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The Ubyssey Sep 30, 1969

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 Who
the hell
is
THS UBYSSEY
Michael
Yeats?
Vol. II, No. 7
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1969
228-2305
Pickets
in action
at SFU
By JOHN ANDERSEN
BURNABY (StafO-The strike
at Simon Fraser University is
gaining momentum.
In an emotional speech to a
meeting of four hundred students
Monday, Kathleen Aberle, a
faculty member of the striking
political science, sociology and
anthropology department, called
on all profs and students to leave
their classes in support of PSA.
The SFU history union will
meet today to decide whether or
not to strike in support of PSA.
Information pickets are being
set up outside of non-striking PSA
classes and PSA students are going
into classes of other departments
to speak in support of the strike.
At present, 11 of the 16
members of the department, as
well as a large majority of the
students, are on strike to protest
the non-granting of tenure to
, eight PSA profs. Refusal of
tenure, in effect, means firing.
The PSA profs maintain; they
lost tenure for political, not
academic, reasons.
Another striking prof,
Prudence Wheelen, told the
meeting, "What McCarthy did was
to destroy dissent in the
universities, in the media ... I see
McCarthyism on this campus right
now."
PSA prof David Potter, is on
strike although he has been
granted tenure.
"I'm not striking for my job, I
t
See page 2: SFU COP
—barry narod photo
KIM CARSWELL of Varsity Outdoor Club is dwarfed by
mountains of equipment, part of used skiing and hiking gear to
be sold in SUB 125, Oct. 9, from 12:30-2:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. If
you want to sell something take it to   VOC clubroom by Oct. 8
AMS plans
border halt
to rap blast
By NATE SMITH
The Alma Mater Society is organizing students to seal off the
Blaine border crossing.
The border will be blocked for an hour Wednesday in protest
against the Thursday's planned UJS. nuclear test at Amchitka Island,
in the Aleutians.
The AMS will charter buses to transport students to the border,
where they will block northbound traffic.
The demonstration is being planned in conjunction with student
councils at Simon Fraser University and the University of Victoria.
AMS vice president Tony Hodge said a telegram has been sent to 70
student councils across Canada, asking them to organize similar
activities in their areas.
Full details of Wednesday's demonstrations will be announced
at a special AMS general meeting today at noon in the SUB plaza. In
the event of rain, the meeting will be held in the SUB ballroom.
"We are pointing out our disagreement with the American
decision to go ahead with the test," Hodge said Monday night.
The proposed 1.2 megaton blast has been widely criticized
because it will be located near a major fault in the earth's crust.
"It's impossible to know what will happen because nobody has
ever set off an atomic bomb next to a major fault system," said
ecology prof Robin Harger.
Harger said the test could generate a massive earthquake or tidal
waves.
He said there is also a possibility of a "radioactive blowout"
from the underground test, allowing radioactive materials to escape
into the atmosphere.
AMS ombudsman Sean McHugh said he is hoping for 3,000
participants in Wednesday's demonstration.
"The idea is to voice our disapproval of the Canadian
government for not condemning the American action," he said.
McHugh said the demonstration will be "totally non-violent."
"If the RCMP asks us to move, it will be up to each individual
to decide if he will obey," he said.
"We should make it clear to the mounties that they are also
Canadians and should also be objecting," said law student association
president Carey Linde.
AMS external affairs officer Mike Doyle warned that the.
demonstration would be an act of civil disobedience and those who
participate must be willing to accept the consequences.
Linde said he would be very surprised if the police took any"
action against the demonstration.
McMorran goes out of his way to prosecute GS'
By MURRAY KENNEDY said   in   an   interview  Monday.   "All With regard to the obscenity charges,      patently  not  obscene, that the mere
City prosecutor Stewart McMorran     members are expected to maintain these      there   are   two   courses open  to  the      laying of the charges shows an abuse of
By MURRAY KENNEDY
City prosecutor Stewart McMorran
may be in for a surprise.
Georgia Straight defence lawyer John
Laxton has indicated he is considering
instituting an unquiry into McMorran's
behaviour towards the Straight.
In the most recent Straight" trial,
Judge Bernard Isman said: "It has
always remained a mystery to me why
some publications are singled out for
prosecution and others are not."
At the same trial, Laxton said: "One
cannot escape the conclusion that the
paper is being victimized, that there has
been abuse of the judicial process."
Straight editors and writers have felt
this persecution for three years and have
been able to survive. However, recent
attempts at breaking the paper have
been so obvious they have even aroused
the usually apathetic editorial staffs of
our two great metropolitan dailies.
"The legal profession has developed
high standards over the years," Laxton
said in an interview Monday. "All
members are expected to maintain these
standards. The prosecutor especially
must be extremely careful to see that
his powers are not abused."
He went on to articulate several
reasons why, in his opinion, McMorran
and his staff have been misusing their
powers.
First there is the sheer number of
charges. Laxton said the continual
persecution of the paper, coupled with
the fact that the charges appear to be
timed so they will do the most possible
damage, creates the unescapable
impression of persecution.
Next there is the kind of charges that
are being used. The criminal libel charge
of last fall was the first charge of its
kind in over 60 years and last week's
counselling charge has been used only
three times in this century.
Laxton said this definitely indicates
that the prosecutor has been going out
of his way to find charges to lay against
the paper.
With regard to the obscenity charges,
there are two courses open to the
prosecutor, Laxton explained.
He said the police can merely seize
the offending literature and take it to
court. If it is judged obscene
distribution is banned and no charges
are laid. Alternatively, they can lay
charges immediately.
The fact that in every obscenity case
involving the Straight, McMorran has
allowed charges to be laid immediately
shows that the paper is being victimized,
Laxton said.
Laxton said in almost every case of
obscenity, the Straight has been
reproducing an article from some other
source or the same article has since been
reproduced elsewhere without charges
being laid against the other publishers.
This also leads one to conclude that
there are two standards being used in
laying charges, he said.
The final point in Laxton's criticism
of the prosecutor's actions is the nature
of the latest charges. "They were so
patently not obscene, that the mere
laying of the charges shows an abuse of
the judicial process," he said.
An inquiry Would have to be
instituted by the disciplinary body of
the bar association, Laxton said. 'It
would be the most impartial body I
could expect," he said. "I could hardly
expect the attorney-general or the
police to conduct an impartial inquiry."
The reasoning behind the persecution
of the Straight is difficult to find.
Managing editor Bob Cummings feels
the answer is that the authorities can
sense the changing values of society.
In an interview Friday he said they
are trying to maintain the stability of
their crumbling system. "The myth of
the freedoms which they profess is
being tested and is in danger of being
shattered," he said.
"The Straight is the one visible thing
they can attack, but it is really only the
tip of the iceberg. It is not a wide spread
revolutionary thing, but merely a
question of liberation." Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 30,  1969
mp>        ^m  UNANIMOUS VOTE
rJl_^ AMS backs PSA
blasts Strand
By JIM DAVIES
The Alma Mater Society voted Monday to give full support to
the striking political science, sociology, and anthropology department
at Simon Fraser University.
The support motion,moved by medicine representative Russ
Ellison, received unanimous support from the councillors.
The motion was noteworthy for its severity towards the SFU
adminstration and its unqualified support for the striking PSA faculity
members
The motion read: "Moved that student council condemn the
administration of Simon Fraser University in its actions to apply
political criteria for the hiring and firing of faculty, especially the PSA
department."
"Further, that we condemn the blatant attempt of the
administration to impose a uniform and monolithic educational
environment at SFU without regard to either the forms or intentions
of rational, open dialogue."
"Further, that we as student representatives at UBC wish to
express our clear understanding that the unjust and authoritarian
attitude evidenced by the recent trusteeship of PSA will lead to the
destruction of SFU as a university."
"Further, we support the actions of the SFU student society in
calling for a meeting of the joint faculty in the hopes that this will
settle the dispute."
"Further, that the AMS support the opposition of the SFU PSA
department to the authoritarian concept of education evidence by the
actions of the administration."
Present at the council meeting was Mordecai Briemberg, elected
chairman of the SFU PSA department. He outlined the struggle at
SFU, explaining its origins and possible effects.
Conspicuous by his absence at the council meeting was Kenneth-
Strand, president at SFU.
Strand was invited to the meeting personally by Tony Hodge,
AMS vice-president.
He gave as his reason for refusal that he has two choices: remain
secretive or speak and be sued, and he has chosen the former.
When informed of Strand's statement, Briemberg made a public
promise that he will never sue Strand.
Waterloo students get veto
over CPUO recommendations
HOPE . .. denies spying
SFU cop
in classes
From page 1
don't have to, I've been granted
tenure. I'm not striking for the
PSA, I'm striking for this
university," he told the students.
After the meeting, Fred Hope,
chief security officer at SFU, was
singled out in the crowd and
challenged to deny he had been in
PSA classes taking notes on what
was being taught.
He denied taking notes but
admitted attending the lectures.
Another undercover officer, when
spotted, refused comment.
A lone heckler, when asked!
why Kenneth Strand, SFU
president, refused to debate the
issues publicly admitted. "I guess
he doesn't like everyone asking
him questions."
WATERLOO (CUP)-Students at the university
of Waterloo will have the opportunity to veto any
recommendations coming out of the report of the
committee of presidents of universities of Ontario,
before they become university policy.
Waterloo administration president Howard
Petch made the promise Thursday to students who
gathered outside his office demanding his reaction
to the report, which calls for a hardline response to
virtually every form of campus disturbance except
ordinary picketing. (Earlier story, Page 9.)
While he would not reject the CPUO report out
of hand, petch said, all recommendations made by a
committee studying the document would be subject
to the approval of the Waterloo federation of
students.
Petch rejected student federation president
Tom Patterson's description of the arrangements as
a "parity veto", preferring instead to call it
"defining mutually acceptable guidelines", as not
only the students but also the faculty association
He won't tell
Alma Mater Society president Fraser
Hodge has compiled his list of possible
student representatives to the board of
governors, but he's not telling who is on the
list.
Hodge, when contacted Monday by The
Ubyssey, said he had made a list of senior
students which he will submit to education
minister Donald Brothers-who will fill the
vacancy on the BoG.
Hodge and Brothers discussed wider
representation on the BoG when they met in
S*UB Sept. 16, and Brothers asked Hodge to
submit a list of students capable of filling
the vacancy.
The students on Hodge's list were
chosen for "their understanding of student
problems." Hodge also withheld the number
of students he recommended.
and the president's council (senior administrative
body at Waterloo) have to approve any
recommendations.
The next day, Petch also indicated he wouldn't
mind leaving the enforcement of law and order in
the hands of the state, rather than setting up
disciplinary bodies within the university to
accomplish the same task.
Interviewed by the student newspaper, the
Chevron, Petch said he was willing to accept the
implementation of a report submitted last fall by a
five-year committee on discipline, composed of
students, faculty and administration.
The committee recommended that campus
disciplinary bodies confine their jurisdiction to such
academic offenses as cheating, leaving any activity
covered by the criminal code of Canada to the
discretion of the courts.
The CPUO report called for punitive action by
both the courts and the university, and would add
suspension to any legal penalties administered to
university offenders.
Under the Waterloo committee
recommendations, any students arrested during a
disruption would be able to return to classes as soon
as they had posted bail.
"If that's what people want, then I will call
the police," Petch said, adding that he "wouldn't
appreciate adverse campus reaction if the police
were called.
Meanwhile, the Ontario Progressive
Conservative Student Association has joined the
rapidly-swelling ranks of protest against the report,
terming the document "unwarranted, precipitous
and provocative."
In a resolution passed Wednesday, the executive
of the association condemned the report and
"strongly urged" the Ontario government,
particularly the minister of iniversity affairs, to
"publicly dissociate his department and the
government of Ontario from the working paper."
In condmening the report, the association
stressed that Ontario had been "largely free of
violent confrontation," and that "moderate
students are again filling positions of leadership in
Ontario's educational institutions."
THE  END  OF  THE
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SANDWICH
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THEY
LAST
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"Vow Link WMi Stearity" Tuesday,  September 30,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Engineers want
to broaden
their curriculum
By SHANE McCUNE
The future engineers of UBC want a little more social involvement
than what's available at the library pond.
During registration, the engineering undergraduate society student
curriculum committee conducted a survey among all undergraduate
engineers.
The survey was answered by 71 per cent of those questioned and
shows a general dissatisfaction with course content and presentation.
Of the students questioned, 85 per cent want mandatory courses
ui education methods for all lecturers, 70 per cent want smaller classes
'facilitated by graduate-conducted seminars, and 70 per cent feel that
students should usually have a decisive voice in the selection of
lecturers.
Most of the engineers said they wished to acquire technological
competence coupled with some awareness of the world in which the
technology will be applied.
Over 60 per cent of them feel humanities and social science
courses should be an integral part of the engineering curriculum.
Similar percentages of students favored the ideas of seminars and
weekend symposia on topics such as ethics, politics, and technology in
society.
The survey results accompany a grief by Jim McEwen, eng. 3,
chairman of the curriculum committee. The survey results and the brief
are being reviewed today by the engineering faculty curriculum
committee.
Aside from student recommendations applying to the engineering
curriculum, the brief supports "University I" program, modelled after
the Arts I concept, to be taken by new students in all faculties.
SFU rejoins CUS;
crucial test to come
BURNABY (CUP)-The Canadian Union of Students came out
one member larger following the first of this year's CUS referendums at
Simon Fraser University, when a meagre turnout voted two to one in
favor of rejoining the national union.
When the votes were counted following balloting Thursday and
Friday, 444 students had voted in favor of CUS, 251 against.
The SFU referendum, held in the shadow of the current strike
and teach-in by the university's political science, sociology and
anthropology department, was the first in a Grucial series which could
make or break CUS by Christmas.
Referendums will be held at Carleton University Oct. 20 and at
the university of Toronto Oct. 23, which will determine the fate of the
union one way or the other.
SFU delegates to the 33rd congress held this fall at Port Arthur
did not sign the committment form to the union and thus SFU will
have to rejoin. CUS now has 13 members, and, with the addition of
approximately 5,600 SFU students, represents approximately 45,000
students.
It was just too far to walk
LORETTEVILLE, Que. (CUP)-About 2,000 students walked
out on classes Monday when the local school commission refused to
supply noon-hour bus service so they could go home for lunch.
The only lunch service for the students of four regional schools
in this Quebec city suburb was the cafeteria in St. Louis Institute. The
students said there were only dining facilities for 500, although 1,200
students live too far from school to walk home at noon.
Student housing
neglected again
Administration president Walter Gage said Monday he has
received no specific reply from B.C. MPs concerning the student
housing crisis.
Gage sent the MPs a letter a month ago asking them too
pressure Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation for money.
Gage said the MPs agreed the problem was a serious one.
They also said they would do all that they could to give the
student housing problem "a high priority."
All Gage would say about the situation was that it was
indeed a serious one and there was not much more once could
say. Gage also said UBC definitely needs more housing.
However, he would not comment on the opening of illegal
suites, stating that is a matter for city council.
-richard Sullivan photo
HAPPINESS is a warm crown. Competition was heavy but due honors went toMaureenHuston, frosh
queen for this year. That's self-proclaimed reactionary, classics head Malcolm McGregor, in the
limelight talking Maureen into something or other.
■*M^^H^^H^H^MMIi^M^MHMMH^^M«H^H^MMMM^^MM«HMMM^^MM^BMHMMHMMM^M^H^M^MMMMMM«aMM-_________________«__l
Space shortage still problem
even with expansion program
By LESLIE MINOT
The new biological science west wing addition
and the Woodward Library extension will be
finished by March 1970, but already there is doubt
as to whether they will solve the shortage of library
space.
"Although the Woodward extension will not
solve the present general library space problem it
will be adquate as a library for the life sciences,"
said Basil Stuart-Stubbs, head librarian.
The new building will double the present
facilities, providing room for 2,300 books and
having twice the seating capacity of the old
building.
"The present bio-sciences facilities, including
the new wing, are disgraceful as far as space is
concerned," said botany head Dr. G. H. N. Towers.
"There is no study space for students and
inadequate room for classes and for graduate
studies." (Picture, page 9.)
"The biological west wing addition is meant
to be the first wing of a three and a half wing
complex to house the biological sciences," said
oceanography director Dr. G. L. Pickard.
Oceanography is one of the departments
which will be serviced by the new wing.
"Completion of the other wings will depend upon
the available funds," said Pickard.
According to Towers, the new wing is a
revision of the original three wing plan which would
have cost about $8 million to construct.
"The  wing  that  has  been  built was the
cheapest to construct and was necessary because the
service facilities are located in it, he said.
"However, in comparison with the two other
wings proposed, it was not the best wing to build
since it has the smallest number of teaching labs and
will not solve the space problem.
The space problem can only be solved if the
entire complex is completed now," said Towers.
"But it will be a few years befor the complex
is completed and until money can be found to
complete the project the huts will have to be used
to cope with space problems," said Towers.
"The Woodward extension was built as a life
science library and was meant to be the first of a
new network of libraries each accommodating
certain areas of study," said Stuart-Stubbs.
"Three other libraries have also been
proposed: a new Sedgewick library to serve all
undergraduates in arts, commerce, and education; a
science library; and a special education library.
"If these buildings are built the present space
problem will be alleviated. In the meantime, the
problem will remain acute," he said.
According to Franz Conrads, superintendent
of new construction the Woodward extension will
have cost approximately $1,250,000 while the
biological science addition will have cost
$2,800,000.
"UBC is behind other universities such as
Carleton and the University of Alberta in providing
adequate facilities for the biological sciences yet we
have the best botany and zoology departments in
Canada," said Towers. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 30,   1969
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the university of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
SEPTEMBER 30,1969
Blockade
Student council is finally off its ass.
And hopefully, the students of UBC will also get
off their respective asses and go with their elected
representatives to Blaine on Wednesday.
Council Monday night climbed out on a limb a
little ways, took a chance in the hope of accomplishing
something. Fortunately, this time their decision was a
good one.
But it is not enough that councillors are willing to
take "radical" action. The only way the protest against
the U.S. atom blast can have any effect is if a great
number of students support the border blockade.
The issues are clear to those people with the least
interest in British Columbia, the least social conscience.
While the U.S. can say that the blast isn't expected
to cause a massive earthquake, devastating tidal waves
and untold destruction of B.C.'s coastal communities, it
cannot assure us that these things will not occur.
While the Canadian government can go so far as to
hold the U.S. responsible for the repercussions of the
nuclear test, there is no way the explosion can be
prevented.
We, the students of UBC and other universities in
this province, cannot stop the blast.
But we can cause such a ruckus, make the U.S.
look so bad and create such a scene, that the U.S.
government will find itself in a very bad light.
At this point, the U.S. has got all the bad publicity
it can use. We aim to give them a little more, for once
demonstrate that the entire world is not the domain of
this Goliath country and that Canadians, at least, are
willing to fight.
Only when we are prepared to lay our principles,
time and bodies on the line will the U.S. stop making a
private whore out of this country and all the countries
of the world.
Praise, at last
The A-Bomb wasn't the only thing to get council
off its ass Monday.
Contraceptives did it, too. Taking a step in the
right direction, council voted to make it possible for
male students to buy "safes" from dispensers in the
men's cans.
And dope did it. Council voted to co-operate with
the Royal Commission into the non-medical use of
drugs. Good work.
And Mordecai Briemberg did it. With a
condemnation of SFU's administration and a vote of
support for the PSA department, council may make it
yet.
All in all, a good night's work. Keep it up.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City Nate Smith
Photo Bruce Stout
Wire Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Associate Peter Ladner
Senior John Twigg
Ass't City John Gibbs
Ass't News Maurice Bridge
Managing Bruce Curtis
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert.Ruebsaat
There comes a time at the end of
each day when one sift through the
day's events and make the ultimate
judgment: "nothing happened" (That's
^^-*****
^^-^^zd^^Z^d^
r cCr t tirrr --
soap
J
HEADS
GEORGIA
STRAIGHT
•
DERMOT
BOYD
\ SFU  PSA
ETC
Jk&xd  LStoUo
Next
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Shame
the masthead's heavy philosophical trip
for this year, folks).
Sifting though the dying embers
were: Murray Kennedy, John
Andersen, Robin Burgess, Colleen
Hammond, Dave Keillor, Bill Dodd,
Leslie Minot, Christine Krawczyk, Fran
McGrath, Sandy Kass, Urve Torva,
Ginny Gait and Jennifer Jordan.
Among the dying embers were Jim
Davies, Shane McCune, Brian
McWatters, Nick Orchard and John
Moret.
The darkroom was the scene of a
major traffic iam, with George Mah,
Tony Strayski,' Dave Enns, Dave
Bowerman, Barry Narod, Richard
Sullivan, Dirk Visser, Walt Barnshcrter
and Dick Button all doing their weird
thing.
Giant, gala editorial board meeting
Wednesday noon.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I came like a lamb to the
slaughter, But where are the
wolves? I came wide-eyed and
innocent. And dammit, I remain
wide-eyed and innocent. Beware
those university boys, I was told.
They have One Thing On Their
Mind. I haven't even managed to
interest an engineer. Come on,
you red-blooded Canadians. Don't
disappoint all us poor young girls.
We may seem over conscientious,
bending over our books, burying
ourselves in work. The
responsibility lies with you-the
responsibility of our Liberation!
ARTS1
Call 228-2301, ask for
Michael.-Ed.
Semantics
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to point out three
facts in relation to John
Andersen's artice on Friday, Sept.
26, "Court decides against
Chuck."
1. It was not a disciplinary
hearing.
2. It was a decision on a
constitutional question.
3. It was not a conviction.
It also seems strange the The
Ubyssey should publish an article
on the decision before they
publish the decision itself.
A. WATCHORN
court clerk
Gross out
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I see you had to go far to find
an article to insult UBC students
again. "Do You Ball To Music?",
a reprint from "The Berkeley
Barb", is a typical example of
perverted sex. The implication of
this article is that you must
believe that UBC students need
'gimics' to bolster up their sex
life.
The only other motive for
printing this line of article is that
you are testing your freedom, as
an immature student tests a
teacher's patience. Do you expect
to impress the frosh with such
bold print? Are you trying to
shock the parents who by chance
might pick up a student's copy?
Whatever your motive is, it is a
sign of misused freedom.
Page Friday, this week, did
have, on the whole, an improved
quality of handling art subjects
and the topics were timely. I
enjoy a laugh at sex like any
person   does,   but   when   it   is
in    taste,    and    without   insult
attached.
DANIEL E. MEAKES
arts 2
Justified •..
P.S. Tell the Hairy Planaria I like
rye.
Obiously, since you think
balling to music is perverted, you
have never tried it. Could be
you've never tried balling. It is
because people like you exist thai
we run such stories—to attempt to
better students' lives by opening
their eyes to things joyful and
pleasant.-Ed.
. .. paranoia
Bad vibes in U.S.
By JOHN TWIGG
What is happening down
south?
Nobody seems to know exactly
what is happening, but they agree
it is ugly and undesirable.
For example, a Ubyssey staffer
took a recent shopping trip to
Seattle. While walking the streets,
he was confronted by four
uniformed men who asked, "What
the hell is keeping you, out (of
the army)?"
Our staffer, wearing bell
bottoms and other crooked (not
straight) clothes, said: "I'm from
Canada." His ears were blasted
with: "Well get the hell back there
then, we don't want you here."
What makes Americans so
uptight?
When single women check in to
Seattle hotels they are warned to
chain-lock their doors at night,
and not to walk unescorted on the
streets at any time.
On a recent visit to Salem,
Oregon, I took occasion to walk
the streets with two friends in
search of a pub. Only.once in our
journey did we see people near us
in age-downtown Salem at 9 p.m.
Friday!
Next morning, I left the hotel
at 9 a.m. to do some shopping
prior to leaving the city. The
streets were deserted except for
old, bow-legged hags and
alcoholic-looking rubbies—in
downtown Salem, the capital city
of Oregon.
Even they peered at me
suspiciously, a young,
not-too-long-haired male.
The only other signs of
habitation were a few police cars,
taxis and one family (husband
thirty-ish, wife near that, and two
pre-school daughters).
One of the daughters said,
"Guess what we saw on TV this
morning, Daddy? We saw Magilla
Gorilla (or something similar)
beaten up."
Daddy was non-committal,
saying, "Is that right," as he
walked on the inside of the
sidewalk, his wife nearest the
road.
Why are Americans so
suspicious of strangers?
I presented a blue $5 bill to a
young salesgirl in one of the larger
department stores. She looked at
me in bewilderment and said, "I
can't cash that. You'll have to go
over to cashier six, maybe she'll
do it for you."
There were no "I'm sorry" or
"I hope you won't mind's." I felt
like a freak, in downtown Salem
on a Saturday morning.
Perhaps it is unfair to
generalize, but Americans seem
afraid of themselves.
And you can be sure self-fear is
creeping north.
There are a few Americans who
can see what is happening "to the
land of the free and the home of
the brave", and they are leaving
that land as soon as they can.
Canada should accept these
people, regardless of whether or
not they are hippies, draft-dodgers
or musicians.
We need them.
They have experienced what il
is like to live in a police state and
they escaped. Perhaps they car
yet save Canada from this
disease, self-fear, that has not yet
been experienced here.
The U.S. was once a nice pla«
to visit, but not to live in. It is no-
even a nice place to visit an>
more. Tuesday, September 30,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
x^;****"^.*, -' -x
• '*,?•*. *• '.V*,-*** *'   *?--*;•'
The Deviants
Bad temper doesn't
produce good music
by
Mark
Jacques
"Not particularly perverse."
"That's just a big conglomeration of
noise."
"It's giving me a headache."
Those were some of the reactions to
The Deviants, who were featured at The
Colonial Music Hall last weekend.
When I heard them Friday night,
they struck me as being the loudest rock
group I'd ever heard. Even standing
under a barrage of speakers at The
Seattle Pop Festival last July wasn't as
painful as the sonic cataclysm unleashed
by "Britain's number one underground
rock group."
Hot   poop
SIC FESTIVAL
The  Collectors  plus  Lynn  Brooks  and A Cast of
Thousands,  tonight  at  QueeniE  Playhouse. FREE !   !   !
Although get there early to avoid the mobs of teenyboppers).
UBC MUSIC DEPT.
Vocal recital tomorrow at noon in Music Bldg. Recital
Hall. FREE ! ! !
VANCOUVER OPERA ASSN.
Presents hot porno in the guise of Salome, Richard
Strauss' opera. QueeniE Theatre starting this Thursday.
UBC FINE ARTS GALLERY
Extensions photography exhibit opens this Fri. and
continues until Oct. 25.
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
Opens   this   Sunday   at   QueeniE   Theatre.  Dvorak,
Schumann, Vaughan Williams and other excitement.
The group's first Friday night set was
abysmally bad, judging by the responses
of the patrons and even their manager.
This was perhaps a reaction to Province
pop critic Brian McLeod's review, which
wasn't exactly favorable, but pretty
accurate. At one point lead guitarist
Paul rudolph refrained from some patter
between songs because "that Province
critic might be here."
Tsk, tsk. Bad temper doesn't
necessarily make for good material, as
their musical display indicated. "A big
conglomeration of noise" was about all
they produced, made up of boring bass
lines, boring lead guitar lines, some
half-decent drumming, and a vocal
which was completely drowned out by
the instruments. It wasn't even an
attempt to turn the audience off like
The Mothers of Invention. It was just a
drag.
By contrast, The High Flyin' Bird
h-ad improved immensely since their
appearance the week before.
Highlighting their set was a drum solo
which wasn't technically fantastic, but
sounded extremely good.
The light show by Addled Chromish
was also an improvement over the
previous week's efforts by Lysergia.
However, somewhat conspicuous by its
absence was a strobe, and I also wished
that the lights would have covered some
of the audience instead of just the
performers on stage.
This week, featured artists at The
Music Hall are Lynn Brooks and the
Friendly Cactus, who were playing at
Daisy last week.
The UBC extension department is planning a special lecture
series commemorating the centennial of the birth of Mahatma
Gandhi on Oct. 2.
The Man and the Idea, the lecture series by Fritz Lehman, will
examine Gandhi in relation to his own times.
Topics will include Gandhi's place in the history of ideas, his
role in the Indian independence movement (Oct. 9), impact on
African nationalism and influence on the black American civil rights
movement.
UBC STUDENT REP.-JOHN KEATING-Res. YU 8-5144
ARE YOU GRADUATING
THIS YEAR?
-.All 1970 Grads have paid $7 to a Grad Class Fund.
- Anyone and everyone interested in using this money
with WORTHWHILE and CREATIVE ideas to make
this Grad Class memorable, meet in
SUB A UBITOBIUM
TODAY      12:30 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  30,   1969
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
By CAREY LINDE
Who'll go to the conference?
X
—david bcnwarman photo
FEARLESS SUSAN TUTT donates her blood to the Red Cross.
Any other hardy souls who can spare a pint should report to SUB
207 and 209 between 9:40 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. daily until Oct. 3.
Yet another sponsored
discussion of "student
government" is to be held this
weekend.
All students are invited to
present papers, listen to panels,
and give direction to their elected
officials. But they have always
been invited to do so, and
annually the people stay away in
hordes. Student council then
blames somebody for failing to do
a good promotion job for the
conference, and they resign
themselves to living out their term
as peacefully as possible.
Those of us who have been
hanging around in one capacity
or another for a few years will
probably come. We will confirm
Mysterious
resignation
at UVic
VICTORIA (Staff)-The editor
of the University of Victoria
newspaper, the Martlet, has
resigned following a conflict with
UVic's Alma Mater Society over
salary.
Editor Ray Kraft has been
waging a month-long battle with
AMS over the society's alleged
failure to pay him $60 per week
as promised.
Kraft's resignation Saturday,
however, followed directly on the
heels of a reluctant AMS decision
Wednesday night to meet his
salary demands. The real motive
behind his resignation, therefore,
remains a mystery.
According to Tony Farr, a
member of the Martlet editorial
board, Kraft submitted letters
announcing his resignation the
Martlet staff and CFAX radio
station, Saturday.
"We have an idea." was all Farr
would say when asked to
comment on the Martlet staffs
explanation for the resignation.
Steve Hume, former Martlet
editor, has been appointed
temporary editor for a two week
period.
Doyle doped on Socred funny money
Alma Mater Society external affairs officer
Mike Doyle knew that B.C.'s deputy minister Neil
Perry really existed.
Wednesday, he travelled to Victoria just to tell
him so.
When he got to Victoria he found that Perry
was unavailable and was shunted off to Bill Reid,
the assistant superintendent of the division of
university and college affairs of the department of
education.
Reid, who heads the division concerned with
student loans, gave Doyle a detailed explanation of
how W. A. C. Bennett's money is doled out to the
students.
Loans  are  handed out on the basis of the
parents' probable income. No allowances are made
for students not living at home or receiving no
financial aid from their parents.
Reid had no comment on the amount of the
premier's generosity but said the federal minister's
council on education, picked by the education
minister, looks after the money.
The academic board is a legal board supposed
to be in charge of academic planning but AMS
speedster Doyle says it has been "slow moving."
Doyle summed up his experiences by saying,
"This time I just sat and listened. I wanted to know
what the department did and how it worked so that
I am better equipped to do something if I choose."
our old views to each other,
appreciate who the enemy is, as
we suspected, and then go home
knowing nothing has changed. But
will there be anybody else?
A prime topic for discussion
seems to be developing along
these lines: should student
government be purely an
administrative council, delegating
the authority to manage our
material possessions, or should it
not also, or perhaps solely
concern itself with politics, on the
campus and/or off.
NOT POLITICAL
One underlying assumption
held by many, which I would
seriously challenge, is that right
now the AMS is doing both
politics and administration and
that it seems to be doing neither
well. I don't think the AMS has
ever seriously considered being, or
has been political. Certainly not in
terms of on campus concerns.
During the past election a student
was run against education minister
Brothers as an independent. That
questionable act is the only time
the AMS has really become
political.
The only time politics rears its
nasty head is when the AMS can't
solve a purely administrative
procedure. The mere fact that the
function and style of the general
manager of the AMS, a man
thirteen years at the job, comes
up every year as a big time
consuming, political issue is
adequate demonstration of the
AMS's conplete failure at
administering itself quietly and
effectively.
DECENTRALIZATION
Until the administration is
fixed, the politics will never work,
at least not AMS type politics.
Such politics depend on the
smooth functioning of the big
machine. Consequently politics, in
its best and worse sense, is carried
on independently of the AMS by
on campus groups on the right,
left and corner.
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Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
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In  The  Village
(Next   to   U.B.C.   Barber   Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT    REASONABLE    PRICES
For  Take-Out  Service  Ph. 224-6121
OPEN  TUES. • TO  -  SAT.
11:30 A.M. TO 10 P.M.
SUNDAY & MONDAY 4 TO 10 P.M.
In an age when
decentralization is fashionable,
the undergraduate societies are
just beginning to realize the
burden that rests squarely on their
shoulders to bring the problems
back to the grass roots.
These undergrad councils can
now levy their own fees (even
though the treasurer of the AMS
maintains feudalistic control in
the final analysis as to how such
fees shall be spent.) The large
faculties now have more
proportionate representation on
council than they had a year ago.
With the old professional
power blocks no longer in control,
and with the lack of a new and
equally disastrous "humanities"
block, the importance of faculty
representation on council will
diminish to nil within one year.
REBUILD AMS
The next step to make will be
to give the remaining vestiges of
control retained by the AMS
completely to the undergrad
faculties, thus enabling them to
pursue their own unique ends, and
allowing them to work in
coalition with other faculties
when the need requires. And the
central or federal student council
should be made up on a campus
wide basis. Or even better, the
central body should totally
dissolve, allow the undergrad
societies, and the students in
them, to reappraise the goals and
needs faced, and to then
restructure such a central
government from scratch, making
it meet the needs—if any—they
jointly agree must be met by a
force larger than just a separate
faculty.
The proposal then is: the AMS
should give back to the faculties
what the faculties originally gave
to the AMS, and for the AMS to
merely run the buildings it
controls—nothing else. Let a new
and meaningful politics try to
developein a clean field. It might
take a year or two, but even that
is better than what we now have.
UBC STUDENT REP.-JOHN KEATING-Res. YU 8-5144
WINNER OF THE $457 IN THE
CYVR-UBC RADIO BILLBOARD CLUB
is
ROBERT MENZIES
Place Vanier Residence
6560 N.W. Marine Dr.
Vancouver 8
REMEMBER - Keep your ticket stub and
receive reduced admission to specifically
advertised Billboard Club Events Tuesday, September 30,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Academic freedom* Shop teachers "•?f_rt.
threatened at SFU
exemption from SUB fees
If the issues at stake at
Simon Fraser University are
not resolved, there will be a
threat to academic
democracy at all B.C.
universities, James Foulks,
head of the UBC
pharmacology department,
said Friday.
"The gravity of the
situation at SFU should not
be underestimated," he told a
panel discussion concerning
the SFU political science,
sociology, and anthropology
department.
The discussion was
sponsored jointly by the
Campus Left Action
Movement and the Alma
Mater Society.
The panel also included
UBC English prof Fred
Stockholder, SFU PSA
elected chairman Mordecai
Briemberg and PSA graduate
student Brian Plummer.
Foulks expressed his
concern on the issues of
academic freedom and
tenure. He said it was
unfortunate that these issues
have no formal legal basis.
Of the 11 PSA faculty
who have been refused
tenure, he said: "To the best
of my knowledge these
people have impeccable
academic qualifications."
Briemberg, however, was
not mystified by the loss of
tenure of the PSA faculty
members.
"There is no correlation
between the loss of tenure
and either publications or
student evaluation," he said.
"I can see only one
positive correlation and that
is that faculty members who
have been outspoken in favor
of student parity in academic
affairs have lost their tenure."
"I call this political criteria
in its lowest form," said
Briemberg.
Stockholder was in
complete accord with
Briemberg. "It seems that the
guarantees of tenure hold
most solidly for those who
conform," he said.
—dave enns photo
BRIEMBERG
He added that student
support for the PSA
department is a strong
indication of the teaching
abilities of the faculty.
"Students have stood up
and said we will not see our
educational system
destroyed," he said.
Plummer was even more
dramatic in his analysis of the
situation.
"If Strand is successful in
smashing the strike and
destroying the PSA faculty,
SFU will become a Mississippi
U., only without a good
football team," he said.
Beer for sale!
Pit opens today
By JOHN MORET
UBC has a beer garden again.
PIT committee chairman Lome Stewart, said the Pit will open
this afternoon. It will be open from 5 to 11:30 p.m. Tuesdays and
Thursdays in the SUB party room.
Only bottled beer will be served, but the Pit committee is still
trying to obtain a draft beer licence.
Membership cards go on sale today in SUB 215 for $2.50, an
increase of $ 1 from last year.
Stewart said the price hike is a necessary requirement for a club
liquor licence, which the Pit hopes to obtain for next year's operation.
The club must have been in operation for a year before a license can
be issued.
The Pit planning committee has gone ahead with preliminary
plans for a permanent location in the basement behind the
Thunderbird Shop.
A rough cost estimate is $100,000, but an architect's report,
with more accurate estimate is due in several weeks.
By BRIAN McWATTERS
The Alma Mater Society will hold a student
referendum Oct. 15 on behalf of the industrial
education students.
"The students who study at the industrial
education teacher training center in Burnaby do not
attend UBC at all, even though they are members of
the AMS," education undergraduate society
treasurer Rod Gulmans said Monday.
"They should not be required to pay $15 for
SUB as part of their AMS fees," Gulmans charged.
"We have 72 students out in Burnaby who have
their own president, vice-president and
secretary-treasurer and publish their own
newspaper," Gulmans said.
He said they have all their classes in Burnaby
and conduct their own student affairs but would
like to remain members of the AMS.
"The students in third and fourth years of the
medical school have been exempted by a
referendum from paying the $15 SUB capital fee
levy because they spend no time on campus and we
feel our students in Burnaby should have the same
exemption," Gulmans said.
A recommendation for the referendum was
unanimously approved at a meeting of the AMS
councial on Sept. 16.
The referendum has to pass by a two-thirds
majority with a minimun of 20 per cent of the
students voting.
Advance polls will be held Oct. 10 and Oct. 14.
Administrators see improving
relationships with radicals
OTTAWA (CUP)-It shouldn't
be too bad a year for university
administrators, according to most
of the administrators at an
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada press
conference Thursday.
'The feeling is that new and
better relationships are
developing," aid Geoffrey
Andrew, AUCC executive
director.
AUCC is an organization of
university and college
administrators from 59 campuses
who, according to Andrew, are a
national organization to "speak
for Canadian universities."
At Thursday's press conference
some said they were even talking
to the radical students on their
campuses.
University      of      Manitoba
administration president H. H.
Saunderson said even the most
extreme radical students he had
dealt with were amenable to
discussion about shortcomings of
programs they proposed.
But there were dissenters.
"I'll send you some of mine,"
administration president Colin
MacKay of the university of New
Brunswick said. MacKay, AUCC
president, last spring saw a
censure of UNB by the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers after he had called police
on campus to break up
demonstrations over his dismissal
of physicist Norman Strax.
W. E. Beckel, academic
vice-president at the University of
Lethbridge, said most radical
students were not interested in
the welfare of the university. He
Faculty's grape gripe
A motion to boycott California grapes in the faculty club was
passed Thursday night.
The club membership passed the motion by a vote of 31 to 21.
Engineering prof Norman Epstein said the motion is an
"expression of solidarity" to immediately stop all purchase of
California grapes, and not to resume such purchases until the grape
boycott, instituted by the striking California (farm workers, is lifted.
The motion must still be approved by the club's executive.
A similar motion failed last year and three philosophy profs left
the club.
There was no indication whether the three would rejoin the club
now.
COLD MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE
Vancouver, B.C.
CURRENT SCHEDULE
Oct. 3- 5. BODY AWARENESS AND THE SENSE OF BEING. A weekend
with   Dr.   Edward  Maupin  of  Esalen   Institute,  Big  Sur,  Calif.
Oct. 17-19.    INTEGRATED  ENCOUNTER WORKSHOP  with   Richard  Weaver.
Sometime in October. AN EVENING WITH GARY SNYDER: poet, scholar,
and ecologist. An open evening of poetry reading, discussions
of ecology, tribalism, and other contemporary social phenomena.
Oct. 23.    INTRODUCTION  TO ENCOUNTER, led  by  Richard Weaver.
For  reservations  or further information,  please  call 522-3324 or write to
Cold Mountain Institute, P.O. Box 2884, Vancouver 3.
SAVE UP TO $125 FOR $1.75!
GO PLACES 2 FOR 1
INVITATION
THE STUDENT ENTERTAINMENT BOOK
ON   SALE   NOW:  SUB  INFORMATION
BOOK STORE
HE & SHE CLOTHING
said " dialogue with extremists
does not work.
But he agreed that some
students were amenable to
discussion. 'The real problem is
how do you recognize the
difference," he said.
"We are all becoming better
involved with these students,"
said Sister Catharine Wallace,
administration president at Mount
St. Vincent in Halifax, "and we all
make mistakes."
"The less you know, the surer
you are," said L. P. Bonneau,
vice-rector of Laval University.
5 new reps
for artsies
The arts undergraduate society
will elect five new representatives
to the Alma Mater Society council
Oct. 14.
Arts is allowed greater
representation this year because
of last year's constitutional
revision providing for
representation by population.
Nominations open today.
Forms are available in the AMS
office.
Get
campus
Notebooks
and
Writing
Supplies
at
your
Book
Store
campus
m Stat.lon.ery Supplies M Page 8 THEUBYSSEY Tuesday, September 30,  1969
ITS YOUR MONEY
For the $24.00 that is taken for the Alma Mater Society:
YOU could buy:
• 53.3   Deluxe   Hamburgers  (yech!)
• 2Va "Dime" bags 'before Operation Intercept, at least)
• 9 months supply of the pill.
Instead YOU get:
• SUB and the Winter Sports Centre
• The Ubyssey, Tuum Est and Birth Control Handbook
• 164 Clubs and subsidiary organizations
Is This What You Want?
CONFERENCE ON
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
SUB AUDITORIUM OCT. 4& 5
SATURDAY: Oct 4 - SUB AUDITORIUM
9:30 o.m.-OUTLINE OF CONFERENCE
Dick Johnston, chairman
10:00 a.m.-PANEL 1 - "STUDENT GOVERNMENT OR VOLUNTARY SOCIETY"
John Cherrington
Stan Persky
Dave Zirnhelt
11:00 a.m.-QUESTION PERIOD
11:30 a.m.-GROUP DISCUSSION AND LUNCH
Auditorium, Rooms 211, 213, 215 SUB
2:00 p.m.-PLENARY DISCUSSION OF GROUP REPORTS
3:00 p.m.-PANEL II "PRESENT TRENDS & THOUGHTS"
Chuck Cambell Dick Betts
Tony Hodge Mike   Finlay
Fraser Hodge Paul  Knox
5:30 p.m.-Adjourn for informal discussion and preparation of resolutions for Sunday Plenary
SUNDAY: Oct. 5 - SUB AUDITORIUM
1:00-5:00 p.m.-PLENARY
Open discussion and resolutions
Here's a special chance for all students to participate in an informal discussion on the
role and direction of student society. Tuesday, September 30,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
WE    DON'T   WANT   termites   here   yet!"   says   worker   as
construction  goes ahead on the new biology  building wing
currently under construction.
COUNCIL JOLLIES
2 5-cent safes
for SUB cans
SUB washrooms will soon house vending machines for
"micro-thin transparent prophylactics."
In a motion put before the Alma Mater Society Monday by Cliff
Upton and Elmer Scott of the Scoton Vending Company, it was
proposed that the availability of condom vending machines would
seriously curtail venereal disease and unwanted pregnancies.
The AMS will obtain 25 per cent of the money put into the
machines.
The condoms, costing only 25 cents, are said to be of high
quality. A sample passed around in council drew appreciative
comments from council members.
A recent change in the criminal code permits the use of vending
machines for this purpose.
"The high veneral disease rate, the frequency of illegal
abortions, and the educational lives being destroyed by unwanted
pregnancies make us aware that something must be done," Upton
said.
In other council business, the AMS gave its support to the
commission on the non-medical use of drugs.
This support came in the form of a motion involving the
formlating of written briefs and the carrying out of -surveys on the
UBC campus.
Peter Stein, a member of the commission said he will be meeting
with students and holding discussions on the topic in the near future.
The case of former SUB games area manager Dermot Boyd was
tabled again until next week's council meeting. Boyd's temporary
status will be determined this week at another meeting of the student
court.
Court judgment
The Ubyssey is required to print the following notice:
JUDGMENT OF THE STUDENTS' COURT OF THE
ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Sitting Held: September 22, 1969
Oral Judgment Given: September 23, 1969
Written Judgment Delivered: September 24, 1969
Kevin Crowe, Plaintiff, v. Charles Campbell, as Treasurer
of the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia
Members of the Court Present:
Chief Justice Mr. Louis Romero; Judges Art Ewert, Dave Robertson, Dave
Donohoe, Greg Bowden Dave Mossup, Gary Tindall.
Making Submissions to the Court:
Messrs. A. R. Callaghan and J. H. Bennet for Mr. Crowe, Mr. I. R. Sisett for
Mr. Campbell.
Mr. Kevin Crowe, a member in good standing of the Alma Mater Society
of the University of British Columbia has requested that the students' Court be
called into session in order to decide about the constitutionality of the dismissal
of Mr. Dermot Boyd from the position of Games Area Supervisor in the Student
Union Building.
The first question this Court had to decide upon was whether it had
jurisdiction to hear this kind of case and deliver an opinion upon it.
By-Law   12   (6)   (a)   and   (b)   of  the   A.M.S.   Constitution   and   By-Laws
establishes that:—
"There shall be a Students' Court . . . which shall have jurisdiction over
individuals . . . (and) Alma Mater Society organizations:
(a) for any alleged violation of the Alma Mater Society Constitution,
By-Laws or Code, and
(b) for any alleged violation of any rule, resolution or regulation passed
by the Students' Council or the Society for the governance of the
Students ..."
Even if in principle the Students' Court can consider alleged violations of the
A.M.S. Constitution and By-Laws, is Mr. Crowe entitled to raise this kind of
issue on the present facts? The seven members of this Court are unanimous in
deciding that Mr. Crowe is entitled to request a written opinion from this Court
in this case, under the authority of By-Law 12 (6) (f) viii):
"The Court shall be the only interpreter of the meaning of the
Constitution, Code and By-Laws of the Society and shall deliver written
opinion upon any portions thereof at the request of the Students'
Council, or any active member of the Society."
Four members of this Court will grant Mr. Crowe's request on the added
ground of Article 4 (4) (a) (iii) of the A.M.S. Code:
"The Court  shall  exercise  its  powers  as sole interpreter of the A.M.S.
Constitution, By-Laws and Code . . .
(iii) When any active member of the Society or A.M.S. organization who
is granted rights, privileges or interests by virtue of the Constitution
alleges an infringement or violation of his or its right, privilege, or
interest, by any active member of the Society or A.M.S.
organization."
In the opinion of the majority of this Court Mr. Crowe has an interest in
having the Constitution enforced and compiled with and is entitled to allege a
violation of infringement of that interest and request an opinion from this
Court, while three members of this Court dissent on this point, as in their
opinion in the present case Mr. Crowe lacks that interest required by Article 4
(4) (a) (iii).
It is the unanimous decision of this Court that it is not within the powers
of the Treasurer of the Alma Mater Society under By-Law 4 (4) (f) (x) to
dismiss persons hired by the Students' Council, in the specific exercise of its
power under By-Law 4 (8) (e). (That is, the power to "engage and pay" must be
read to include the power to "fire" in the absence of any other specific
provisions in the Constitution and By-Laws.)
This Court recognizes that modern business considerations may require
that certain powers vest in individuals other than Students' Council in certain
circumstances but this appears difficult under the present Constitution and
By-Laws in view of By-Law 4 (8) (j) as it presently reads:—
"Have power to make such further rules and regulations consistent with
the Constitution and By-Laws of the Society as it may consider advisable
relating to any student activities under the control of the Society, but
shall not delegate any of the powers or duties conferred or imposed upon
it by the Constitution or by the By-Laws.
It is suggested thatthe only alternative to dlrectcouncil action would be a
power to "suspend", vesting in the Student Union Building Management
Committee as created by Students' Council, and subject to dismissal in the
normal course by Students' Council business.
Further it is the decision of this Court that reclassification of the position
of Games Area Supervisor as created by resolution of the Students' Council was
not unconstitutional per se, but under minute No. 23 of October 27, 1968
should have been accomplished by resolution of the Student Union Building
Management Committee and ratified by Council in the normal course of affairs,
or reclassified directly by Council itself and not by the Treasurer or others
acting outside of the Student Union Building Management Committee, which
was not within the constitutional powers of those acting on the matter.
Therefore the reclassification in this case has also been unconstitutional.
Louis Romero,
Chief Justice,
Students* Court.
SUB FILMS PRESENT:
fcfc
THE HILL
with SEAN CONNERY
October 2-5 SUB - 75c
Thursday: 12:30
Friday: 12:30 - 3:30 - 7:00 - 9:30
Saturday: 7:00 - 9:30     -     Sunday: 6:30
11
mm
•EAT IN -TAKE OUT* DELIVERY'
3261 W. Broadway      736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Life's
a ball
You're a clown. You're a queen.
You're whatever you dream.
Just imagine.
You're able to do what you want
any day, every day.
Run. Ride. Play. Even swim...
What a world!
And all you have to do to
help it all come true is forget
about those difficult days each
month. And that's as easy as
switching from bulky uncomfortable sanitary napkins to
Tampax tampons.
A Tampax tampon is worn
internally. When properly in
place, you hardly know it's
there. And no one else will
know because nothing
shows. Not even when you I
wear something sheer or "see-
through."
Easy-to-use Tampax tampons were developed by a doctor. Any woman, married or
single, can use them with confidence. And to make them even
more convenient, Tampax tampons are available in three
absorbency-sizes: Regular, Super and Junior.
TAMPAX
ZtunponA
SANITARY PROTECTION WORN INTERNALLY
MADE ONLY BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD., BARRIE, ONT.
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Grad Class General Meeting
First General Meeting of the 1969-1970 Grad Class.
SUB Auditorium — 12:30 noon, Tuesday,  September 30.
Election of Grad Class Executive.
Everyone in the Grad Class is urged to attend!!! Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 30,  1969
WE STOCK PARTS ON OUR OWN
**-4-*^>
to ensure you don't have unnecessary delays
waiting for your car repairs..,
- one more reason we're Number 1
AUTO-HENNEKEN
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine) Phone 263-8121
"QUALITY WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED"
INDOOR TENNIS
Commencing on October 1, 1969 a new tennis programme
will be put into effect in the Armoury.
Listed hereunder are times during which the four courts
are set aside for U.B.C. students:
MONDAY 9:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
TUESDAY 7:00 p.m. to    8:30 p.m.
FRIDAY 2:30 p.m. to    5:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
SATURDAY 5:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
SUNDAY 12:00 noon to    3:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m. to  11:30 p.m.
A fee of $2.00 for the academic term (1969-70) will be
charged each student for the privilege of playing during
the above listed times.
This fee will allow students to reserve a court for the period
of one hour per day.
A supervisor will  be  in  attendance to check  credentials
and to ensure that reservations are honoured and general
regulations are adhered to.
Registration fees may be paid at the Thunderbird Winter
Sports  Centre  from   8:30 a.m.   to   11:00   p.m.   or  at  the
Armoury during the above times.
FOR  RESERVATIONS  PHONE THE THUNDERBIRD  WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE 228^3197, 8:30 A.M. -11:00 P.M. DAILY.
LAST CHANCE TO SAVE
BIRD CALLS
UBC Student Telephone Directory
PRE-SAIE TICKETS
NOW ONLY 75c
Buy Yours Today From
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, SUB
and UBC BOOKSTORE
— AFTER PUBLICATION PRICE $1 00
Books  Available  Next  Week
IT'S THE MOST USEFUL BOOK
ON CAMPUS
BIRD CALLS
BUY HOW AND SAVEl
spob ts
i!M&€x«  .™*
•*•* ■*,. :■ *. *..     ^ ■•-■-"•A^ " *■■'■ '"-ijaJH___^    '    '     '■■'   ■     r   '
:s^-^m^ftdM
i- - i*«**-JB^- ■■■.■<;•:• ■
■ ■'--. ■'  ft %*£, vSr".,- -■■'■ ■^f-v.r-u:   *.
;•■'■;:. -■ . JttSS+G**      * - r**:*"1; - £*£*'•/*':   ■
?V^'M, »*W»3!!T.:■■**: * > ■ ■ ■■■■* ■"• *'■."■•■■!-..-   -  •-**'--*.-.
—richard aillhran photo
Mike Hutchison gets another pass away
Rugby Thunderbirds drop
season's opening match
Coach Donn Spence and his It was in interesting game from Spence     was     very
rugby Thunderbirds had a very the field. The .spectators, some ^of "disappointed" with the way his
rough weekend. whom came with the Brits, and a team   played   "We    ended   up
The  Birds  got  bombed  19-9 number of old UBC *yPes met in playing their game and we're too
Saturday in front of some 300 m0!tat co,mbat on ,*,, sidfn1es li8ht to do that successfully, we
highly vocal and pugnacious fans and the players couldn t tell the must    run    and    depend    on
at Wnlfcnn fi^iH   k        d *«    •      different sides without a program. ■   conditioning, not just stand there
at Wolfson field, by ex-Bnttania,        Eric Martin led the Birds ^    ^ fight J* ^
Coach Spence  had a  similar two penalty goals, the first and        "We'll have to learn something
problem-while running down the last UBC scores. from this game, ibecause the team
side-lines to follow a play, he was Doug Schick got the only other we are playing here next week,
tripped by a spectator and lost counter for the Birds on a try that the Trojans, play, the same style
both his balance and his cool. remained unconverted. 0f ball."
Defensively, football
Ts for the T'birds
^ By STEVE MALLARD                  They  failed  to  get  the first the 22 yard line and that set up
"Our    god-damnest    best down and that was it. They didn't the second Bearcat touchdown, an,
defensive performance in years!" get another first down until late in 18 yard pass from Gary Clark to'
Coach Frank Gnup used these the third quarter. Bob Riley,
words to sum up his Thunderbirds         .,„„„,             , Thi-m-ah  th* mm„j h»ir +-,«,
28-0    loss    to    the    Willamette         At 1:28 of the second quarter trough the second half the
Bearcats   Saturdav   TZem     the Bird defense let down *» the     *"* °ffen"W ""* C°ntinUed l°
Bearcats   Saturday    in    Salem,    on]y   ^   ^   ^  ^   ^    treat possession of the ball as an
Despite Willamette's 28 points Myen, Willamette's highly touted "panted luxury,
scored, the loss could hardly be freshman back> rambled 76 yards Lee intercepted another UBC
attributed    to    any    defensive to the goal and a touchdown. The aerial and eventually Clark carried
shortcomings   of  the   Birds.  At convert was good. it over for the major. The convert
times the defensive had to fight The defense continued to keep made 2t a 21~° Same-
two  offensive  teams, their own the Bearcasts opened in their own With 29 seconds left on the
and Willamette. end until a roughing the kicker score board Clark carted another
The Bird offence hit a new low penalty gave Willamette good field <qb sneak   over, after Willamette
giving   up   the   ball  eight   times position. The next turnover put picked up a fumble on the UBC
through     fumbles     and the Bird offense in their own end 22 yard line,
interceptions. and they stayed there for the rest
UBC    received    the    opening of the game. Willamette   scored    all    its
kickoff and marched down the Cal    T pp      Wilhmptt, touchdowns after being given the,
fie]d AiVal    Lee'    Willamette s ball by the UBC offense, through
XX    ., ...... ,   „„ All-American    linebacker fi-mhl.-*-* or intprr-pntinn-*
A fumble on Willamette's 37 intercePted an Al Larson pass on interceptions,
yard line killed the motion, and The Thunderbirds defense held
set the pattern for the game. *r__«M*J__*__i_ a Powerful team to a mere 244
After trading punts with the X*9^0UwHKK yard offense, including 135 on the
Bearcats, UBC recovered a fumble ■   .__    ■ , ground. That includes their lapse
at the Willamette 30 yard line and U(Jx .     WUtamrtto whkh al]owed a ?6 yard ^ sq
moved  down  to   the   goal  line.       £ir*VHJ™5?J \l< the average carry against them was
However, John Wilson fumbled a      -J^?}""*** .*' "ffi about one yard.
completed pass   and Willamette       WYsB«S.«B»!*pg ,,W9
recovered killing the drive. ;&!&*&**>¥**. - •- *' • • *> u If n°thVlg dS,e' Saturdays -?ame
After a Willamette punt, the 'S#fi*W*>' & showed   the   Players   themselves
Birds ran into a fourth and two iMM^^M'^"'^ l^l °m MtJhe American J™"
situation on the Bearcat 17 yard JB_-_----_SHwS^; Tl    »  offense  to  match  the
i,„a ■7Ss^aSH^HsS9SBS^Km^ii^99 defense, the Birds could win.
line. ■.,   jt   Tv   ™ • "■,'™*4ir*1 ™',\****r**j,yj^.r- Tuesday, September 30,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
Intramural Notices
Badminton
The final draw for badminton is now posted at the intramural
office. Competition starts Oct. 6th, at 12:30. Check to see when you
play.
Tennis:
All preliminary round games must be played by Oct. 1st and
reported to the intramural office.
Cycle Drag:
Eight teams will compete on Oct. 2nd at John Owen Pavilion.
This is a new event in the intramural program and promises to be both
fast and exciting.
Position Open
The position for assistant Director of Intramurals is now open.
Any person interested please make application before Oct. 3, to Mr.
Korchensky, Intramural Faculty Advisor, room 208, War Memorial
Gym.
Please state previous experience with the organization of sports
and why you are interested in attaining the position. The position will
entail scheduling, filing, typing and general administration duties.
CO-RECJ Badminton
Every Tuesday 12:30-1:15 at Memorial gym. Racquets and birds
-supplied.
Tennis:
Every Tuesday 12:30-1:15 at the armouries and Memorial gym
courts. Racquets and balls available.
WOMAN'S INTRAMURALS
Night League Volleyball:
Wednesday night at 7:30 in the Women's Gym. Everyone
welcome.
PE Softball
PE Softball starts on Wed. noon. Schedule is posted in the
Women's Gym.
Jogging
Jogger's club: Starting next Monday, Oct. 6th at 12:30 from
Women's Gym. General meeting of all women students who wish to jog.
Hockey men
dump India
By KELVIN BECKETT
In field hockey action over the
weekend, the UBC Thunderbirds
took over sole possession of first
place in the city league.
Led by the three-goal
performance of forward Antonie
Schouten, the Birds defeated
last-place India, 6-1.
Other UBC scorers were Martin
Tjeebes, Ron Millar and Paul
McMillen.
The second division, Braves
made it a perfect weekend for
UBC by shutting out North Shore
A. 2-0.
Brave marksmen were Baldave
Johal and Mark Skoran.
Player-coach, Paul McMillen, is
looking for new players to form a
third team.
He can be contacted at
224-5453. In previous seasons the
university has managed to field
four full teams.
Gymmen need aid
Three gymnasts are attempting
to form a mens' club to compete
in intercollegiate Gymnastics this
season. The group is in need of
competitors as well as a coach. All
those interested in mens'
gymnastics are invited to a
meeting today at noon in War
Memorial Gym, room 211.
&-4
%
MAHAMSHI MEHESH YOGI
JEWRY JARVIS
WHO DO YOU KNOW?
If You Know Yourself, You Can Know Anything. Transcendental Meditation is an easy technique for self-exploration. Anyone who can think can meditate. It results in
a physical change which brings clear-thinking, increased
energy, and inner joy.
This means much greater, effectiveness in living and study.
Who is this student? What is his potentiial?
JERRY JARVIS
Jerry Jarvis, former Washington journalist, has just returned from an all India tour with Maharishi Mehesh
Yogi, and recent talks at Harvard, Yale, and Michigan
State universities.
He will answer questions on this fascinating and illuminating process which results in permanent expansion of the
conscious mind. It is safe, spontaneous and simple.
He is student leader of Meditation groups in 80 American
universities.
Attention Skiers . . . Its Here!
THE LARGEST PRE-SEASON SKI SALE EVER
ONLY THREE DAYS (OCT. 2 - 3 - 4th) SO  HURRY!
Remember Thurs., Fri. and Sat. - That's All
SKI POLES - Lots of Poles
Reg. $6.95 NOW $4.95
DELUXE SKI SET
European Epoxi Ski, Tyrolia
Step-In Harness __ only $45.00
Special Clearance Of '
USED SKI Equipment-Boots, Skis, etc.
LOADS OF JACKETS
Especially Ladies - Small
NOW 25% TO 33% OFF
X
Tr
,*V
rf>
#
*«
d*
JACKETS
1/3 off
ODDS
&
SIZES
4T
•#'
%
r#
JUST EVERYONE IS JUMPING TO IVOR WILLIAMS SPORTING GOODS
HERE'S SOMETHING SPECIAL - We are the newest Head Ski and Lang Boot Dealers in Vancouver.
We have switched from Hart Skis to Head Skis. We must clear out our old Hart Ski stock. NOW — for
the first time you will be able to purchase a franchise ski at a discount — For these 3 days only all Hart
Skis in stock will go at 25% off the selling price. Supply is Limited — So Hurry! — Sale lasts for only three
days. SEE US AT-
IVOR WILLIAMS SPORTING GOODS
2120 W. 41st Ave.-261-6011
(All Sales Are Final)
Right in the middle of Kerrisdale
Open Every Day — 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Friday Till 9 p.m. Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  30,   1969
7WEEN CLASSES
Nothing happens today
TODAY
UBC SOCREDS
General meet,   noon,   Bu.   224.
SQUARE   DANCE   CLUB
Dance for beginners and new members,  noon,  SUB  ballroom extension.
THEATRE   AUDITIONS
Auditions for studio production The
Fall and Redemption of Man, direct*
ed by John Brockington, today and
Wed., noon, to 2:30 p.m. FW 209.
Needed: 8 men, 4 women.
SCM
General meeting, 7 p.m., 3035 W.
10th.
WW   EDUCATION   WORKERS
Organizational meeting, 8 p.m., 3791
W.  5th Avenue.
VARSITY   OUTDOOR   CLUB
Equipment to sell? Bring to VOC
Lounge by Oct. 7. Massive sale, Oct.
8,   SUB  125.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Purpose and organization of the col>
lege,   SUB   111,   noon.
PRE-DENTAL,   HYGIENE   SOC
General   meeting,   noon,   SUB   113.
WEDNESDAY
MUSSOC
Auditions for original revue to be
presented in Nov. will be held Wed.
and Thurs., 6:30 p.m., Old aud. This
production is in addition to Mussoc's
annual Feb. production of Hello Dolly
for which auditions will be held later
in Oct.
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE
Meeting, noon, IH 20.
BLACK CROSS FOOD CO-OP
Organizational meeting to continue
service. Helpers wanted 8 p.m., 3791
W.   7th  Ave.   Ph.   224-3031.
CANOE   CLUB
General |meeting, noon, Ang 110.
Weekend trip: Squamish River.
UNITED APPEAL
Donate today . . .
PRE-MED   SOCIETY
General meeting, noon. Dean McCreary,   Faculty  of  Medicine,   speaks.
TEACHERS COMMITTEE ON VIETNAM
General meet to discuss Nov. 15 protest against Amchitka nuclear tests,
noon,  Bu.   1278.  All faculty welcome.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC
Greater Dimensions in Life, noon, Bu.
232.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB
119.
DEBATE
Should   SFU   PSA   dissidents   be   expelled?   Noon,  Bu.   104.
PSYCH CLUB
General meeting,  noon,  Ang 24.
FOLK DANCING
Every Wednesday noon, dance studio
in Armouries.
NEWMAN   CLUB
General meet, non, SUB 105B. Hoote-
nany, Sat., 8 p.m., St. Mark's lounge.
STUDENT WIVES  ASSOC.
First meting of fall term, 8 p.m.,
Cecil Green Park. Speaker from
Children's Aid on adoption.
COMMUNITY   INFO   PROGRAM
Deputy administration president, Bill
Armstrong speaks noon, council chambers.
EXPERIMENTAL  COLLEGE
Purpose and organization of the col-
. lege,  SUB  125,   noon.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Meeting noon, SUB 125.
THURSDAY
FILM
The HUI, SUB aud., Oct. 2-5. Thurs.,
noon; Frid. noon, 3:30, 7, 9:30 p.m.;
Sat., 7,  9:30; Sun., 6:30 p.m.
CHRISTIAN   PERSPECTIVE
Creation discussed noon today, SUB
324.
C.V.C.
General meeting, noon today, club
lounge, SUB.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Teach-in, noon, Ed. 202. New B.C.
director  speaks.
SKYDIVING  CLUB
Informal meet, 7:30 p.m., SUB 119.
General meet,  Fri.  noon, SUB 111.
MARKETING CLUB
Ben Gaiter of Tartan Breweries
speaks noon, Angus 207.
BERKELEY IM*
Discussion with Norman Epstein and
film.   7:30 p.m.,  Chem.   Ens.   206.
NISEI  VARSITY
First general meet, noon, Bu.  203.
SPORTS   CAR  CLUB
General meet, noon, Chem. 250. Coffee party 7:30 p.m., grad centre lower
lounge.
ROD  AND  GUN
General meet noon,  SUB 111.
CUSO
Meeting 7:30 P.m. for all interested.
Phone 228-3264 or come to CUSO office in IH for location,  info.
SIMS
Jerry Jarvis: an introductory talk on
Transcendental Meditation, noon, SUB
ballroom.
PROGRESSIVE  CONSERVATIVES
Urban planning seminar, noon, SUB
119.
FRIDAY
LITERARY   CLUB
Meeting,  noon,   Bu.   225.
WEEKEND
CHINESE VARSITY
Candle  light  dance   party,   8:30 p.m.,
Sat. Free to new members.
THE   DINER
4556 W. 10th Ave.
AIR CONDITIONED -
FOR YOUR COMFORT
Satisfying Meals at
Satisfying Prices
PATIO
•EAT IN .TAKEOUT- DELIVERY*
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25*;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. ot B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
GREAT DOUBLE DANCE! SPRING,
Thin Red Line, at Place Vanier,
Fri., Oct. 3 — 9-1. Res. 1.25, Other
$1.50.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
14
PERSON WHO 'BORROWED'
clarinets from Music Bid!*;, please
return to that vicinity. My only
source of income. Reward — call
988-5363	
LOST: GOLD WATCH INSCRIP-
tion "Susan June 1962" on back.
Reward,   call   Susan  261-8582.
FOUND: GIRL HITCH HIKING
left Bible and Uosey's "Sometimes
a Great Notion." Contact infor-
mation   desk   in   S.U.B.    	
LOST: BROWN BUCKLED SHOES
in white plastic bag. Size 9. Desperately needed. Call Leona 987-
9078.	
PERSON WHO 'FOUND' BROWN
suede jacket in S.U.B. Ballroom
please return to lost and found or
call   Gary   738-6809.   Reward.
LOST: PEARL RING IN SUB.
Great sentiment attached. Reward.
Phone   Linda   224-1084.	
FOUND: 4000 PLUS UNDERGRAD-
uates — please claim at SUB Aud.
Noon  today.	
LOST: 4000 PLUS UNDERGRADS—
See SUB Aud. Noon today for details.
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY — FREEDOM. $18.00
per month inc. insurance. See the
volume dealer in "Two-Wheel
Freedom" for details. Hi-Performance Honda 3712 W. 10th at Alma.
Phone 228-9077.	
TWO DRIVERS NEEDED FOR
mixed carpool. 49th and Granville
area.  8:30's.  2G1-4476 Vicki.
Special Notices
16
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON (NEAR
campus). Complete hair care. 5736
University  Blvd.   Tel.   228-8942.
U.B.C. BARBER' SHOP. 4 BAR-
bers to serve you. Open 6 days a
week.   5736   University   Blvd.	
AQUA SOC GENERAL MEETING
12:30, Oct. 2. Upstairs in Brock
Hall, Rm. 303. Subsequent meet-
in ■?slastThursd***^*^«-*£h_J2
DIRECT FROM SPOKANE THE
Thin Red Line, Also Spring, Place
Vanier.   Fri..   Oct.   3   —   9-1.	
MALE STUDENT WOULD LTKE
to have tel. conversation with Ger-
man  fern,   stud,   eves.   682-1150.
IMPORTANT GENERAL MEETING
Naisei Varsity Thurs., Oct. 2 at
12:30 Bu. 203. New members welcome.
Travel Opportunities 17
Wanted-Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale 21
1962 CHEVY CONVERTIBLE —
immaculate. Floor shift, reconditioned engine, radio, new tires,
etc. Linda, 987-5605 after 6:15 p.m.
1961 RILEY 1.5, ASKING $375.00.
City tested, engine trans, rebuilt;
twin S.U. carbs tach.   266-6035	
1960 VOLVO 544, asking $595 or
nearest offer.   Phone  946-9162.
FOR SALE. 1963 V.W. TWO NEW
tires, Car rack, leatherette. $575
or best offer,  266-9706.	
1962 AUSTIN 850. PHONE 733-7713
after 5.  Best offer over $400.
1960 HILLMAN. RADIO, SNOW
tires, chains, ski rack, city-tested,
$250. Phone 731-1554 even.	
'61 VALIANT, DENTED GUARD.
But mech. V. Good — recond.
engine,   etc.   $400.   733-3626.	
'66 VIVA, GOOD COND'N. SNOW
tires. Hasn't driven in city. CaU
Lonnie, 684-1603 after 6 p.m.
$1300.	
LOVE BUG! '57 V.W. FUN CAR.
988-4564   afternoon.
Autos For Sale—Cont'd
21
'64 TR4. MUST SELL. 1st $500 CASH
offer! cd., Radials, etc.; more
info,   phone   224-6895—Don.	
'67 HONDA SPORTS CAR. PER.
feet. Share low insurance offers.
263-7327.	
NASH MET. IN EXCELLENT
condition. Must sell immde., Best
offer takes it. 738-2822.	
1969 V.W. DeLuxe. MECHANICAL-
ly good throughout. Radio. Just
city tested. $425  o.n.o.  224-4581.
'61 AUSTIN HEALEY 3000, RADIO,
overdrive, wire wheels, new paint,
tires, excellent conditions. $1,200.
263-5059.	
'56 PONTIAC AUTO 6. EXEC.
cond., 2nd owner, offers to $275.
733-8263  or  266-2768.
MARRIED STUDENT MUST SELL
second car. '64 Volvo 122-S. Immaculate conditions 325-9075 after
5:30.  $1,350.
22
Automobiles—Wanted
WANTED—PLUS 4, OR SUPER
sports Morgan. No specific year.
Call David-Room No. 86. Phone
224-9834.
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs 24
Motorcycles 25
1969 BULTACO PURSANG SCRAM-
bler, Fbgls. body, 250 CC. 33 H.P.,
has lights, muffler removable. $500
224-0681.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
I NEED 15" D-140's; A GOOD
camera. For sale or trade—El.
Guitar. 988-4564 evening.
Photography
34
EXACTA VXLLA 55/1.9 Auto Macro
lens. Like new, must sell. Phone
224-9049   John,   rm.   224.
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
L! S! D! LIKE SUPPER DANCES.
Place Vanier. Oct. 3—Fri. 9-1. Two
great bands.  Res.   1.25.	
WHO GAVE $7 TJO HAVE THEIR
pictures taken and to plant a tree?
Turn up at SUB Auditorium Noon
Today to see the 1970 GRAD
CLASS.
Sewing & Alterations
38
INDIES - GENTS - SEWING -
New work - alterations - mending
UBC Campus. Phone 224-7141.
Typewriters & Repairs
38
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
321-2102. ,	
TYPING WORK WANTED. 3589
West   10th   Ave.    733-5922	
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED,
electric typewriters, UBC grad.
Will pick up and deliver. 30c per
sheet.   Phone   942-8144.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. TR 4-
9253.	
EXPERT TYPING, COMPETATIVE
rates.   879-1807.	
STUDENTS TYPING ESSAYS,
Thesis and Editorial. Phone 435-
2108.
TYPIST  EXP.  ELECTRIC.  738-7881.'
TYPING — ESSAYS, THESES,
Stencils, etc. On 10th Ave., half
block outside gates. Phone 224-
0244.
— EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
NO EXPERIENCE ALLOWED; Executive council for 1970 Graduating
Class — Apply SUB Auditorium,
12:30   today.	
WANT TO MAKE MONEY IN
spare minutes on Campus? Luca-
tive, legal, far from laborious.
Call Mrs. Duncan, 228-9597	
A GENUINE OFFER ENABLING
male and female students to earn
exceptional wages through part
time referral selling. A worthwhile opportunity for financial reward. If you're of 1.50 per hour
positions then breakaway. Experience is not essential, simply contact Mr. Watson at 733-6845 after
5  p.m.	
Work Wanted
54
EXPERIENCED DRAUGHTSMAN
and artist available for all kinds
graphs, diagrams, artwork. Very
low rates. Call John Kula, 224-
4146.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wauled
61
PRIVATE TUTOR WANTED FOR
maths 202 student. Call evening
261-6939,   Anthony.
Language Instruction
61A
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Learn Conversational French, Spanish, German or English (New Canadians for as low as
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Take    advantage    of    this    amazing
offer:   only   six   students   maximum
per group.
For   the   best  tutoring   in   language
conversation,    call   us   today   (8:30
a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) at 736-5401.
CONVERSA-SCHOOL
OF LANGUAGES
(Recognized Educ. Institution)
1603 W.  4th   (at Fir)
Music
62
Special Classes
_       63
SKI INSTRUCTORS' TRAINING
COURSE —- Whistler Mtn. — 6
weekends — Oct. 4th and/or 5th
to Nov. 8th and/or 9th. 6 consecutive Sats. OR Sundays—$20.00; all
12 Saturdays and Sundays—$36.00.
For information phone or write:
Jim McConkey, Alta Lake, B.C.
932-5422.
SCUBA DIVING
CLASSES
N.A.U.I. CERTIFICATION
(Internationally    Recognized)
PLACE: Crystal Pool (West End)
TIME: On* night per week for » wks.
HOURS:   7:30-12:00 p.m.
STARTING  DATES: Monday,  Oct.  t
or Wednesday, Oct.  8.
COST:   S50
COURSE   INCLUDES:
it 30 hours Instruction
. -A* All equipment supplied
* Book
* Ocean chock-out
* 20% off equipment purchase!
LIMITED ENROLLMENT
Few openings available
REGISTER BY PHONE
(14 HR. SERVICE)
685-6017
Tutoring
64
JAPANESE - CANADIAN TUTOR
available for either language call
James   521-1062.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUY  PRE-SALE TICKETS  FOR
BIRD CALLS
Your Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW-Only 75c and SAVE
After  Publication   Price  Will   Be
$1.00
Misc. for Sale—Cont'd 71
FREE PASSES TO GUESTS OF
Invitation 69/70 Book holders to
movies,   restaurants,   night   clubs,
etc. Don't miss yours, $1.75, at
SUB   information.
STUDENTS' SPECIALS (THIS
Week Only). Single Hollywood
beds complete 49.50 and up. Ready
to finish chairs 6.95 and up.
Chests of drawers 14.95 and up.
6 drawer Mr. & Mrs. chest 18.95
each. 3 shelf bo.ikoases 6.95 and
up. Klassen's, 3207 W. Broadway.
RE 6-0712. Beer bottle drive-ir*
at  rear of store.
FLEA MARKET. LORD BYNG
High School 16th Crown. Oct. 2nd
and 3rd, 4:00 - 9:30 p.m. Auction
8:15. Clothing, Household goods,
furniture,   etc.	
BEDS, BEDDING, PILLOWS,
lamps, chairs, drop leaf table, and
chairs. Small chesterfield, lamps,
studio couch, refrig., stove (elec-
tric) dishwasher. Phone 733-2687.
MATTRESS FOR DOUBLE BED.
Mint condition. Phone Tim at 228-
3934   or  738-5990.	
CHEMISTRY AND BACTERIOLO-
gical Lab. Chemicals and euipment
for sale. Phone Bill 224-6585.	
WINCHESTER COOEY, MODEL
600. New .22 cal. bolt action repeater rifle with Weaver C4 Scope,
strap, carrying case and cleaning
kit. $50. Call 434-3047 after 6 p.m.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURN. ROOM. MALE NON-
smoker. Light — washing — sandwiches. Breakf. arranged. Close to
UBC.   Phone   224-7141.	
GIRL TO SHARE HOUSEKEEP-
ing room near Gates. Private
bath, entrance, $45. See Helen,
back basement,  4460 West 11th.
ROOM FOR LET. CLEAN, NICELY
finished basement room. Males
only please, 2995 W. 10th Ave.
Phone   738-0476.	
BASEMENT ROOM FOR ONE
student, $35 plus baby sitting
once a week, 3934 W. 20th, 224-6419.
MALE ROOMER WANTED.
Lunches and laundry if desired.
Phone   738-7715.	
TIRED OF COMMUTING? ROOMS
for male students on campus,
5760 Toronto Rd. Room $50 per
month, room and board $95 per
month. Kitchen privileges available. Linen changed weekly.
Parking accommodation for 20
large study room & lounge. Contact Ron Dick at the house or at
home.   224-0327. 	
FURNISHED SLEEPING ROOM
for male on campus laundry facilities. Shower & Toilet $50. 224-
5726.	
TWO FURNISHED ROOMS AVAIL-
able now. Quiet location near gates.
Phone  224-4243.	
SPACIOUS SLEEPING ROOM FOR
Male, priv. ent., priv. bath, 1%
blacks from campus, prefer third
or fourth year. $40.04. 224-6389.
Room & Board
82
BE A BOARDER AT PHI GAMMA
Delta. 10 mins. walking to any
building on campus. Call 224-9769
for details.  '
THE SIGMA CHI HOUSE IS OPEN-
ing this week so will all those who
were interested please secure a
room by $25 damage deposit or
the room will be let.	
ROOM BOARD (Male) PRIV. ENT.
sleeping room. 3665 W. 11th Ave.
731-5996, Mrs. F. A. Phillips.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE CAMPUS flat. Only 7 min. from classes!
$80, room and board. Telephone
228-9598	
GIRL STUDENT TO SHARE
great West End apt. with same.
$85 month.  Phone Dawn 688-8909.
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FURN.
2 bdrm. suite. Phone utilities incl.
$60. Phone 224-7274 after 8 p.m.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84

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