UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 13, 1975

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126073.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126073.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126073-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126073-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126073-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126073-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126073-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126073-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126073-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126073.ris

Full Text

 Psych rejects second prof
By SUEVOHANKA
The psychology department is
recommending refusal of tenure to
yet another assistant professor.
Dennis Foth said Wednesday the
department's tenure and
promotions committee recently
informed him of its decision, but
Foth declined  further comment.
Meredith Kimball, faculty
association president and Women's
studies organizer and professor,
has also been not recommended for
tenure by the department.
The departmental committee is
composed of all associate and full
professors in the department.
Kimball and Foth are the only two
psychology professors up for
tenure this year.
Both cases are currently under
review by the dean's tenure and
promotions committee within the
arts faculty.
However, sources have said the
dean's committee rarely overturns
departmental    recommendations.
Acting arts dean Robert Will
refused to answer when asked
Wednesday if his committeee had
reached a decision on either case.
"I don't discuss personnel cases
publicly," Will said. "That's the
way it should be."
The criteria for tenure, according to the faculty handbook,
are teaching, research and service
to the university.
But the key issue in both cases is
research publication.
A source who wished to remain
unidentified has said Kimball was
not recommended for tenure
because she has not been
publishing in appropriate scholarly
journals. She has published eight
or nine articles in the last five
years, not in the last year as
previously reported, including an
article on women and success in a
book entitled Women in Canada.
Another source said the
psychology department wants to
deny Foth tenure because of
inadequate publishing.
Fuller
flips for
office
Jennifer Fuller was named internal affairs officer for next
year's Alma Mater Society
executive by virtue of the flip of a
coin, Wednesday.
After a recount of the results for
the recently held AMS elections,
Tom Manson and Fuller were tied.
With the full consent of all interested parties, an agreement
was reached to flip for the winner
rather than hold another election.
And so, in the middle of council
chambers, AMS vice-president
Robbie Smith flipped a quarter and
the heads up gave Fuller the job.
President-elect Jake van der
Kamp said that despite the loss,
Manson would be part of the
executive next year working on bus
problems and looking into the tri-
semester system for the university.
Van der Kamp said Manson
would not hold council voting
privileges but he would still be part
of next year's executive.
In other business, science rep
Ron Walls, will be setting up a
mock library processing centre in
order to visually demonstrate the
effects of a building located near
SUB.
Walls said he wants to encourage
student reaction to a building
located near SUB by placing an
outline of the proposed building on
the controversial site along with
information about the building.
He said the final decision on the
site could be made within two
weeks.
An assistant psychology
professor who was denied tenure
last year because of inadequate
research said Wednesday the
department's publication policy is
"unreasonable."
"There are probably 15
'reputable' scientific journals,"
said Chris Tragakis. "Articles
published in those count." He said
articles published elsewhere don't
count or don't count as much.
Tragakis has continued teaching
at UBC on a terminal contract
which ends this summer.
He said articles must appear in
academic scientific journals as
opposed to magazines or books not
necessarily read by academics.
"The content of research is not
being looked at. It's where it's
being published," he said.
Tragakis also said the department has an unwritten policy that
two articles must be published
each year, "but nobody in the
department will admit that."
. "The number thing is just bad.
It's not a reasonable criterion,"
Tragakis said.
Associate psychology professor
Robert Knox said Wednesday he
wondered if Tragakis' statements
were true.
"I've never seen a statement to
that effect," he said.
, "The criteria that are laid out in
the faculty handbook are definitely
followed," said Knox. But he added
the criteria are nebulous and
subjective. "There is a question of
interpretation."
"Within departments an individual researches his own mind
as to how much weight to give
those criteria. People weigh those
criteria and weigh them differently," he said.
Knox said research is not
measured by the sheer number of
articles published, but rather with
some consideration as to both how
much and how good.
"It's expectation of some
scholarly work," he said. But Knox
said he himself would certainly not
advocate a minimum number of
necessary publications.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LVI, No. 50       VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1975
228-2301
NO ROBES, no wigs, not even any quill pens, but these five
serious-looking and most august personages form most; of student
court. Court was sitting Wednesday to hear torturous ins and outs of
—marise savaria photo
controversy over dispersal of grad class money. The personages ruled
that because of technicality in setting up class general meeting, it's got
to be done all over again.
Grad meeting declared void by court
ByREEDCLARKE
A lack of proper publicity for the
Feb. 7 grad class general meeting
has resulted in the meeting being
declared null and void by student
court.
The court ruled Wednesday that
because notice of the general
meeting was not given a clear 10
days' previous to the meeting, a%
the grad class constitution states,
the motions passed by the class are
null and void.
The court's ruling said its
unanimous decision was taken
because financial matters were
dealt with at the general meeting
and therefore the grad class
council should have worked
strictly within the constitution.
Ron Walls, science rep on grad
class council, and Frank Tichler,
arts rep, brought the issue to the
court because of their
disagreement with the actions of
the grad class general meeting.
"As far as I am concerned, the
only reason for any constitution is
to protect individuals who pay
money," Walls said.
"One of the few things we have to
work with is a constitution, any
breach of the constitution is a
serious break in faith with the
people on whose behalf you work,"
he said.
"The whole issue is its the first
time that an individual or individuals have had recourse to
come to student court and say,
"my rights are being abused,
please   make   this   organization
police itself by following the
constitution."
Walls and Tichler presented a
list of issues which together led
them to take action in the court.
Walls said he did not like the
allowance of $2,500 for a social
event to be held not later than April
30.
Tichler said it is not clear that a
ball is in the best interests of the
majority of grad students without
some form of mail ballot being
taken to determine this.
Walls said if only 250 people
attend, then the grad class will be
giving these people $10 per person
for the ball when they only paid in
$7 to the grad class council.
The same problem came up with.
faculty composite photos, he said.
The small organized faculties
can take advantage of the approximate $3 rebate for the pic
tures but the large unorganized
faculties such as arts do not get the
rebate for their members, Walls
said.
He said the result of these
rebates is that the large
unorganized faculties end up
subsidizing the small organized
groups.
This same general issue of
rebates was fought and won by
See page 5: GRAD
Petition seeks res aid
Two UBC students are collecting
signatures for a petition to
premier Dave Barrett demanding
government subsidies to lessen the
impact of proposed residence rent
increases on students living in
residence^
Doug 'Oliver, education 2 and
Mike Milko, marine biology 3, said
they drafted the petition because
they think proposed 18 per cent
rent hikes are too excessive in view
of the fact services are not being
upgraded.
The two students said they obtained 400 signatures in four hours
from fellow students in Place
Vanier.
The signatures appeared to
contradict a statement 10 days ago
by housing director Les Rohringer
who  said  he  believed   students
wouldn't complain about the increase.
Rohringer says he does not
believe single-student residences
will be covered by the Landlord
and Tenant Act. Provincial rentalsman Barrie Clark said Monday
his office's lawyer will report in
two weeks on whether the single
residences are covered.
The two Place Vanier students
are working alone on the petition.
The Place Vanier residence
association has so far declined to
offer help with the petition because
the association is examining the
residence budget.
"They're trying to be diplomatic
about the whole thing and not get
housing uptight," Oliver said.
The petition demands residence
rent increases not exceed the 10.6
per cent rent ceiling of the Landlord and Tenant Act, or that the
government subsidize the costs of
residence accommodation so the
increase remains below the 10.6
per cent level.
Oliver said he drafted the
petition after receiving a letter
from the housing administration
announcing the proposed increases
of 18 per cent in rents and of 31 per
cent in food costs for a jump of 24
per cent in the cost of residence
living.
"The residences should be a
service to the students, not a rip-
off," Oliver said.
"We'd like to get support from at
least 60 per cent of the people in the
residences," Milko said.
A copy of the petition is available
to be signed outside Room 111 in
Cariboo House at Place Vanier. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday February 13,  1975
SFU breaks contract talks
By MARCUS GEE
Simon Fraser University broke
off negotiations with the
Association of University and
College Employees Tuesday when
two union members barred from
negotiations walked into a
meeting.
The university had previously
barred the two AUC members
from attending negotiations and
the union responded by filing an
unfair labor practice charge with
the B.C. Labor Relations Board
Monday.
SFU claims that if the two AUCE
members, Percilia Groves and
Reva Clavier, take time off for
negotiations they will hinder
operation of the humanities section
of the library where they work.
But AUCE claims the university
is trying to intimidate employees
for union activities; a practice
prohibited by the B.C. Labor Code.
The union said in a statement
Monday that "AUCE sees this
refusal to allow both elected officials to attend negotiations as
blatantly anti-union.V
AUCE local 2 vice-president
Melody Rudd said Wednesday the
university's claim that it needs
both Groves and Clavier to run the
library is "hilarious."
Rudd said both library workers
took two week vacations in
January while one of them was
attending negotiations and the
library continued to function effectively.
Rudd claimed the university has
employees that could replace
Groves and Clavier during
negotiations but "the bosses say
they cannot find replacements."
SFU personnel manager Bruce
Young said Monday  if both the
'LG
plans suit
Striking CKLG disc jockey Ed
Mitchell says he plans to sue
station music director Roy Hennessey for slander, for remarks
Hennessey allegedly made to UBC
students Feb. 5.
However, Mitchell said Wednesday the suit would not be filed
until the Canadian Union of Public
Employees local 686, to which
striking CKLG staffers belong, go
to court to fight an ex parte injunction limiting the number of
strikers picketing the station to
eight.
That case is scheduled to be
heard in B.C. supreme court at
10:30 a.m. today.
Mitchell said the remarks were
allegedly made by Hennessey to
members of CITR, the campus
radio station.
Thirty-three employees of CKLG
went on strike Feb. 1 to back
demands for a first contract.
The B.C. supreme court issued
an injunction the next day limiting
to eight the number of strikers on
the picket line after station
manager Don Hamilton and scab
workers were allegedly prevented
from crossing picket lines.
Mitchell said the law suit would
help the union's cause in the strike.
"It'll throw them (station
management) into a flap. They'll
sign a contract a lot sooner," he
said.
He said he was disappointed that
the injunction had been issued,
saying the NDP had been elected in
1972 partly on the basis that there
wouldn't be any more ex parte
injunctions issued.
The Association of University
and College Employees, Local 1, is
sponsoring a meeting of the
campus support committee today
for CKLG strikers.
Object of the meeting is to coordinate student, staff and faculty
action to support the strike which
is currently in its second week.
The meeting takes place at 5:15
p.m. in SUB 215.
library workers attend
negotiations, the humanities
library efficiency will "drop by
one-third," ,
"We have suggested a number of
alternatives to avoid this but the
union rejected them," he said. "I
think this is a tempest in a teapot."
Rudd said she thinks there is a
pattern developing in the
university's attitude to AUCE. The
SFU administration is trying to put
the AUCE in a bad negotiating
position by limiting which employees are allowed to negotiate,
she said.
"The university is being quite
miserable. They are trying to
make us a wishy-washy union."
The SFU union is in the
preliminary stages of negotiating
its contract with the administration. AUCE executive
member Jackie Ainsworth said
Wednesday there are many
similarities between the problems
the union is having with the SFU
administration and UBC's.
"SFU is being just as bad as UBC
if not worse."
The AUCE grievance committee
at UBC met with the .administration Tuesday to present its
list of grievances for the third
time.
A panel of university representatives told the committee they
would give AUCE an answer about
the grievances by Friday or
Monday.
AUCE claims it will seek arbitration on all the grievances if
the administration does not
recognize them by Monday.
An AUCE application for arbitration on a dispute about higher
wages for student library
assistants and clerical workers is
currently before the B.C. Labor
Relations Board.
AUCE expects an LRB decision
by early March.
A.U.S. ELECTIONS
Nominations are now open for the following A.U.S.
positions:
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
SECRETARY
and FIVE A.M.S. (ARTS) REPS.
Nominations close
Wednesday, February 19th, 12:30 Noon
ELECTION
THURSDAY - FEBRUARY 27th
Departure
Date
No. of
Days
Return
Price
P«
Person
Must Book
Before
Apr. 04
21
Apr. 25
Feb.03
Apr. 04
42
May 16
$344
Feb. 03
Apr. 11
21
May 02
$344
Feb. 10
Apr. 11
49
May 30
$344
Feb. 10
Apr. 25
21
May 16
$344
Feb. 24
Apr. 25
42
June 06
$344
Feb.24
Mav 02
28
Mav 30
$379
Mar. 03
May 02
63
July 04
$379
Mar. 03
May 16
21
June 06
$379
Mar. 17
May 16
56
Julv11
$379
Mar. 17
'May 21
28
June 18
$379
Mar. 21
'May 21
42
July 02
$379
Mar. 21
•May 21
56
July16
$379
Mar. 21
May 30
35
July 04
$379
Mar. 31
May 30
77
Aua.15
$379
Mar. 31
'June04
14
June18
$379
Apr. 04
'June04
28
July 02
$379
Apr. 04
'June04
56
July 30
$379
Apr. 04
June 06
35
July11
$379
Apr. 07
June06
63
Aug. 08
$379
Apr. 07
*June18
14
July 02
$379
Apr. 18
*June18
28
Julv16
$379
Apr. 18
*June18
56
Aua.13
$379
Apr. 18
'July 02
14
July16
$444
May 02
•July 02
28
July 30
$444
Mav 02
•July 02
56
Aug. 27
$444
Mav 02
July 04
42
Aug. 15
$444
Mav 05
July 04
63
Sept. 05
$444
May 05
July 11
28
Aug.08
$444
Mav 12
Juty 11
49
Aug. 29
$444
Mav 12
*July16
14
July 30
$444
May 16
•July16
28
Aug. 13
$444
May 16
•July 16
56
Sept. 10
$444
May 16
•July 30
14
Aug. 13
$444
May 30
Departure
No. of
Return
Price   Must Book
Date
Days
per       Before
Person
•July 30
28
Aug. 27
$444
May 30
*July30
56
Sept. 24
$444
May 30
Aug. 08
21
Aug. 29
$444
June09
Aug. 08
42
Sept. 19
$444
June 09
•Aug. 13
14
Aug. 27
$444
June13
'Aug. 13
28
Sept. 10
$444
June13
•Aug. 13
56
Oct. 08
$444
June13
Aug. 15
21
Sept. 05
$444
June16
Aug.15
54
Oct. 08
S444
June16
•Aug. 27
14
Sept. 10
$379
June 27
•Aug. 27
28
Sept. 24
$379
June 27
•Aug. 27
56
Oct. 22
$379
June 27
Aug.29
21
Sept. 19
$379
June 30
Aug.29
42
Oct. 10
_$379
June 30
Sept. 05
47
Oct. 22
$379
July 07
Sept. 05
105
Dec. 19
$379
July 07
•Sept. 10
14
Sept. 24
$379
July11
•Sept. 10
28
Oct. 08
$379
July 11
•Sept. 10
100
Dec. 19
$379
July 11
Sept. 19
21
Oct. 10
$379
July 21
Sept. 19
42
Oct. 31
$379
July 21
Oct. 10
21
Oct. 31
$344
Aug. 11
Oct. 10
42
Nov. 21
$344
Aug. 11
Oct. 31
21
Nov. 21
$344
Sept. 01
Oct. 31
42
Dec. 12
$344
Sept. 01
Nov. 21
21
Dec. 12
$344
Sept. 22
Nov. 21
49
Jan.09
$344
Sept. 22
Dec. 12
28
Jan.09
$379
Oct. 13
Dec. 19
14
Jan.02
$379
Oct. 20
' LAKER DC10
SunflighfABC
Charter flights from Canada's Number One Holidaymaker.
TRAVEL
Room 100B S.U.B., University of British Columbia
Vancouver 224-0111 Thursday, February  13,  1975
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Budget decisions are secretive
In the story below, Ubyssey
reporter Mark Buckshon takes a
look at university financing and
how the powers that bore decide
what each university gets. This is
the first of a series on university
financing.
By MARK BUCKSHON
How does the government decide
how much money B.C.'s universities get each year?
Part of the answer lies in complex Universities Act language.
But most of the answer is behind
almost completely closed doors at
different levels of university
governance.
Decisions are made at private
university board of governors
meetings, passed to closed B.C.
Universities Council hearings and
finalized in meetings between the
premier and tnree cabinet
ministers that are usually closed to
even high government officials
such as Eileen Dailly. Then they
are sent to the provincial cabinet,
the legislature, back to the
universities council and at last are
returned to the university boards.
The concrete decisions become
public only after they are made
and largely unchangeable. Secrecy
is the rule — despite statements by
some proponents of the new
Universities Act that decisionmaking would become open with
the reforms.
UBC's administration relunc-
tantly released figures last week
relating to the first part of the
financing process after a
spokesman for the more open
Simon Fraser University administration gave a reporter the
information.
William White, UBC bursar and
deputy president, said the
university asked the Universities
Council for a $99.5 million capital
grant and $18 million operating
grant at meetings last December.
A UBC board of governors
member said Monday he is
"surprised" the administration
released the figures since he understood they were to be kept
completely secret and might never
be released.
The Universities Council con-
• solidated UBC's budget request
with ones from SFU and the
University of Victoria and, after
closed meetings, sent the requests
with its own recommendations to
the provincial education department.
What is puzzling is that the
education department doesn't
appear, or want to admit, it has
any input into the decision of where
and how a major chunk of its
budget is going to be spent.
Several department officials
interviewed Tuesday say the most
important cog in the decisionmaking process is the provincial
treasury board — possibly the
most powerful body in the
provincial government — and also
the most secretive.
Board members are premier and
finance minister Dave Barrett,
agriculture minister Dave Stupich,
A look at how universities are getting their  budgets
DAILLY...
i \      budgets not hers
ARMSTRONG ... I
listens to requests
highways minister Robert
Strachan and provincial secretary
Ernie Hall.
Gerald Bryson, a civil servant
who is probably the most powerful
non-elected member of the
government, is secretary to the
board and advises the premier and
cabinet about financial decisions.
The civil servants, who generally
don't allow their names to appear
in newspapers, would not say when
the treasury board considered the
Universities Council report and
how board members reacted to it.
A   spokeswoman   from   Eileen
Dailly's office said she understands Dailly, deputy education
minister Jack Fleming and Inge
Vallen, education department
chief financial officer, discussed
the Universities Council report
informally before sending it the
treasury board.
Vallen said he has discussed the
report with Dailly and Fleming but
the three haven't sat at a meeting
to examine problems and make
recommendations to the treasury
board.
He said the education department, observing the intent of the
Universities Act, keeps itshand out
of university financing and leaves
those decisions to the universities
council and treasury board.
He said the "hands off" policy
was also observed under the old act
and the Social Credit administration.
"The department of education
has never to my knowledge ever
placed any recommendations
(about university financing)
before the treasury board," he
said.
A spokesman for Barrett's office
said Dailly, Fleming and Vallen
could attend treasury board
meetings when university financing is discussed and "make a
case" for special requests.
He also said the board's decisionmaking power is not final as its
recommendations must go before
an be approved by the full cabinet.
However, he indicated Dailly and
education department representatives would have trouble fighting
the weight of a negative treasury
board recommendation in the
cabinet.
The treasury board and cabinet's
decision will be released probably
in early March when the
legislature discusses education
department estimates in the
budget debates.
The Universities Act requires
part of the Universities Council's
report to the education department
to be released not later than 15
days after the opening of the
legislative assembly.
But vague wording in the act
makes it likely the government can
keep university budget requests
and the Universities Council
recommendations secret —
releasing only a "cover" report
discussing the council's public
meetings and research projects.
The subsection requiring a
"report" be released to the
legislature does not require the
government to release the real
report, merely one "with respect to
the operations of the universities."
So, after the Universities Council
later this year divides the total
budget approved by the legislature
among the universities, those
affected by the decisions will know
what they are.
But they probably won't know
what they could have been — if
they could have understood or
shared, even distantly, in the
decision-making.
Future issues of The Ubyssey
will examine more closely the
decision-making process.
N-arms treaties false protection
By MICHAEL MacLEOD
Nuclear arms control is nonexistent. There are only deceptive
treaties and an arms race moving
rapidly out of control.
That was the message the past
secretary of the United Nations
disarmament commission
delivered to UBC audiences this
week.
William Epstein said little
progress has been made in 25 years
of effort.
"The widely touted accords —
salt (Strategic Arms Limitation
Talks), the non-proliferation and
ABM (Anti-Ballistics Missiles)
treaties — are spurious
agreements which allow the arms
race to continue unabated," he
said.
"Stockpiles of atomic weapons
are growing as fast as ever among
the established powers and a host
of politically unstable countries
are threatening to join the nuclear
club."
Epstein came to UBC as a Cecil
and Ida Green visiting lecturer.
Cecil Green made his money as a
war profiteer selling arms to the
U.S. military for use in Vietnam.
"Defense budgets best reflect
the success of arms talks," Epstein
said. "With the end of the cold war,
the arms agreements and winding
down of the Vietnamese war,
expenditures should have declined,
but they haven't. In fact they are
escalating swiftly.
"Obviously there is a great
difference between what nations
say and what they are really doing.
I don't know that the arms race is
out of control, but I suspect it."
Epstein illustrated what he
considers the specious nature of
recent   treaties.   The   1972   ABM
treaty between the U.S. and the
USSR restricted each country to
two ABM sites. In 1974 this limit
was reduced to one.
"Rubbish," said Epstein. "The
ABM programs were conspicuous
failures anyway. Neither country
was prepared to continue with the
projects, so they bargained them
away, meaningless chips in an
international poker game."
Epstein said the threshhold
testing ban is another example of
futile treaties. After April Fool's
day, 1976, subterranean nuclear
testing will be restricted to devices
under 150 kilotons, he said.
Very few tests yet have exceeded
that limit, and the ban doesn't
apply to civilian testing, he said.
"How does one distinguish
between a civilian and a military
bomb?" Epstein asked. "Almost
all the treaties impose limits which
are in no danger of being exceeded.
"Limits which are not constricting are no limits at all.
However, some small successes
have been achieved. Outer space,
the Arctic, and the sea bed are off
limits to nuclear armaments, but
the majority of the earth's useable
environment is not covered by
treaty."
Epstein said he thinks the
greatest danger will come from
small countries now developing
nuclear potential. India recently
joined the U.S., USSR, France,
England and China as the sixth
nuclear country, largely employing technology provided by
Canada.
In the next five years, Epstein
estimated half a dozen countries
will join that group or be able to,
See page 5: ARMS
canned laughter
by alan doree
Canada's Arctic defences ill-prepared to
defend natural resources against Third
World attack — ancient news item.
Field Marshal Byron Blizzard, commander of the 142nd Armored Weather
Forecasters Brigade has taken steps to
block a possible invasion of Canada's nor-
thland by Nigerian commandos.
He took the steps from military bases all
across the country and scattered them
throughout the Yukon where he feels the
attacking Nigerian troops will trip over
them.
When asked why Nigeria would invade
Canada's north, Blizzard replied: "Because
they don't have any snow, of course, and
Canada has enough potential reserves to
supply the entire western world for 5,000
years.
"If they take over our snowfields they
could exert an economic stranglehold on the
world that would make the Arabs' look like a.
love caress."
Blizzard said Canada's warning system
has been beefed up "by the addition of more
meat to the cooking pots of all the camps
across the Northwest Territories known as
the Stew Line."
"The kayaks of our Nuclear Strike Force
— NSF for short — are safely protected
from Burmese frogmen — they have some
strange mutants done down there, you know
— here beneath the 4,000 feet of pre-
smashed concrete of our underground
kayak pens.
These pens are totally sealed off, making
it impossible for the cunning Burmese to get
through, however, it also makes it impossible for us to get the kayaks out to their
fail-safe points."
"Where are the fail-safe points?"
"About 20 feet down the Mackenzie River,
we usually know by then if the kayaks are
going to stay afloat or not."
"Isn't that dangerous being so close to the
Canadian coast?
"Actually we ■ don't have any nuclear
devices; our guys just roll out and throw
handfuls of uranium ore at the enemy."
"What other precautions have you
taken?"
"We have totally re-equipped our antiaircraft guns, as a matter of fact we handed
out the new snowballs just this morning.
"We've hired a dozen new fishing trawlers
to catch submarines.
"We trained a squad of suicide commandos but they all committed suicide.
"We've also established one of the best
forest fire fighting units the world has ever
seen in case the Third  World countries
launch an incendiary attack in an attempt to
leave our northland a blackened wasteland.
Those people are really desperate for snow,
you know and they'll stoop to anything."
"Why db they want this snow so badly?"
"How else can nations like Tanzania ever
hope to get the Winter Olympics?"
"What's your last line of defence?"
"The Mexican-American border, but don't
worry it'll never get that far because we've
strung the Montreal Canadiens across the
Prairie provinces."
This column isn't the slightest bit funny
and I would like to apologize to all my
readers everywhere. Bill and Frank, I'm
sorry. They make me do it. I'm only
following orders. They won't let me go to the
bathroom until I fill this space. I should have
listened to Mom and stayed in the poultry
business. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday February 13, 1975
Kimball not
the issue
Ah yes, tenure.
Tenure hassles at this university, like Watergate, tend to
turn into affairs concentrating on personalities rather than
the basic issue itself.
And that's a rather short term way to look at things,
since it means that while the profs denied tenure may or
may not get another hearing, the system keeps grinding
along, making the same mistakes.
That's a special danger here, because psych prof Meredith
Kimball, recently not recommended for tenure by her
departmental committee, is such a prominent and well-liked
person.
Therefore her students and colleagues are interested in
pestering psych department members and starting petitions
in order to insure her reinstatement at a campus where her
teaching and organizing skills are badly needed.
Kimball has asked her students and colleagues not to do
these things because she fears publicity will damage her
chances for getting the case overturned.
But we urge students and faculty to go through these
steps anyway.
Yet it's important for people to remember the wider
ramifications of the issue instead of getting caught up in
Kimball's and Dennis Foth's particular cases.
The ramifications are these.:
Currently, tenure is granted through a system which
depends largely on who you know. Are you popular with
your seniors who make the initial recommendation for
tenure? Do you have contacts with the right editor of the
right journal to ensure publication of enough of your
articles? Are you the sort of person who won't rock the
boat, but rather help build up the reputation of a stable
department?
Are you the type of person, in short, who will allow
those on top to stay on top and mind your place in the
meantime?
Now obviously those considerations aren't in the interest
of students, since in case you haven't noticed, we aren't
exactly at the top of the academic pile.
Rather, our considerations come last, and an obviously
poor last. Because we are concerned whether the professor
in question is a good teacher and an innovative teacher.
Now that particular evaluation is one which we are most
qualified to make, since we're the ones with first-hand
experience * not donuts on the departmental or faculty
committees who sit in on one or two classes.
But under the current system not only do our
considerations come through second, but we have little say
in the deciding.
For instance, in the psych department, students fill out
questionnaires every spring evaluating their profs. These
form sheets are forwarded to a teacher evaluation
committee, which looks them all over, lets profs know what
students think of them and how students suggest their
teaching methods might improve.
And two students even sit on the evaluation committee,
whose piles of information is used whenever someone comes
up for tenure in the department.
But that's not enough by far.
And this is where students' action must be directed —to
ensure equity representation on evaluation as well as
promotion and tenure committees.
Now, granted, we are not always the best people to
decide the value of research conducted by the prof in
question, or of the published articles they spew. But we
bring a more unprejudiced eye into these considerations.
And we're a lot more likely to evaluate fairly the
contributions of a prof who suggests innovations and new
directions for education.
After all, we're the ones who are here to get some sort of
a meaningful, whatever that is, education.
And we're much more open to changes in a structure that
has been allowed to continue, unchallenged, for too long.
We're not firmly entrenched within a department whose
major tradition regards stability and reputation as priorities.
And our opinions aren't affected by professional jealousy
or self-interest.
Therefore, it's important we work to get on promotion
and tenure committees throughout the university. And now
that we have a certain amount of representation at least on
senate and the board of governors, it's time to apply the
pressure.
Motions in senate, from the BoG, and petitions and
representations to these bodies are important at this time.
We have the sort of case in Kimball that acts as a good
example of the injustices of the current system, loath as she
is for personal publicity.
But keeping her here isn't the important thing. Instead,
we've got to ensure that people like Kimball don't have to
go through this ridiculous hassle to stay.
God knows, there are few enough good teachers here as it
is.
Letters
Grad
council
As much as I would prefer not to
use The Ubyssey as a forum of
discussion better suited to the grad
class council, I think the position of
our council must be made clear.
Frank Tichler's first charge
against us is that because of poor
attendance of council meetings we
do not represent the grad class
very well.
All members of the grad class
council were notified of the
meetings and their decision not to
attend should not delay our work.
It should be noted that at the
meetings in question, science,
education and arts, whose
graduates total 2,807 of a university total of 4,299 were well represented.
I must dispute the "proposed $3
rebate" as there is no such
proposal. It was earlier conceded
by council that Phe $3 rebate passed
on Jan. 23 would probably not
stand up in court and on Feb. 6 the
motion was rescinded. Mr. Tichler
was at both meetings so it is surprising that he speaks of the rebate
and composite pictures as two
separate expenses. The rescinded
motion provided no funds for
composites on top of the $3 rebate.
Perhaps Tichler is actually
taking issue with a motion passed
at the grad class general meeting
on Feb. 7.
If he had examined the wording
of that motion he would see that it
does not open the gates for funds to
be channeled to the small
organized faculties he fears so
much. The motion, as taken from
the minutes, states, "That the grad
class council run a referendum to
determine student opinion of
rebates."
If this referendum indicates that
students do want rebates, and I
think it will, I suppose it would
allow them in 1975-1976. This year
it would be difficult to give rebates
as our funds will be given out according to student wishes before
the referendum.
Tichler may be opposed to the
whole concept of rebates but he
cannot argue with what the
students decide.
Contrary to what Tichler states,
all students are provided with a
chance to vote on social programs
and gift allocations. Their chance
to vote on social programs came at
the general meeting and all gifts
will be determined according to a
ballot mailed to each student.
Finally, I should point out that
one of the primary reasons for
organizing the grad class was to
promote social events. In light of
this I see no reason why funds
should not be used to finance a
social   program.   I   assure   you,
Tichler will be welcome to attend.
Tom de Wolf
president, grad class
Milko
I would like to express my sincere appreciation for the article
that you wrote about me. I feel that
taking my thoughts and feelings
over the past six months, as I went
through the preliminaries, was the
best approach.
I'm sorry to say though that I
was vague about my feelings about
this period and couldn't express
them totally, or I would have
probably consumed the whole issue
of The Ubyssey.
I express my sincere thanks
again for getting my side of the
story.
Mike Milko
marine biology 3
Unity
THE UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 13,1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Lesley Krueger
"And furthermore, someone went poo poo on my typewriter," said
Alan Doree plaintively. "Tough shit," punned her honorperson Kini
McDonald. "Yep, that's the way it goes . . . and comes," chimed Reed
Clarke and Marcus Gee. Carl Vesterback, Chris Gainor and Michael
MacLeod tittered in unison and thrust wads of old Lesley Krueger
editorials with just a pinch of Gary Coull firemen features and Doug
Rushton deadliners at him. Sue Vohanka discussed boxing with Mark
Buckshon while Ralph Maurer, Marise Savaria and Berton Woodward
practised curtsies.
It appears an agriculture student
has got the Student Unity campaign chant wrong. The correct
version is:
We are, we are, we are
Student Unity.
We can, we can, we can
Revamp the University.
Want to join us, Trevor? With
your help we'll try to make the
university a "supposedly
responsible, both socially and
mentally, community."
Jake van der Kamp
arts 4
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241 K.
HuC "£.■£;.x.*s.. Thursday,  February  13,  1975
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Grad meeting confused council
From page 1
Walls and Tichler last week. In the
past, grad class council has paid
out general rebates to any group
which applied for the money.
After a threat by Walls and
Tichler to take the issue of general
rebates to student court, the
council rescinded its motion to give
out the rebates.
Other   complaints   by   Tichler
centred around the conduct of the
general meeting itself. He said
votes at the meeting produced
clear majorities because only
about half of the people were
voting.
He said it was a very confused
meeting and in the end there was
probably only about 200 people left
from the original 350.
Tichler also complained about
lack of information before the
meeting.
"I wasn't informed as to what
size of a social event subsidy was
going to be suggested or even what
method would be used to arrive at
the subsidy," he said.
Tichler said the matter of
general rebates was brought up
after assurances from the grad
class council president it was a
Arms spread 'frightening'
From page 3
and in the five years after that a
dozen more .
Epstein said this spread of
atomic weapons has frightening
implications." The danger of war
by madness, mistake, or design
increases and the likelihood of
fissionable materials being stolen
becomes greater," he said.
"That's disconcerting when you
can read in the Encyclopedia
Brittanica how to make an atomic
bomb."
The small countries, unlike the
U.S. or USSR, will not have the
absorptive capacity to retaliate
against an attacker, he said.
Therefore, pre-emptive nuclear
strikes will be militarily attractive, he said.
"Unfortunately,   though   the
UBC law students elect
first woman president
Five persons have been elected
to the executive of the Law
Students Association including a
woman president.
Gillian Andrew, law 2, becomes
the first woman ever to hold the
office of LSA president in the
history of the law school.
Also elected were Lee Tupper,
law 2, internal vice president;
Barry Frazer, law 1, external vice
president; George Shimizu, law 2,
secretary; Bill Harris, law 2,
treasurer.
Brian Murphy, law 2, was
elected ombudsman while. Don
MacLeod, law 2, won the office of
honorary architect and washroom
monitor by acclamation.
CHEESES
PIZZAS
COLD MEATS
SUBMARINES
ICECREAM
Where?
AT
SOFT
CONTACT
LENS
$150
ALL NEW
• invisible
• attractive
• immediate comfort
TRY THEM AND SEE
willow
CONTACT LENS
CLINIC LTD.
2525 Willow St.  874-6221
TO: STAFF, FACULTY, AND STUDENTS
THINK SMALL!
-IN PRICE
-GAS BILLS
- OPERATING COSTS
- PAYMENTS
-PARKING SPACE
-POLLUTION
But think BIG in
-ROOMINESS
- COMFORT
-CAR MILEAGE
-DRIVING PLEASURE
Call JEFF SMITH Comm. 3
228-8361
for a Test Drive
of any DATSUN model
THINK
DATSUN
P.S. We have some remaining 74's at great savings,
as well as clean trades.
290 S.W. MARINE DR. 724-4644
Motor Dealer Lie. No. D6270
situation is more serious now than
it was 10 years ago, protest is
less," Epstein said. "When atmospheric tests ceased, concern
died."
"It is indicative of the lack of
progress that President Ford
recently said he-felt the U.S. was
morally obliged to build its nuclear
stockpile up to the limits set in the
latest accord with Russia.
"How many times must we be
able to kill each other?" Epstein
asked. "For the first time in 25
years of working in this field, I am
scared."
Epstein will return to UBC in
March to deliver another three
lectures. He is currently a visiting
professor at the University of
Victoria and special consultant on
disarmament to the secretary
general of the UN.
dead   issue   and   would   not   be
brought up.
"That was the straw that broke
the camel's back," he said.
Science rep Steve Narod said if
the people who are supposed to
have been injured by the decisions
of the grad class council were
really interested they would have
turned up at the general meeting.
"Walls and Tichler, instead of
getting their own members out
there (to the meeting), spent their
efforts against smaller groups," he
said.
Narod said there was open
discussion on all issues including
the $2,500 social event subsidy.
Grad class councill will now have
to call another general meeting in
order to carry out its business; this
time giving 10 days' notice before
the meeting is to be held.
Hewlett Packard
Calculators
Now Available
At Discount Prices
HP 35 Reg. $297   Our Price $225
HP 45 Reg. $429   Our Price $386
H P 55 R eg. $499   O ur Pri ce $472
HP 65 Reg. $1049 Our Price $944
HP 70 Reg. $363   Our Price $326
HP80Reg.$521   Our Price$469
Phone Rick 266-8169
or 325-4161
HP-55 ON DISPLAY NOW
in the
CO-OP BOOKSTORE
S.U.B. Basement
PROBLEM: YOU'RE BURNING RUBBER
ON THE SLOPES AND WIPING OUT
AT THE END OF THE PEN.
SOLUTION: Register with the UBC
Tutorial Centre, 12:30 - 2:30 p.m.,
Speak-Easy. Fee $1. They'll find you
a tutor. For information call
228-4557 anytime. Fee refundable if
no tutor is available.
A programme of the UBC Alumni Association
Something fo"cheers"abouf:
Now the glorious beer of Copenhagen is brewed right here in Canada.
It comes to you fresh from the brewery. So it tastes even better than ever.
And Carlsberg is sold at regular prices.
So let's hear it, Carlsberg lovers. "One, two, three . . . Cheers!" Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday February 13, 1975
Hot flashes
World youth
wants you
For those who don't want to
return to university next year and
who want an experience that is
stimulating and broadening,
Canada World Youth could be
what you're looking for.
CWY is looking for participants
and staff for its 10-month long
program starting this September.
Thirty-one participants aged 17
to 20 will be selected from B.C.
There are also openings for
qualified .group leaders aged 23 to
28 and for coordinators aged 26
to 35.
The program involves group
travel in different parts of Canada
for several months and four
months in a Third World exchange
country.
Application deadlines for
group leaders and co-ordinators is
March 3 and for participants,
March 21.
Information is available at the
CWY office at 2524 Cypress.
Berrigan
Phil Berrigan, a former
Catholic priest who spent 40
months in a U.S. prison because
of his outspoken views on the war
in Vietnam, will speak today in
the SUB ballroom.
Berrigan has been active in the
defense of political prisoners in
South   Vietnam  and   the  Soviet
Union. He was slammed into an
American jail for dumping blood
on draft records.
He is speaking at noon on the
case of Valentyne Moroz, an
imprisoned Soviet hisforian.
Poetry
'Tween classes
TODAY
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
University   Symphony   Orchestra,
noon, Old Auditorium.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Herschel   Handler,  author of  a   "A
Nation  Unaware," speaks on "How
Canada    differs   from    the    U.S.,"
noon, Bu. 205.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Film on  Martin Luther, 7:30 p.m.,
Lutheran campus centre.
ZOOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Noon   hour  travels  with   zoologists
continues with  a lecture on Greek
temples    and    things,    noon,
biosciences 2000.
UKRAINIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Phil   Berrigan   speaks,   noon,   SUB
ballroom.
HILLEL HOUSE
Paul Marantz speaks on the Jackson
amendment, noon, Hillel house; also
Zahava   Cohen   does   Israeli   songs,
1:30 p.m.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Paul   Stevens   on   sexuality  from  a
biblical    perspective,    noon,    SUB
207-209.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Charlie Johnston speaks, noon, SUB
205.
PRE DENTAL SOC
Demonstration    on    restoration
materials, noon, JBM lounge.
FRIDAY
ALPHA-OMEGA UKRAINIAN
STUDENTS' CLUB
Important   general   meeting,   noon,
SUB 213.
SLAVONIC STUDENTS
DEPARTMENT
Aram    Ohanjanian   speaks   on   the
peoples  of Siberia, noon, Bu.  203.
BUCK
FOLDING
KNIVES-a
special offer
Reg. 44.50
s39.95
For a limited time we
are able to offer the
famous blade at this
ABC    savin9'
Recreational
Equipment
557 Richards St. 687-7885
1822 WEST 4th AVE. 731-4018
f¥m\\ VICTORIA'- 564 YATES ST.
YJJt\ 384-6522
the specialty shop
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Joe Kellner speaks on the threat of
escalation in Vietnam, 8 p.m., 1208
Granville.
ANARCHIST COLLECTIVE
Discussion, noon, SUB 211.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General   meeting,   noon,   IH   upper
lounge.
The second reading in a series
of modern Russian and East
European poetry entitled Political
Poetry: Mayakovsky will be
presented by the Slavonic studies
department at noon today at
Buchanan 102.
No theatre
Japanese theatre comes to UBC
this week in the form of a free
performance and a lecture on No
Theatre, practice and
performance.
Sadayo Kita and a troupe of 10
performers from the No'Theatre
will perform Hagoromo: The
Heavenly Maiden at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday in IRC 2.
He is one of the leading
masters of the No Theatre in
Japan.
Ed. S. A. ELECTIONS
Nominations are now open
for the following Ed. S. A. positions:
Ombudsperson
four A.M.S.
(Arts) Reps.
President
Vice-President
Treasurer
Secretary
Elementary Policy Council Rep.
Secondary Policy Council Rep.
Nominations close
Friday, March 14th,  12:30 Noon
* Genii
leeitt picture t
*ih<«ter
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• Browns • Blues
• Greys 9 Burgundy
• Tux-Tails • Velvets
• Double Knits • White
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rrntals
1110 Seymour 688-2481
ASSOCIATED STORES
Men's Room Westwood Mall 941-2541
4639 Kingsway 435-1160
2174 West 41st Ave. 261-2750
1046 Austin, Coquitlam 937-3516
1420 Lonsdale, N. Van. 988-7620
3048 Edgemount Blvd., N.V. 987-5121
1586 Marine, W. Van. 936-1813
1527 Lonsdale, N. Van. 985-4312
Fraser's Surrey Place 588-7323
Werners Lougheed Mall 936-7222
Friesens Guildford Centre 581-8722
Kennedy McDonald, Park Royal 922-6421
Fraser's Park Royal North 926-1916
• 10% discount to U.B.C. students
CRASH COURSE ON IRAN
DR. HANNA KASSIS
DR. GUSTAV THAISS
DR. JOHN SPAGNOLO
will participate in an illustrated lecture/discussion
program on the role and influence of historically and
culturally endowed country.
FRIDAY, FEB. 14, 7:30-10:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, FEB. 15, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Lecture Hall 4, Instructional Resources Centre, The
University of British Columbia
Registration $6.00 (Students $3.00, fee waived for persons
over 65) payable at the door or in advance to:
Centre for Continuing Education,
The University of British Columbia
Vancouver V6T 1W5 (228-2181, local 219)
THC CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication..
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
DR.     BUNDOLO    Wednesday    Evening
Feb.   19,   8:00 P.M.   It's  Free.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
NEW
TEXAS   INSTRUMENTS
SR-51   —   $275.00
HEWLETT   PACKARD
HP-55  —  $472.00
TEXAS   INSTRUMENTS
SR-16  —  $104.95
CO-OP   BOOKSTORE
S.U.B.   Basement   or  call   32S-4161
C   &  C  SPORTS
ANNIVERSARY  SALE  NOW ON
20% Off Everything
Big  Savings On  Ice  Skates,
Hockey Equipment, Racquets.
Gym  Strip,  Etc.
Open 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Wed.
4 p.m.-9 p.m. Thurs.  & Fri.
9 am.-6 p.m.  Saturday
3*16 W. 4th Ave.
AT 4406 W. 10th VARSITY  FURNITURE
Best prices paid for furniture and all
miscellaneous items. 224-7313.
11 — For Sale — Private
SUNBEAM CORDLESS Mist Stick Curling Iron $15.00 <Regular $30.00) Used
five times.  Phone 738-1037 eves.
30 — Jobs
TENNIS PROFESSIONAL
REQUIRED
To   teach,,   supervise   courts,   assist
in operation of Pro Shop from May
through August. Club with 6 Lay-co
lighted courts, new clubhouse,  over
400   members.   Apply  by   April   1st,
with   qualifications,   references,   experience and salary expected to:
M.  R.   HANNA, President
Lethbridge  Tennis  Club
913—21st Street South
Lethbridge, Alberta
PART TIME employment offered to
imaginative physicist to research and
co-ordinate work on ah Anti-Gravity
Machine.
WOMEN from Penticton area wanted
for employment in Proposed Women's
Center of OFY Project. Phone 731-
4808.
35 - Lost
BROWN WALLET LOST Feb. 6. David
Kirshner. Return to B. Zaks, Room
266 SUB.  Reward.
LOST: Silver Indian Thunderbird Pendant Monday. Please call Betty 732-
9194  if   any   information.   Reward.
TEXAS INSTRUMENT SR11 in Hebb,
Fri., Feb. 7. Please phone 266-5928
after 1.  Reward.
40 — Messages
LONELY Young African Gent wishes
to meet lady companion and friend
for outings. Reply to Box 40 "The
Ubyssey", Rm. 241 S.U.B.
CHERYL thanks for taking the time
to send me my wallet. Randy.
65 — Scandals
HELP) Beige handbag, leather wallet,
chain mail purse stolen Four Shore
Beach  Feb.   1.   Pam  732-0369.
LIVE RADIO COMEDY! Dr. Bundolo's
Pandemonium Medicine Show. This
Wednesday evening, Feb. 19, 8:00
P.M.  It's Free.
70 — Services
PASSPORT
Visa, Application Photos
U.B.C. SPECIAL $1.95
Regular $2.95
SHOW YOUR AMS CARD
(Negative Free)
CANDID   STUDIOS
3343  W.  Broadway
Phone: 732-7446
SOUND RESEARCH — Thousands of research papers — Custom Research-
Student Resume Services. 1969 West
Broadway. 738-3715. Office Hours:
1:00 p m.-5:00 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
80 — Tutoring
I   NEED   a   tutor   for   Math   100.    Call
Wendy at 224-9163 after 6.
85 — Typing
STUDENT DISCOUNTS on typewriter
rentals. Manual, portable, electric,
call now. Seymour Disco Rentals.
689-7237.
EXPERT CORRECTING IBM Selectric
Typist. Experienced Technical and
Thesis Typing. Reasonable Rates.
Mrs.   Ellis  321-3838.
FAST EFFICIENT TYPING (near 41st
and  Marine  Drive).   266-5053.
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC     TYPING.     My
home. Essays, Thesis, etc. Neat, Accurate Work. Reasonable Rates. 263-
5317.
90-Wanted
WANTED — Students interested in
earning $100.00 to $1,000 per month.
Part time. From home or residence.
Call 736-1791  between 6-8 p.m. Thursday, February 13,  1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Sports budget shafts women
This is the second in a series of
articles by The Ubyssey sports
staff looking at the operation of the
athletic department. Next week's
article will focus on financing of
the department,, weaknesses,
inequities,      ■   and possible
suggestions for alternatives.
ByCARLVESTERBACK
"When the men's soccer team
won the national title this year,
(administration president) Walter
Gage treated the players to dinner.
Our (basketball) team has won the
national title three years in a row.
We haven't heard a peep from
him."
This is a frequent attitude
toward women in sports at UBC.
Why?
Most women on campus have
little idea of the workings of the
various bodies representing
women's sport at UBC.
It isn't clear how funds are
received or allocated, or, indeed,
what sports are available for
women outside the physical
education department.
It is also unclear whether women
are getting the proper standard of
sports program which should be
available to them on the basis of
their participation in the university.
The Women's Athletic Association is, in theory, the body which
expresses the desires of the women
of the campus.
The WAA's interests are expressed by the Women's Athletic
Directorate, a body composed of
an executive elected  by  women
and the Alma Mater Society. One
member is appointed by Walter
Gage and one member is the
athletic director for women,
Marilyn Pomfret.
An examination of the men's and
women's budgets reveals that the
allocation of funds for women's
and men's extramural sports is
unequal.
authorities in the athletic department. The usual dodge is to point to
the per capita expenditure in each
program. For the total sports
program (extramural), the per
capita cost is $162.50 for the men
and $142.90 for the women.
The figures are closer, but this
argument is a shuck. All it means
is women do not  participate  in
students, team managers, the
intramural director, a person
concerned with equipment needs,
and the president of the Big Block
Club. WAD makes recommendations to the real power body, the
Women's Athletic Committee.
The committee is composed of
four students, the president, vice-
president, secretary and member-
at-large from WAA and one representative from each of the physical
education school, the dean of
women,  the  Alumni  Association
MEN'S ATHLETICS . .. dominate women athletics
The men receive a total of
$136,935 to run their extramural
program. Of this, $49,535 comes
from the university as a grant. The
athletic fee levied on students
provides $81,900. Other sources are
revenues from the various teams
in the form of gate receipts,
making a total of $4,900.
The women receive a total of
$39,700 for their extramural needs.
Their university grant is $12,500,
and their share of the athletic fee
levy is $15,200. The university has
granted the women $6,000 for air
fare increases and meal
requirements, and $2,500 for this
year only for the upgrading of
uniforms and equipment.
The biggest reason for the
disparity between the totals
available to the two departments
lies in the difference of the money
accruing to each from the athletic
fee. Of the $5 that each student
pays at registration, $4.20 goes to
the men and 80 cents to the women.
Thus, the men end up with $81,900
and the women with $15,200.
The reason behind this difference lies in the history of the
athletic fee.
During the '50s and continuing
through the '60s, the men voted
themselves increasing amounts of
money through campus referendums. The women were late in
waking up to this, and have only
voted themselves 80 cents since the
end of the '50s.
Further referendums have,
according to athletic department
sources, been held up by an AMS
more concerned with referendums
on other matters. The AMS has
been reluctant to increase the
athletic fee for women, because it
has been involved in raising the
AMS levy for projects such as SUB.
The result of this situation has
been a much more limited extramural program for women. The
men have a total of 26 sports; the
women, 13.
The total of funds allocated to
sports pursued by both sexes is
identical. But the men's department spends $73,035 on additional
sports, while - the women spend
$100.
These additional sports for the
men are such as ice hockey,
football, soccer, rowing, sailing,
squash and weightlifting. The
single additional women's sport is
figure skating.
Complaints have been raised
about these glaring disparities to
Celebrate the
Year of the Rabbit!
at the Auditorium Snack Bar
Delicious Chinese Food
Served 11 A.M. - 2 P.M.
COMBO PLATE REDUCED
to only $1.00
Tues. Feb. 11 -Fri. Feb. 14
Free Fortune Cookie
and Tea to all
Chinese Food Customers
SCIENCE STUDENTS
All Science Students urged to attend the
General Meeting
of the
Science Undergrad Society
THURSDAY, FEB. 20fh, 1975 AT 12:30
IN HEBB THEATRE
Agenda: i) Effects of possible new A.M.S. constitution next year
ii) Fee levy
iii) Upcoming elections on Feb. 25th
extramural sport to the same
degree as men. And the reason
they do not demand more equal
funding and a greater variety of
sports is because of the sexist bias
of the society.
Women are conditioned from
early childhood to believe that
sports are not for girls, that they
are unfeminine.
There is virtually no minor
league system for young girls of
elementary age. There are no
elementary teachers whose job is
solely to teach physical education.
School boards want teachers who
are qualified to teach a general
curriculum, teachers who usually
have not had any PE training. And
school boards generally reflect the
desires of parents.
These conditioned attitudes are
unjust since they prevent people
from realizing their potentials.
They should be changed.
This is a big job, one which will
parks board. We are making
recommendations to the government for changes," she said.
"One thing we are trying to do is
make it easier for girls'
organizations to book park time for
their activities. The ratio of park
use is83 boys per girl. We're trying
to change that."
Pomfret added that athletics at
UBC have come a long way in the
last 10 years.
"The women's budget used to be#
$2,000. We were required to use the
women's gym over by Buchanan.
Women were simply never seen
around War Memorial gym. But
now, you see them running the
circuit, practising alongside the
men's teams, jogging to the gates
... all these things have happened."
Change is going on, but in most
cases too slowly. Women who
participate in extramural sports
have grown discouraged in their
attempts to get a referendum
through the AMS for more money.
Concerned women also encounter a certain degree of inertia
within the athletic department.
Men within the department
hearing complaints point to the per
capita figures .and then ask what
all the fuss is about.
Much remains to be done. It is a
fact that the men get more money
than the women.
It is a fact that no sports
program worthy of the name exists
for girls of elementary school age.
And it is a fact that parents'
attitudes about the roles for their
children remain in the majority of
cases    oriented     toward     the
It is a fact that the men get
more money than the
women.
require strong leadership and an
abundance of expertise. This role
could, and should, be filled by the
university. It should be a policy of
this campus' administration to
publicize the need for change.
According to women's athletic
head Marilyn Pomfret, progress is
being made. Pomfret was part of a
delegation from B.C. which attended the National Conference of
Women in Sport. The members of
the delegation have remained
active since returning to the
province.
"We have women in influential
positions. For example, one
member of our delegation is on the
traditional stereotypes about what
boys and girls should be.
The university must take a more
aggressive stand in this regard. It
must itself go into the community
to help concerned mothers
organize sports for their daughters
in the manner in which fathers now
do for their sons.
If it finds itself stymied at this
level, it must put recommendations before government agencies
whose implementation would
repair the. lack of opportunity
outlined.
And especially, it must clean up
its own house in order to set a good
example.
HILLEL HOUSE PRESENTS
PROF. PAUL MARANTZ
Dept. of Political Science,
on
"THE JACKSON AMENDMENT:
PROSPECTS FOR THE FUTURE"
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 12:30-1:30 P.M.
HILLEL HOUSE LOCATED DIRECTL Y
BEHIND BROCK HALL
ATTENTION all ELTON JOHN fans!
The famous  Saturday Night  shirt back by popular demand.
4 distinct colors (just  won't  fade' ) on a 100% cotton
doubleknit T-shirt  (not them  cheap, see - thru kind ). Still
only S4.95. guaranteed, and delivery in 10 days from
Raul
> graph
.U1
2920 hammond bay rd.
nanaimo, be V9T 1E2
sizes S-M-L-XL
no., sire , at $4.95. amount
mm
hiirt
sorry no CODs;
cheques or money orders only Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday February 13,  1975
Says council chairman Armstrong
UVic buildings are bad
but take a look at UBC
Special to The Ubyssey
VICTORIA — University of
Victoria huts may be decrepit and
falling down, but UVic buildings
aren't in as bad shape as those at
UBC, Universities Council
cfiairman William Armstrong said
here Tuesday.
After a tour of the campus
similar to those the council had
made at UBC and Simon Fraser,
Armstrong told a meeting he is
aware many old UVic army huts
should be condemned.
But he added that many of UBC's
main buildings violate building
codes.  -
(The UBC main library violates
the codes because of staff overcrowding and fire hazards, while
UBC army huts, first used as
"temporary" buildings" after the
Second World War, are given only
minimum maintenance as they
deteriorate).
Armstrong said his tour of UVic
was more comprehensive than
those at the other two universities,
but complained that none of the
universities had shown the council
their daycare centres.
He was responding to an invitation at the post-tour meeting
from the UVic daycare centre
supervisor to see the facility.
Kirk Patterson, president of the
UVic Alma Mater Society, told the
council in a brief that enrolment
should be restricted to students of
true university calibre.
Patterson charged that the low
standards at UVic contributes to
apathy and cynicism on campus.
The student body wants financial
stpport based on quality, not
quantity, he said.
Patterson called for an expanded
building program at the university,
especially of campus housing and
daycare facilities.
Dental care services should be
added to the current medical care
service available to students he
said.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Desperately near bankruptcy and
littered with bitter internal strife,
the major daily newspaper here
Monday called out for help.
Suddenly, as if a vision of
heaven, the mountains parted and
out lept a short, solid figure with an
em ruler and brief case in one
hand, a flashy smile and riding a
Pinto horse.
"I'm AD MAN and I'm here to
hip," he said, dismounting the
Pinto and taking off its snowshoes.
"Many students go through their
entire four years of post-secondary
schooling without seeing a dentist," he said.
Armstrong replied that hard
facts on housing problems are hard
to obtain and the council would
appreciate any figures the AMS
could provide on how many
students did not go to university
because of the housing ^shortage.
Armstrong also said the idea of
student dental care is a new one to
the council, which he said he had
heard it for the first time at SFU
Monday.
Grad student president Anne
Forrester told the council tuition
fees should not be equalized among
the three universities because
UVic doesn't have the same
facilities the two Lower Mainland
universities have.
She also asked the council to
examine grad students' current
ineligibility status for B.C.
government grants.
Philosophy prof Danny Daniels
expressed concern over the ability
of smaller department's to carry
on their current programs if the
council simply gives a block sum of
money to the university without
specifying how it should be spent.
New programs could take money
TAX TIME
Canadian and U.S.
tax returns.
Highest quality,
lowest prices.
THE TAX PLACE
1941 W. 4th AVE.
732-1515
MARTIN
LUTHER
Documentary film
(no charge)
7:30 p.m., Thursday
Lutheran Campus Centre
Sponsor:
Charismatic Christian
Fellowship
HOUR FRAMING
I DO-IT-YOURSELF
■ PICTURE FRAMING
Take your picture home in One Hour and save up to
50%.
LARGE SELECTION OF FRAMES -
Frames, glass and mats cut to size — and a professional staff to
assist you I
DO - IT - YOURSELF FRAMING
3522 W. 41 st Ave. 266-8225
away from existing programs, he
said, even if the council gave
separate grants for new programs
and current ones.
"It would be pretty hard to
convince us the money isn't
coming out of our hide," Daniels
told the council.
Connie Moore, head of UVic's
women's action group, told the
council women on campus need
less "Why Not?" (the International Women's Year slogan)
and more "let's get on with it."
She called for more daycare
facilities on campus and for a
study of discrimination against
women at UVic similar to one
made at UBC in 1973. Council
member Rita MacDonald
responded that many studies have
already been done and much information gathered. What is
needed now is affirmative action,
she said.
Moore replied that at UVic there
are people who won't believe
discrimination exists unless they
see it worked out in percentages.
discount to U.B.C. students!
And our well stocked shop has the
right selection Just For You!
SKIS: Rossignol, Dynamic, Fischer, Hexcel, Kneissl,
Dynastar, Blizzard, Atomic.
BOOTS:    Trappeur,    IMordica,    Hanson,    Kastinger,
Dolomite, Tyrol.
w*^
336 W. Pender St. 681-2004 or 681-8423
OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTS UNTIL 9:00
fREE PARKING AF   REAR OF STORE
More than an Engineer.
Our Military Engineers are very specialised people.
They design and build bridges, airstrips, base facilities, supervise and maintain all kinds ot equipment on our
bases around the world.
It's a very special job. One that involves working
with men. Guiding them. Training them. A job where you
can apply your knowledge in all kinds ot challenging
situations.
If you're into engineering, we can get you into
something mdre than just an office job. An Officer's job,
where you can develop your full potential.
Give it some thought. We can give you plenty of
opportunities to use your specialised knowledge in some
very unusual ways.
Send this coupon for more information.
GET
INVOLVED
WITH THE
CANADIAN
ARMED
FORCES.
Directorate of Recruiting & Selection,
National Defence Headquarters, Box 8989, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K2
Please send me more information about opportunities in the Canadian Forces for Military
Engineers.   '.
Name	
Address..
City	
Prov._
Postal Code_
University
Course _
Year

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126073/manifest

Comment

Related Items