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The Ubyssey Mar 27, 1984

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 UBC Archives Serial
Vol. LXVI.No.47
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 27, 1984
^ «        228-2301
AMS manager to get $73
iii
By CHRIS WONG
THE Alma Mater Society executive decided at a closed
meeting Monday to give student
society general manager Charles
Redden a 10 per cent salary increase, bringing his earnings up to
$73,000 a yea-.
AMS vice-president Doug Low,
the only one of five executive
members to vote against the increase, said Redden's current
$66,000 salary is sufficient. A
survey conducted at the University
of Alberta revealed that the next
highest paid student society general    his    West    Vancouver    home
Spy bill receives
federal support
manager in Canada receives $35,(XX)
a year, he added.
"It's outrageous the AMS would
give a 10 per cent increase to the
general manager who's salary is
double that of any student society
general manager. At a time when
everybody else is being cut, how do
students have the audacity of giving
this increase?"
Low said the salary increase
should be discussed at a council
meeting for ratification.
But Redden, in an interview from
By VICTOR WONG
The coalition against the creation
of a civilian security intelligence
agency has vowed to renew its opposition now that parliament has
approved the proposal in principle.
"This is probably the greatest
threat to our freedom that's come
forward so far," said coalition
member Don Stewart. "We are saddened and frustrated that there has
been no public outcry against this."
Parliament gave approval in principle to Bill C-9 — the Canadian
Security Intelligence Act — March
20 by a margin of 128 to 96. Currently under study in a committee,
the bill will probably be passed
before the current legislative session
ends, Stewart said.
"The Liberals are quite anxious
to get it through."
But the possibility of a summer
federal election could prompt the
bill's death on the order paper, he
said, adding the NDP are
vehemently opposed to the creation
of an intelligence agency. He said
the Progressive Conservatives have
mixed feelings about the proposal.
"The party lines are fairly well
drawn; it's unlikely that any politicians will swing one way or the
other."
Coalition member Brian
Haywood said the coalition wants
the federal government to scrap the
bill. "Once the bill becomes law,
that's it. There can be no discussion
about it. It's like cancer — you
don't know you've got it until
you're almost dead."
Although several prominent
politicians, including Ontario's attorney general, are pressing for revisions, any changes will not reduce
the bill's impact on civil libenies, he
said.
Reg Robson, B.C. Civil Liberties
Association president, said the
government failed to make major
revisions to the bill and that Bill C-9
is essentially the same as the
original version, Bill C-157.
"The power to act illegally is still
there."
The association is working on a
brief to be presented within two
weeks to the committee studying the
bill.
"It is a dangerous bill, and we
will devote our resources to fighting
it," Robson said.
'Leftoids' axe CFS
Canadian University Press
The Canadian Federation of Students has lost two especially paintfui
membership referenda. For the first time, the federation faced
opposition from campus activists who endorse the idea of a national student organization, but reject CFS as too moderate. The two campuses —
Guelph University and Trent University — used to be active in the
organization. Student leaders at both campuses held what they called
"principled no" campaigns.
Teresa LeGrand, member of the Trent student union executive, said the
federation does not succeed at mobilizing students and its members do not
debate serious issues. She conceded the federation provides services and
lobbies the federal government, but said "if this is all that is of concern to
CFS, let's just cut the crap, call it the 'Canadian Student Interest Lobby
Group and Services Organization' and lower the membership fee."
Tami Roberts, B.C. representative to the federation's national executive,
said the Guelph and Trent councils fail to realize the benefits from working
with other students.
"Their analysis is superficial and simplistic. If they see (CFS) as
something outside of their own campuses, they don't understand what the
federation is about."
Roberts said the two universities want to reap the benefits of a national
student organization without participating in the democratic process, adding if the student leaders had principles, they would act on their beliefs in
conjunction with other students.
"It's a strange response to the conservative trend in campus politics. It's
like saying, 'I'll take all my marbles and go home,' " she said.
Roberts also criticized Ann Travers. Guelph external vice-president, who
led the first "no" campaign. Travers was defeated when she ran for national chair at the CFS general meeting in November.
"The whole thing reeks of sour grapes. If she won chair, and thought
that one position could change the face of this organization, then she is
putting too much faith into the 'leadership' than the grassroots who she
claims to represent," said Roberts.
"I would doubt that those campuses are as trendy leftoid as the councils
claim they are."
disagreed. Executive members
traditionally decide the increases in
the general manager's salary
without council input, he said. "As
far as I'm concerned, both me and
the previous general manager have
always negotiated salaries with the
outgoing president and the finance
director," he said.
Redden added his salary should
not be compared to those of other
student society general managers
because they have different skills.
"I don't have a career as a slu-
dent business manager, I have a
career as a business man. I worked
hard to get (my skills) and I've been
paid a fair rate."
AMS president Margaret Copping said Redden is worth his salary
because he makes "much, much
more" for the AMS than he gets
paid. Both the Pit and Games
Room have become profit-making
operations under Redden's direction, she said.
"Charles is hired to expand the
AMS — that's why he gets paid
what he does," Copping said.
Redden's salary increase should
match similar pay hikes given to Office and Technical Employee Union
members in November, she said.
The OTEU received a 11.5 per cent
salary increase over two years.
Copping said all negotiations are
based on percentages and not
discussed in dollar figures.
But Low said Redden's increase
can not be justified by comparing
percentage increases because his
base salary is substantially larger
than OTEU workers.
"That's a value judgement,"
Redden said.
A consulting firm should be hired
to review the general manager's
salary and recommend a more appropriate figure. Low said.
ywww
He said the money funding Redden's increase could be re-directed
into areas that directly benefit
students. "How can the executive
say they're representing students
when they're just wasting student
money. I'd rather use the money for
bursaries than give it to someone
who already has a fairly good income."
Redden said salaries are confidential and should not be discussed in public. "I don't think it's
right for Doug Low to run to a
newspaper. He should go to council
first."
Copping and AMS finance director James Hollis agreed with Redden, and advised the Ubyssey not to
publish the information about Redden's salary increase.
Hollis said it would be "in bad
taste" to report on Redden's increase in anything but percentage
terms.
— nail lucente photo
YET ANOTHER LIBERAL leadership hopeful comes to UBC in vain hope of (re)gaining charisma in time for Ottawa convention. Pictured is energy commissar John Christian asking audience where he could go to rid himself
of invisible gum on his fingertips. Christian admitted later that gum was cheap gimmick aimed at broader section
of party and promised to get government's fingers in more serious projects like free access to dental floss and the
right to free speech impediments.
Feds say student summer employment fine
OTTAWA (CUP) — The federal
government has good news for
job-seeking students — employment programs this summer will be
at least as effective as last summer.
That means students can look forward to more than 20 per cent
unemployment.
Bob Borgess, the optimistic information officer for the employment and immigration ministry,
says federal government funding
will likely provide jobs for more
than one per cent of all youths who
would otherwise be unemployed
this summer.
"The    programs    are   effective
every year, and we can only believe
it will be the same this year," Burgess said in a recent interview.
He said government programs,
including job boards at Canada
Employment Centres, will place a
half million young people in jobs
"one way or another."
Although the last two summers
have seen unemployment figures
above 20 per cent for young people,
he said it is impossible to tell what
level unemployment will reach this
time around.
"I couldn't hazard a guess," he
said. "But I think it might be a pretty good summer.
"We enter the summer every year
with the highest of hopes."
But not everyone shares Burgess'
enthusiasm. A Canadian Federation of Students researcher says the
combination of a five per cent enrolment increase at Canadian universities last year, a high unemployment rate for all Canadians and a
generally poor economy will lead to
heavy competition for jobs.
Employment and immigration
minister John Roberts has hinted he
may announce new funds for summer job programs, but so far the
federal government has pledged only $1.1 billion — about the same
level as last year. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 27, 1984
Administrators take action
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Threats to
academic freedom in B.C. and Ontario have prompted university
faculty and administrators across
Canada to take a stand against
governments who undermine
university autonomy.
At the urging of senates and
faculty associations, the Association of Universities and Colleges of
Canada adopted a resolution earlier
this month "reaffirm(ing) its commitment to the principles of
academic freedom and institutional
autonomy," and resolving to take
action against governments who impinge on this freedom.
The AUCC is the national
organization of university and college presidents.
Ed Anderson, a University of
Manitoba professor who is vice
president of the Canadian Association of University Teachers, said
concern is not limited to B.C. and
Ontario, although the B.C. Public
Restraint Act and the Ontario
Bovey Commission, which is seeking to restructure the Ontario
education system, are worrisome.
"These actions (in B.C. and Ontario), coupled with current attitudes regarding the level of funding for post-secondary education,
lead to real fears for university
autonomy and academic freedom
from government intrusion," said
Anderson.
Anderson said these actions
remove the authority of universities
to determine programs and restrict
the   freedom   of   professors   to
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research without the protection of
academic freedom, which hampers
independent thought.
"How would you like to be a professor (in B.C.) doing research on
the effects of the Socred government of B.C.?" he asked.
"Students wouldn't learn much
from someone with those constraints or fears."
Anderson added threats to
academic freedom usually appear
"under the guise of restraint" and
go hand in hand with the under-
funding of universities.
"I sometimes wonder just what
governments feel they're going to
accomplish by these actions," said
Anderson.
"You can't just close down
piecemeal or wholesale a university
system and crank it up again a few
years later. The product of universities, knowledge and the creation
of academics, takes a long time,"
he said.
Manitoba's NDP government has
assured universities it fully supports
academic freedom and condemns
the actions of the Socreds in B.C.
Nestle back in style again
CALGARY (CUP) — The six-
year international boycott of Nestle
products is over, at least temporarily.
The International Boycott Committee made the announcement recently, after saying its campaign
against marketers of baby formula
in the third world had made important gains.
Nestle Corp. was the main company targeted by the campaign because of its aggressive marketing
techniques aimed at third world
mothers. INFACT, the Infant Formula Action Committee, charged
Nestle with encouraging new mothers to give up breast feeding unnecessarily for formula exposing infants to serious health risks and
possibly death. INFACT said moth
ers became dependent on the formula after they stopped breast feeding, and with poor sanitary conditions, improper use and lack of
funds, the formula is often diluted
or contaminated.
INFACT says it is not completely
satisfied with Nestle's actions, but
feels an important goal of the campaign was accomplished. It may reinstate the boycott if conditions deteriorate in the future.
In 1981, Nestle agreed to abide by
the World Health Organization's
guidelines, which recommended
government enforcement of WHO
aims, protection and promotion of
breast feeding and providing information on the proper use of
breast milk substitutes.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Women's struggle for academic excellence could be termed a handicap race. They carry an
lextra burden around with them from class to class — attitudes toward their body.
Male professors often think women's bodies are as
worthy of comment as the mark on their last exam,
knowing in most cases the student will put up with it.
From sexual innuendo, suggestive remarks and
touching to proposition combined with outright
academic threats, male professors have enjoyed the
benefits of their ivory tower status, allowing them to put
women students through embarrassment and emotional
hell.
official sexual harassment grievance
committees. Trent University in
Peterborough, University of
Regina, McGill University and
others are in various stages of investigating or developing official
channels for complaints.
York University was the first to
recognize the problem and take
action in 1980. Following a
student's charge that she was raped
by her professor and amid heightened publicity around the issue of sexual harassment, York president Ian
Macdonald created an advisory
committee to create appropriate
procedures for dealing with offenders. Its report has served as a
model for other campuses.
While sexual harassment can occur between any two people in the
university community, the committee found the most common and
serious cases were between people
of unequal status, namely an
employer harassing an employee, or
between professor and student.
Other formal surveys have quantified the problem. At the University of Calgary, a survey found that
13 per cent of undergraduates and
10 per cent of graduate students had
experienced physical sexual assault
more than once.
The York committee gave an example of an incidence of sexual
harassment:
A professor falls in love with his
Professors hold power over
students — they control their learning environment and evaluate their
work. For students who feel harassed by unwanted sexual attention,
their options are minimal — they
comply, reject the professor's advances and risk a lower grade or
drop out of the course.
But recently, universities are
beginning to warn professors
against "unacceptable behavior"
and are creating accessible
grievance committees to help victims of sexual harassment and
punish offenders.
Sexual harassment is an exercise
in power, says Phyllis Leonardi, the
status of women coordinator at
Carleton University in Ottawa. By
developing a sexual harassment
grievance procedure, sanctioned by
the administrations and faculty
unions, Leonardi says women are
shifting the power structure.
"Men used to be able to do
anything they wanted," Leonardi
said. "Now they may have to
change their behaviour, and that
may be threatening."
Carleton is just one of many
Canadian colleges and universities
that are addressing the problem of
sexual harassment. Dawson College
in Montreal, the University of
Alberta, and Toronto's Ryerson
Polytechnic Institute have created
Putting the
pressure on
offensive
professors
Dy CATHY McDONALD
Canadian University Press
brightest student, repeatedly invites
her out and telephones her and
sends her love letters. Although she
admires him as a distinguished
scholar, she is disturbed by the unwanted attention. She is concerned
she will not be able to ask him to be
her dissertation supervisor. Her
work in other courses suffers and
she feels her academic career is at
stake.
She considers leaving school or
making a complaint to the department chair, but since the chair and
the professor are friends, she fears
her complaint will not be taken
seriously. Also, she does not want
to jeopardize both her own and the
professor's reputation in the
department where they will continue to work.
Other examples include harassment of male students and
homosexual advances, often increasing the student's feelings of
embarrassment.
The committee concluded that
traditional complaint procedures on
campus were inadequate. Deans
and department chairs, as colleagues of the harasser, are often
seen by the victim as non-
sympathetic. In some cases, the
dean might actually be the offender
Some campuses have an ora-
budsperson to receive complaints
on any matter, but their role is
simply to mediate and encourage
solutions, and they lack the authority to intervene.
The approved sexual harassment
grievance committee structure includes appointees from different
parts of the university community.
It operates in confidentiality, and
an informal approach at resolving
conflicts is attempted in all situations. Often making the professor
aware that his actions are unacceptable, and that the committee has
been notified, will end the problem.
If the situation is severe, the committee will hold hearings and may
recommend the university take
punitive  action,  ranging   from  a
reprimand to dismissal.
The definition of sexual harassment is the most difficult part in
creating a grievance procedure. The
Canadian Association of University
Teachers has a definition of the
problem many faculty unions are
now including in their contracts.
As part of its guidelines on professional ethics and relationships,
CAUT says sexual harassment entails advances, requests for favors
and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when it is
combined with the threat of damaging the person's employment or
academic status. Sexual conduct
that unreasonably interferes with an
individual's academic performance
or creates an intimidating, hostile
or offensive environment, is also
termed sexual harassment.
Some men are wary of attempts
to define harassment. Men have
told Leonardi they are intimidated
because they do not know what acceptable behaviour is and feel
women might misinterpret an innocent gesture.
"Surely one stare is okay," one
man exclaimed.
"I say it's not okay," Leonardi
said. "Their idea is that women
have to put up with something . . .
If men don't know (when they're
harassing women), then that has to
do with their attitude towards
women. They see women as sex objects."
Redefining relationships between
men and women to that of mutual
respect is what the new grievance
procedures are all about, and
education on campus is an important part of the process. But not
everyone is happy with the increased discussion of sexual harassment.
The York committee has been accused of "policing" professor-
student relationships. Their reply
was they had no wish to stop relationships from running their
natural course, but the university
had a responsibility to protect its
community.
See page 5: WOMEN Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 27, 1984
You, you you, yes you, the potential opinion writer, why don't you
you you, get your tail, in here here here with a funky perspectives.
Cause if you look above, that ain't no dove, it's good ol Ronnie,
yeah, aren't you sick and tired, of reading about Americans in the U
U U Ubyssey. So write write write, about something, like maybe a bit
more local (Sung to you know what)
The $73,000 question
Charles Redden is the general manager of your
student society. He isn't a student. He lives in
West Vancouver on the $66,000 you pay him to
run the AMS as profitably as possible. AMS
revenue has never been higher, and the executive is so proud to have Charles on their
team, they say he's worth $73,000 next year.
Charles Redden has indeed turned the AMS
into a profit-making organization over the last
two years. He is also responsible for ploughing
those profits back into more money-making
schemes rather than funding student's immediate needs, like housing or daycare.
Ten percent of Redden's current salary is
about $7,000, or about half of an Office and
Technical Employees Union worker's yearly pay.
Redden's salary is already twice that of
Canada's second-best paid student society
manager. Why are students paying Redden this
much?
The AMS executive, who voted for the raise,
say Redden pays for himself and more, and a ten
percent raise would encourage him to stay.
It seems that your AMS supports restraint
with student services, but not executive salaries.
Why not use the money to create 14  $500
bursaries for needy students, instead of turning
SUB into an AMS shopping mall?
The AMS executive, elected by you
(remember? did you vote), met in private and
decided to raise Redden's pay. They consulted
with neither the student council nor you, the
students.
That they can do this is interesting to say the
least. Did they ask you?
Redden and others consider his salary confidential." And AMS executive members even
tried to influence The Ubyssey's coverage of the
story.
We believe you have a right to know.
Letters
Science, Aristotle don't mix
Last Saturday evening I had the
privilege of hearing professor K.
Bloch from the department of
chemistry, Harvard University, give
a lecture on the chemistry of evolution.
Much of what he said about the
chronology of evolution I could
understand and it was no fault of
his that much of the detailed explanation was like a foreign
language to me. However, when
Bloch concluded his lecture with a
slide showing the following quotation from Aristotle: "Nature is the
end, and what each thing is when
fully developed, we call nature," I
was encouraged to ask the following question: "When one combines
biology with philosophy, can I say
that   events   like   Auschwitz   were
peculiar chemical problems and
that my own moral reaction is
nothing more than my own peculiar
chemical reaction?"
Anticipating the reaction from
the chairperson, I added the following question: "Or must I wait for
another evening when I can conveniently forget about chemistry and
discuss the moral issue in isolation
from chemistry?" My anticipation
was correct. My questions were ruled out of order on the basis of being
unfair and irrelevent.
Unfair perhaps, but hardly irrelevent. Surely if Aristotle was correct
then the one aspect that I can demand from science is that it provide
continuity. In this case, the continuity    I    seek   lies   between   the
chemical evolution of man and the
moral nature of man.
Perhaps next week, when the
topic will centre on the environment
and the dangers to man's continued
existence on this planet, I will be
able to ask the next question:
"Where, in the chemical evolution
of man did the premise arise that
my continued existence in this
universe should matter either to
myself or to the universe?" Or will
the ensuing week provide a sufficient time period to jump the gap
between the hypothesis of man's
evolution and the moral question of
man's continued existence in his
natural environment.
A. Harms
Douglas College Instructor
Reaganite's rebuttal rambles
Matthew Auerbach's letter Reagan's strength saves
U.S. from ridicule (March 23), warrants an immediate reply for two basic reasons: glaring oversight
and unacceptable inaccuracies.
It should be noted at the outset that my freestyle
specifically concerned the failure of Reagan's Lebanon policy, a policy that indirectly resulted in the
death of 240 brave young marines. Rather than addressing this specific issue, Auerbach proceeded to
try his hand at political prose, thereby getting his
name in the paper. The result was a rambling,
nonsensical dissertion.
First, there was a major oversight on Auerbach's
part: I did not conclude, as Auerbach asserts, that
Reagan would lose the Nov. 6 general election. I said
"by November the American public may be ready to
call Reagan to account."
Secondly, Auerbach's letter frequently includes
blatant errors of fact. His pathetic overuse of the
cliche appears to be a grab for some kind of literary
legitimacy:
• Auerbach insists the ill-fated rescue mission of
the American hostages was personally Carter's fault,
believing the Israelis could have done a better job if
they had been given the chance. Such mindless oversimplification is utterly unfair.
• The U.S. department of defense has publicly
admitted the failure of the mission was primarily due
to two separate factors: prevaling weather conditions
and inappropriate equipment. In other words, Pratt
and Whitney's turbine engine could not tolerate the
unexpectedly severe sandstorm that greeted the two
army helicopters as they attempted to land in the Iranian desert.
• Auerbach believes Reagan "can get away with
bungled missions" and "overall foolish moves"
while Carter could not. He attributes this to Reagan's
"image." There is some validity to this, but Auerbach is totaly vague in explaining what he means by
"image," preferring instead to remind us that
Reagan likes horses and was once an actor. Reagan
succeeds where Carter failed because his political
flunkies are better at handling the media than
Carter's flunkies were. Reagan himself is a masterful
politician who possesses a less than masterful intellect.
• Auerbach insinuates Americans stopped being
patriotic during the Carter presidency. That is definitely news to me since at least of my friends, from
Pennsylvania to Washington, continued to exude
much nationalistic fervor during those years. The
American public was humiliated by Iran, and angered over hard economic times. American patriotism,
however, was not affected by any of this.
• Auerbach says Reagan received a bullet "in his
chest." Wrong. One of the four shots fired by John
Hinckley in 1981 penetrated Reagan's abdominal
side, not his chest.
On top of these reprehensible errors, Auerbach insists on using silly cliches: "knee jerk liberal" and
"great white father" appear to be his favorites.
Carter had many faults as president, but at least he
displayed a certain moral conviction that transcended
American interests. He also had more than one
foreign policy success. The same cannot be said of
Ronald Reagan.
Wayne Nikituk
Ubyssey staffer
r
V—
THE UBYSSEY
March 27, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Let's boogiel Chris Wong, Muriel Draiisma, Victor Wong and Robby Robertson would dance off against the immicable Lisa Hebert, Yaku,
Sarah Millin and Ian Weniger. Robert Beynon would judge the crews on originality and fewest Michael Jackson copycats, and the tiebreaker
match would pit Scott Sleep and Charlie Fidelman versus Monte Stewart and Elena Miller. Breaking is GO! ROCKIT' Tuesday, March 27, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Student droppings are Senate's concern
By SHERRI DICKINSON
In the last year, decisions have
been made in senate which divert
large sums of scholarship money to
the professional faculties and which
place an arbitrary limit on the
number of students which will be
accepted into first year. While we
all spent a great many hours talking
to our friends about these issues,
none of us could claim to have
reached a large number of students.
Senate   makes   decisions   about
program content, priorities in
budget cuts, student awards, student standing, and academic
discipline. These decisions affect
you, and should not be made
without your input.
The purpose of this article and
others that will follow is to put the
issues to you and invite your comments before a formal resolution
comes to senate. Thus, your input
will not only come at a point where
it could make a difference, but it
Letters
Contraceptive article
misconstrues history
The article Contraceptives
(March 13) was anything but a
study of history. Sampling only a
few of the egregious statements,
one can cite, for example, the quotation from the "historical
authors," Heinson and Steiger,
who make the judgmental claim
that the whole thrust of papal condemnations of contraception and
abortion were motivated more by
patriarchal state interests than by
morality.
Then there is the blatant insinuation that Pope Pius IX's "outlawing" of contraception and abortion
led so many women in the nineteenth century to resort to infanticide that the Church had to create
orphanages presumably to prevent
all those mothers from killing her
own children. Such an accusation is
both an insult to the women of the
time and also a gross misrepresentation of the history of orphanages.
There is no doubt that every woman should have the right to decide
for herself whether or not she
wishes to marry and, if she does, to
be  an  equal   partner  in   deciding
And now for
the $640,000
question. . .
Who is Jen Bang"?
Todd Collier
science 3
upon the spacing of the children,
taking into account the demands of
her career, etc. The real issue concerns what means are morally acceptable in achieving a good goal —
responsible parenthood.
To start from a biased historical
study to ev.-uuate the morality of
contraception and abortion is to
taint one's capacity to consider
these issues objectively. Just as
women should never be treated as
chattels "to achieve patriarchal and
nationalistic goals" so, also, human
sexual activity is not to be merely an
animal function, and any children
that result from such activity are
not to be treated as mere chattels
either.
L. Abello
physics grad student
An urgent staff meeting to
discuss the fate of the Summer-
Used-to-be will be held in our
beloved newsroom at 12:30
Wednesday. Sources say the omnipotent ones down the hallway will
soon decide whether or not Ihe four
headed monster will be gainfully
employed this summer. For current
editorial collective types, the
agonies of waiting for a job with the
Pig Press will be discussed.
Other items on the agenda include staff democracy, the latest
power struggle, gossipy rumors and
the abnormally small number of
mazola parties held this year.
Bring lubricants and position
papers but no sexually transmitted
diseases please.
Be there or be pecked on.
APPLICATIONS FOR
AMS SUB
SECURITY TEAM
ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED
The Security Team works Friday and Saturday
nights in the Student Union Building. Briefly, the
Team is responsible for assisting the Proctor in protecting SUB from vandalism, aiding security teams
for any function in SUB, and implementing SAC
policy in the Games Room.
Application forms are available in the AMS
Executive Secretary's Office
SUB Room 238, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
These positions are open to both males and
females.
APPLICATIONS ARE DUE THURSDAY, APRIL
19, 1984.
Interviews will be held in early May, 1984.
will have more credibility, coming
from a large number of students.
The question I would like to put
to you now is how we should deal
with a new regulation brought in at
the last senate meeting. It was
decided that if students drop a
course after the course change
deadline, it could either be deleted
entirely from their transcripts if
dropped with the professor's permission for a valid (medical or compassionate) reason, or else the student would be given a failure standing. It was felt that this move
would discourage students from
dropping a course simply because
they were failing it.
The question we now face is
whether and how these failing
grades should be tabulated with
students' other grades in calculating
their average. The feelings of the
committee charged with this decision are leaning to a suggestion that
a simple total of all work done in
the course up to the time of drop
ping should be submitted as a mark.
This would clearly not be
satisfactory in courses where there
are no formal assignments before
the final exam. It also penalizes
students who realize early in the
term that they are overloaded and
drop a course to lighten their load;
someone who receives failing marks
on all assignments up to within a
month of the final would be much
better off.
EJXI
Should a numerical grade be
given in these courses? (Some people think they should just be given
zero.) Could a scale be created so
that marks would reflect the grades
received on all assignments done, or
should the mark depend on the
fraction of the course which was
completed? How much leeway
should  the  system  leave  for the
prof's subjective judgement?
Since it clearly behoves student to
try to convince professors of the
validity of their excuse for dropping
the course, should this interview be
allowed to become a forum to
bargain for marks?
Obviously, some policy guideline
will be necessary, an while it should
not penalize well-meaning students
unnecessarily, it must also
discourage students from occupying
progressively scarce seats in courses
they will not complete.
If you have an opinion on this or
any matter concerning Senate, get
in touch. Our office is room 262 in
SUB, our phone number is
228-6101, and we all have mailboxes
in SUB so you can reach us free by
campus mail. You'll be hearing
from us in future; let us hear from
you.
Sherri Dickinson is an outgoing
senator at-large.
Women fight profs' harassment
From page 3
Leonardi feels there is a lot of unfocused resistance in the university
that is holding up implementation
of the grievance procedure. She
says support for it is strong, coming
from support staff and teaching
assistants, but mostly from students
through the campus women's centre.
But most of the questions and
anxiety are coming from men.
"With 97 per cent of men doing
the harassing, its obvious why
women understand the need (for
the grievance procedure)," she said.
Some men worry a few women
will abuse the process to "gang up"
on an innocent man. But Leonardi
says the victim must be believed.
"Nobody wants to report it when
they are harassed, never mind make
it up."
Students on another Ontario
campus have taken the initiative
towards a sexual harassment committee, but feel the administration
is stalling.
"The administration has been
totally non-committal," says Anita
Braha, a member of the University
of Toronto's informal sexual
harassment grievance committee.
The initiative for the committee
came from the graduate student
union two years ago. A coalition
representing students, faculty, staff
and unionized employees was formed and continues to develop the
procedure. Now the committee is
waiting for administration endorsement to give it official weight.
Women have made strides into
academic life, and Leonardi's job is
a recognition that women's battle to
enter non-traditional roles continues. (Male professors still hold
the sexist attitude of "jokes" or
put-downs like "I car see why
you're having problems on
assignments, being up with the boys
all night . . .") The most pervasive
kind of harassment is a professor's
classroom attitude, such as comparing the structure of a bridge to a
woman's body — "well-built."
Taking female engineering
students as an example, Leonardi
says women must deal with a lot of
unspoken resistance to their new
roles.
"She has to break a lot of boundaries. She has to be willing to take
risks, to be frightened and to take a
lot of flak, anger and hostility that
has nothing to do with her personally."
"Men don't have to put up with
that."
Grievance procedures for sexual
harassment are becoming available
to help a student deal with situations that jeopardize her emotional
well-being as well as her academic
goals.
A presidential advisory committee at UBC is currently studying the
problem and trying to develop
suitable grievances procedures. A
few students, members of campus
unions and faculty members are on
the committee which meets weekly
and will make recommendations
before the fall of 1984.
IZ65 W. fl£K)D£R... V1H&& NeMBAGSBf* VMS* S7Z#3.' Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 27, 1984
i^3**%
TODAY
ORIENTEERING UBC
Orienteering   —   campus score event,  6 p.m.,
War Memorial gym.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics, 4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m., SUB 207 209.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
WEDNESDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Singing, bible study discussion, noon, SUB 213
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gay research group session,  4-6 p.m.,  gallery
lounge.
DANCEWORKS UBC
Tickets will be on sale for the performance of
Menagerie on March 30, 8:30 p.m.,  Centennial
Theatre.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Last subversive literature table of the year, 11-2
p.m., SUB concourse.
THURSDAY
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN
THOUGHT IN SCRIPTURE
Discussion:   Final  "So What?"  meeting,  noon,
Scarfe 204.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meetings, 7:30 p.m., call 228-8554
or 224-4553 for information.
ANARCHIST CLUB
A talk on ecology and anarchism, noon, Buch.
D352.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly  testimony  meeting:   all  welcome,   1:30
p.m., SUB 215.
UBC CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Come and listen to Mr. Chai Hok Low from Regent College speaking on the topic: Is there only
one way?, noon, Scarfe 206.
UBC FLYING CLUB
General meeting and discussion of flight to the
island, noon, Hennings 302.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics, 4:30-5:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
DANCEWORKS UBC
Tickets will be on sale for the performance of
Menagerie on March 30, 8:30 p.m., Centennial
Theatre.
UBC FEE HIKE STRIKE COMMITTEE
Open meeting, 1:30 p.m., Buchanan D238.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film showing, free admission, Gui Dao — on the
way-round trip to Beijing,  noon, Asian Centre
auditorium.
UBC AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY
Spring general meeting. All club members please
attend to elect next year's executive, noon to
1:30 p.m., Brock Extension, Room 358.
SCIENCE FOR PEACE AND
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
National Film  Board's war series:  The Deadly
Game of Nations, noon, Hebb Theatre.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, noon, SUB 215.
FRIDAY
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Film: On Our Land, Arabic snacks, speaker, $3,
6:30 p.m.. International House — upstairs.
GRAD STUDENT CENTRE
Folk night featuring Culloden, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m..
Garden Room, Graduate Student Centre.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Student reading, 8 p.m.. Home Ec 60, free admission.
Danceworks UBC, an innovative new dance ensemble, will be
making its debut in a performance
presented by Presentation House.
An original choreography by Jennifer Mascail, Barbara Bourget and
Jay Hirabayash. Tickets are $6 and
$4 for students and seniors. 8:30
p.m. at Centennial Theatre, 123
East 23rd Ave., North Vancouver.
For more information call 228-6668.
$
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rTHE CLASSIFIEDS'
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
80 - TUTORING
TRAVEL CUTS FILM
PRESENTATION
TOUR OF EUROPE
with
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Coffee and Donuts
Thursday, March 29
2:30-4:00 p.m.
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NEED A TUTOR
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FINAL?
Tutor referral for nearly all
faculties available at
SPEAKEASY
Drop by SUB concourse or phone
228-3777
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Monday - Friday
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Little or No Experience
Required
JUNE 8-17
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For info, call:
Barbara Milne - 228-7428
Chris Harris - 266-3381
ENGLISH TUTORING - Assistance in all
areas. Oral, written, grammar, composition, spelling, punctuation. 682-1043.
85 - TYPING
TYPWRITING
Essays,    Resumes,    Tapes
transcribed
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED
U.B.C. Village location
224-6518 DAY or NIGHT
20 - HOUSING
MOVING OUT -  $25 -  IF I  MOVE IN.
Wtd. 1 or 2 bdrm. hse/ste. Alma/Cambie
area, for May. $400 max. 876-3561 (4-11
p.m.).
ROOMMATEISI M/F req'd to share 2 br.
apt. for winter session Sept. '84-May '85.
University Village Location, pool, d.w.
Prefer quiet n/s. 228-9102 eves.
NEW1 BDRM STE. for rent. May 1-Aug. 31.
West 18th/close to Dunbar. 732-1745 eves.
25 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT. GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
ESSAYS, term papers, reports, etc. Writer
with extensive academic exper. can assist
with research, writing editing. 682-1043.
30 - JOBS
PART-TIME demonstrators required to
demonstrate nationally advertised meal
substitute product. Inquire 734-7291.
65 - SCANDALS
SURE SHE'S GOOD LOOKING ... But it
was her personalized bumper sticker from
the T-Bird shop in SUB that caught my eye.
DARBY DAYS DARBY DAYS DARBY DAYS
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DARBY DAYS DARBY DAYS DARBY DAYS
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, &■ masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208
EXCELLENT TYPIST, IBM. AVAILABLE
ANYTIME. Reasonable rates. 263-0351.
NEW   SONY   SERIES   36  w/p   SYSTEM
installed. Have your essay, resumes &
manuscripts done on the best. We have
special rates for students. Four years in
business at 266-6814.
W/P & typing: term papers, theses, mscpt.,
essays, incl. reports, letters, resumes, Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
SAME DAY SERVICE. Fast, accurate,
typing. Reasonable rates. 734-8451.
EXPERT TYPING. Fast, accurate, reliable.
Near Arbutus/King Edward. 8.50 hr. Agni.
736-1544
WORD PROCESSING, all jobs, tapes
transcribed, student rates. On King Edward
bus route, 879-5108.
PROFESSIONAL W/P SERVICES - 24-
hour turnaround, courier or drop off. The
WORDCENTRE, 106-7031 Westminster
Hwy. Rmd. 276-2283.
FAST, accurate typing of term papers.
Rush jobs accepted. $1.25/page. Phone
732-0364.
70 - SERVICES
RESUME SERVICE — Professionally written
word processor typed. Call Rick.
Reasonable rates. 732-9127.
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6518.
WORD PROCESSING. Essays, Theses,
Resumes, Etc. by professional typist. Ask
for our student rate. Ellen, 271-6924.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: All phases, fast,
reasonable. 25 yrs. exp. Electronic type
271-6755.
WHAT A DEALI Fast, accurate, reliable
typing for $1.00 per page! Call Kathy
266-8498 Tuesday, March 27, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Prominent UBC athletes receive awards
By MONTE STEWART
Individually speaking the best
UBC athletes stood on the court
this season. Collectively speaking
they rose to prominence on the
field.
The best male and female athletes
of the year performed within the
confines of War Memorial gym and
other gymnasiums throughout the
country. Paul Thiessen was named
men's athlete of the year at the annual men's Big Block Awards banquet held at the faculty club Thursday, March 15. At the women's Big
Block dinner at Cisco's restaurant,
Cathy Bultitude took home top
honors.
Thiessen was a five-year starter
with the very successful men's
volleyball team, which won the Canadian Inter-Athletic Union title in
1983 and finished second in the nation this year. A graduate of John
Oliver Secondary School, Thiessen
was a Canada West all-star five
years in a row (three years on the
first team and two on the second).
He was considered the Most Valuable Player at the 1983 CIAU
finals and was named an All-Canadian for both 1983 and 1984. The
22-year-old physical education student also played for the Canadian
junior national team and served as
an assistant coach for the B.C. provincial boys' squad.
Thiessen received the Bobby Gaul
Award, the trophy dedicated to an
outstanding athlete who died of
cancer shortly after graduating
from UBC.
Bultitude led the women's basketball team to one of its finest seasons in recent memory. In 1983,
Bultitude took a leave of absence
V
cX3iXi5
"V
T-2
from
3 to4
xxo
XX
THE GOOD WOMAN
OF SETZUAN
by Bertolt Brecht
adapted by Eric Bentley
Directed by Claire Brown
MARCH 27-31
8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $5
Students: $4
[Box Office: Room 20771
| Frederic Wood Theatre |
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
University of British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
from school and paced Kirby's, a
local senior "A" team to a national
crown. This year Bultitude finished
third in Canada West scoring while
averaging 14.6 points and 4.8 rebounds per game.
The youthful 24-year-old is currently in fifth year Education. She
plans to enter the coaching ranks in
the not too distant future as she embarks on her teaching career Although Bultitude seemed to be the
most obvious choice for women's
athlete of the year, she was surprised that she won the award.
"I was thinking of a few other
girls who were (nominated) for the
award too, and they're really good
athletes," Bultitude said. "So I was
really happy to get it."
Meanwhile, the two-time national
champion women's field hockey
club was named Women's Team of
the Year for the second year in a
row. (There is no Men's Team of
the Year Award). In presenting the
award, UBC president George Pedersen, who was substituting for his
wife who had a "genuine" back ailment, said that he was "genuinely"
privileged to present such a prestigious award to such a fine team.
(The president made his speech
short undoubtedly because of the
obvious misplacement of his
Roget's Thesaurus.)
Pat West, a member of the men's
hoop squad, was the first ever recipient of the Brian Upson Memorial
Trophy. West's teammates judged
him to be the most inspirational
player. The award is in honor of
former West Vancouver Highlanders' mentor Brian Upson who lost a
battle with cancer after his team
won the B.C. provincial title in
1982.
Master of ceremonies Tom
Thomson did not exactly pay fitting
tribute to Upson. Thomson, who
arrived late for the ceremonies,
skipped over the presentation of the
Upson trophy despite the fact that
he conducted the ceremonies from
an itinerary. Dr. Peter Mullins presented the award to West in absentia after guest speaker Herb Capozzi
finished cracking one-liners.
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Telephone: 224-7821
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custom framing of this year's U.B.C.
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Drop by before May 15, 1984 and
we will give you a
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Experienced University framers, we
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BS Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 27, 1984
Boys' club deserves feminist criticism
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Jean Barbeau's play, The Guys,
cleverly exploits women to say that
exploitation is wrong. It deserves to
be criticized for its blatant sexism,
but since Barbeau's intent was not
to exploit anyone, especially
women, it poses a dilemma.
Barbeau provides a male perspective from a feminist point of view.
The action takes place Friday
afternoon, when the men find
themselves without their wives, by
the hot tub of Augustus Barnes.
Gus, (Terence Kelly) a salesman of
low education and redneck mentality, invites his next door neighbor
Henry Robbins (Stephen E. Miller)
for a splash and a few beers. The
boys club really begins when professor Jackson (Jerry Wasserman)
rides in on a 10 speed.
Robbins, dubbed Father Robbins
because of his prudishness, is a
social worker who wants meaning
in his life. He wants to talk about
who he is really living with. "We're
not living with stoves, refrigerators,
and cars." At this point Gus asks
how many miles the prof has on his
car and wife simultaneously. Robbins is outraged by Gus' dirty books
and loud bragging. And Gus calls
Father Robbins an old woman.
Gus does not want to talk — talking is something women do.
Robbins sits and polishes window
screens because his wife asked him
to, in between dips of hot tub and
sips of beer. He is always updating
the house and its paraphenalia. He
is self-admittedly oriented towards
the nuclear family and is caught in
his obligation to family and job.
Understandably, when on the eve of
a family outing she doesn't come
home but rather goes on a seperate
vacation, Robbins gets upset.
Gus would rather continue talking about sports, sex, and work.
The audience groans loudly because
Gus is so obvious in his leaching
and leering. Referring to Sweet-
Pea, the Professor's wife: "If she
was mine, I'd put her in a velvet box
with the sign that said look but
don't touch."
Robbins whines, "Why don't
guys talk to one another. We
didn't used to be like this when were
children. We're amputees or
something." Robbins wants to get
in touch with his feelings in a style
reminiscent of psychoanalysis, the
religion of the '70s that somehow
went hand in hand with raising of
consciousness. But he is the least
honest with himself and the others
as is evidenced by a dream sequence: Susie (Moira Walley), the
precocious baby-sitter reveals her
beautiful muscle bound body and
entices Father Robbins to seduce or
be seduced. But alas, 'tis only a fantasy.
Because Robbins has these secret
fantasies, he accuses the prof of
having the same.
The professor denies ever taking
advantage of a student. He is Mr.
Cool of the '80s, leaning to the left
of centre and living in an open style
marriage.   His   commitment   is   to
You die laughing
Suicide poses ingenious solution
By ELENA MILLER
You're poor, you're permanently
unemployed, and your family is
constantly bothering you. So what
are you going to do? Perhaps you
think of ending it all. After all, you
have nothing to live for. You can't
even learn to play the tuba because
the instructions say you need a piano to do that. "I'm going to kill
myself!" you exclaim in exasperation.
The Suicide
By Nicolai Erdman
Directed by Klaus Strassman
So word gets around you're
about to pull the plug on your own
bathtub. Suicide. And pretty soon
some strange people start knocking
on your door. Members of the intelligentsia, the clergy, famous actresses. They have all heard you are
going to kill yourself, and they want
you to do it for them. They have all
got a cause, you see, a cause worth
dying for. Only they don't want to
do the dying.
This is basically the situation in
Nicolai Erdman's The Suicide. The
poor guy who says he is going to kill
himself because of frustration, gets
taken at his word, literally. He finds
himself saddled with instant notori
ety and a virtual death warrant
from a whole crowd of people
wanting to do themselves a favor
through his suicide. The play's
theme is pretty ingenious, showing
how personal affairs may be exploited by political causes, but once
immersed, the plot becomes predictable.
Freddy Wood's production of
this Russian play written in the '20s
fleshes out the rather skeletal plot
line with all kinds of spectacle and
theatrical flair. The theatrical setting begins in the lobby before the
show even begins — living dummies
are planted among the audience.
These dummies race down the aisles
as the play beings.
The Suicide is essentially a one-
person show, although the cast is
very large. Semion (Simon Webb)
gave the character a kind of live-
wire intensity. Although he is very
funny, he conveys a very serious
mood. Pam Danglemaier and Carolyn Soper as Semion's wife and
mother-in-law, respectively, found
the right farcical notes in their
characters.
The set itself is a theatrical coup;
it seems to have been given a half-
turn and tilted on edge to produce a
kind of crazy, farcical effect. (The
play is a farce.) And the props in
this production were outstanding.
A huge picture of Stalin filling up
the whole of the back wall of the
theatre descends for only a few
brief, splendid moments at the end
of the play. It is truly a memorable
image.
HAIR
CORKYS
STYLING
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Cecil H. and Ida Green
Visiting Professorships
1984 SPRING LECTURES
IRVING LAVIN
Dr. Irving Lavin is one of North America's most distinguished art historians.
He is particularly well known for his expertise in the area of the seventeenth
century Italian art and its relation to the intellectual and cultural developments
of that period. Dr. Lavin is a professor in the Institute of Advanced Study at
Princeton University and he is an engaging and stimulating speaker.
BERNINI'S  SPEAKING MARBLES'
Thursday, March 29 — In Room 102, Lasserre Building, at 12:30 p.m.
THE UNITY OF THE ARTS AND THE EARLY BAROQUE OPERA HOUSE
Saturday, March 31 — In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at
8:15 p.m. (Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information.
himself which he demonstrates by
wearing the fashions and accessories of the fitness craze: the
lightweight bike, leatherette riding
gloves minus their fingers, a headband. But while the men on stage
grapple with the classic male trait of
not being able to communicate with
each other, through subtle and tacit
clues the audience learns that the
professor's wife has lost the skill.
Communicating and talking is a
feminine social trait. Sweet-Pea has
distanced herself and stereotyped
the prof as one of the herd. And he
doesn't like to be seen as a phallic
time bomb ready to explode
anywhere as a rapist.
Gus explodes last after the prof
calls him crude. And that is true.
Gus is full of platitudes, a working
man, and honest man. He owns his
house because he is a loud mouth
and loudmouths finish first. "But I
always thought we were in the same
boat together," he tells the prof.
The least likeable and least
educated character displays the
highest level of moral reasoning,
albeit in the crudest way, but Gus is
willing to overlook superficial differences to preserve a principle of
equality among men despite differences.
Even in the boys club discrimination exists.
• ••••••••••••A"*******
* AMS CONCERTS *
UPCOMING LINE-UP
Mar. 29 - Billy Idol - SOLD OUT
Apr. 2 — The Three O'Clock
In the Pit, 9 p.m.
Apr. 11  - Adam Ant - CANCELLED
Apr. 11 — Knights of Illusions  From Montreal
Mime — Illusions — Ballet
SUB Aud., 12:30 p.m. FREE
Apr. 21  - GOLDEN EARRING
War Mem. Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Apr. 22 — Saxon/Accept
War Mem. Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Apr. 23 — Romantics/Wang Chung
War Mem. Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Apr. 30 - Black Flag
SUB Ballroom, 8 p.m.
Tickets for all shows at AMS Box Office
••••••••*•••••••••••
DO YOU:
A) NEED CAREER EXPERIENCE?
B) WANT TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS?
0 HAVE AN INTEREST IN PERSONNEL,
COUNSELLING, PUBLIC RELATIONS OR
ADMINITRATION?
IF You answered 'YES' to any of
these questions, then Volunteer
Connections would like to hear
from you. We are looking for On-
Campus Volunteer Interviewers
for the 1984-85 school term.
(Training provided)
IF You are People-Oriented, have
good communication skills and
can volunteer 4-5 hours per week,
and would like to find out more
about Volunteer Connections,
contact us in the Student
Counselling 8- Resources Centre,
Brock Hall 200, or call 228-3811.

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