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The Ubyssey Sep 19, 1972

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Array Parking at Gage towers dangerous
An evening's parking at the
Walter Gage Towers will cost
you $12.
All unauthorized cars found
there will be towed away by
Buster's Towing Service.
Ian Ronalds, architecture 1,
had the misfortune to learn this
information when he visited a
friend Friday evening.
Ronalds said he parked his
car on the outdoor lot of the
Towers.
When he returned, Buster's
towing had taken his car fo
their shop on Keefer Street. It
cost him $12 to get his car back.
Ronald said he did not see
any indication that he was
parking his car illegally. The
warning sign that Buster's
towing has posted is to the
right of the driveway away
from headlamps and is difficult to see at night.
Further, Ronalds said, there
is no sign there at all at the
lower entrance to the lot where
he entered.
A residence clerk at the
Gage Towers said he sympathized with people who must
pay for their cars impounding.
"We are trying as
desperately as we can to accommodate the people," he
said. "We try to give
everybody a fair shake."
There are many things still
left to be ironed out, he added,
and putting up more parking
warnings is one of them.
A spokesman for the
University Traffic Control said
they are not responsible.
The spokesman, who
refused to be identified, said
that the patrol will issue tickets
for traffic obstruction, but will
not tow a vehicle away.
Director of residence Les
Rohringer said Buster's have
been contracted to ensure that
the numbered lots are kept
open for the residents.
UBC enrolment down
we UBYSSEY
Vol. LIV, No. 3        VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 19, 1972
228-2301
As enrolment at UBC
dropped by 400, Simon Fraser
University reported an increase of 400 in fall
registration.
Friday's total shows.: 18,907
UBC students have registered.
By the end of the month 400 to
500 graduate students will have
enrolled bringing the total
down to about 19,400 from last
year's 19,826.
At SFU enrolment reached
5,491. Undergraduate
enrolment was reported at
4,725 and graduate enrolment
at 766.
UBC information officer
Jim Banham said Friday
enrolment was following the
same trend as last year with
the arts and education
faculties reporting decreases.
THIS   UNOFFICIAL   looking   sign   in   the   Walter   Gage   Towers   parking  lot   is the
administration's response to student protest about impoundment of its visitors' car.  The
—dirk visser photo
sign, photographed Monday, is meant to supplement the towing company's small, obscure
parking signs. A bulldozer has since pushed the sign further back into the parking lot.
Everything has its price
AN EDITORIAL
Our problems with the Alma
Mater Society are continuing.
The latest problem centres
around what is on four pages of this
newspaper.
The Alma Mater Society
executive, more specifically AMS
treasurer David Dick, forced The
Ubyssey to print the AMS budget
on these four pages.
The Ubyssey was forced to give
him four pages for free. For
nothing. Gratis.
The Ubyssey is not a charity,
contrary to what Dick seems to
think. We have a budget to meet as
does every other group on this
campus.
Revenue from advertising forms
an integral part of our budget. And
the   costs   incurred   in   giving   the
AMS what is in effect a free ad are
being paid by The Ubyssey.
We cannot accept this. The
budget of the newspaper is already
at rock-bottom. We simply cannot
afford to give the AMS four pages
of free space.
Dick seems to think that he can
have four free pages because the
constitution says The Ubyssey is
required to print the budget. But
this is all it says. Period. Nowhere
does it state how much space is to
be devoted to the budget.
Theoretically we could
micro-dot the damned thing and
use it for a period in the want-ads.
This move by Dick contradicts a
motion passed by a large majority
of students at the AMS general
meeting in 19§9. The motion was
in support of The Ubyssey's
position that no free ads were to be
inserted in the newspaper without
the editor's permission.
There is also the matter of the
contract between the Alma Mater
Society and College Printers, the
company which prints The
Ubyssey.
The contract states quite plainly
that the editors of The Ubyssey
shall have the final say over the
news and editorial content of the
newspaper. If the budget is not an
advertisement, then surely it must
fall under the category of news and
editorial content.
Yet Dick saw fit to tell the
owner of College Printers to ignore
this section of the contract.
Dick is the official publisher of
The Ubyssey, so our printer was
forced to bow to Dick's demanda
The Ubyssey's policy concerning
the budget has been that we will
grant the AMS maximum of one
free page to print the budget. In the
past, if the AMS executive felt
more space was necessary, they
have paid for it.
A motion was passed at AMS
council last week instructing Dick
to follow the practice of previous
years concerning the printing of the
budget.
Dick also saw fit to ignore this
directive.
The matter will be brought up
Wednesday at the AMS council
meeting. We hope Dick will be
there.
And we hope council will have
the courage to demand some good
explanations from this little man
who has suddenly found himself in
a position of power. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 19, 1972
Burau to leave UBC
Experimental College head
Karl Burau is leaving UBC in
January for teaching position
in Germany.
"There is almost no hope for
anything (a position or
reforms) in Canada. In Germany the situation is quite
different," Burau said Sunday.
Burau, 61, came to Canada in
1954 after getting an
amalgamated doctorate in
history, literature and
philosophy. His education had
earlier been interrupted by the
Gestapo and a nine-year term
in concentration camps.
"I came to Canada with
great hopes and great
illlusions," Burau said.
No phone policy
Bv DAVE MILLS
BC Tel and the housing administration can't agree on
phone policy for the new Walter Gage towers, and resident
students are suffering as a result.
At present, to obtain a phone in the Wally Gage residence
each student must appeal to BC Tel individually and thus be
subjected to the $6.50 per month charge plus $10.00 per year
installation costs.
Financially this is out of the question for the majority of
students so BC Tel was asked about installing one phone per
quadrant of six people. The students were told that proposal;
was not possible.
Looking for alternatives the students asked BC Tel to install
a pay phone in each quadrant. BC Tel apparently would love to
do this but according to them the housing administration objected.
The housing administration _says BC Tel was not telling
the whole truth. They would like to get the pay phones as an
alternative but BC Tel cannot install one phone per quadrant or
even one per floor but maybe one every four floors which is
approximately one phone for every 96 people.
So at the moment the only choice resident students have is
to hand out the cash for private lines.
Burau's first major
disillusionment came when he
was dismissed unfairly from a
teaching position in Vanderhoof, and found he could not
sue the superintendent of
schools because B.C. law
allows the crown the right to
decide when it can be sued.
His primary aim since has
been university reform and for
the past 11 years Burau says he
has been living on $60 to $70 a
month (from his own savings).
He has arranged discussions,
lately through the Experimental College.
"In Germany the students
have a real say," Burau said.
"Here when faculty appoint
new members they choose
persons like themselves. Over
the years they tend to become
blind to new necessities — this
is great in arts which depends
so much on interpretation —
not so much in sciences where
experiments play a part," he
said.
Burau is against university
fees for students.
The effect of fees, Burau
said, is to discriminate against
the poor.
Dr. Sidney B. Smordin
and Dr. Susan K. C. Chow
annouce the relocation to new offices
for the practice of Dentistry
at 4433 West 10th Avenue
Vancouver 8, B. C.
Effective approximately October 10th, 1972
Two Blocks
Telephone remains East of present
224-3205 Location
WHITE TOWER        __,
8 SPAGHETTI HOUSE tTD.
fSteaks-Pizza-Spaghetti-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatorti-Chicken Cacciatorel
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11 a.m. -4 a.m.
Sun.
11 a.m. -1 a.m.
TAKE OUT ORDERS
HOME DELIVERY    /OO-TOxU
DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618 W. Broadway <
(at Dunbar)
738-1113
T POINT
y   shop
3-Speed - $69.00
Free Light Set
With English 10-Speed
3771 W. 10 Ave.
SEE US
Before you empty your wallet!
WE HAVE REALISTIC PRICES
COMPREHENSIVE STOCK -
SATISFYING SERVICE
ASK OUR CUSTOMERS
STUDENT DISCO UNT
Theft Insurance — Cables — Locks Etc.
224-3336
ROYAL BANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Dave Stewart, Manager
Terry Cotton, Loans
10th at Sasamat — 224-4348
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
The University of
British Columbia
... is a center for international
activities that promote
understanding and goodwill among
students from all countries
attending UBC. Overseas and
Canadian students, faculty and
community are invited to join in
developing more friendly
international relations and world
peace.
Our ANNUAL DINNER AND DANCE will be held
on Saturday September 23rd from 6:30 p.m. - 1
a.m. Dance to "Serenaders Steelband". Students
$2.25 - Faculty & Community $3.25. Dance only
$1.50.
TICKETS IN ADVANCE ONLY AT I.H. - 228-3264
^^^^C~^^^^^i~f"^^!i^?~^^t~^i^ Tuesday, September 19, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
NDP means reform
UBC political science prof Phil
Resnick argues that the
demise of Social Credit here,
like that of the Duplessis
regime in Quebec, means
reform not ideological change.
Reprinted from Le Devoir, Sept. 11
I he B.C. election of Aug. 30 that swept the NDP
into power recalls in certain respects the June, 1960
election in Quebec that ended the reign of the Union
Nationale. In B.C., as in Quebec, it is an ancient
regime has finally crumbled, and with it, a style of
authoritarian politics worthy of the dark ages.
To be sure, the analogies between Quebec under
Duplessis and B.C. under Bennett are not total, and
there are differences between the NDP under
Barrett and the Lesage Liberals. Yet it might be well
to dwell on some of the parallels while considering
where B.C. is likely to go under its new NDP
government.
W. A. C. Bennett's Social Credit Party came to
power in 1952, following the disintegration of the old
Liberal-Conservative government. Though the CCF
had a greater percentage of the vote in the 1952
election, it was Bennett, a renegade Conservative,
who emerged with a one-seat plurality over the CCF.
The twenty years of Social Credit rule witnessed a
transfer of political power from the old traditional
elites of the province, centred in Vancouver and
Victoria. Bennett and the men he surrounded himself
with, Sommers, Gagliardi, etc., were for the most
part the products of the B.C. interior, and spoke for
the interests of a petite bourgeoisie of small town
businessmen and contractors. Ideologically, Bennett
and his entourage could appeal strongly to religious
fundamentalism and to a petty bourgeois fear of
socialism, themes that were to figure prominently in
the seven successive elections Bennett won.
I he greatest beneficiary ot Social Credit rule,
however, was a quite different class, the resource
entrepreneurs, who for 20 years enjoyed
unhindered access to B.C. resources. To be sure,
previous provincial regimes had also fostered
resource exploitation, but the Bennett years were to
see the influx of a whole series of foreign capitalists,
principally American and Japanese, and the consolidation of such local giants as MacMillan Bloedel.
Throughout the Bennett years, B.C. resources
commanded a high price on the world market, a
function of the tremendous resource needs of
American, West European and Japanese capitalism
from the period of the Korean War onwards.
Resource giveaways became government property,
climaxed perhaps by the Columbia River Treaty of
the early 1960s, and backed up by the billions of
dollars the provincial government poured into The
Pacific Great Eastern Railway (now the B.C.
Railway), B.C. Hydro, and highway and port
developments, to open the province up for resource
exploitation.
The consequences of this policy, naturally
enough, were a tremendous underdeveloped
secondary sector, a rate of regional unemployment
consistently above the Canadian average, and the
alienation of vital B.C. resources. Gangster
capitalism is the term I would use to describe the
period, and it characterized Bennett's approach to
power no less than the policies of the large
capitalists.
increased its percentage of the overall vote from 33
per cent to 40 per cent on a very high turnout. It is
these new, largely urban, social forces, centred in
greater Vancouver, but with strong support through
much of the province that are now in political
command.
B.C. workers . . . march
formation on the operation of government departments. The analogies to Duplesses are clear enough.
At the same time, in his labor legislation, Bills 3, 33,
and 42, he proved the most vicious opponent of
organized labor since the Quebec petty dictator. Also
true to form, Bennett surrounded himself with
mediocrities, identifying both regime and party with
his one-man rule. Fittingly, the defeat of Bennett at
the same time heralds the collapse of the Social
Credit Party which he built up.
the mood in B.C. today is a little like that in
Quebec in 1960. Everything suddenly appears
possible. Firstly, there is a government no longer
committed to blind resource giveaways, but pledged
to controlling and taxing the large multinational
corporations, while laying the foundation for a more
balanced provincial economy, with important
secondary industry. Such at least are the promises.
Secondly, there is the prospect of reallocating
government priorities from roads and "development" to health and education, environmental
control, and urban planning. Thirdly, there is the
hope that political and intellectual consciousness
may at last come alive in this province, and that the
whole tone of public life and discussion will acquire
seriousness and urgency. Finally, B.C. has now
ceased to be the laughing stock of Confederation, and
promises to play a role, in conjunction with the other
Western provinces, as an effective counter-weight to
Ontario. As a corollary, this may give Quebec more
breathing room with which to prepare its own form
of self-determination. In a number of ways, then,
B.C. would appear headed for its own Quiet
Revolution.
B
Bennett's contempt for the parliamentary
process was complete, and the B.C. legislature met
for no more than a few weeks of the year. Bennett
dominated its proceedings, bullied the opposition,
and refused any and all requests for detailed in-
Ihe gangster capitalists have by no means all
been in government. More characteristically, they
have been firms like Westcoast Transmission,
controlled by powerful U.S. oil interests, which in a
little over 20 years had become a major exporter of
Alberta and B.C. natural gas to the U.S., with global
assets approaching $500 million. In 1958, a study for
the Borden Royal Commission had already found
that "the operating profits of Westcoast were coming
solely from the Canadian consumer and no profit was
being made by Westcoast in carrying out the terms
of its contracts with (the U.S. company) Pacific
Northwest." In 1967, the National Energy Board
chided Westcoast."for failing to make as long-term a
commitment to its Canadian customers as it is
prepared to make to El Paso Natural Gas Company
(U.S.)." It was resource capitalists like Frank
MacMahon, long-time President of Westcoast, who
were the principal backers of Bennett's government.
There are limits to everything, however, as this
election has shown. Even as the last years of the
Duplessis regime were marked by growing opposition from the trade unions, the intellectuals and
the new urban French Canadian middle class, the
last few years had seen growing opposition to the
Bennett government. The trade unions had been
consistent opponents throughout, but they were
joined in growing numbers by teachers,
professionals, urban white collar workers, and
broadly speaking, the young. Though some of the
opposition to Bennett was siphoned off into the
revival of the provincial Conservative Party, a
major part of it went directly to the NDP, which
F\ number of serious caveats, however, are in
order. Just as Quebec's Quiet Revolution was not
really a revolution but an aggiornamento, so an NDP
government in B.C. is more a bringing up to date
than a revolution. The NDP is far from being a
socialist, as opposed to a social democratic, party,
and is certainly not committed to any radical cnange
in the structure of private ownership of the means of
production or in the pattern of multinational
domination in B.C. Even the nationalization of
American-controlled B.C. telephone is uncertain.
The B.C. NDP ran its campaign on a very moderate
platform, backing away from anything that
suggested radical measures. Barrett, on election
night, spoke of prudent government. Whatever
change comes in B.C. will be cautious in character.
Moreover, the NDP in B.C., like the Quebec
Liberal Party in the early 1960s or the Parti
Quebecois today, is overwhelmingly a part of the
new professional and white collar strata, not of the
working class itself. Most of its leaders are social
workers, lawyers, and professionals, and though it
has a strong trade union base, it is the former who
control it. Though some of these new middle class
strata are radical, on the whole their consciousness
is not particularly revolutionary or socialist, but
reformist. Interestingly, the Waffle, for all its
limitations in Ontario or Saskatchewan, never even
got off the ground in B.C. The left within the B.C.
NDP has been disparate and disorganized, with old
CCFers often the strongest socialists.
W
What the NDP government stands for, therefore,
are such things as better schools and hospitals, more
effective pollution and other controls over large
corporations, some lightening of the tax load on the
middle income tax payers, a more honest, modern,
reform-oriented government. Allowed to develop
unopposed from the left, such a concept of government rapidly becomes technocratic and anti-
participatory, as happened in the middle years of the
Lesage regime, or as the Schreyer government has
largely become. The need for extra-parliamentary
opposition, both within and outside the NDP, grows
with the coming to power of an NDP government.
To conclude, the Aug. 30 election promises some
good for B.C., and some much needed changes in
political, economic and social policies! It is a breath
of fresh air after 20 years of authoritarian rule, and
after a 100 years of direct company rule. Those,
however, expecting any major transformation in the
political economy of the province away from
capitalist domination had better think twice. Social
democracy is not so much the New Jerusalem, as the
Old Jerusalem, papered over. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 19, 1972
Wanna take a dive?
So we're going to be asked on
Oct. 6 to cough up another $5 in
student fees to pay for a covered
pool.
While we're in agreement with the
worthiness of this project, there are a
few things we should mention about
student subsidization of university
buildings.
Student bucks for buildings has
been one of the longest lasting
traditions of our campus. The first
gym, Brock hall, a Second World War
armory, War Memorial gym,
Sherwood Lett House, the Winter
Sports Centre and that white
elephant SUB were all built through
student action and money.
In fact, UBC is one of the few
universities in Canada that depends
on student money for recreational or
student facilities.
Why, you ask, does this situation
exist? Well, for a couple of reasons.
Firstly, the basic class
composition of the student body is
middle or upper class, which means
most students are able to pay extra
amounts in student fees for these
luxuries without any trouble. If this
campus were composed largely of
working class or lower middle class
kids extra money for recreational
buildings would be a little harder to
come by.
Secondly, the provincial
government has never been overly
generous in providing funds for new
buildings on campus. Consequently,
the senate decided about five years
ago that recreational facilities were
not priorities.
So once again the onus falls on
the shoulders of the student body to
provide the initial energy and money
for a much needed recreational
facility.
We would't mind that so much if
the idea wasn't being rammed down
our throats with a slick ad campaign
that stinks of Madison Avenue and
evades some important facts.
The question of the feasibility of
covering Empire pool versus building
a new pool has not been presented
adequately.
As pointed out at Wednesday's
student council meeting the fact that
it costs only $700,000 more to build
a brand new pool than it does to
cover Empire is not a justification
for spending that extra amount.
We would like to know why it
isn't feasible to just cover Empire
pool.
We also would trust the ad-hoc
committee for a covered pool a little
more if they would fully explain the
amount of interest incurred by the
proposed $925,000 loan students are
being asked to support.
Indications are that the interest
will push the loan up to a total of
$T9 million. This is why we will be
paying an extra $5 in fees for 22
years.
People tell us that student
subsidization is a good thing because
it guarantees student parity on
management    committees.    At   this
time the only place we have parity is
on the Winter Sports Centre
management committee.
We have always maintained that
student parity on university
committees, be they athletic or
academic, is legitimate and should
not be based on monetary
contributions.
Most importantly we must not let
the pool referendum act as a
diversion from real and important
issues on campus.
Because the pool referendum is
the only referendum we are faced
with it becomes a priority. However,
this  does   not   necessarily   mean   a
covered pool should be a top priority
on campus.
It means the AMS executive did
not do its job during the summer.
They have not, to our knowledge,
tackled any other important campus
issue such as an alternate food store
and service for Wally Gage towers
students, student representation on
the board of governors, more
representation on senate,
decentralization of AMS business
offices, or greater representation and
say on departmental committees.
The point is we cannot allow the
AMS executive to sit back and rest
with the impression that a covered
pool is the only issue facing students.
J.O.
Rag theft
It's too bad 3,000 of you weren't
given a chance to read last Tuesday's
Ubyssey.
But, you see, the Alma Mater
Society executive wanted to check
our distribution system.
They thought putting 3,000
copies of the paper in their offices
would make it easier for you to find
the rag.
Now we don't really understand
the logic of this move.
We suspect that they're in such a
tenuous position regarding the
proposed cutback in The Ubyssey
budget that they have to stoop to
nefarious means of control like
stealing the paper.
We will persevere, however, and
continue to publish twice a week,
Tuesday and Friday, until the AMS
budget is passed.
And in case you have trouble
finding the paper in the future here
is a list of our main dropoff points:
SUB, Buchanan, Ponderosa caf, old
auditorium caf, civil engineering
building, electrical engineering
building, bookstore, MacMillan
building, Wesbrook, War Memorial
gym, education building, Angus,
chemistry building, biological
sciences building, law school, social
work building, Woodward library,
Wally Gage towers, Place Vanier and
Totem Park. j q
Letters
Support
I am a recent arrival from
the Keystone province —
Manitoba. When I left the land
of 100,000 lakes and headed
toward B.C., I was looking
forward to mountains (found
plenty of those); rain (a
Christmas present I hear);
Western hospitality (nice of
you to change the government
to make me feel at home) and
The Ubyssey (two editions
already and a drunken orgy to
boot!). So far, so good. But how
long will it last?
The Ubyssey has a
reputation on campuses in
Manitoba as a university
newspaper of some considerable stature. Therefore, I
looked forward to the first
edition    with    considerable
anticipation. When I read it, I
was appalled. The problem
was not the format or even the
general content, but the fact
that the "dormant paper",
rather than rising "phoenixlike from the ashes of the past"
was about to be strangled by
umbilical strings attached to
the proverbial purse.
'The editors and staff of a
university newspaper have a
unique role to play. They are
leaders of opinion in a community of leaders, and as such
must certainly expect to bear
the burden of accountability;
that is, they must be answerable to the public whom
they serve. Moreover, because of the high visibility of
the forum in which they
operate, they must expect to be
the    objects    of    continual
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 19, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-ed itors:
John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
"What does one write a masthead about?" inquired archy of the
enthralled masses, particularly Berton Woodward, sage supreme? Mike,
Sasges supreme, replied that we hadn't done one on a winery lately. Nor on
a convent said John Andersen. How about one where we're all hanging
from a Joshua tree said Jan O'Brien? Or an ice plant said Lesley Krueger,
slashing with the with that's made people like Sandi Shreve and Kini
McDonald, drive Steve Morris up Dirk Visser's wall. I bet said Dave Mills,
tlfat no one's ever done a masthead about the can in Forrest Nelson's
house. I know a nice can in a forest outside Nelson said Vince Bubich.
Then Larry Manuluk, Garry Coull, and a cast of thousands summed up by
asking if the masthead could be situated in the Wally Gage tower. How
about a newspaper office said Vaughn Palmer? How vulgar said David
Schmidt.
criticism and attack. However,
almost by definition, they must
also expect that they will be
accorded a degree of freedom
commensurate with the
responsibilities that they bear.
The crudest form of censorship is that which is exerted
through economic sanctions. It
is simple and inevitably effective — no rubles, no rag.
However, such a patently
obvious ploy on the part of
people who themselves are
elected leaders of opinion, and
as such answerable for their
moves, must be recognized for
what it is, and met with the
vigorous resistance it deserves. Therefore, I call upon all
thinking students to put
pressure on their reps to see
that The Ubyssey receives a
reasonable allocation at
tommorow's budget meeting.
If the publications that result
don't seem to warrant the
support that we obtain, we can
throw the blighters out. But
let's at least make sure that
they have a reasonable opportunity to demonstrate their
worth.
Editors, you have a considerable challenge. The
Ubyssey represents a tradition
that I look to you to maintain.
We'll do what we can to
provide you with the resources
that you need. As for what
comes after — Tuum Est.
ROBERT COBERT
Adult Education
Silly
___-/
To say that the two editorials
which appeared in last
Tuesday's Ubyssey were the
silliest I have ever read would
perhaps to too strong, but
undoubtedly they would rank
high on the list.
In the first of flacks and
flunkies, you decry the fact
that people other than students
have brought out informative
and (notably in the case of
Lifesaver '72) very well
presented publications.
As a newcomer to the
campus on a full-time basis, I
was gratified that someone,
regardless of the side of the
academic fence he occupies,
had taken the trouble to
provide what I considered
essential information, and to
do so in a readable and unbiased style.
(On the question of bias, if I
may digress, the booklet
known as the Arts Anti-
Calendar is in my opinion not
only a biased, but also an
uninformative and almost
useless, piece of work.)
If you felt so strongly that a
student-produced guide was
needed, surely the old principle
of "where there's a will,
there's a way" could have
prevailed. The mimeograph
lives!
Your second editorial The
money hassle: how we see it
has at least the virtue of being
shorter, but its tone of "little us
against the big AMS establishment" is a good deal more
pronounced.
Frankly, I don't understand
why it is vital to the students of
this university that The
Ubyssey should publish three
times a week.
As one who gave up being a
regular subscriber to the
Vancouver dailies nearly a
year ago, for mainly ecological
reasons, I believe the fewer
acres of trees we destroy to
make tons of newsprint, the
better off the whole world
would be.
Perhaps if you were com
pelled to ration your output to
one issue a week, that issue
would be more worthy of our
notice and less likely to be
consigned to the nearest
wastebasket or have to be
discarded by an overworked
member of the kitchen staff.
(As an example, the West
Ender, which serves an area
with roughly one and a half
times the population of the
university, was publishing only
once every two weeks when I
lived in the West End a year
ago, and it was being run as a
commercial venture.)
I have tried to keep my
remarks brief and pertinent
and I hope I have been successful. May they be worthy of
consideration and/or
publication.
Sincerely yours
BARBARA ANNE EDDY
Arts 3
Firstly, you can't read trees.
Secondly, our concerns are
communication and providing
a service to students. This can
best be done through two or
three issues a week.
J.O.
Help
While reading The Ubyssey
it has come to our attention
that the paper sorely needs a
cartoonist.
We are hoping this letter will
bring latent or otherwise
cartoonists out of the woodwork and into The Ubyssey
office, top floor of the northeast
corner of SUB.
JAN O'BRIEN
JOHN ANDERSEN A.M.S. BUDGE!
The Budget this year is a reflection of the continued shortage of money
available to both the university and the Alma Mater Society. The continued drop in
enrolment is of serious consequence and must cause us all to re-examine priorities
and programs at all levels in the university community.
The Budget appears in a different format this year. There are many reasons
for this but most important is to ensure that all students have available a complete
picture of our financial situation. Some parts, such as the building operation, have
never before gone to Council for approval.
At first glance, the whole thing must appear somewhat convoluted. However,
if one follows it through, it should present a more detailed and complete picture
than we have had in some time.
The Budget is, of course, political. The allocation of available resources is,
perhaps, the most political decision that an organization can make. As such, it
reflects the priorities which the Executive feels are the right ones for this year.
Undoubtedly, there will be those who disagree. If anyone wishes to make
representations to the Budget Committee, they should call 228-3971 to set up a
time.
DAVID S. DICK, Treasurer.
GENERAL SUMMARY - ESTIMATES 1972-73
Department
President
Vice-President
Treasurer
Co-ordinator
External Affairs
Internal Affairs
Secretary
Ombudsperson
Title
Undergrad Societies	
Student Council	
Crane Library   	
Constitution Revisions	
Men's Intramurals	
Women's Intramurals	
Indoor Pool	
Administration   	
Clubs	
Conferences .-.	
Debt   	
Transfer Payments	
University Clubs Committee
Student Union Building
Activities	
Government Relations	
Inter-Campus Committee . . .
Community Visitations
Local Initiatives	
Social Services	
Publications	
Ubyssey	
Education   	
Elections	
Administration   	
TOTAL ESTIMATES   	
Revenues
Discretionary Fee  	
S.U.B. Fee	
Interest Income	
Miscellaneous	
Margin	
TOTAL BUDGET	
Vote
Expense
Revenue
1
24,111.60
(S)
2,600.00
20
27,150.00
30
1.00
(S)
4,600.00
4,600.00
58,462.60
4,600.00
5
300.00
10
4,750.00
15
1,950.00
30
1.00
(S)
6,000.00
6,000.00
13,001.00
6,000.00
5
201,770.30
70,000.00
(S)
13,800.00
10
11,800.00
15
1,500.00
(S)
179,434.12
54,864.42
(S)
12,000.00
12,000.00
30
1,000.00
421,304.42
136,864.42
5
249,533.60
252,000.00
(S)
200.00
30
35,700.00
30,000.00
285,433.60
282,000.00
5
1,950.00
10
1,050.00
15
500.00
30
1.00
(S)
7,911.59
7,911.59
11,412.59
7,911.59
5
4,450.00
4,150.00
10
13,455.00
12,400.00
20
70,020.00
48,000.00
(S)
1,000.00
30
2,300.00
91,225.00
64,550.00
5
2,001.00
2,001.00
400.00
400.00
883,240.21
883,240.21
22,685.80
905,926.01
501,926.01
148,500.00
247,500.00
7,000.00
1,000.00
905,926.01
905,926.01
DETAILS OF BUDGET AS ASSIGNED TO EXECUTIVE
PRESIDENT - A - Undergraduate Societies Program
Budgetary
Vote 5
Program expenditures, administrative support
and services to Undergraduate Societies, grants
and loans as listed in the estimates	
Statutory — President — Salary and Honorarium  ....
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity
Operating
Department Administration     15,550.00
Guaranteed Income Plan     	
TOTAL ESTIMATES      13,550.00
Add — Services provided by other departments     56.000.00
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM      71,550.00
Objective
To    provide   administrative   support    and   economic
advisory   services  to  all  undergraduate societies; to
provide        additional        economic        support        for
undergraduate programs as provided by A.M.S. Code
Article 9.
Program Description
Departmental Administration — Office of President,
central support services including administration, data
processing finance and personnel.
Guaranteed  Income  Plan —   Provision   of  funds  for
undergraduate programs.
Estimates
1972-73
24,111.60
2.600.00
26,711.60
Grants &
Capital  Contributions Total
       15,550.00
     11.161.60    11.161.60
     11,161.60    26,711.60
       56.000.00
       82,711.60
Objects of Expenditure Estimates
_         .. 1972-73
Operating
Salaries and wages     10,800.00
Other personnel  1,200.20
Transportation and communications  365.60
Professional and special services  400.00
Rentals	
Purchased repair and upkeep     300.00
Utilities, material and supplies  600.00
All other expenditures  1,884.20
TOTAL OPERATING     15,550.00
Estimates
Grants to: 1972-73
Agriculture Undergraduate Soc  288.00
Architecture Undergraduate Soc  260.80
Arts Undergraduate Soc  2,078.00
Commerce Undergraduate Soc  592.00
Dentistry Undergraduate Soc  272.40
Education Undergraduate Soc  1,406.00
Engineering Undergraduate Soc  604.00
Forestry Undergraduate Soc  286.40
Graduate Students' Assoc  526.40
Home Economics Undergraduate Soc  309.20
Law Students' Assoc  435.20
Library School Students' Assoc  226.00
Medical Undergraduate Soc  316.00
Nursing Undergraduate Soc  282.00
Pharmacy Undergraduate Soc  310.40
Physical Educ. Undergraduate Soc  361.60
Recreation Students' Assoc  252.00
Rehab. Medicine Undergr. Soc  270.00
Science Undergraduate Soc  1,582.00
Social Work Students' Assoc  255.20
TOTAL G RANTS      11.161.60~
total    ~5|7TT~rj
Actual
1971-72
200.00
100.00
750.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
800.00
100.00
Estimates  Supplem'ry
1971-72 1971-72
100.00
750.00
50.00
50.00
800.00
100-00
100.00
2,700.00       2,400.00
300.00 unpaid  advertisement
DETAILS OF BUDGET AS ASSIGNED TO EXECUTIVE (Cont.)
PRESIDENT - A - Student Council Program
Budgetary
Vote 10
To provide support services including
administrative costs and information
for Students' Council	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity Operating
Administration     26,650.00
Information  400.00
Membership  	
TOTAL ESTIMATES     27,050.00
Add — Services provided by other departments 114.000.00
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM 141,050.00
Objective
To   provide support  services for Students'
Council including reports, communications, etc., and
costs of meetings, memberships, etc.
Program Description
Administration — to provide for production of
minutes, reports to Council, communications with
Council members and miscellaneous expenses.
Information — To provide for dissemination of
Council decisions and other communications as
directed by Council.
Membership — to provide for A.M.S. membership
obligations in various student and community
organizations as listed in the estimates.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Salaries and wages   	
Other personnel	
Transportation and communications	
Professional and special services	
Utilities, materials and supplies   	
All other expenditures	
TOTAL   	
Grants, Contributions and other transfer payments
Contribution (membership) to
B.C. Civil Liberties Union	
TOTAL   	
Estimates
1972-73
27.550.00
27^550.00
Grants &
Capital Contributions Total
         26,650.00
            400.00
     100.00    100.00
^~    100.00 27,150.00
    114.000.00
141,150.00
Estimates
1972-73
21,600.00
2,400.00
750.00
1,300.00
800.00
200.00
27,050.00
100.00
27,150.00
VICE-PRESIDENT-C-Women's Intramural Program
Budgetary
Vote 15
Program expenditures, administrative support
and services, promotional and equipment costs
for Women's Intramural Sports Program   	
TOTAL PROG RAM	
Program by Activity
Operating
Women's Intramurals        1.950.00
TOTAL ESTIMATES        1,950.00
Add — Services provided by other departments        6,500.00
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM        8,450.00
Objective
To provide administrative and technical support for
an integrated program of intramural athletics for
women on as wide a basis as possible in types of
sports and individuals participating.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Transportation and communications	
I nf ormation	
Professional and special services	
Rentals	
Utilities, materials and supplies   	
All other expenditures	
TOTAL   	
VICE-PRESIDENT - D - Indoor Pool Project
Budgetary
Vote 30
Authorization to administer the project
and provide support services	
(S) — Monies to be spent from Graduating Class
Grant for program expenditures as specified
in the trust	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Estimates
1972-73
1,950.00
1,950.00
Grants &
Capital   Contributions      Total
          jjgSO.OO
        1,950.00
        6.500.00
~==      8,450.00
Estimates
1972-73
100.00
50.00
1,000.00
515.00
265.00
20.00
1,950.00
Estimates
1972-73
1.00
6.000.00
6,001.00
PRESIDENT - B - Crane Library Project
Budgetary
Vote 30
Program expenditures, administrative
support and purchase of materials to produce
Braille textbooks by computer	
Statutory — Program expenditures supported
by grants from other organizations	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity
Operating
Computerized Book Production       4.601.00
TOTAL ESTI MATES        4,601.00
Add — Services provided by other departments	
U.B.C. Computing Centre        5,000.00
Less —Grant from Graduating Class (1971-72)          	
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM         9,601.00
Objective
To produce Braille tests by computer.
Program Description
Computerized       Book       Production       —       to       pay
administrative costs; provide computer time, purchase
computer   hardware   and   software   necessary  for the
program  and special paper for imprinting of Braille
text.
VICE-PRESIDENT - A - Constitution Revisions
Budgetary
Vote 5
Program expenditures, administrative support
and services to Constitution Revisions
Committee	
Non-Budgetary
Approprations not required for 1972-73
Publicity and promotion for Constitutional
Amendments   	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity
C
Revision Consolidation	
Amendment Promotion  	
TOTAL PROG RAM  300.00
Objective
To   prepare,   effect   and   consolidate   Constitutional
amendments to the A.M.S. Constitution and Code as
required.
Program Description
Revision  Consolidation  — to  codify,  consolidate all
amendments to  the A.M.S.  Constitution  and  Code
and  to   publish   new  documents incorporating these
amendments.
Amendment    Promotion    —    to   promote    proposed
amendments to the A.M.S.  Constitution  in order to
effect passage.
Objects of Expenditure
Estimates
1972-73
1.00
4,600.00
4,601.00
Grants &
Capital  Contributions Total
    4.601.00
                     4,601.00
                     5,000.00
    (4.600.00)    (4.600.00)
    (4,600.00) 4,001.00
Estimates
1972-73
300.00
erating
300.00
Grants &
Capital  Contributions
Total
300.00
	
                  	
	
300.00
Operating Information
TOTAL   	
VICE-PRESIDENT -B- Men's Intramural Program
Budgetary
Vote 10
Program expenditures, administrative support
and services, promotional and equipment costs
for Men's Intramural Sports Program	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity
Operating
Men's Intramurals       4.750.00
TOTAL ESTIMATES        4,750.00
Add — Services provided by other departments 10.000.00
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM      14,750.00
Objective
To provide administrative and technical support for
an integrated program of intramural athletics for men
on as wide a basis as possible in types of sports and in
number of individuals participating.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Salaries and Wages	
Transportation and communications
Information	
Professional and special services
Rentals	
Utilities, materials and supplies
TOTAL   	
Estimates
1972-73
300.00
300.00
Estimates
1972-73
4,750.00
4750.60
Grants &
Capital Contributions       Total
         4,750.00
= ~= 4|/fa0.00
       10,000.00
     14,750.00
Estimates
1972-73
500.00
100.00
100.00
2,200.00
1,600.00
250.00
4,750.00
TREASURER - A - Administration Program
Budgetary Estimates
Vote 5 1972-73
Program expenditures, including administrative support and services where not
directly charged to other programs  201,770.30
Statutory — Treasurer — Salary and Honorarium  .... 2,400.00
Grants as listed in the estimates  11,400.00
TOTAL PROGRAM  215,570.30
Program by Activity Grants &
Operating Capital    Contributions      Total
Departmental Administration       6,740.00 192,930.30    15,900.00 215.570.30
TOTAL ESTIMATES        6,740.00 192,930.30     15,900.00 215,570.30
Less— Receipts credited to revenue   (70,000.00)  (70,000.00)
Add — Services provided by other departments     10,000.00        10.000.00
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM      16,740.66 1___2,930.30     15,900.00 155,570.30
Objective
To assist the A.M.S. and Council in deciding on and
implementing  financial and  other  economic  policies
and   measures  that   will   best   accomplish   its   major
objective.
Program Description
Department     Administration     —     offices     of    the
Treasurer,    General    Manager   and   Office   Manager,
administrative     personnel     and     financial     services;
operations of the Finance Committee.
Objects of Expenditures
Operating
Salaries and wages   	
Transportation and communications	
Professional and special services	
Rentals	
Utilities   	
All other expenditures	
TOTAL   	
Capital
Construction and acquisition of machinery and equipment
(Student Union & Winter Sports Centre)	
Grants to
Accident Benefit Fund	
SUB Management Fund	
SUB Art Fund   	
Contributions to
Cost of registration photos	
"Open House — '73"	
TOTAL   	
TOTAL PROG RAM	
Estimates
1972-73
3,930.00
660.00
800.00
50.00
1,000.00
300.00
6,740.00
192,930.30
Estimates
1972-73
Actual
1971-72'
Estimates
1971-72
1,650.00 1,748.00 1,770.00
8,250.00 8,740.40 8,850.00
1,500.00       1,500.00       1,500.00
2,500.00
2.000.00
4,900.00      4,500.00
15,900.00    16,888.40
2f5.576.36      	
16,620.00
TREASURER - A - Clubs Program
Budgetary
Vote 10
Program expenditures, administrative support
and services for clubs including grants as
listed in the estimatess	
TOTAL   	
Program by Activity
Operating
Administration and operations      10,800.00
Special Projects Grants      	
TOTAL ESTIMATES      10,800.00
Add — Services provided by other departments     42,750.00
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM     53,550.00
Objective
To   provide   funds   and   personnel   support   for   the
operation of clubs constituted under the A.M.S.
Program Description
Administration       and       operations      —       provides
administrative  support  including accounting services
and activity co-ordination.
Special Project Grants — provides money for special
projects of campus-wide interest and including major
capital expenditures within the terms of A.M.S. Code
Article 3(5).
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Personnel — salaries and wages	
Other personnel	
Information   	
Professional and special services	
TOTAL   	
Grants to
Self-sustaining Clubs Fund	
Educational Clubs Fund	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Estimates
1972-73
11,800.00
11,800.00
Grants &
Capital   Contributions      Total
       10,800.00
       1.000.00      1.000.00
1,000.00
11,800.00
42.750.00
1,000.00    54,550.00
Estimates
1972-73
9,000.00
1.000.00
200.00
600.00
10,800.00
500.00
500.00
11,800.00 u n
p a
dverti semen t
DETAILS OF BUDGET AS ASSIGNED TO EXECUTIVE (Cont.)
TREASURER - A - Conference Program
Budgetary
Vote 15
Grants to Undergraduate Societies
and Clubs to enable them to send delegates
to conferences of academic value at the
discretion of the Finance Committee upon
ratification by Council	
TOTAL   	
Objective
To   aid   Undergraduate   Societies   and   other  A.M.S.
organizations in sending a maximum of two delegates
to conferences where such representation would be of
appreciable   benefit  to  the faculty  or  campus as a
whole.
Objects of Expenditure
Grants to Undergraduate Societies and
other organizations	
TOTAL   	
Estimates
1972-73
1.500.00
1,500.00
Operating
TREASURER - A - Debt Program
Budgetary
Statutory— Interest on unmatured debt
(including loans and debentures)
incurred on behalf of the Alma Mater Society . . .
Statutory— Interest on unmatured debt
incurred on behalf of the Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre	
TOTAL PROG RAM	
Program by Activity
Interest payments on unmatured debt	
TOTAL ESTIMATES	
Less—transfer payments from Winter Sports
Centre Management Committee	
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM	
Program Description
The provisions of funds for the interest costs of the
Society's debt; servicing costs of the debt and the
cost of issuing new loans.
Objects of Expenditures
Operating
Debt Charges   	
TOTAL    	
TREASURER - A - Transfer Payments Program
Budgetary
Statutory— Payments to Undergraduate
Societies pursuant to Bylaw 10(2) and
10(3) of the A.M.S. Constitution	
Statutory— Payments to Undergraduate
Societies pursuant to Bylaw 10(4, 5, & 6)   	
TOTAL PROG RAM	
Program by Activity
Operating
Transfer of Undergraduate fee levies
collected on their behalf     11,400.00
Transfer of Undergraduate Capital
Fund levies collected on their behalf        	
TOTAL ESTIMATES      11,400.00
Less— Receipts and revenues credited
to vote     11,400.00
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM  -r—
Program Description
The provision of funds for payments to
Undergraduate Societies for their fee and Capital
Fund levies passed pursuant to Bylaw 10.
Objects of Expenditure
Grants, Contributions and other transfer payments
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Grants &
Capital    Contributions      Total.
        1.500.00      1.500.00
       1,500.00       1,500.00
Estimates
1972-73
124,569.70
54.864.42
179,434.12
179,434.12
179,434.12
(54.864.42)
124,569.70
179,434.12
179,434.12
Estimates
1972-73
11,400.00
600.00
12,000.00
Grants &
Capital    Contributions      Totai
         11,400.00
600.00      600.00
600.00
600.00
12,000.00
12,000.00
Estimates Actual Estimates
1972-73 1971-72 1971-72
12,000.00 12,815.00 12,600.00
12,666.66 12,815.66 12,660.60
Capital
TREASURER -A- University Clubs Committee
Budgetary
Vote 30
Program expenditures, administrative
support, grants as detailed in the
estimates   	
TOTAL PROG RAM	
Program by Activity
Operating
Clubs Day  500.00
Per Capital Grants      	
TOTAL ESTIMATES  500.00
Objective
To   provide   information   to   students   on   all   clubs
constituted   under   the   A.M.S.   and   to  support  the
activities of clubs under the U.C.C.
Program Description
Clubs   Day   —   provides   facilities   and   promotional
support for clubs to make their activities known to
students.
Per Capita Grants — provides basic funds to support
the activities of political and service clubs under the
U.C.C.  as outlined  in  A.M.S.  Code Article 3(5) and
the U.C.C. Constitution.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Transportation	
Information	
Rentals	
Utilities, materials and supplies   	
TOTAL   	
Grants
Grants to political and service clubs
on a per capita basis	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
CO-ORDINATOR - A - Student Union Building Program
Budgetary
Vote 5
Program expenditures, administrative support
and services for the operation of the Student
Union Building	
Statutory — Co-ordinator — Honorarium	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity
Operating Capital
Department Administration     31,733.60    32,000.00
Operations 186,000.00 	
TOTAL ESTI MATES 217,733.60    32,000.00
Add — Services provided by other departments 159,000.00 	
Less— Revenues credited to the vote (252.000.00) 	
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM 124,733.60    32,000.00
Objective
To     provide     services     and     facilities    to    A.M.S.
organizations;    to    provide    accessibility   of   limited
commercial activity to students.
Program Description
Departmental    Administration    —    Office    of    the
Co-ordinator and Building Manager; support services
for operations.
Operations,— Direct costs of operating various service
activities within the Student Union Building.
Estimates
1972-73
1.000.00
1,000.00
Grants &
Contributions
500.00
Total
500.00
500.00
500.00        1,000.00
Estimates
1972-73
50.00
50.00
300.00
100.00
500.00
1,000.00
Estimates
1972-73
249,533.60
200.00
24^,733.66
Grants &
Contributions
     63,
   186.
Total
733.60
000.00
- 249,
- 159,
-(252,
733.60
000.00
000.00)
124,733.60
(Co-ordinator —A— Student Union Building Program cont.)
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Salaries and wages   	
Other personnel	
All other expenditures (see Appendix)	
TOTAL   	
Capital
Replacement of furnishings and equipment	
Games Room (partial repayment)   	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Less— Revenue credit to vote   	
CO-ORDINATOR - A - Activities Program
Budgetary
Vote 30
Program expenditures
including contract and insurance cos,ts	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity
Operating
Special Events        29,700.00
Art Gallery       6.000.00
TOTAL ESTIMATES     35,700.00
Less— revenues credited to vote    (30,000.00)
TOTAL COST OF PROG RAM        5,700.00
Program Description
Special  Events —  provides funds for entertainment
and   other  events  for presentation to the  university
community.
Art Gallery — provides funds for operation of the Art
Gallery     and     mounting    of    art     shows    including
insurance and staff.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Transportation and communications	
I nformation	
Professional and special services	
Rentals	
All other expenditures	
Utilities, materials and supplies   	
TOTAL    	
Less— Revenues credited to vote	
TOTAL    	
Student Union Building Operations
Building Operations:
Co-op Bookstore   	
S.U.B. Filmsoc	
Games Area   	
Information Desk	
Mamooks 	
Pit   	
Reading Room, Listening Lounge   	
Rentals (Booking)    	
Rentals (Lessee)	
Stage Crew	
Vending	
Art Gallery	
Craftstore	
Operating Income	
Less— Administrative Expenditure:
Provisions for replacement of furnishings
and equipment	
Office and Administrative Services	
Allocation to S.U.B. Management Reserve
S.U.B. Administrative Salaries	
Net I ncome   	
Estimates
1972-73
29,296.88
2,436.72
186.000.00
217,733.60
27,000.00
5.000.00
249>33.60
(252.000.00
(     2,266.40
Estimates
1972-73
35,700.00
35,700.00
Grants &
Capita!.! Contributions     Total
       29,700.00
          6.000.00
=     '-      35,700.00
   (30.000.00)
5,700.00
Revenue
Estimates
10,000.00
16,000.00
40,000.00
95,000.00
6,000.00
45,000.00
12,000.00
16,000.00
1,000.00
11,000.00
Estimates
1972-73
1,000.00
2,000.00
28,000.00
2,000.00
700.00
2.0OQ.0O
351766.66
(30,000.00)
5,766.66
Expense
Estimates
8,000.00
14,000.00
21,000.00
85,000.00
6,000.00
45,000.00
6,000.00
1,000.00
252,000.00
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS - A - Government Relations Program
Budgetary
Vote 5
Program expenditures including
information and transportation costs	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity
Operating Capital
Provincial Issues       1,450.00 	
Civic and Local Issues  500.00 	
TOTAL ESTIMATES        1,950.00 	
Add — Services provided by other departments        7.000.00 	
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM       8,950.00 	
Objective
To provide information and student input on political
and other government issues affecting the A.M.S. and
university community.
Program Description
Provincial      Issues     —     Contact     with     Provincial
Government    M.L.A.'s   and   community   groups   to
forward A.M.S. objectives in such areas as education
policy,   environmental   issues,   liquor   laws and other
issues as determined by Council.
Civic    and     Local     Issues    —    Contact    with    civic
governments    and    community    groups    to    forward
A.M.S.   objectives    in   such    areas   as   rapid   transit,
student   housing   and  other   issues as determined  by
Council.
Objects of Expenditure
186,000.00
66,066.66
(27,000.00)
(10,000.00)
( 5,000.00)
(23.000.00)
J65.ooo.66J
(   1,000.00)
Estimates
1972-73
1,950.00
l|956.66
Grants &
Contributions      Total
       1,450.00
   500.00
1,950.00
7,000.00
8,950.00
Estimates
1972-73
Operating
Transportation and communication	
Information   	
Rentals	
Utilities, materials and supplies   	
All other expenditures	
TOTAL    	
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS — A — Inter-Campus Communications Program
Budgetary
Vote 10
Program expenditures including
information and transportation costs	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity Grants &
Operating Capital    Contributions      Total
Communications          1,050.00 ==        1.050.00
TOTAL ESTI MATES         1,050.00 	
Objective
To promote communication with other campuses on
issues of mutual concern in the academic and student
government fields.
Program Description
Communications —  provides administrative facilities
for communication with other student governments
and    participation   in   service   oriented   inter-campus
organizations.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Transportation and communications	
Information	
Rentals ".	
Utilities, materials and supplies   	
All other	
TOTAL   	
1,000.00
100.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
1,950.00
Estimates
1972-73
1,050.00
1,050.00
1,050.00
Estimates
1972-73
500.00
100.00
400.00
50.00
1,050.00 unpaid   advertisement
DETAILS OF BUDGET AS ASSIGNED TO EXECUTIVE (Cont.)
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS - Community Visitations Program
Budgetary
Vote 15
Program expenditures including
information and transportation costs	
TOTAL PROG RAM	
Program by Activity
Operating Capital
Community Visitations     500.00 	
TOTAL ESTI MATES  500.00 	
Objective
To   provide  information  on  the  university and the
A.M.S.    to    senior    secondary    students    in    British
Columbia.
Program Description
Community   Visitations —In   co-operation   with the
University of Victoria, Simon Fraser, B.C.I.T., V.C.C.
and V.V.I, to provide information through literature
and direct contact on post-secondary education.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Transportation and communications   	
Information	
Rentals	
Utilities, materials and supplies   	
TOTAL    	
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS - B - Local Initiatives Program
Budgetary Estimates
Vote 30 1972-73
Program expenditures, administrative
support and all costs related to Local
Initiatives Programs as approved and
funded by the Federal Government  1.00
Statutory  7.911.59
TOTAL PROGRAM  7,912.59
Program by Activity
Operating Capital
Trails Project          7.912.59 ——
TOTAL ESTIMATES         7,912.59 	
Less— Grant received from Federal Government ....     (7,911.59) 	
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM  T~5 ~-
Objective
To   provide for the establishment,  development and
administration of Local Initiative Projects under the
A.M.S. in conjunction with the Federal Government.
Program Description
Trails Project — reconstruction of eroded trails and
laying of corduroy to  prevent future erosion on the
University Endowment Lands.
Estimates
1972-73
500.00
500.00
Grants &
Contributions
Total
500.00
500.00
Actual
1971-72
Estimates
1972-73
200.00
50.00
250.00
500.00
Estimates
1971-72
1.00
1.00
Grants &
Contributions      Total
        7.912.59
7,912.59
(7,911.59)
1.00
INTERNAL AFFAIRS - Social Services Program
Budgetary
Vote 5
Program expenditures including information
costs and training of resource personnel	
TOTAL PROGRAM . ._	
Program by Activity
/ Operating
Speak Easy    4.450.00
Total Estimates    4,450.00
Add — services provided by other departments   	
Less— revenues credited to vote (grants received)  . . .j4,150.00
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM       300.00
Estimates
1972-73
4,450.00
Grants &
Capital    Contributions
Total
4.150.00
4,450.00
4,150.00
INTERNAL AFFAIRS - Ubyssey Program
Budgetary
Vote 20
The Ubyssey— Program expenditures
including layout and printing,
administrative expenditures	
Statutory Editors' Honorariums	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity Operating
The Ubyssey     71.020.00
TOTAL ESTIMATES      71,020.00
Add — cost of services provided by other
departments     28,500.00
Less- receipts and revenues credited to vote    (48.000.00)
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM     51,5-50.00
Objective
To  publish the "UBYSSEY" to provide information
to the university community on  issues and events of
interests.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Salaries and wages     (
Other personnel	
Transportation and communication	
information	
Professional and special services	
Utilities, materials and supplies   	
TOTAL   	
Less— receipts and revenues credited to vote	
TOTAL    	
Estimates
1972-73
70,020.00
1.000.00
Actual
1971-72
90,625.00
875.00
Estimates
1971-72
87,900.00
1.100.00
71,020.00    91,500.00    89,000.00
Grants &
Capitat    Contributions     Tota*
 ——      71.020.00
71,020.00
     28,500.00
——(481000i00)
~~51~~~0
Estimates
1972-73
10,954.13
895.87
1,925.00
48,800.00
7,350.00
1.095.00
Actual
1971-72
12,425.00
3,400.00
64,270.00
9,405.00
2.000.00
Estimates
1971-72
12,650.00
4,000.00
60,450.00
9,300.00
2.600.00
71,020.00    91,500.00    89,000.00
(48.000.00) (57,000.00) (52,000.00)
23,020.00    34,500.00    37,000.00
INTERNAL AFFAIRS - A - Education Program
Budgetary
Vote 30
Program expenditures, including support
services for Education and Speakers
Committees   	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity
Operating
Speakers Committee        1,000.00
Education Committee          1,000.00
Women's Studies         	
TOTAL ESTI MATES  ~="
Objective
To   provide   programs   of   educational   and   cultural
interest and value for the university community.
Program Description
Speakers   Committee  —   Arranges   for  speakers and
lecturers of interest to the university community.
Education     Committee     —     Arranges     integrated
educational     experiences     including    speakers
demonstrations, seminars and displays.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Transportation and communications
Information	
Professional and special services
Rentals	
TOTAL    	
Grants
Add —Grant to Women's Studies   ..
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Capital
Estimates
1972-73
2.300.00
2^300.00
Grants &
Contributions      Total,
       1,000.00.
       1,000.00
300.00 300.00
300.00       2,300.00
Estimates
1972-73
500.00
300.00
400.00
400.00
2,000.00
300.00
2,300.00
300.00
Objective
To provide a central information centre and referral
service for counselling.
Program Description
SpeakEasy — general office in S.U.B. — provides
information on subjects such as birth control, tenants
"ights, etc. and preliminary counselling on various
personal problems; referral to specialized agencies if
necessary.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Salaries and wages   	
Other personnel	
Transport and communications   	
Information	
Rentals	
Utilities, materials and supplies   	
TOTAL PROGRAM .	
Less— Grants from other organizations for program .
TOTAL    	
INTERNAL AFFAIRS - Publications Program
Budgetary
Vote 10
Publications— program expenditures,
expenditures, excluding support of
The Ubyssey	
TOTAL PROG RAM	
Program by Activity Operating
Administration        2,475.00
Bird Calls     10.980.00
TOTAL ESTI MATES .'.      13,455.06
Less— revenues credited to vote    (12,400.00)
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM        1,655.60
Objective
To     provide    for    publication    of    directories    and
technical journals associated with he activities of the
Society.
Program Description
Administration — provides administrative and support
service     for     miscellaneous     publications    and
organizations    such     as     Mamooks,     Law     Review,
Forestry Handbook, Undergrad publications.
Bird   Calls —   provides  a   directory of  student  and
faculty    telephone    numbers   on    and    off    campus
including yellow pages— published annually.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Salaries	
Other personnel	
Transportation and communications	
Information	
Professional and special services	
All other expenses     	
TOTAL   	
Less— receipts and revenues credited to the vote ....
TOTAL   	
Estimates
1972-73
1,600.00
150.00
400.00
1,650.00
150.00
500.00
4,450.00
4.150.00
300.00
Estimates
1972-73
Capital
13,455.00
13,455.00
Grants &
Contributions      Total
       2,475.00
10,980.00
— i3;455.60
  (12,400.00)
— '  1 655.00
Estimates
1972-73
4,266.06
383.94
375.00
6,000.00
105.00
25.00
13,455.00
12.400.00
llUbb.OU
SECRETARY A - Elections Committee
Budgetary
Vote 5
Program expenditures, administrative
support and services, including printing	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity
Operating Capital
Eligibility Committee  1.00 	
Elections Committee           2.000.00 	
TOTAL ESTIMATES         2,001.00 	
Add — Services provided by other departments        5.000.00 	
TOTAL COST OF PROGRAM        7,001.00 —~"
Objective
To provide administrative support for A.M.S. general
elections and referendums.
Program Description
Eligibility Committee — Rulings on the eligibility of
candidates  to   run  for  A.M.S.   office or for  persons
holding certain appointed positions.
Elections    Committee   —   Organization   of    polling
stations,   printing and  counting of ballots for A.M.S.
general elections and referendums.
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Transportation and communications
I nformation	
Purchase, repair and upkeep	
Utilities, material and supplies	
All other expenditures	
TOTAL   	
Capital
Construction and acquisition of
machinery and equipment
TOTAL    	
OMBUDSPERSON
Budgetary
Vote 5
Program expenditures, administrative,
support and services	
TOTAL PROGRAM	
Program by Activity _ „
Operating Capital
Administration 400 00 	
TOTAL ESTIMATES  400.00 ~—
Objective
To   provide  an  avenue for solution of disputes and
difficulties  of all   kinds relating  to  students at  the
university.
Estimates
1972-73
2.001.00
2,001.00
Grants &
Contributions
Total
1.00
2.000.00
2,001.00
5.000.00
7,001.00
Estmates
1972-73
101.00
500.00
100.00
1,000.00
300.00
2,001.00
2,001.00
Estimates
1972-73
400.00
400.00
Grants &
Contributions
Total
400.00
406.66"
Objects of Expenditure
Operating
Transportation and communication
Utilities, material and supplies ....
TOTAL   	
Estimates
1972-73
300.00
100.00
400.00 Tuesday, September 19, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Exposure
By ART SMOLENSKY
Who pays what taxes in
Canada?
According to recently
released federal treasury
statistics, federal government
revenues have almost doubled
in the past seven years from $7
billion to about $14 billion.
Interestingly enough, the
bulk of this increase has come
from direct taxes on people
which have tripled from $2
billion (30 per cent) to $6 billion
(42 per cent) in that same
seven-year period.
At the same time the corporate share of the tax burden
has dropped!
Corporations paid $1.5 billion
(21 per cent) seven years ago,
last year they paid $2.2 billion
(15 per cent) or only one-third
of what individuals are paying
today.
The Committee for an Independent Canada at their
national convention in Edmonton last week clearly
pointed to foreign corporations
and Liberal government laxity
in dealing with them as the
major cause of this imbalance.
During the Trudeau years
(1968 to 1971 inclusive) Canada
paid out $5.7 billion to
foreigners in interest and
dividends and $4.4 billion in
service fees for a total outflow
of $10.1 billion.
Besides the heavy economics
indulged in by the conference
they focused their attentions on
education, culture, trade
unions and natural resources.
The 20-odd B.C. delegation
seemed to be most concerned
with the last topic and were
instrumental in having policy
statements passed drastically
limiting the export of oil, gas
electric power and water.
Also passed was a resolution
AMS to keep
food staff
Food services staff won't be
fired if the Alma Mater Society
takes over the SUB food services operation, AMS president
Doug Aldridge said Monday.
The AMS intends to honor the
University's two-year contract
with the Canadian Union of
Public Employees, he said.
Aldridge said the AMS would
hire a new manager who would
be in charge of food services,
personnel, and the Pit.
The new manager could if he
wanted to increase or decrease
the number of staff, "but at the
present time no staff changes
are planned, he said, "except
for a new manager."
Aldridge said an article in
Friday's Ubyssey stating staff
might be fired after the
takeover had seriously
damaged negotiations and the
AMS relationship with CUPE.
He said he spent some time
convincing CUPE that the
AMS would not fire union
employees.
However, the new manager
could if he wanted, Aldridge
said.
The AMS would cover the
debt by extending the $15
building levy another four or
five years which would mean
food services would only have
to break He said the
operation wouldn't be taken
over until November which is
when the AMS plans to go
before the board of governors.
It would be several months
before the transfer could actually take place, he said.
that the CIC focus its attention
and point out as an election
issue the construction and
ownership of the MacKenzie
Valley pipeline.
The proposed gas pipeline is
to be built by Gas Arctic (a
consortium of mostly
American companies) to
transmit gas from Alaska to
Chicago. The Canadian
government has already
subsidized this operation by
announcing the construction of
an access road along the future
route.
CIC's contention is that this
would lead to upward pressure
on the Canadian dollar and
more importantly some drastic
changes in the plant and
animal ecology of the north.
Only a marginal number of
temporary jobs are to be
created in Canada since the
ripe itself is to be manufac-
tured in the U.S. using
Japanese steel.
Few Canadian engineers are
to be used since the construction company of this $5
billion project will be likely be
Bechtel — a large, California
based company. Bechtel's
operations in Canada to date
have mostly consisted of work
for Imperial Oil.
CIC education policy included statements that long
term tenure should be granted
to Canadian citizens only and
that all deans, department
heads  and  senior  university
administrators be Canadians.
*   *   *
Exposure has received a
healthy number of letters this
past week. These will be investigated and published in
next week's column.
Address all enquiries to
Exposure, The Ubyssey, SUB.
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . .
• • • For VKNMI
for that smart look in gloom ...
look to
PtesclibtioH. Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
Living in Christian Community
for Social Action
HARRY BARKER    Ghetto Lawyer
Thursday, September 21
12:30 noon - SUB 215
Sponsored by UBC Chaplains
7:30 p.m. — Lutheran Campus Centre
Sponsored by Charismatic Ministry — B. Gerard
FORESTRY
Presents
THE UNDERCUT
Saturday, Sept. 30th - Full Fac.
SUB Cafeteria
8:30 - T :00
$3.50 Couple
Dress Hard Times
Tickets: In SUB
or from MacMillan Building
jooooooooooooooooooooeoooooaoooooooooooooooooa
ESCAPE
oooooooooooooc
into the
Underwater World
of
SCUBA DIVING
with
Aqua Venture Ltd.
All   equipment supplied,  indoor heated  pools,  six
week course — $40.00.
For information phone 733-5809.
The next courses start at 7:30 p.m. on
Sept. 19th, 20th, 25th, and Oct. 1st.
N.A.U.I. CERTIFICATION PROGRAM
JOOCOOCOOOOCOOOOOOCCOOOOOOCOCOOOOOOOCOOOOCOOOOO*
The Science Undergraduate Society
Presents
PR. MICHAEL OVENDEN
Speaking In
HEBB THEATRE
at 12:30, Wednesday the 20th
on
"THE LOST PLANET"
Dr. Ovenden will show slides in
presenting his new theory of Planetary
Interactions, and its implications.
THIS   IS THE   FIRST   IN  A WEEKLY  SERIES  OF
TALKS SPONSORED BY THE S.U.S.
B C stands for
BIRD CALLS
the UBC Student Telephone Directory
and
BONUS COUPONS
Coming
Early
October Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 19, 1972
BELEHEMDflW
OCTOBER 4-5, 1972
INDOOR POOL REFERENDUM INFORMATION SHEET
WHAT WILL IT LOOK LIKE?
No designs have been done yet — the requirements for the pool are that it
be about 65 metres long with two moveable bulkheads and with full diving
facilities. Our presentation to the Board of Governors was for a facility comparable to those at most other Canadian universities.
would involve providing adequate changing, locker, and shower facilities and
as this would be involved in providing a new facility, the eventual covering of
Empire Pool in the future will be made cheaper; (3) It would take about a year
and a half to cover Empire and so the use of Empire would be lost for students
during that time.
HOW MUCH WILL IT COST?
The best estimate available is about $2,800,000 for a comparable facility.
HOW TO BE FINANCED
At its June meeting, the Board of Governors of the University agreed in
principle to put up 1/3 of the cost of the facility provided that the remaining
cost was raised by the outside community and by students. A fund-raising
committee for outside donations is ready to move and all indications point to a
successful drive for funds from outside sources (business, governments,
private swim groups, individuals, staff on campus, faculty on campus, etc.)
The fund-raising efforts are ready to go if AND ONLY IF students on campus
show that they want a pool. The referendum in October would show two things:
(1) by a large turnout students would show their desire to have a pool; and (2)
by a large YES vote they would show that they are willing to participate in the
cost of that facility. Students will be asked to contribute up to 1/3 of the cost of
the facility and if we are able to raise more than 1/3 from outside sources the
student share will decrease.
We feel confident that this will be the case but we are asking students to
show a willingness to put a full 1/3 share if that becomes necessary.
HOW MUCH WILL OUR Vz COST US?
If it is necessary for students to put up a full 1/3 share of the cost (a share of
$925,000) the Alma Mater Society would borrow that amount and would pay off
the loan over about twenty years. The $5.00 per student per year INDOOR
POOL LEVY would be used to pay off the loan over that period and it is expected that our total interest and principle repayment for that sum would
amount to about 1.6 million over the twenty year period. It should be noted that
the INDOOR POOL LEVY would be first collected during the 1973-74 school
year and at that time graduating students would not be assessed the LEVY —
that way only those who will have a chance to use the pool will be asked to pay
for it.
WHY NOT COVER EMPIRE POOL?
The most recent estimate of the cost of covering Empire Pool is about
$2,000,000 (to cover it, convert all its equipment for indoor use, and to bring the
present equipment up to full working order.) It was thought, with this cost in
mind, that there were distinct advantages of building a new pool rather than
covering Empire: (1) For the extra $800,000 we will have two facilities which
will complement each others' use; (2) as part of the cost of covering Empire
WHERE WILL IT BE LOCATED?
The referendum places the stipulation that it must be located near the
Student Union Building (SUB) and we will recommend that the site be where
the present Empire Pool Parking Lot is located. The advantages of that site
are as follows: (1) It is close to the student centre of campus; (2) It is close to
other student recreational facilities — Memorial Gym, S.U.B., Empire Pool,
the playing fields; and (3) It would provide another link in what could eventually be a complete recreational centre for student activities on the campus.
HOW WOULD IT BE MANAGED?
The referendum stipulates that the planning and management of the
facility be handled by a committee on which students have an equal say — one
where student representation be equal to the representation of other members
of the committee. This will allow students to assure that student priorities will
be heard during the planning stages and that student needs will be assured
during the life of the pool.
WHAT DO STUDENTS GET OUT OF THE
FACILITY?
The referendum stipulates that free swimming time be available for
students. The management committee's structure would assure this and since
the facility could be programmed for up to three activities at any one time (the
moveable bulkheads allow the pool to be divided into three sections of varying
width) we have been assured that free swimming time could be made available
at almost all times during the day. The facility would also provide full spectator accommodation so that 'armchair swimmers' will also have a place to go.
The facility will provide a place to swim for students (on a year round
basis); it will provide a place for students to learn how to swim and will give
the University an educational and recreational centre which is long overdue!
WHY SHOULD STUDENTS PUT UP PART OF
THE FUNDS?
The Building Priority Committee of the University's Senate deals only with
"academic" buildings — they will not consider recreational and athletic
facilities.
The initiative for such facilities must come from students! We can
guarantee a strong student say in this important facility by our contribution —
the matter boils down to this: if we want a pool, now is the time for it and this is
the only way we are going to get it.
THE AD-HOC COMMITTEE TO GET
A COVERED POOL FOR U.B.C.
BOX 152, S.U.B. Tuesday, September 19, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Tween classes
TODAY
AUS
All information on AUS intramurals
and schedules can be found on the
Buchanan lecture bulletin board.
NEWMAN CLUB
General  meeting,   noon, St. Mark's
music room.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl  Burau on Germany revisited,
noon, SUB 111.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
IS PC
General meeting, noon, IH 400.
WEDNESDAY
Executive    elections,
house.
noon.    Hillel
OSS moves
to Ponderosa
The Office of Student Services
has moved from its old location
opposite the armory to the new
Ponderosa Annex behind the
Ponderosa cafeteria.
"It may be a little hard to find,
but it's there," UBC placement
officer   Cam Craik, said Monday.
The Office of Student Services
assists students in finding both
part-time and full-time
employment and provides a
counselling service for distraught
students.
"There are quite a few part
time jobs available and students
should hurry over if they want
one," Craik said.
He also reminds arts students
who are graduating this year of
the job possibilities with the
federal government.
"Each year a number of
positions as administrative
trainees in the public service and
some    positions   in   the   foreign
SKI INSTRUCTOR'S
TRAINING COURSE
Whistler Mountain
Alta Lake, B.C.
Starting
SEPT. 30 and OCT. 1
For information call
Jim McConkey - 932-5422
Garibaldi Ski School
or Vancouver - 926-1034
STUDENTS' WIVES
COFFEE PARTY
Cecil Green
8:00 P.M., Wed., Sept 27
Girls interested
please attend
Has Mankind Mass
Amnesia?
Have You Forgotten
Who You Are?
hear
"LEARNING IS
SIMPLY REMEMBERING"
Michael Cecil
Loyd Meeker
Wed. Sept. 20 - 12:30
Bu. 216
ONTOLOGY
VOC
Meeting, noon, Angus 104.
SUS
Dr. Michael Ovenden on "The Lost
Planet", noon, Hebb Theatre.
EDUCATION STAGE BAND
Organization      meeting,      noon,
Education 1317.
AMS
Councial   meeting,   8  p.m., Council
Chambers.
THURSDAY
KARATE CLUB
Meeting,    7:30   p.m.,   Thunderbird
Gym B.
KUNG FU CLUB
Free    demonstration,    noon,    SUB
Ballroom.
GAY LIBERATION
General   meeting.  Noon, SUB 213.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Meeting, noon, SUB 211.
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Lecture:      Learning     is     simply
remembering, noon, Buch. 216.
CURLING CLUB
General meeting,  noon, Buch. 102.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Tryouts,    5   p.m.,   Gym   A   Winter
Sports Centre.
UKRAINIAN VARSITYCLUB
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB
212A.
VCF
Meeting, noon, party room.
AIESEC
Meeting, noon, SUB 215.
Hot flashes
service are available to arts
graduates."
"However, anyone interested
in one of these positions must
write an exam which this year will
be held on the evening of Oct.
19."
"Students who wish to write
these exams must register with
the placement office before Oct.
10. Because there are only a
limited number of seats available I
would advise students to register
early," said Craik.
Marx, Christ
Klaus-Heinrich Kanstein, West
German clergyman, will hold a
discussion of marxist-christian
philosophy, Thursday noon, in
SUB 224.
All are welcome to the
discussion, sponsored by the
Anglican United Campus Ministry.
Batik show
An exhibit of sculpture, batik,
and drawings from German
churches is on display 8:30 a.m.
to 11 p.m. in the chapel of the
Lutheran    Campus   Centre.   The
exhibit   is   provided   by  German
artist, Elly-Viola Nahmmacker.
Vote extended
Some voter registration centres
for the Dec. 17 civic elections will
remain open until the Thursday
deadline.
The UBC centre in SUB which
registered more than 900 students
in its week of operation closed
Monday. It will still be possible to
get on the voters list 7 to 10 p.m.
at the Medical Clinic, 1452 West
Fourth and at the main voter
registration centre 2512 Yukon
until Thursday.
If you are 19 years o'ld and
have lived in B.C. Jan. 1 to June
15, 1972 you are eligible to vote.
Get out and help unelect your
favorite city concillor.
Exile to read
losof Brodsky, exiled Soviet
poet, will give a reading of his
work Friday noon in the old
auditorium. The reading,
sponsored by the Slavonic studies
department, will be in Russian,
but a translator will be present.
Ph. 224-1614
Office — Lutheran Campus
Centre
Anglican-United
Campus Ministry
Weekly Eucharist Tuesday 12:30
Lutheran Campus Centre
Coming Program
Sept. 21 Marxist-Christian Dialogue
Klaus Kanstein of Berlin
SUB 224 at 12:30
Sept. 25 — Supper with Bishop of Dublin
Sept. 27 - SUB 207-209
Education and Change
Al Rimmer of Toronto
Sept. 28 - 5:30 Supper
7:00 Al Rimmer
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
THE UBC MUSICAL THEATRE SOCIETY
WILL HOLD
OPEN AUDITIONS
FOR ITS SPRING PRODUCTION
"PROMISES, PROMISES"
To be held Sat., Sept. 23rd
and Sun., Sept. 24th
from 1 -5 P.M.
in the
Student Union Building Auditorium
ww:-::::-:*::X::::::::^^
::::::::y::vW*ra^
FRIDAY
SKYDIVERS
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
GOLF TEAM
Meeting, noon, Buch. 100.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl     Burau     on     the     German
elections, noon, SUB 111.
SUNDAY
MEWMAN CLUB
Folk  mass and free meal, 11 a.m.,
St. Marks Chapel.
HELLO YOU BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE!!
Your U.B.C. Card is worth 5% Off
on any purchase!
HAPPINESS IS . . . sale days
everyday. . . try us, our prices are
lower on all new Fall fashions —
sweaters, blouses, slacks, co-ordinates,
brushed denims, cords. Happiness
Is... Boutique, 4576 West 10th
Avenue, 238-9931. Across Safeway.
LATE PAYMENT OF FEES
A late payment fee of $25.00 additional to all other fees will be
assessed if payment of the first instalment is not made on or before
September 22. Refund of this fee will be considered only on the basis of a
medical certificate covering illness or on evidence of domestic affliction. If
fees are not paid in full by the following date, registration will be cancelled
and the student concerned excluded from classes. First instalment —
October 6, 1972.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for non-payment of
fees applies for reinstatement and his application is approved by the
Registrar, he will be required to pay a reinstatement fee of $25.00, the late
fee of $25.00, and all other outstanding fees before he is permitted to
resume classes.
FOXY LADY
Shampoo
Lotions
Cream Rinse
Creams
Conditioner
Soaps
Bubble Bath
Oils
BOTTLES-20c
OR BRING YOUR OWN
All of our products are
Biodegradable and
made to our
specifications.
(all goods sold by tha oz.)
135 WATER STREET, GASTOWN
VAN., B.C.
CLASSIFIED
Rates:
Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines. 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and an- payable in
advance Deadline ii lhMla.ni.. the dav fir/ore publication.
Publications Office. Room 241 S.U.B.. UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DANCES
11
MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT UN-
dercut 72. Sat, Sept. 30, 8:30-1:00
SUB Cafeteria. Hardtlmes, full
facilities. ^ *
VAN. EAST FED. CONSERVATIVE
Social and Dance — Thurs., Sept.
21 — 8 p..m. — at Maglio's, 1739
Venables at Commercial — $2.50
per person — Students'. $1.50 —
For tickets phone 254-2031, 254-
2340   or  254-3054.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
$75 FOR 75c. WATCH FOR B.C.
Bonus Coupons coming early
October   .	
DISCOUNT STEREO. EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akai, A.G.S.,
Zenith   TVs.   Call   732-6769.
FOR YOUR HAIR NEEDS. GIVE
the UBC Barber Shop, or Beauty
Salon a visit. 5736 University
Blvd.   in   the   Village.	
DR. BUNDOLO'S PANDEMONIUM
Medicine Show. What is it? Who
cares?
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED   IMMEDIATELY   —   10v
speed bike in good condition.  Ph.
224-9684 ask for or leave message:
Blake	
URGENTLY REQUIRED. SECOND-
hand copies Physics 105 text
books and lab manuals. Bring to
Co-op   Book   Store.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1965 VALIANT V-200 2 DR. 6
cyl., stnd. Good condition, clean
w.w., radio, winter studs, $475.
Call  263-0714.	
'72 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE. PER-
fect condition. 12,000 miles, $2150.
Jaime Smith, Gage Residence,
East   17,   B   6.	
1970 VW BEETLE. VERY CLEAN,
good condition, extras, beige. Call
733-3282,   Eves.
Autos Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycle*
25
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Art Services
31
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Dance Bands
33
Duplicating & Copying
34
Scandals
37
WILL JACK FELL J'ANE AT
"  dercut    72?    Cum    and    see!
Sept.   30   SUB   Cafe.
UN-
Sat.
Typing
40
EXPERT    IBM    SELECTRIC    TY-
pist. Experienced essay and thesis
typist.  Mrs.  Ellis — 321-3838.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
ROOM,   BOARD,   REMUNERATION
to   woman   student   for   part-time
assistance,   including   driving,   for
paraplegic   working   woman.   Dunbar area.   733-2819  eves.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION 8c SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
SI
Special Classes
62
POTTERY  CLASSES,   NEAR  UBC,
mornings,      including      Saturday,
evenings.   12   weeks   $50.   Huyghe
School   of   Pottery,   4430   W.   10th
Ave.   224-5194,   228-9879.
Tutoring Service
83
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room &  Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
NEAR CAMPUS. SPACIOUS 3
room suite. Priv. bath & priv.
entrance. For two to share. No
cooking,   $40   each.   224-6389.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 19, 1972
SPOR TS
'Birds loss improvement
At this point in the football season one year
ago, UBC had just lost 52-0 to the U. of Alberta
Golden Bears.
Saturday the 'Birds faced those same Bears
in Edmonton. In spite of their 35-8 loss, they're
a greatly improved team.
The 'Birds show further reason for optimism
in the fact that they doubled their offensive
output of only one week ago. Against Calgary
the offense managed 41 yards. Saturday, they
gained 81.     In fact, had it not been for five
'Bird fumbles, four interceptions, and the
numerous dropped passes, the game might
have been close.
Alas, all cannot be perfect.
UBC quarterback Jim Tarves injured his
vertebrae early in the second half and may be
out for the season. If so, rookie Ten Hoh Choo
will take over.
The 'Birds' next effort will be Saturday
against the U. of Saskatchewan at Saskatchewan.
UBC BOWLING CLUB
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
Wed. Sept. 20, 12:30 Buch. 104
Bowling will be on Mon. evenings starting Sept. 25 and
possibly a Wed. league will be formed if the Mon. league
is full.
For further information call Walter
(the Secretary) at 228-8225
NEW    BOWLERS   WELCOME   IN   SUB    LANES
Volleyball and tennis begin
There are other extramural
activities at UBC besides
football.
For instance, men's extramural volleyball begins this
week. Three teams will be
raised and players are needed.
The first practices is at 6:30
p.m. today in PE gym B. There
are two other practices in the
Sports fest
The Women's Athletic
Department will hold a sports
night at 7:30 p.m. in War
Memorial Gym.
The meeting is intended for
those interested in women's
sports on campus.
The following women's intramural sports start this
week. Basketball, Thursday at
4:30 p.m. in Gym A. Volleyball,
Intramurals
Attention all managers!
Please note that Flag
Football and Badminton entries must be handed into Rm.
202, War Memorial Gym by
Wednesday. A managers'
meeting will be held on Friday
in Rm. 213 War Memorial gym
at 12:30 p.m.
All women students at UBC
are eligible for intramurals.
Interested students may
contact their organization's
manager or intramural coordinator Heather Mitton in
Rm. 202 War Memorial gym.
OPTOMETRIST
J.O. MacKENZIE
E ye   Exa-Tiinations
Contact   Lenses
3235   W.   Broadway
732-0311
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125  W.   10th  at Arbutus
War Memorial Gym at 6:30
p.m. Thursday and at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday.
Tennis team tryouts start
this week and if you don't
tryout you don't play.
Tryouts are scheduled today
through Friday from 4:30 p.m.
to 6:30 p.m. at the Winter
Sports Centre.
today at 7:30 in War Memorial
Gym. Gymnastics, weekdays
3:00 - 5:30 in gym E. Swimming, Thursday at 12:30 in War
Memorial 25. Badminton, Oct.
4at 6:30-8:30in gym A. Track,
Oct. 10 at 4:30 in the armories.
WAD still needs managers
for the following positions:
Vice-president, Big Block
President, Track Manager,
Tennis Manager, Campus
League Co-ordinator and
Public Relation Officer.
... Up and away with the volleyball squad.
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
Nominations are now
open for the following
Executive and Senate positions:
C0-0RDINAT0R
INTERNAL AFFAIRS
OFFICER
OMBUDSPERSON
SENATOR AT LARGE
Deadline for nominations is 12:30 p.m. Friday, September 22, 1972.
GRAD STUDIES
SENATOR
ARTS SENATOR
APPLIED SCIENCE
SENATOR
For eligibility forms and/or information, come to the
AMS Secretary's office SUB 250.
I
PAYMENT OF FEES
The Department of Finance, General Services Administration Bldg., wishes to remind students that the first
instalment is due on or before
Friday, September 22,1972
dealers of world famous
NIKON
RAGMIRE HANDYCRAFTS
EYE OPENERS FOR PEOPLE IN RES.
o East Indian Bed Spreads
$5.95-$7.95 Good colors and sizes
o Mexican shirts, blouses, leather and silver
o Men's plain white cotton shirts a specialty
o Pottery, Candies, Pipes, Good Vibes
Goods hand-made and special to order.
4474 West 10th
228-8030
to*
m**m*
NMWMMMMWM
mm
mm
SPORTS NIGHT!
Wednesday, September 20th
War Memorial Gym
For all women on campus interested in:
1 — Intercollegiate Sports
2 — Intramurals
3 — Campus League
4 — Recreation
5 — Referees and Scorers
Find out what athletics is all about!
Applications for positions of vice-president, managers and
campus league co-ordinator are being accepted NOW.
FREE COFFEE AND DONUTS! BRING A FRIEND!
mm
mm
mmmemmmmm
m
mm
This is a weicom amateur
^'-"r^'-a   oJ prices
Lens and SW«er Cameras
3010 W^roadWdjM^^^^
f^ttPi
N'PPOn   £
&0*****
'.*'

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