was at midfielc
Penny Cuthbert raised the Thunderetti
hopes with a goal at the 23-minute mark on
10-metre shot from directly in front, but Bit
Mountain responded with two goals within
minute to break the match open. Tuesday, November 21, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
-^( |*,.#**: '
*$^«&<aS»
■wv
£'*WMM
rl>
^jStfc«-
«■ * V.
^wjS^SJSF^
■ :J-"4-.fc-'-
'Sfil*'
DEBBIE SHAW
—peter menyasz photo
team captain shows ball control
ake Moore Mug
at year," Legh eaid. "So we told them if
e Old Boys couldn't play in their league, we
mid join the Fraser Valley League and play
i the Valley Rep team."
The league gave in at that point and
lowed the Old Boys to play.
The first year was a successful start, but
ter dropping the exhibition system in the
cond year there was a noticeable decline in
e quality of play.
"We were really just playing for two
tints each week in our second and third
ar," said Legh.
Last year the players decided to forget the
andings and play the fast, open style they
vored. As a result, they won the Miller Cup
r Vancouver League supremacy and ad
vanced to the provincial final, in which they
lost to Island rep James Bay.
Although the Old Boys are having
problems in the front row this year, they
played well against the powerful Thunderbirds. The first half saw a great deal of good
rugby between the goal lines, but the only
points were scored by UBC's Dave Whyte,
who intercepted an Old Boys' pass and went
50 metres for a try at the 23 minute mark.
The Thunderbirds missed four penalty goals,
a drop kick and a convert during the first 45
minutes, leaving the score 4-0 at the half.
In the second half the Old Boys put on
several  displays  of excellent   passing   but
continued to be frustrated near the goal. Don
Halliday finally connected on a 25-metre
See page 10: MOORE
Ice'Birds split
ANITA DORNER .
—peter menyasz photo
lifts ball past Blue Mountain defender
ByDON MacINTYRE
The UBC Thunderbirds hockey team
returned from their weekend swing to
Saskatoon only slightly worse for wear.
The Thunderbirds split their series with the
University of Saskatchewan Huskies
dropping a 4-2 decision Friday and rebounding for an 8-6 win Saturday. The single
win keeps UBC's Canada West University
Athletic Association record even at three and
three.
Rob Jones and Derek Williams tallied for
the 'Birds in Friday's loss. But it was the
strong three-goal performance of Williams
that led the UBC team to the victory in
Saturday's contest. Teammate Jones also
played well, snagging two goals of his own.
Other 'Bird scoring came from Jim
McLaughlin, who popped two past the
Husky netminder and Frank Gorringe, who
is credited with the only single goal performance in the game. UBC outshot the
Huskies 35-18.
Despite the .500 record at this point in the
season, UBC coach Bert Halliwell is well
aware of the team's problems.
"We've lost a few players to injuries, and
that's hurt us," said Halliwell.
Most recently UBC lost the services of
five-year man Peter Moyls, whose nagging
back injury has finally forced him to the
sidelines.
"Moyls has only been able to go about 70
per cent all season," commented Halliwell.
"And it looks as though he will be lost to us
until after Christmas."
The loss of Moyls will definitely weaken
the 'Birds' already-limited scoring punch this
year. The Thunderbirds can put the puck in
the net, but point production is consistently
coming from the same three or four players.
"I've tried juggling lines but it will take
time," he said. "We have good goal scorers,
but they're not natural goal scorers. We have
to work very hard for it."
Two players that have been working ex-
«j*^
MOYLS . . . injured
'"%V
%!!$ =8Bw +
'ifc*
5vC
1
WILLIAMS . . . high scorer
tremely hard thus far in the young season
have been back-liners. These are Terry Shykora and Ross Cory, both of whom have
helped to settle the inexperienced UBC
defence. When asked about the play of the
defence, Halliwell replied: "We improve a
little bit every game, but Shykora and Cory
are the anchors back there. I try to have one
of them on the ice at all times."
Of course, the best defensive performance
up to this point has come from UBC's all-
star netminder Ron Paterson. Paterson is
another of the dying breed of veterans thet
UBC retains this year. His performance in
goal can always be relied upon, despite the
fact that he has been bothered by a nagging
groin pull for the last couple of weeks.
Coach Halliwell realizes he must build his
team for the future and hopes experience will
be the cure for some of the ailments from the
Thunderbirds are suffering. Halliwell has set
realistic expectations for his T-Bird crew.
"We would like to be .500 at Christmas.
That's our objective. We will improve as we
go along and hope to catch a playoff spot."
Halliwell is confident that the team will be
competitive, even though they dropped a pair
of home games to the University of Alberta
Golden Bears the previous weekend.
"They played two perfect games against
us," explained Halliwell.
But the Bears are no longer perfect,
suffering their first loss of the season Friday
against the University of Calgary Dinosaurs
in other weekend action. To further complicate matters, the 6-5 loss was handed to
them in Edmonton by a team the 'Birds
swept a pair from earlier in the season. When
asked to explain, Halliwell replied: "They
were at a high against us. Maybe this
weekend they were at a low."
But the Bears won't be worrying yet.
Canadian champs don't worry, they create
worry.
UBC will hit the trail again this weekend to
meet the University of Calgary Dinosaurs,
fresh off the upset of the league-leading
Bears. The 'Birds also have an international
contest coming up. On Dec. 5 they take on
the Japanese national team in an exhibition
game. Faceoff time is 7:30 p.m.
The Thunderette volleyball team starts its
defence of the Canadian inter-collegiate title,
which it has held for two years, with a trip to
a tourney in Edmonton Friday and Saturday.
Returning this year to boost UBC's
chances for another title are Kim Brand,
Maryanne Branson, Jayne Cryer, Shelley
Hopkins, Kerry Hutchinson, Chris Trainor
and Sue Oliver. New talent this year comes
from Shelley Ledingham, Kelly Grant, Nora
Kountzelman, Liz Vidoni and Sandy
Walhovd.
This year the Thunderettes will need the
experienced coaching of George Neufeld to
overcome the challenge of the University of
Saskatchewan, a team which won't take
defeat easily.
Last weekend at Montana State, UBC lost
the tourney final to the University of
Washington 15-6, 15-12, 9-15, 14-16, 13-15.
UBC hosts the annual Thunderette In
vitational on January 13, and on Feb. 3-
4 UBC will again host a group of visiting
schools.
The winless basketball Thunderettes lost
78-44, 68-52 to the University of Calgary in
Calgary on the weekend. Margot Mc-
Cullough led UBC scorers with 12 and 18
points in each of the respective games.
UBC hosts the University of Alberta at the
War Memorial Gym at 6:45 p.m. Friday and
Saturday.
*      *      *
In its last league game before the
December break, the UBC field hockey team
meets the Tigers at 1 p.m. Saturday at
Trafalgar Park. On Saturday UBC tied
Simon Fraser University 1-1 at Trafalgar,
then on Sunday beat the Mohawks 3-2
UBC. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21, 1978
'Tween classes
TODAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
UBC PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Provincial leader Vic Stephens speaks, noon,
SUB 212.
UNIVERSITY LECTURES COMMITTEE
Dr. Jo Olive speaks on Speech Synthesis by
Rule, 1:30 p.m., Hector McLeod building room
402.
HEALTH SCIENCES
STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Health Care, You and the Nation seminar, 7
p.m., Woodward IRC 4.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper, Ernest Willy speaks on Indian People
and Their Land, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
HILLEL HOUSE
Open meeting, noon, Hillel House.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
YOUNG TRUTCHKEYITES
Kitchen clean-up, anytime, Trutch House.
BALLET APPRECIATION CLUB
Beginners' classes tryout, noon, SUB ballroom.
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
Tuition fee forum, 6:30 p.m., SUB 206.
UNIVERSITY LECTURES' COMMITTEE
Prof. John Manning speaks on What Happened
in Australian History, noon, Buch. 104.
Prof. John Manning speaks on Colonial Conservatism, 1820-1850, 3:30 p.m.. Brock Halt, room
363.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
lestimony meetings, noon, SUB 224.
WEDNESDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
WHOLISTIC LIVING
Dala Maranda speaks, noon, Buch. 204.
AMNESTY UBC
Form letters for prisoners of conscience, noon,
SUB concourse.
New format letter writing workshop, noon, SUB
212A.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Snooker and bowling night, 7:30 p.m.,  SUB
basement.
UNIVERSITY LECTURES' COMMITTEE
George   Kane,   University   of   North   Carolina,
speaks   on   Background   to   Chaucer's   Love
Poetry, noon, Buch. 203.
THURSDAY
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 113.
GAY PEOPLE
Rev.    MacElrod   speaks   on    Homosexual
\       References from the Old and New Testament,
noon,   SUB 212.
SFfen
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Slide show, noon, Chem. 230.
AMNESTY UBC
Form letters for prisoners of conscience, noon,
SUB concourse. Informal meeting, noon, SUB
237.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Demonstration   of   cross-examination   debate,
noon, Buch. 204.
EAST INDIAN
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
UBC NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
FRIDAY
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
Hot flashes
Pigskin rivalry
is shrum fun
Who has not thrilled to the sharp
crack of plastic shoulders into the
groins of apprehensive blockers?
This Saturday at 8 p.m., football
lovers will be in the stands at Empire Stadium, but their hearts will
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
be out on the turf, as UBC and
Simon Fraser University resume
their Shrum Bowl rivalry.
Free buses will leave SUB and
Totem Park at 6:30 p.m.
Catch this spectacle for a mere
$2. Tickets are being sold at the
AMS business office in SUB.
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
Henneken Auto
MERCEDES—VOLKSWAGEN RABBIT—VOLVO
Service—Repairs—Used Cars
8914 Oak St. (Oak & Marine) 263-8121
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to
run for election for the following positions:
BOARD OF GOVERNORS    — TWO students
SENATE —    SEVENTEEN    students   (five
at-large and one from each faculty)
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of
nomination are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S.
Office (Room 266 S.U.B.) and in the offices of the Student
Undergraduate Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later
than 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 20, 1978.
TRANSFER STUDENTS
Important notice for transfer
students in Applied Science,
Commerce, Agricultural
Sciences, Pharmaceutical
Sciences, Forestry, and Arts.
Transfer students in the above
faculties who have not yet written the Diagnostic Test for
Transfer Students must do so
on Thursday, January 4, 1979,
at 4:30 p.m. in Buchanan 106.
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1978 FALL LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Richard Meier
A professor of environmental design at the University of California at Berkeley,
Richard Meier was educated as a chemist He was exposed to policy planning as a
member of a group concerned with advanced weapons policies following World War
II From there he has evolved into one of the foremost urban planners in North
America. His concern with resource-conserving urbanism and the relationship between
technology and development have taken him all over the globe
THE FUTURE OF ASIAN CITIES
Tuesday, November 21       In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m
COMMUNITY ECOLOGY AND THE URBANIZATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Thursday, November 23     In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCED
sponsored by
The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional lines 50b Additional days $2.50 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office. Room 241. SUB., UBC. Van.. B.C. V6T 1W5.
5"~ Comintj Events
Come     on
C\
out          to
Shrumbowl
ul    *"■*'
Saturday,
■/•■
November
25    at 8:00
p.m. in Em
pire     Sta-,
dium.
Tickets are
on
y $2.00
available at
the
A.M.S.
business office.
Professor Mark  Reutlinger of the
University of Puget Sound School of
Law in Tacoma, Washington, will
speak with interested students
about law schools and law careers
in general, and about the University
of Puget Sound in particular, on
Thursday, November 23, 1978 at
10:00 a.m. in room 215 of the Student Union Building. No particular
major is required for law school,
and all undergraduate and graduate
students are invited to attend this
meeting. (U.P.S. welcomes students
who intend to practice in either
Canada or the U.S.)
UBC DEBATING
SOCIETY
McGOWAN CUP
General Meeting
FRIDAY, NOV. 24
12:30 SUB 211
EVERYONE PLEASE ATTEND
5 — Coming Events (Cont.)
amnesty ubc
■ m^m1mmm FRI. NOV. 24/78
— SUB 205 —
 gj.^.   TICKETS $1.00
Iflil'^r^B Available in advance
■ ■ ■ ■ ^^ only, at the Amnesty
UBC Office, SUB 237
MEMBERS: Come
and Meet Your
Executive!
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for ice skates, hockey, aocoer, jogging
and racquet «xtrU equipment. 733-
1913, 3818 West Broadway, Vancourer.
B.C.
11 - For Sale — Private
VW BEETLE. Exc. body, 3,000 miles oo
new brakes, trans and reconditioned
'72 motor, converted to 12 volt, working beater, radio, good mow tires.
738-1939. *850.
'47 MUSTANG. 280, 3-speed, auto, runs
fine, no rust. SOTS.  23*-3406 Rob.
35-Lost
SONY Tape recorder needed for exams!
Please call 283-1185. Seward.
LEATHER Clutch Purse lost. Friday
November 10. Buchanan, third floor.
Please contact Laurie 28&5S33.
LOST: SR50 Calculator last Wednesday.
Reward. Paul 201-3268.
65 — Scandals (Continued)
D-DAY   has   come   and   gone.   Bad   a
delightful time. Where were you?
GET OUT OF TOWN
PASSPORTS
70 — Services
WE COPY IT
ALL FOR YOU
BOOKS-THESES-FLYERS
845 Burrard
682-2919
Rm. 100 A
SUB
REPRODUCTION CENTKE      224-1011
85 — Typing
TYPINO — 75c per page. Fast and •»
curate by experienced typist. Gordon,
50 — Rentals
AVAILABLE  IMMEDIATELY -
room. 8125/mth. Kitchen facilities.
Priority to 1st and 2nd yr. students.
XS (Kappa Sigma) Fraternty, 2280
Wesbrook. Ph. 2244879, ask tor Greg
or Mike.
65 — Scandals
STOLEN — Black briefcase from Chem
Lab. Please turn in Lab notebooks to
SUB lost and found.
. LETTER-WRITERS, Come and escpnas
yourselves. Amnesty TTBC letter
workshop, SUB Ziza, Tomorrow,
Wed., Nov. aa.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, resumes, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy, 324-9434.
PROFESSIONAL TYPINO — Correcting
IBM Selectric.  254-8365.
FAST,    efficient
rates. 268-5053.
typing.    Reasonable
FOR ACCURATE TYPING on an IBM
Selectric Correcting Typewriter, caJ3
988-2577 after 2:00 p.m. Rush work
accepted.
PROFESSIONAL Typing on IBM correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary. 224-1967.
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPOR1
PHOTOS
I I   ~~"  jicco ia/ -iru.i
ERAS LTD.
4558 W 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858 Tuesday, November 21, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Bureaucracy slows rape cases
From page 3
living alone, Or marital status
unclear cases turn up in higher
percentages in the unfounded
category.
The most credible rape victims in
terms of employment are students
or the gainfully employed. Being
very young but not at school or
work is a negative factor, according
to the police.
The greater the degree of
acquaintance between the victim
and the rapist, the higher the incidence of unfounded cases.
Alcohol use is not as significant a
variable in Vancouver as in
Toronto, but use by either the
victim or offender tends to lead to
an unfounded classification at
about twice the rate of founded
classification. A higher incidence of
drug use in Vancouver than
Toronto is evident from the data.
This filtering process is compounded by the rape victim herself.
Many women, aware of the
stereotypes surrounding rape, are
hesitant to report rapes. Non-white
women are discouraged, according
to the report, from reporting the
offence and taking it to trial.
A long length of time between the
actual rape and the first report to
the police casts doubts on the
credibility of the victim. Indeed,
Clark and Lewis found that some
judges would dismiss a preliminary
hearing on the grounds that a
woman did not report a rape to the
first responsible person she saw and
was therefore not a credible
complainant. Victims who do not
show extreme signs of distress at the
time of first report are seen as less
credible.
From this maze of variables, the
police weed out the "most likely to
succeed" cases and pass them on to
the Crown prosecutors. The woman
herself does not determine if the
case will go to trial, although an
obviously hostile witness will be less
credible.
After reporting to the police, the
woman who is strong enough to
endure the rigors of going to trial
may ask to press charges. A medical
examination then becomes
necessary.
Clark and Lewis discovered that
in many instances the victim had
not been briefed on the court
procedures and received little
support from the prosecutor. Thus,
the trial often became a horror
show.
In rape trials, they say, rules to
protect the victim's rights are
largely forgotten. An amendment
to de-emphasize the past sexual
history of the defendent has largely
been ignored by defence lawyers
and not enforced by judges.
Rape is the only crime where
consent plays such an important
role. A robbery victim, for instance, who had been in the habit of
2.904 W. •**•» Ave.    733-3713
'An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one o< the best mexican restaurants north ol California.' Thats what
it is all about!
OPEN TUES.-SUN.
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME!
LICENSED
AJyantna Jlours   -/,,-
Food Services
$<" Stop Cojfa&Oj,
•SUfi Snacj^tiar
"ion. to uiws
OJXn  wttC fy^
giving out large charitable
donations would not be told he had
asked to be robbed at gunpoint
because of his past history. The
presence of a threat, whether verbal
or physical, takes away the
charitable aspect. Not so in rape.
It is little wonder then that so few
women are willing to press charges.
Being buffeted through a cynical
and suspicious judicial system does
little to ease the hurt, anger and
humiliation the woman has already
suffered.
Instead the job of supporting
women through this traumatizing
period is left to groups such as
Vancouver's Rape Relief. For many
of the women who utilize Rape
Relief the service is often only a
voice on the end of a telephone but
it is a supportive voice.
"We encourage them to speak
out," says staffer Barbara Joyce.
See page 11: RAPE
HILLEL   HOUSE
B'NAI BRITH
FREE   LUNCH
Returns this Thursday—Nov. 23, 12:00
AT   HILLEL
THE DINER
Serving U.B.C. and Wast Point Grey
lor the last 20 years.
We put our Sole In your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals,
at Reasonable Prices.
WE ACCEPT CHARGEX
Open Mon. to Sat.
7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sun. t, Public Holidays
4556 W. 10th Ave.—224-1912
GET OUT OF TOWN
If that's the travel advice you've
been getting, now you can do better!
INTRODUCING
PASSPORTS
THE NEW QUARTERLY TRAVELLERS' JOURNAL
Share OnTheRoad adventures ot people with your style of travel.
PASSPORTS creates a forum for travel ideas; an exchange of experiences by those who have been there and a unique source ot
budget travel Information.
DKCCDnDTO.    A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE
rAoorUn I o.   for your next trip
ONE YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $8. MAIL CHEQUE OR M/O TO
PASSPORTS, BOX 48227, BENTALL CENTRE,
VANCOUVER, B.C. V7X 1N8
Employment
Personnel from the Ministry of Labour are on campus to accept
applications for summer employment with the Provincial Government
under the provincial YOUTH EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM.
Interested students should plan to attend on the following dates
between 8:30 and 4:30 p.m.
DATE
FACULTY
UBC
LOCATION: Room 214, Brock Hall
NOV.   20
NOV.    21
22
23
24
27
28
29
30
DEC.      1
Fine Arts and Library Sciences
Art History
Graphic Design
Applied Science
Community & Regional
Planning
Faculty of Arts
Architecture
Recreation
Commerce and Business
Economics
Faculty of Education
Forestry
Agriculture
Human and Social Therapy
Psychology
Social Work
Law
Dance
Engineering
History
Journalism
Commerce
Theatre
Computer Science
Communications
Public Administration
Sciences
Zoology
Ecology
Child Care
Counselling
Aquatics
Fisheries
Community
Development
Oceanography
Biology
Province of Ministry of
British Columbia Labour
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY PROGRAMS Pago 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21, 1978
Crosstown
rivalry
heats up
From page 6
But its final was a bright spot in
a dismal season for SFU.
Injuries, though, may hurt the
'Birds. They have played 12 games
this season and their team roster is
starting to reflect this. Mackay is
out for the season, defensive back
Dave Singh is very much a maybe
for the game and Al Chorney may
be confined to just punting instead
of his usual spot as a key man in the
defensive backfield.
Tickets for Saturday's contest are
available all this week from the
Alma Mater Society business office
in SUB 266. Originally sales were to
be cut off Monday but the response
was so strong, more than 2,000
seats having been sold from UBC
alone, that the deadline was extended. A pep rally will be held in the
Pit at 4 p.m. Saturday and buses
will be provided for transportation
to the game.
Moore Mug
gives very
fine drink
From page 7
penalty goal for UBC at the 31-
minute mark, and several minutes
later Ross Breen managed to jar the
ball free at midfield and chase it
toward the goal. However, after
finally kicking it into the end zone
he was beaten to the ball by an Old
Boy, saving a try. The 'Birds
eventually did get another try at the
42-minute mark when Rob Greig
scored on a five-metre run after
UBC won a scrum.
The Thunderbirds' next game is
against the Rowing Club at Brockton Oval at 2:30 p.m. Saturday.
The Rowers are the only team to
have beaten UBC this season.
The 'Birds play in the Vancouver
Rugby Union league, whose
schedule is divided into two rounds.
This year is the first time UBC will
play in both rounds, which will
make them eligible to win the
Tisdall Cup, presented to the first-
place finisher, and the Miller Cup,
given to the winner of the playoffs.
The VRU also operates a club
championship, which is decided
through a complicated formula
involving play in all four divisions
of play.
PUBLIC
228-6121
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
$V 1:00— 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN     .75
ADULTS $1-2S
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER „
SPORTS CENTRE |
NORRES
J1 MOVING AND u
IH TRANSFER LTD
I    SI
MOVING AND |=E=
STORAGE      ^
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 "W. 10th
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES,
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
^^^to^o^^a^e^^^r
The UBC Bookstore
BROCK BOOK EVENT
OUR BIG BARGAIN BOOK BONANZA
All kinds of books for all kinds of people — cookbooks, kids
books, art, hobbies, gift books — come and have a look!
BROCK HALL
Till Dec. 1st
Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m
ubc
bookstore
228-4741
YOUR ONE CHANCE FOR THE BARGAINS
ITS  12 MONTHS TO THE NEXT ONE!
"I used to think banks
robbed employees of their
individuality and gave it
back when they retired?
"When it came to picking a career,
banking was the last thing on my mind.
The reason was, I pictured myself
disappearing into the woodwork and
surfacing 40 years later with a gold
watch, a slap on the back and one of those
'good old boy' retirement parties.
"Brother, was I wrong.
"After graduating from UBC, I talked
with one of Toronto Dominion's
recruiters. He stressed the personality of
the bank and its people. Plus the fact
that I wouldn't get lost in the shuffle-and
I could make my own opportunities if
I worked hard at it.
"He talked a lot about TD's management opportunities, too. He explained
that they were into everything from
market research to international banking.
"I was impressed. And so I decided
to give TD a chance.
"I started in their BanklabTraining
Course and it gave me some important
insights into management. Then I did
some work as an Administration Officer
at two different branches. Now I'm a
Marketing Officer-agood job with a lot
of responsibility.
"Today, I'm pretty optimistic. The
future looks bright and prosperous. And
Bob Dean is getting ahead in the world."
The bank where people
make the difference
Look forTD recruiters on your campus soon. Tuesday, November 21, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Rape relief helps
From page 9
"We do not try to put words in
their mouth."
Supporting a rape victim can
mean a lot of things, according to
another staffer Lee Lakeman. It
can be giving concrete help on what
to say to the police, family and
friends. It can be accompanying the
woman to her medical examination.
It can be a reassuring voice at two
in the morning. It can be "sharing
the horror of non-solutions."
Joyce says it is good for a rape
victim to have a medical
examination in case she later
decides to press charges.
"Sometimes it takes a few days for
the anger to come out." And, if a
masculinity    with    stereotyped
passivity and acquiescence.
"Women have been taught to
accept the main responsibility to
create harmony in society," she
said. "Women often give over their
power in order to create harmony,
often false harmony and allow
themselves to be manipulated."
Precisely that passive image is
advocated in a film produced by
Fred Storaska called, "How to say
no to a rapist and survive" — that a
woman should act out a compromise with an offender and look
for a getaway chance later. Rape
Relief, with other women's groups,
has condemned the film as being
misleading.
woman does decide to go to court,
Rape Relief will brief the woman on
what to expect and will accompany
her to court.
Selkin cautions against playing
along with a rapist then making a
bolt for freedom, saying it is an
invitation for murder.
"If she should suddenly resist
him or try to hurt him, nothing but
his inadequate ego is available to
stop him from maiming or murdering her," Selkin says.
Joyce says women must learn to
be aware of potential danger
situations and support other
women collectively to rectify
potential situations.
She recounts a situation on a bus
where a man had his penis out. Her
first reaction, she says, was to
comment loudly on the situation
with the intent of embarrassing
him. Then she asked the bus driver
to remove the man from the bus.
"Bus drivers are usually excellent
in responding to you," she said.
"The key is to communicate clearly
and immediately your refusal to
accept this situation."
"For a rapist the idea is to
humiliate women, not be
humiliated themselves."
The fact that so many offenders
have difficulty reaching orgasm
proves that rape is not necessarily
the result of insatiable lust or
irresistible sexual impulses, according to Clark and Lewis. Joyce
agrees. Rape, she says, is acting out
the male myth to its extreme.
"It is the ideal act to affirm
masculinity."
Women, she says, must learn not
to   counteract   that   aggressive
"Storaska is known as a profiteer
and is not respected in any circle,"
Joyce said.
"The slogan 'rape is not a
compromise' has its uses," she
said. "Storaska's methods don't
support aggressive behavior and the
energy goes to the rapist."
Rape Relief supports self-defense
and assertiveness training for
women. Eighty per cent of rapists
can be repelled by an initial
aggressive act, Joyce says.
Rapists look for an available
victim, one that is alone and
vulnerable. They look for a secure
environment where they can
commit the offence without getting
caught. Dr. James Selkin, of the
Dever Centre for the study of
violence, says that rapists often test
their victims before actually raping
them. They make suggestive or
insinuating remarks, caress or grab
the victim, or gauge her reactions
by first robbing her.
"The testing phase is crucial for
therapist," he says. "If he guesses
wrong about whether a woman can
be intimidated, he will lose the
opportunity to rape her."
Thus a clear, assertive refusal to
co-operate is the best way to repel a
would-be rapist.
STARTS THURS.
k$v
GO^I
! Thurs 7:00
Fri, Sat, Sun
$1.00
7:00 & 9:30 SUB theatre |
Note extra show Sun. at 9:30!
AMS card must be shown.
® CUSO
INFORMATION
NIGHT
ON EDUCATION
Lower Lounge, International House, UBC
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd, 1978 — 7:30 p.m.
LINDA LEHR and BILL RAIKES will show slides on
teaching in Botswana and Sierra Leone. Job Flyers and
other recruitment information will be available.
EVERYONE WELCOME
m
24 HR. SHOWTIME INFORMATION - 681-4255
1
WARNING: May J.B.R. tolki
frighten some
children — B.C. Dir.   ^f-UfOL
.VANCOUVER CENTRE-
\NVILLE4 GEORGIA 6694442
alkien's                            -m^m* \
 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 W^ \
7:30, 9:30
MATS. SAT. SUN. 2:00
— DENMAN PLACE —_.
1737 COMOX 683 4647
InThe Big City
WARNING: Occasional Suggestive Scenes
& Dialogue — B.C. Director
— CAPITOL 6.
820 GRANVILLE MALL
3:00, 5:15, 7:30, 9:50
A WEDDING |
WARNING: Some gory scenes.
/ II i.i j, ■» —B.C. Director
— CAPITOL 6_
820 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
2:45, 4:55, 7:05, 9:20
THE BOYS
FROM BRAZIL
if they survive...will we?
* CAPITOL 6.
820 GRANVILLE MALL
msam
LOUGHEED MALL
SSEHl
HEAVEN CAN WAIT
CAP — 2:00. 4:00. 6:00. 8.00. 10:00
LOUGHEED MALL — 7:20. 9:15 — Mats Sal. Sun 2:15
2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:40
 CAPITOL 6_
820 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
IflQATnflCflRbTIE'M
DEflTrmiLE
I
— CAPITOL 6 —
820 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
LUNG
    AT CHEF
OF EUROPE?
WARNING: Some coarse language. JWCK fflCHOLSOTI    IM
.^—CAPITOL 6.
820 GRANVILLE MALL
1:^0, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30
^seee
PARK ROYAL
— COLUMBIA	
NEW WESTMINSTER 521 0830
-RICHMOND SQUARE.
NUMBER THREE ROAD 273 4474
PARK ROYAL-7:30  9:30
MATS  SAT  only 2:00
COLUMBIA-7:30. 9:30
MATS. SAT   SUN   2:00
RICHMOND—7:00. 9:00
MATS. SAT  SUN   2:00
DONNY OSMOND  MARIE OSMOND
-VANCOUVER CENTRE.
GRANVILLE&GEORGIA 6694
 GUILDFORD
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE
VAN CENTRE
1:25,3:30, 5:35, 7:45,9:55
GUILDFORD 7:00, 9:10
Mat. Sat. only 2:00
WARNING: Some gory violence, coarse
language throughout. —BC DIRECTOR
GRANVILLE at rah
STANLEY
 GUILDFORD	
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE 5811716
STANLEY 7:30. 9:30
Mats   Sal. Sun. 2:00
GUILDFORD 7:30. 9:30
Mat   Sal. only 2:00
MAGIC
_ DOWNTOWN _
965 GRANVILLE 685 6725
 PARAMOUNT	
NEW WESTMINSTER 522 4958
— DELTA DR-IN,
1'2mi.Wof KNIGHT ST. BR.
DOWNTOWN: 1:30. 3:25.
5:25, 7:25. 9:25
PARAMOUNT: 7:00. 9:00
Mats  Sat   Sun   2:00
DELTA DR. IN
Gates 730 — Show 8.00
DELTA OPEN
FRIDAY, SATURDAY,      Added Feature at the Drive-In
SUNDAY ONLY "CONVOY"
THFftAY
DENMAN ot BARCLAY 6859822
COLUMBIA
BAY—Hot Wax 7:30
Grease 9:15
COLUMBIA 7:00 9:00
MATS. SAT. SUN. 2:00
Added Feature at the Bay
"AMERICAN HOT WAX"
Evenings 7:30, 9:30
Sat. 1:30. 3:30. 5:30. 7:30  9:30
Sun   from 3:30
WARNING: Altered version.
— B.C. DIRECTOR
 FINE ARTS,
1117 WEST GEORGIA
f00ii/mmiiimT^
rlr^""*1 ^T
 PARK ROYAL	
WEST VANCOUVER 9229174
LOUGHEED MALL
PARK ROYAL 7:00. 9:00-MATS. SAT. SUN   2:00
LOUGHEED MALL 7:45. 9:40—MATS. SAT. SUN. 2:00
REVENGE OF THE PINK PANTHER
WARNING: Some violence—B.C. Dir.
msm
LOUGHEED MALL
"Comes a floiseinaii"
7:00, 9:05-MAT. SAT. ONLY 2:00
WARNING: Occasional coarse language — B.C. DIRECTOR
RICHMOND 7:30, 9:30
*-RICHMOND SQUARE-
INUMBER THREE ROAD 2714474
LOUGHEED DR-IN
/AYE of BOUNDRY
SEE
MAT. SAT. only 2.00
LOUGHEED DR. IN
Gates 7:00 — Show 7:30
Added Feature at the Drive-ln
'CAPRICORN ONE" Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21, 1978
Costello caught in new wave neurosis
By BILL TIELEMAN
"Everything they say and do is getting on
my nerves!"
It shows. Elvis Costello's performance Friday night was positively psychotic, as he lurched his way through an intense set before
about 5,500 mesmerized fans at the Coliseum.
Costello's music has been aptly compared
to Woody Allen's movies and one can easily
see the neurotic, not to mention physical,
similarities      between      the      two.
Costello started the show with cold,
removed versions of Mystery Dance and Red
Shoes before warming to the audience.
After fulfilling an apparent obligation to
play a few songs off the My Aim Is True
album, Costello and his band, The Attractions,  went into overdrive,  smashing out
'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyii
Elvis stalked the stage
like a marionette in need
of lithium threatments.
Pump It Up, Lipstick Vogue, This Year's
Girl, Radio Radio and The Beat, all from This
Year's Model.
The Attractions tend to be overshadowed
by the crazed antics of Elvis but have to be
one of the tightest bands around. While most
rock drummers surround themselves with a
percussion version of the Great Wall of
China, Pete Thomas is content with the
sparsest of kits.
—peter menyasz photos
PAGE TUESDAY
psychotic musical rage at his imaginary victim.
But the other highpoint of the short, hour-
long show, was his rendition of Allison, a
tearjerker from the first album. Simply introducing it as a "true story," Costello had
the outlandishly punk/new wave dressed audience silent and spellbound as he sang, "I
hear you let that little friend of mine take off
your party dress." As always, Costello is the
victim of his lovers.
Another victim of the concert was the
crowd, who were assaulted with the amazingly bad Battered Wives. Even by punk standards the band was poor. The genuine punk
supporters showered the Wives with garbage
and drinks as they flailed their way through
songs   like   Lover's   Balls.   The   Uganda
The incessant beat, with
some excellent snare drum
work, propelled the songs.
Illllllllllllllllllll
Stomp (Bomp Idi Bomp) was a rare exception to their droning repertoire.
The Wives, who have been busier making
hype for themselves than music, were attacked in a pamphlet distributed by the Vancouver Status of Women. While the issue of
wife-battering is a serious one the pamphlet,
headlined "Would a band called the Jew-
Killers be a gas?", failed to put forward a
logical argument, opting for sensationalism.
YOUNG . . . organist fills gaps
And it's all he needs. The incessant beat,
with some excellent snare drum work propelled the songs throughout the concert,
especially at times when Costello left his
Fender Jazzmaster hanging around his neck
like a dead albatross.
Organist Steve Young is also an integral
part of the Costello "neurocktic" sound.
Where Costello's guitar dominated My Aim
is True, the organ fills in the spaces between
Bruce Thomas' ; bass lines, the heavy beat
and Costello's voice and guitar.
Young's wild bouncing and dancing (he
never sat down to play) was a complete contrast to Costello's automaton motions.
Resplendent in red shoes (what else?) and a
red   suit,   Elvis   stalked   the   stage   like   a
marionette in need of lithium treatments, his
legs glued at the knees and his head tilted to
one side while slashing wireless guitar
through the air like a butcher knife.
While the lyrics and music were impeccably
performed, it was Costello's actions that
made the concert extraordinary. As he
wound up the show with an incredible version of I'm Not Angry the psychotic glint in
his eyes and tremor in his voice both terrified
and excited the crowd.
Rather than angrily shout out the lyrics as
he does on the record, Costello bent his head
to one side, fondled the mike stand as if it
were a slender white neck and whispered,
"I'm not angry. No I'm not. I'm not. I'm
not   angry,"    before   launching   into   a
BATTERED WIFE . . divorced from music

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126084/manifest

Comment

Related Items