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The Ubyssey Sep 24, 1985

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 TJBC /a-cluvsss S&noi
THE UBYSSEY
^
Vol. LXVIII. No. 5
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 24,1985
228-2301
AIDS dispute centres on UBC
By GORDANA RASIC
Vancouver Aids victims are having difficulty getting dental work
done and they say UBC can, but
won't, do something about it.
"UBC doesn't have the finances
at this time for an AIDS dental
clinic," said George E. Price,
medical   director   of   the   Health
Sciences Centre. "The UBC dental
clinic does not turn any AIDS patients away. They are treated with
the usual infectious disease procedures."
Price said UBC does have special
provisions for hepatitis carriers but
it is already filled and has a waiting
list.
"If we put the AIDS patients on
top of that what would we have
then,' he said.
AIDS Vancouver head Bob Tivey
said he was "disappointed in the
response from UBC to a proposed
dental clinic there" since he knows
that "UBC has the needed facilities
but has not come forward."
"St. Paul's hospital received %Vi
-  mary mcalister photo
VANCOUVER'S WOMEN JOINED forces Friday evening to "take back the night." Carrying banners, singing
and chanting, they moved through the downtown core, calling attention to the plight of women in the city. Giant
dolls symbolising all women were carried, causing more than one second glance. Over four hundred women walked Friday. For complete story see page three.
UBC professors' salaries ranked   13th
By ALLISON FELKF.R
UBC faculty salaries are 13th
highest out of 36 universities in
Canada, down from first in
1981-82, according to a UBC administration study released Monday.
"The feeling is the situation
won't get much better this year or
next," said UBC faculty association
president Sidney Mindess. The
largest problem caused by the falling relative salaries is low morale,
he added.
"There is a gut feeling that more
people are looking for other jobs,"
he said, adding the lower salary
makes it difficult to retain and
recruit people.
Instructors also have fewer
teaching aids because of budget cuts
and "must work harder to get the
same amount of teaching," he said.
Average annual salaries at UBC
are $47,943 for 1984-85. Professors
at the University of Alberta, whose
salaries ranked first, were paid an
average of $54,024 for the same
year.
"Some indication is needed that
there will be a significant increase in
the future before long term
deterioration takes place" said
Mindess.
Robert Smith, acting president of
U.B.C, said the low salary levels
are a "regrettable situation." "You
can slip down faster than you can
climb up." Smith said.
Student representatives are also
concerned about the effect of professors salaries. "If you want to be
a world class university, we can't
expect to keep faculty, at current
salary rates," said Glenna Chessnut
president of the AMS.
She said young professors particularly, are paid less," and added
"sometimes these professors relate
to students better."
million from the government plus
resource money and it makes sense
to us to have all the AIDS programs
in one place," said Price, commenting where AIDS patients should be
treated.
"The teaching hospital decided
St. Paul's has a good program and
we are very supportive and would
recommend they continue to carry
on their mandate," he said.
St. Paul's public relations head
Estell Sures said her hospital didn't
"have such a thing here as a dental
clinic for AIDS patients and had no
plans for one in the future." She
said she didn't know about the $Vi
million funding at the hospital.
"Some funding was allocated to
St. Paul's but it went towards a
year-end adjustment which I don't
have the exact details on," she said.
"AIDS patients are being treated at
all hospitals but we've been getting
more publicity due to our resources
here."
Tivey said St. Paul's is the main
hospital for AIDS treatment in
B.C. due to a core group of doctors
and specialists there. They are also
treated at UBC, Vancouver General
and Shaughnessy hospitals.
"At the moment six or seven
private dentists have agreed to treat
AIDS patients after their work
hours. Their names cannot be
released because at this point the
public is so hysterical that if they
found out they wouldn't go to these
dentists." The precautions these
doctors are taking consist simply of
using sterilized equipment, he said.
Board fills chair
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Bill Sauder is the new chair of
UBC's board of governors following David McLean's resignation at
a board meeting with the Universities Council of B.C. Monday.
Sauder, who is an alumni
representative on the board and has
eight children who have studied at
UBC, said Monday he looked forward to good relations with
students, administration and faculty at the university.
"I have always enjoyed my relations with the young people at the
university," he said, adding he
wants to improve the whole university. "I think that the board will
look forward to dealing with (incoming UBC president) Dr.
Strangway very much," he said.
Faculty association president
Sidney Mindess welcomed the
change and departure of McLean.
"I can't say that faculty will be
sorry that McLean has left," he
said. "I think that faculty percieved
McLean as not being supportive of
the faculty or the university."
Mindess said he didn't know a lot
about Sauder and the board chair
doesn't have a lot to do directly
with faculty but "it remains to be
seen if he will be more supportive of
faculty than McLean was."
Faculty board representative
Patricia Baird said "it can't help
but be good" that Sauder "does his
homework before he looks at an
issue."
Student board representative
Nancy Bradshaw said Sauder seems
to go for student concerns when
votes go to the board.
"He is probably one of the most
concerned about student issues such
as accessibility," she said, adding
Sauder backs retaining funding for
programs students haven't finished.
U.S. cruises Nanoose
By JAMES YOUNG
American submarines visiting
Vancouver Island near Nanaimo
are most likely carrying sea-
launched cruise missiles, an activist
for the Nanoose Conversion Campaign said Sunday.
Speaking to 40 people at La
Quena coffee house, activist Peter
Danenhower said the U.S.S. Salt
Lake City carried Tomahawk
missiles when it visited a naval
weapons testing range 30 miles from
Vancouver in August and early
September.
"Our information is the Salt
Lake City actually had nuclear-
capable submarine-launched cruise
missiles on board while it was in
Nanaoose Bay," he said. "Whether
they were testing anything related to
the Tomahawk, we don't know."
Danenhower cited research by a
Hawaiian group stating the Salt
Lake City carries twelve of the
Tomahawk type missiles which the
Communications with Mexico aided by UBC hams
The UBC Amateur Radio Society is playing a major
role in aiding communications with earthquake-
ravaged Mexico.
"We are an international link to the disaster area,"
said Doug Wirsz, representative and former president
of the club. He added the society is providing the
public with access to radio operators in Mexico.
Most of the work they are doing deals with messages
from British Columbians in Mexico assuring friends
and relatives of their safety, said Wirsz.
The most pressing problem with communication to
Mexico is the lack of international phone lines, said
Wirsz. Most of the local lines are still intact.
The UBC operators radio messages to and from
operators throughout Mexico who have access to
those local lines.
"As long as the local lines in Mexico remain open,
we can maintain communications," said Wirsz.
The UBC Amateur Radio Society, with approximately 15 actively involved members, is one of three
Vancouver groups participating in the Mexican communications effort co-ordinated by the British Columbia Provincial Emergency Program.
American navy began deploying in
June. Of 4,000 missiles being
deployed, 760 are armed with
nuclear warheads, each having 10to
15 times the destructive power of
the Hiroshima bomb.
Referring to the American policy
of not disclosing the existence of
nuclear weapons on board its ships,
Danenhower said, "We've been
told again and again by the previous
and the present defense ministers
that Canada respects U.S. policy of
not informing the Canadian
government on these matters."
But he added it was not clear
whether the Canadian Department
of National Defense really does not
know or simply does not release the
information.
The Conversion Campaign is
calling on the Canadian government to follow New Zealand's decision in February not to allow
American ships into New Zealand
harbours, unless the Americans
confirmed there were no nuclear
weapons aboard.
Danenhower said that the agreement for American ships to use the
Canadian Forces Maritime Experimental and Test Ranges
(CFMETR) at Nanoose Bay comes
up for renewal in April and Canadians should reject it.
"If the agreement is renewed in
1986, and the Americans are allowed to bring nuclear weapons into
Nanoose, then any nuclear-free
campaign for Canada is artificial,"
he said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1985
New president Strangway: rocks in space
By KEITH STRINGER
Evidence suggests meteorites
found in Antarctica originated
from the moon and possibly Mars,
UBC's new president said Saturday.
David Strangway opened the
Vancouver Institute's fall lecture
series with a speech, on Exploring
the Planet for about 1,000 people in
Woodward instructional resources
centre.
Meteorites obtained by recent
American and Japanese scientific
expeditions underwent trapped gas
composition analysis and other tests
to determine their origin in space,
said Strangway.
Strangway said "the inference is
clear that the meteorites could have
come from the moon and Mars as a
result of "the bombardment process in the solar system." He cautioned that "without the whole picture we cannot begin to put into
context" the recent discoveries.
Strangway's guided tour of the
solar system included a discussion
on the impetus of missions into
outer space. He said the Apollo
mission was not done for science,
but was done "to show
technological superiority." He added scientists were "very fortunate to
have an influence" on the research
aspects of the mission.
"Nobody ever said to me you
can't do this, you can't do that,"
said Strangway, who tested lunar
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Room 200, Brock Hall
rock samples for NASA and was involved with other aspects of the
mission.
The American space station project  has an equally non-scientific
driving force, said Strangway.
"In my mind the project was not
driven by scientists trying to get a
space station," said Strangway, adding the push was due to "strategic
and military implications."
Various scientific fields (such as
mass   spectrometry)   will    benefit
from the station, though, by virtue
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Night and day they want freedom
By DEBBIE LO
Eleven year old Natasha Jenkins
was not afraid to walk downtown
last Friday night.
Natasha, accompanied by her
mother and about 400 women, participated in the sixth annual Take
Back the Night protest organized by
Vancouver Rape Relief and
Women's shelter.
"1 want my friends to be able to
walk by themselves when they get
older," she said.
Rape Relief speaker Drena Me-
Cormack addressed the crowd
before the march through
downtown Vancouver including
Granville Mall.
"We dare to demand freedom,"
she said. "I'm here for those
women who were warned about
strangers and then were attacked by
men they know. "Together we are
taking back the night and the day
too."
Women of all ages were present
at the protest.
Joanne Lambert, a young woman
who joined the protest when she
saw a crowd gathering at the Robson Square start site, said she
thought the march was important
for women at home. "Maybe
they'll see they are not alone."
Melissa Searcy, a mother who
brought her two year old daughter
along with her, said the march was
important because it was "energy-
expended toward a positive goal."
She added she hoped her
daughter would remember the
march because of the important
issues it raised.
The group marched through the
crowded Granville mall, some carrying person-sized puppet-like dolls
representing women from several
ethnic groups and backgrounds,
and others carrying candles, a traditional tool for the march.
"Not the church, not the state —
women must control their fate,"
chanted several women on the
march.
The high point in the march occurred when the group stopped for
several minutes in front of a midnight arcade which rents out "adult
videos".
"Tonight I will be able to walk
past   the  sex   shops   on   Granville
street without my head down," said
McCormack at the beginning of the
march.
Little response was noticed
among the silent men standing with
arms folded and hands inside of
their pockets in front of the store at
that time.
Shelley Rosner, a grade nine stu
dent at Killarney high school, said
she hoped the march would make
women at her school realize, "it can
happen to them and they are not
isolated."
The hour long women-only protest ended at St. Andrew's Wesley
Church amid supportive cheering,
whistling and clapping.
Board threatens the Meliorist
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The
University of Lethbridge threatened
to close down the student
newspaper recently if the paper
published the riame of a professor
three students had accused of sexual
harrassment.
The paper ran the story with the
professor's name blacked out, after
getting a threatening letter from the
U of L administration.
"We got a sharp lesson
merits    of   autonomy,
in the
said
Students call for SA ban
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Some UBC students are circulating a petition urging the Alma
Mater Society to stop selling products distributed by companies with
interests in South Africa.
Students for a Free Southern
Africa, a small but growing anti-
apartheid group, hope to halt the
sale of Rothman's cigarettes and
Carling O'Keefe beers in SUB and
have gathered more than 100
signatures in support so far.
"We want to give the AMS
government a better understanding
of where students as a whole stand
on this issue," said the group's
treasurer Sean Boulger, arts 3.
The petition reads in part:
"recognizing that any money I
spend on goods produced by South
Africa owned or partially owned
companies will ultimately support
the apartheid state and all the
violence it generates, I hereby request ... the AMS ... to immediately stop the purchase and
retail sale of;"
• Rothmans, Craven A, Dunhill
and Sportsman natural light
cigarettes in the AMS's SUB-
cetera store;
• Carling O'Keefe products, including Hi-Test, Miller's High
Life, B.C. Grower's Cider and
St. Michelle wines in the Gallery
Lounge and the Pit.
The anti-apartheid group plans to
collect as many as 500 signatures,
all of which will be presented to the
SPECIBLTIES
WCDI
4564 W. 10th Ave.
university gates
228-1112
AMS student council at its next
meeting, Oct. 2.
AMS president Glenna Chestnutt
said Monday she thinks student
council should not make a decision
"of this magnitude" for UBC's
more than 26,000 students.
"I think students should be free
to choose whether to support these
companies or not. It would make a
stronger statement to the companies
if students took a stand on their
own," she said.
The AMS, at its Sept. 18 meeting
failed to outline its position on the
boycott issue. Council members
discussed the possibility of mounting an educational campaign to inform students about companies
with ties to South Africa, but shelved plans to take action. The tabled
motion about the campaign will
likely resurface at the upcoming
meeting.
UBC's Graduate Student Society
has already removed Rothman's
cigarettes from the graduate
students centre's cigarette machine
and as of Sept. 13 has not ordered
Carling O'Keefe products.
Eight graduate student council
members voted in favor at a Sept.
12 meeting to ban the products,
while only two members were opposed, with one abstaining.
Society president Phil Bennett
said the AMS should follow the
graduate students' example. "There
are all kinds of moral and ethical
reasons why they should not sell
products by companies with ties to
South Africa," he said.
Meliorist editor Sue Ward. The
Meliorist is independant from control by the U of L student's council.
The administration told the
Meliorist not to publish the name of
the professor or the professor
would sue the paper for libel, Ward
said.
"We were on solid legal
ground," Ward said. "We had people ready to testify in court for us,
but we can't afford a lawsuit."
U of L president John Woods
said that while the Meliorist is
autonomous and self-governing,
and the board has no legal authority
over it, certain arrangements the
university provides could be reviewed.
"I'm referring to the facilities
here. The Meliorist rents space and
electricity from the university,"
Woods said.
Wards said Woods had threatened to do more than turn off the
power and lock the door.
"Woods said the Board would
forbid distribution of the Meliorist
on Campus," Ward said.
"He also said the board might
sue or suspend staff members if we
didn't pull the professor's name."
The administration contacted the
Meliorist's printer in Taber, Alberta, and said the printer would also
be sued if they printed this story.
Fortunately the woman who took
the call  knew  the libel laws and
Students to make heat, not war
B.C.'s first provincial peace conference has paved the way for a na-
tional peace conference in
November, a member of UBC's
Students for Peace and Mutual
Disarmament (SPMD) said Sunday.
"The conference achieved its
goal to create a network of peace
groups in the province as part of a
national alliance," said Mark Fet-
tes. "The delegates came prepared
and ready to work together."
At the conference's closing session held in the SUB auditorium,
John Moelaert of Kelowna told 150
delegates that Canadians must con
tinue their efforts to make their
government more aware of nuclear
issues.
"Politicians don't see the light
until they feel the heat," he said.
"We have to make the Canadian
politicians feel the heat as much as
the French politicians are over their
government's bombing of the Rainbow Warrior."
Conference delegates agreed End
the Arms Race should foster communication between the various
B.C. peace groups.
The conference took place both
Saturday and Sunday and offered
participants a number of peace-
related workshops to attend. These
covered topics such as the current
Stop Star Wars Campaign, the use
of taxes for peaceful purposes and
the creation of a nuclear-free
Pacific.
As an outgrowth of this conference, 35 B.C. peace group
delegates will attend the first national conference of the Canadian
Peace Alliance in Toronto from
November 8-11. Delegates will be
selected on the basis of regional
representation, with 13 coming
from the lower mainland.
would still run our paper," Ward
said.
The professor responded to the
three women's complaints through
the university's associate dean of
Administrative affairs, telling the
dean to tell the women that "no of
tense or disrespect was intended."
He offered to apologize through
Hoye's office for any offence which
the complainants "may have
perceived to have taken place."
Posters a
problem
Posters at UBC will require administration approval before
posting and the posting space will
be limited this year, if a new poster
proposal is approved.
UBC vice-president of finance
Bruce Gellataly said indiscriminate
postering has been a problem on
campus. "We just put up new bus
shelters and already they're covered
with posters," he said.
Gellataly said most of the posters
come from off-campus and added
the university presently lacks a
postering policy. "If there are no
rules there is nothing we can do,"
he added.
Approval will be required to post
any material outside of SUB. Each
department will be responsible for
their poster boards and the physical
plant will control the rest of campus.
"Students will suffer because less
poster space means less information
will be able to get to them," said
AMS vice-president Jonathon
Mercer. There has always been a
"common courtesy" poster policy
and there is no reason why it needs
to be "enshrined in law" now he
said.
Martin Cocking, student administrative commission secretary,
said physical plant is being given
too much power. Cocking believes
putting postering regulations above
bulleting boards, a method presently used in SUB, is an adequate
method to control postering.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1985
Expocide
We were saddened to learn earlier this week of the deaths of several
businessmen in Japan.
These gentlemen were the unfortunate victims of their own suicide.
Suicide among members of the business community has been known to
occur when the stock market crashes, when a marriage fails or when a
career is ruined. It's a sad by-product of the intensity of international
business.
These men didn't commit hara kiri because of any of the standard
causes. They died because of the failure of Expo '85, held in Scuba, a town
outside of Tokyo, to attract enough visitors over its six month course to be
termed any sort of a success.
One gentleman, unidentified by the press, took his life soon after the
opening day of the fair. Apparently the pavillion he was responsible for was
a restaurant of sorts which chose to offer a lunch featuring fried eels. Of
the hundreds of thousands visiting on the opening day, only 20 felt up to
such a serpentuous meal.
The theme of Expo 85 was high technology. It featured giant displays by
Sony and all the other Japanese corporate giants. Over 60 million people
lived within an easy day's journey of the site, and thousands of others were
expected to attend.
By the end of the exposition's six month run, attendance was only
enough to qualify it on one list of honor. Expo 85 became the fourteenth of
the last 19 world's fairs to lose money. Just over 20 million people stopped
by to pay their respects.
Expo 86, Vancouver's ticket to the big time, has far more realistic aims,
say its directors. The latest projections call for 15 million visits to the site.
Even if all 15 million show up, Expo chairman Jimmy Pattison sets the
estimated losses of Expo 86 at $300 million.
The six deceased businessmen in Japan killed themselves in order to prevent a loss of face. To commit suicide is deemed to be far more honorable
in Japanese tradition than to continue to live with the ignomy of having
lost vast amounts of money. They were not successful so they died.
What d'you think Jimmy? Socrates apparently found a glass of Hemlock
to be quite sufficient.
Letters
Time is ripe for anti-imperialist group at UBC
On September 18, Charles
Boylan, the National spokesperson
for the People's Front, spoke to a
group of thirty UBC students about
the cause of the danger of war, U.S.
imperialism and Soviet social-
imperialism and their military
alliances, NATO and the Warsaw
Pact.
He said that foremost on
students' minds is the desire to find
a solution to the danger of war. In
order to solve any problem, one
must sort out its causes and then
draw up a program of action.
Examining the causes of war, Mr.
Boylan described how the U.S.
created NATO at the end of the
Bleed in SUB
Sept. 30 to Oct. 4 is the annual
Engineers Red Cross Blood drive.
This year our goal is 2,500 pints of
blood, which would firmly establish
the UBC blood drive as the largest
clinic in western Canada.
Once again there is an interfacul-
ty challenge where every faculty
puts up a sum of money. The faculty with the highest percentage
turnout will direct the money to
their favourite charity.
The blood drive is from Monday
to Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
upstairs in SUB. There will be individual prizes for donors awarded
at the end of every day. These prizes
will include Keg dinners and theatre
passes. So come with a friend and
give the gift of life.
Paul Wilting
civil engineering
blood drive coordinator
applied science 4
Line up for offices
We would like to inform all clubs
that the spring bookings line up will
be on Tuesday, October 1, 1985 at
S.U.B. Room 230C. For those of
you who do not know, this is the
first day that appointments can be
made to book SUB rooms for the
spring of 1986. All appointments
will be made on a first come, first
serve basis, so come early if you are
planning a special event.  (In the
past clubs have lined up all night!)
Lorna Pritchard
Nindy Duggal
sac club commissioners
World War Two as a pretext to
keep its army in Europe. Today, the
U.S. declares it must defend the
peoples of the world from the
Soviets. Also, in explaining the
developments of Soviet social-
imperialism, he said counterrevolution had restored capitalism
in the Soviet Union and today it is
also on a chauvinist path.
The cause of war, then, is the imperialist system, highly profitable to
each financial oligarchy, said the
speaker. It is up to the masses to
stop imperialist intervention. This is
a mission in which students have a
very great role. The course of action
which all Canadians must undertake is to get Canada out of NATO.
Getting Canada out of NATO will
partly dismember U.S. imperialism.
One student asked about the need
to maintain the "balance of power"
between the two superpowers. To
this the spokesperson replied that
the superpowers desire a "balance
of power" in order to complete
their own hegemonic plans. Social
uprisings hinder their plans, so that
even a demonstration of 100,000 in
Vancouver worries both superpowers. Therefore, said Mr.
Boylan, it is necessary for the
masses to upset this "balance of
power".
Boylan said the superpowers do
everything they can to manipulate
mass anti-imperialist actions. They
try to convince the people that their
efforts are futile and so on. But the
people must not be passive,
fatalistic nor pessimistic, for this is
all part of the war-psychosis which
the imperialists are trying to inculcate in to the minds of the
youths, students, and others.
The People's Front calls upon
UBC students to actively participate
in the struggle against the war
preparations   of   the   two   super
powers, and, specifically, to get
Canada out of NATO. Also, the
People's Front has been circulating
a petition to oppose the presence of
the superpower warships in Canadian waters, and has received hun
dreds of eager signatures on campus. The time is ripe for the formation of an anti-imperialist war
group at UBC.
Barb Waldern
unclassified student
Books keep going up
Stay open ... or else!
I'm surprised and puzzled that
our library closed at 5 p.m. on Friday. Perhaps the staff, administration, or faculty feels that UBC
students "goof off" for the first
week or half month of the new
term.
I found that my reaction to the 5
p.m. closing of the library was one
much closer to disgust than surprise. University is a seven or more
hours per day occupation — at least
it is for me.
I am sure that I, with my important political connections, could apply immense pressure if UBC does
not mature from these policies and
lack of development within 10 days.
I shall report this negligence to: A)
The government of B.C.; B) The
Council of North American Colleges and Universities; C) The
Canadian universities council; and
D) The Canadian Press; and E)
Brian Mulroney.
I'm able to create many more
items of difficulty unless significant
and meaningful changes occur
within 10 days.
Rick Marshall-Mede
arts grad student
It was with great concern that I
read the article entitled "Textbooks
to Go Up" in the Friday,
September 13th Ubyssey. The story
stated that "... In retaliation to
the flourishing used bookstore
trade on campuses across the country, McGraw Hill Ryerson Limited
announced it will be revising its
texts more frequently, increasing
obsolescence and raising textbook
prices ..."
As the coordinator of this year's
AMS Used Bookstore, I can strongly attest to the demand for secondhand books. This is backed up by
the fact that the AMS Used
Bookstore sold $38,000 of discounted books in the first two days
alone. The reason for this is clear.
As a student, 1 was forced to pay
$110 for three books for one third
year commerce course. I, unfortunately, was unable to get these
books second-hand since they were
all new revisions — an alarming
trend in many of my courses this
year.
It appears that the only way that
McGraw Hill Ryerson will respond
to our concerns is if they hear how
outraged students are at their proposal. I have started a petition to inform them of our concerns and will
be circulating it to other Canadian
universities and colleges. You can
show your concern by signing the
petition located at the Used
Bookstore (SUB 125) or at the AMS
Business office (SUB 266). As they
say on Hill Street, "Let's do it to
them before they do it to us!"
Simon Seshadri
AMS director of administration
THE UBYSSEY
September 24, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Yum, yum, tuna sandwiches" cried Debbie Lo and Stephen Wisenthal as Morgan Burke and Edward
Mou divided the Extra Old Stock at the Ubyssev staff picnic. David McCuilum and Gordana Rasic
slurped Mexican Tequila sensuously in sunny SUB 24IK while Erika Simpson and Byron Johnson
chomped on French Subs embellished with Green Pieces of French cucumber. Allison Felker could'nt
resist Catherine Semple's simple Argentinian beefburger, even as Norm Rawin and Shelley Butler ran
in clutching two bottles of Austrian anti-freeze. Eva Busza demanded a saccharin fix from Svetozar
Kontic while James Young and Steve Neufeld debated in between sips Russian vodka's supremacy
over Polish vodka. The food orgy ended when Kevin Loo found satiated Ubyssians smoking Sportsman cigarettes behind SUB bulletin boards.
UBC CURLING CLUB
2 Draws Available
WEDNESDAY, 5:00-7:00
THURSDAY, 9:30-11:30
Starting Date: Wed., Oct. 9
Thurs., Oct. 10
Box No. 27, AMS office or at our booth on
Clubs Days Sept. 23, 24 in SUB.
Just a reminder . . .
WE DO 1 HR. COLOR PROCESSING AND
PASSPORT/I.D. PHOTOS
STUDENT DISCOUNT 10%
H    #3—4480 W. 10th
(at Sasamat)
224-4215
Mon.-Sat. 9:30-5:30
BPHOTO Tuesday, September 24, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Exploration slowed by gravity
From page 2
of the near perfect vacuum and
weightless environment it provides,
he said.
A handful of space projects
underway that scientists have prompted were outlined during the
talk. Voyager 2 will reach Uranus in
a few months and send back information as it did when passing
Jupiter and Saturn. The Russians
will be sending an unmanned
spacecraft to the moons of Mars
within five years. In the same
period, Americans will be intensifying the search for evidence of other
solar systems using the space shuttle. A high resolution mapping of
Venus is also anticipated.
Dr. Strangway explained that one
of the big problems facing future
space missions lies in our location.
Here on Earth, he said, "we're at
the bottom of a very deep (gravity)
well." Once off, moving around
would be very energy efficient.
"We are captives of this well we are
sitting in the bottom of." By the
end of the century, mining the
moon (with its much "shallower"
gravity well) and using the materials
to build in space the desired ships
and space stations may become a
reality.
Strangway's own field of
research involves the geophysical
history of magnetism, which leads
to the geological history of planets.
He had hoped that lunar rock
samples returned by the Apollo missions would be of sufficient age to
determine the early history of the
Earth and other planets. Unfortunately, he confessed, "the moon
didn't bring us the Rosetta stone of
the solar system."
The key to solving the "early
history of the solar system" will
probably be found in the
meteorites, which are over four and
a half billion years old, he said adding at present, we still don't have
the Rosetta stone to the solar
system.
Strangway did not hesitate to
answer questions which had
religious overtones. When asked if
he trusted the age estimates of some
. to soma cultmos tennis is con***** m^9*m#m&«<tetk>H»tito*wkmto.THiimm<i
no waive* In tiw, BritwhMis:ftM'JtoCMMy-Mtafvwysbeen dead. ThePaoferxmtiJsttsand
(Sneny. Rock and Ral Is the vshicJs *f th» 0s**. ftSfee Charts* has bk, e*s. fifch Utfle.Bfc<* Mack'
fMIher. These we a fwt of my feptfe* tWag*„
 _^<g	
n.  n. O
'I   told   you   we   should   have
packed our tuxedos!"
bacterial fossils thought to be well
over three billion years old, he
answered in the affirmative. He said
clear evidence of such ancient life
now exists.
Strangway does not rule out the
possibility. He said all the water
beneath Europa's surface ice makes
it "A very likley place to go looking
for life forms."
The new UBC president was also
asked whether there was any
"evidence of a creator from space
science." He acknowledged that we
don't know "what the heck happened" in the past billions of years
and that there are "an awful lot of
unanswered questions."
David Strangway will become
UBC's tenth president at the start
of November. In closing the
planetary lecture, UBC chancellor
Robert Wyman remarked that it's a
good thing Dr. Strangway seems so
interested in solving complex problems. "Believe us, November 1
you'll get a complex problem."
 UBC DANCE CLUB	
FREE
INTRODUCTORY
JIVE LESSONS
Fri., Sept. 27
SUB Party Room
12:30-1:30
Contact: UBC Dance Club, SUB 241G (228-3248) or
see us during Clubs Days!
#«£-
=^
l&rWKS/i
To welcome you back we're offering you.
Canon
Whpt HEWLETT
milKM PACKARD
ALL
CALCULATORS
^
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Texas
Instruments
CANON
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TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
Come on over to:
UBC Bookstore Electronics Shop
We Have The Largest Selection of Electronic-
Calculators in Western Canada
We're open Wed. evenings ck all day Saturday
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard   228-4741
10°/(
to ON  THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
1X3/0 DISCOUNT*
ON ANY HAIR SERVICE
(OFFER EXPIRES OCT. 30, '85)
I 5784 University Blvd.
I (in UBC Village) Vi Blk. away
I 'Offer valid witn presentation of tnis ad!
224-1922  |
224-9116  |
i ^^ ,
Dr. Kenneth W. Brown
is pleased to announce the relocation
of his dental practice to:
#407—1770 West 7th
(7th & Burrard)
736-3808
SAME DAY EMERGENCY SERVICE
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
* passport pictures
• specialty papers
* volume discounts
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th8-9       Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
&lbudielhss
Look sharp.
The headhunters
are coming.
Thev're aiming to find you. The cream.
Those who have ambition, smarts and
motivation.
The bright minds who wish to join a bright,
energetic company.
An international firm of chartered
accountants, professionals with an industry
reputation for forward thinking and excellence.
If you think your head fits with ours, please
submit your application, accompanied by recent
transcripts, to the Campus Limployment Center
by October 3rd.
October 2 1st, 22nd & 23rd, we'll be on
campus. Hunting for you. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1985
rweofi
TODAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Fall term registration, 9:30 a.m.  to 3:30 p.m.,
main concourse, SUB.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, Brock Hall 304.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Discussion of boycott policy and meeting of all
photographers, noon, SUB 241k.
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration,   10:30 a.m.   to 2:30  p.m..   Club's
Days table.
UBC JUDO
Meeting, 8:30 p.m., Osborne Gym   E'.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Meeting, 5 p.m., Sybille Buchberger's place.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, party room
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — On the
tiny island kingdom of hairy puce
blurgs Windy Bugel was pacing in
sheer madness hoping that
everything would stop making
sense. Desperately seeking students,
Bugle climbed the clockwork
orange tower and gave the call to
the wild. It was no longer waiting
for Godot Repoman, Eraserhead,
and the breakfast club (eating
Raoul) showed up against the liquid
sky. Paunchy Flabshaw and Payme
Jamie were looking for five easy
pieces to take on a European Vacation.
Chastity was stuffing her ears with
cotton blurgs to avoid hearing the
telephone. Instead she got one of
the sacunderlings to answer the
phone and say, "Ooga booga ooga
ooga".
Ooga had a few things to say about
that, but blurgers were not upon
their flit crit. Back downstairs, the
groundlings were grovelling for
favors. Two amserands would get a
semi-good clubbing spot and three
± connections might get you a spot
near the doors. Very soon the
pleburgers began to file in, each trying to get affiliated with another:
the gregarian instinct took over as
mauve blurgs found mauve blurgs
and pink found pink.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m.. Gallery lounge
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS-
ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch B323.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Open house — wine and cheese, 4:30-6:30 p.m.,
SUB 130.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Free dance classes with coupon, 8:30-10 a.m.,
3:30-6:30 p.m., SUB.
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration, noon, SUB 208.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Pizza   night,   after   Jamatkhana,   Jamatkhana,
Brock Hall.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, party room.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Varsity vs Meralomas, 5:30 p.m., Thunderbird
Stadium.
THUNDERBIRD ORIENTEERS
Orienteering (a sport involving navig
mapped course) event. 6:30 p.m., in
Memorial gym  Instruction fo
Iting around a
front (jf War
Yices available
AIESEC UBC
Career    Days,     10:00-4:30,    SUB    mam
thoroughfare.
THURSDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 5pm., Lutheran Campus Centre.
GAYS AND LESBIANS UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 215
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Group meeting, 7 p.m., 1868 Knox Rd
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration, noon, SUB 208.
MARXIST-LENINIST STUDY GROUP
Forum: "The Necessity for Marxism-Leninism,"
noon, BUCH B223.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Free classes with coupon, 8:30 a.m., 3:30, 6:30
p.m., SUB.
UBC JUDO
Class, 8:30 p.m., Osborne Gym "E".
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
General meeting, noon, Brock Hall 302.
AISEC UBC
Career   Days,   10   a.m.-4:30   p.m.,   SUB   main
thoroughfare.    Informal    wine    and    cheese.
4:30-6:30 p.m., SUB party room.
COMPUTER SCIENCE STUDENTS' SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, CSCI 201
UBC FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
MEN
MEN
Needed for
MEN
By William Congreve
November 6-16
Directed by
Arne Zaslove
Please Contact the Theatre Dept. for Audition
228-3880 or Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre
.HONDA.
Good, Inexpensive Transportation
for Getting Back to School
From your back-toschool
bike shop...
SPREE
One to go"
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Want a little bike?
1984 CB125 DEMOS only $688*
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CARTER
UNDER THH GRANVILLE BRIDGE • AT FOURTH AVENUE • PHONE 736-4547
ZETA PSI . . .
It's not just a fraternity,
it's a tradition!
Rushing dates: Friday, Sept. 27,
Tuesday, Oct. 1, Tues., Oct.8
3569 Mayfair, Ph: 261-6155
VOLUNTEERS WANTED
SPEAKEASY
UBC's Peer Counselling and Information Centre is now
accepting volunteer applications. If you are looking for a
rewarding volunteer job, we want you. Successful applicants will receive training on crisis counselling techniques.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, DROP BY
OUR OFFICE ON SUB MAIN
CONCOURSE OR PHONE 228-3777
I'THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 addi
tional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
11 - FOR SALE- Private
SMITH CORONA electric Typewriter with
cast. Brand new condition. $249.00.
325-3888 after 6 p.m. Corrected number.
21" MEN'S NISHIKI 10-speed, fenders incl.
$150 obo. 738-9019 aft. 6 p.m.
20 - HOUSING
BACHELOR APARTMENT for rent Kits
beach, $350/mo. Available Oct. 1.
736-3896, 732-9313.
25 - INSTRUCTION
FAST, EFFICIENT, professional writing/
editing/typing services. Excellent results.
Reas. rates. 734-0154.
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander,
Graduate of Juilliard School of Music.
321-4809.
30 - JOBS
MOTHERS OF 3-8 year old children wanted
for parenting research, UBC. 1 hr. required
and $5.00 paid for participation. Call Susan,
321-4346.
80 - TUTORING
TUTORING IN
ENGLISH
Private Assistance for students
at all levels.
W.S. Parker, B.A., MA.
733-4534
85 - TYPING
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9857,
224-7351.
WORD WEAVERS Word Processing
(Bilingual! Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
35 - LOST
THUNDERTECH PERFECT TYPING. Computerized word processing system. Essays,
resumes, etc. Stud, rates. 873-2062.
EXPERT TYPING - IBM Sel. essays, term
papers, letters, resumes, theses. Reas.
rates. 298-1147.
ON WED.. SEPT. 18 outside main library,
Seiko Sports 100 diving watch, blue face,
silver band. Call Mike 261-3909.
LOST ON SEPT. 21a lady's gold bracelet
with great sentimental value around Buch.
Phone Cindy at 325-1769 after 8 p.m.
Reward.
40 - MESSAGES
ANY UBC STUDENT, staff, faculty wishing
to write about peace/disarmament for The
Ubyssey please call James at 734-4128.
CALL VERNON GEARING'S friend Chris
that you met in T.O. at Carabana a.s.a.p.
Patti, 931-5026.
70 - SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years ex
penence. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
NORTH VANCOUVER. Fast service, careful
atten. to academic detail. $1.40 dbl. space
page. 985-4829.
TYPIST WILL TYPE essays, reports, theses,
etc. $1 per pg. Call 736-0052 after 6 p.m.
PERSONAL INJURY
ACCIDENT CLAIMS
Gerrit TeHennepe
Barrister & Solicitor
683-6561
No Charge For
Initial Consultation
TYPING & WORDPROCESSING. Special
student rates. Efficiency guaranteed. Call
Gail at 732-8311 or 266-2879.
EXPERT essay, theses typing from legible
wk. Spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829,
10 a..-9 p.m. King Ed. bus rte.
TYPING/WORD    PROCESSING.    Ex
perienced   typist.   Reasonable   rates.   Call
Mari-lou, 421-0818 (near Lougheed Mall).
90 - WANTED
SOCCER goalkeeper needed for 3rd
division, city league team. Contact Bruce
228-5582, 228-8246.
ADVENTUROUS? Two buddies meet two
buddettes. Excitement, intrigue Er
suspense. DISCOVER DOUBLEDATE for
$20/year. 736-4444.
SUBJECTS NEEDED
Physically active female subjects are required immediately for a study involving the effects of mild
iron deficiency on work capacity. Benefits to
subjects include iron status assessment, computerized dietary analysis, physiological assess
merit &■ iron supplementation. Interested?? Contact Ian Newhouse, 734 9662 or B.C. Sports
Medicine Clinic, 228-4045. Tuesday, September 24, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Calgary squeaks by 'Birds
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Calgary Dinosaur quarterback
Lew Lawrick scored on a one yard
plunge with 24 seconds left to go
giving his team a narrow 18-17 victory over the visiting UBC football
club at McMahon stadium on Friday night.
UBC could not take advantage of
a 15-0 half-time lead as a tough
Calgary defense suddenly came to
life in the second half. Lawrick,
Calgary's much heralded star, was
ineffectual for almost the entire
game until he managed to string
together a drive in the last minute.
UBC coach Frank Smith said,
"All the teams we play this year
have veteran defenses which makes
it awfully tough to score
sometimes."
UBC running back Terry
Cochrane had another outstanding
game, scoring two touchdowns and
carrying the ball 19 times for 92
yards. Teammate and quarterback
Jordan Gagner also had another
strong showing completing 17 of 35
passes for a total of 223 yards.
Calgary started their comeback in
the second quarter with a field goal.
Then Lawrick hit receiver Mike
Shiroiska in the end-zone with a
four yard pass. Seconds earlier
Lawrick and Shiroiska had connected for a long gain that took
Calgary down to UBC's 20 yard
line.
A UBC penalty gave Calgary
another chance in the late stages of
the game and Lawrick made full use
of it. A couple of Randy Beck
receptions took Calgary to UBC's 2
yard line and the big 6'1" 210
pound quarterback plunged into
the endzone 1 play later.
As in their previous two games
UBC displayed tremendous ball
control but had difficulty capitalizing on scoring opportunities. One
problem is field goal kicking and
another is the tough veteran
defences of the opposition.
FREDERIC WOOD
THEATRE
University of British Columbia
THE GLASS
MENAGERIE
By Tennessee Williams
HOLDOVER
PERFORMANCE)
Monday,
September 30
8:00 p.m.
Student Price: $4.50
(Box Office: Room 207
Frederic Wood Theatre)
Res. 228-2678
SOPHISTICUT
Special Offer
20% Off
Any Hair Service
[With Student AMS
Card
1071 Denman St.
688-7808
2178 W. Broadway
731-4138
On the defense Rob Moretto
looked a lot like Ken Easly throwing some superb hits including one
that caused a fumble by Calgary
running back Elio Geremia. Mark
Norman and Jack Beestra each had
one interception while Carey Lapa
and Dwayne Derban each had one
sack.
The sore point for the Thunderbirds was field goal kicking which
was less than effectual in the game.
Missed field goals may well have
cost the 'Birds their game and if the
problem is not solved, it could lead
to further losses.
UBC opened scoring at 3:50 of
the first quarter when Cochrane
went in from the six yard line.
Cochrane scored again with only 15
seconds left in the half on a two
yard run. The touchdown capped
off an impressive 12 play 83 yard
drive that was highlighted by a couple of great catches by receiver
Mike Bellefontaine.
ii
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL
>»
Tuesday, Sept. 24
FEAST BEFORE FAST
Join us for a freshly cooked lunch before Yom
Kippur — 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 26
Network Seminar with Prof. William Nicholls of
the Religious Studies Dept.
"Impressions of a Year in Israel" 12:30 p.m.
Torah Portion of the Week — 2:00 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 27
Oneg Shabbat at 1053 Douglas Crescent —
8:30 p.m. Stories, Songs, Dessert.
For further info on all of the above, phone 224-4748
PLEASE NOTE THAT HILLEL WILL BE CLOSED
ON WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25 FOR YOM KIPPUR
**SPECIAL**
*STUDENT PRICE*
Until Oct. 15, 1985
TANDY
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685 E. BROADWAY (at Fraser)
Vancouver, B.C.
PHONE . . . ** DAVID FRENCH **
NOW     . . . ** 874-3433 **
STUDENT SPECIAL
20% OFF
THE REGULAR PRICES
OF ALL MERCHANDISE
IN THE STORE.
With a copy of this ad
or the presentation of
an AMS Card.
Big savings on hockey equipment, soccer   boots,   racquets,   running   wear,
sports bags, day packs, etc. etc. etc.
COMMUNITY SPORTS
3615 West Broadway
733-1612
OPEN SUNDAYS NOON TO 5:00 P.M.
THIS OFFER EXPIRES SEPT. 30/85
Those of us who tike tuna fish sandwiches under our arms ha» John Fraser. Nothing could tortes us
to have garlic sauce on our' beef dip sandwiches. We never ever take Tylenol for our headecdes.
Airplanes'? Forgat that one too. Absolutely none of us eat apples on Metjowe'en. We.«ry not to fletltw '
shakes Jn Mexifio. We never buy seasoning sals that contains methyl isocvsrate. Caveat Emptor,   ' *
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
Faculty Of Arts
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO THE
FACULTY OF ARTS:
One representative from the combined
major, honours, graduate, and diploma
students in each of the departments and
schools of the Faculty of Arts.
Two representatives from each of First and
Second Year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the meetings of
the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department Offices, the Dean of Arts' Office, the Faculty Adviser's Office, and the
Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the Registrar
of the University not later than 4:00 p.m., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27,
1988.
NOTE: In constituencies from which no nominations have been
received by the deadline, there will be no representation.
a)
b)
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3306 WEST BROADWAY
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VANCOUVER, B.C.
732-0008
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Extended Wear
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.38
complete
10% OFF ON EXCLUSIVE FRAMES
WITH THIS COUPON	
STORE HOURS:
Monday/Thursday
Friday
■    Saturday
9 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
9 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
MAJOR CREDIT
CARDS ACCEPTED
lOffer Valid Until Oct. 12/861
/F.
BOOKSTORE
announces a
NEW YEAR ROUND SERVICE,
beginning September 3rd
FOR YOUR
USED TEXTBOOKS
We will pay you up to 50% for
your current edition texts, scientific,
technical or reference books.
A
service
of
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard
228-4741 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1986
Thunderbirds salvage tie with Victoria Vikings
By STEVE NEUFELD
The defending Canadian champion UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team opened their 1985 title defence
last Saturday with a hard fought 1-1
tie with their conference rivals, the
University of Victoria Vikings
before 200 spectators at O.J. Todd
Field on campus.
Less than three minutes into the
game. Thunderbird Canada West
all-star from last year's season,
Mike Malana, opened scoring for
UBC and the game was on. Conditions were ripe for some physical
and close checking soccer and that
is what fans saw as the Vikings carried the play to the Thunderbirds.
With six players on the roster
from   the  recently  successful   na-
VACANCIES
FOR
WOMEN
in
TOTEM PARK
RESIDENCE
(Room & Board)
Commencing: September 1, 1985
to: April 30, 1986
Rates: Single room - $2,986.96
Double room - $2,732.86
Please Contact:
PONDEROSA
HOUSING OFFICE
2071 West Mall
Tel: 228-2811
NEW
RETURN POLICY
On
Course Books
w
• Course books bought for Fall
Term m;iy be  returned for
full refund  any time up to
Oct. l\t   (the ten-day rule
has been eliminated).
Books must be unmarked and
in saleable-as-new condition.
• Returns will NOT be accepted without the original
SALES RECEIPT.
After OCT. 1st all sales of
course books will be NON-
RETURNABLE.
REMEMBER
to keep your receipt.
NO RECEIPT
NO REFUND
NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Blvd.
228-4741
tional team program, UVic proved
quite a match for the T-Birds but
neither team was able to generate
some scoring changes near the nets.
Consequently, the goaltenders (all-
Canadian Brian Kennedy for UBC
and Tobin Walker for the Vikes)
saw little action, although Kennedy
made two solid saves. Walker failed
the test on the only shot he faced:
Malana's goal. Regulation time
ended without Victoria notching the
equalizer but injury time totalling
seven    minutes    allowed    Brad
McAdam to score on Kennedy.
Johnson noted the positive performances of Kevin Riley and Terry
Klim in the afternoon matchup and
summed up the Vikings' domination of play after the game as he
commented in a thick Scottish
brogue.
"It's better to have half a loaf
than none at all," said Johnson.
UBC's next home games in the
short, ten game Canada West
schedule come this Friday and
Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. when
WHERE    YOU    FIND    A
PERFECTLY   ACCEPTABLE
FAST-FOOD MEAL
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE
DAILY SPECIALS. SAVE LOTS
OF MONEY ON YOUR FOOD
BILLS
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Are You In Search Of Excellence?
Laventhol & Horwath urgently needs 1986 graduates interested in becoming chartered accountants with a "business"
sense to handle our existing and new clients.
Our firm seeks creative individuals who take pride in a job
well done and who have the desire and ability to provide professional business advisory, tax planning, and audit services
required by the entrepreneurial business community. Our
clients expect nothing less than the best of service from our
firm.
If you have the desire and ability to provide the innovative
and excellent services our clients expect, we need to hear from
you. Please submit your application and recent transcript to
the attention of Mr. David A. Chucko, our personnel partner, at the Canada Employment Centre by October 3. We
look forward to meeting you on campus on October 21st and
22nd.
u
Laventhol & Horwath
Chartered Accountants/Management Consultants
Vancouver    Calgary    Winnipeg    Toronto    Montreal
A Member of Horwath A Horwath Internationa/ with affiliated offices worldwide.
Super
\fclu
3250 West Broadway
at Blenheim
5% DISCOUNT
Off Your Grocery
Order
Ask at the cashiers
for your Student
Discount card.
Student/AMS card I.D. required. Minimum purchase $30.00
Details at Store
they host Calgary and Lethbridge
respectively. Only the league champion makes the national playoffs in
the   Canada   West,   so   every   en
counter is important. Admission to
these games is free as spectators are
treated to some of the finest soccer
in British Columbia.
Register NOW with the
UBC DANCE CLUB
and enjoy
Meeting People — Learning to.dance — Lessons
taught by professionals — monthly parties — and
much more.
at LOW, LOW Prices!!
Contact: UBC Dance Club-Upper Sub (228-3248)
JOIN THE FUN!!!
•Free Jive Lessons, Friday, September 27 at 12:30 p.m.
SUB Party Room
CURLERS!
HOUSE
SUNDAY OCT. G TH.
UMWINTER
SPORTS CENTER
new > curlers welcome
10AM. TO 4PM.
YOUR CHANCE TO
TRY CURLING-FREE!
■H4JT1 PEi3!V3N
/
PERM • BODYWAVE SPECIAL
PERM, CUT & DRY    6) A    QK
till
31 Oct. 85
733-3831
39
3621 W. 4th Ave.

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