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The Ubyssey Dec 3, 1985

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 President Strangway installation today. War Memorial Gym: 2:15
UBC holds onto its investments
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
UBC's administration will not release information about its holdings in South Africa-
linked banks and companies until it is
prepared to consider divestment, says the
vice president of finance.
"Why jump the gun on it? I'd rather you
would publish a list of investments with a
policy of what we're going to do. Otherwise,
you're just creating an issue," Bruce Gellatly
said Monday.
"It's not a matter of public information at
the moment. We don't want to pre-empt the
board of governors from deciding what it
will or will not release."
Gellatly said he will ask the board's finance
committee Thursday to examine UBC's investments in companies and banks that support the apartheid regime. The committee
will then be asked to form a separate committee to recommend to the board whether or
not to divest, he said.
McGill University in Montreal announced
two weeks ago that it will divest of all its
shares in companies with ties to South
Africa. It is the first university in Canada to
Premier pack
pounces on
budget cuts
By LOIS CORBETT
HALIFAX (CUP) — Ontario's
David Peterson led a pack of
premiers at last week's first
ministers conference in denouncing
Ottawa's plan to cut $6 billion from
federal transfer payments to the
provinces.
Peterson said reductions to the
federal government's contributions
to health and post-secondary education funding would "Cut right into
the bone."
"They will cut right into our
ability to provide the faculties,
libraries and state-of-the-art equipment that are needed to teach and
train the next generation of Canadians," said Peterson.
Peterson told prime minister
Brian Mulroney the first ministers
must approach financing "in a way
that does jeopardise our national
committment to first class health
care and first-rate education and
training."
Peterson joined Manitoba
premier Howard Pawley and just-
defeated Quebec premier Pierre-
Marc Johnson in criticising the
federal government's "unilateral"
action in proposing the cuts to
Established Programmes Financing. Finance minister Michael
Wilson announced the cuts in late
September.
Pawley said the Mulroney
government's actions were "indistinguishable from the approach
of the former government.
"What happened to the new era
in federal-provincial relations?" he
asked.
Pawley called on Mulroney to immediately suspend action on any
cuts to federal programmes affecting the provinces for the next two
years.
Johnson, in Halifax only for the
first day of the conference because
of Monday's provincial election in
Quebec, said the cuts "are unacceptable."
Johnson also criticised
"unilateral re-opening of the present fiscal arrangements one year
before their expiry date."
Pawley said .Mulroney's argument that the provinces have to
bear a fair share in order to reduce
the federal deficit is "phony."
do so, and the divestment process will take
about two years to complete.
The tight-lipped Gellatly admitted it is time
that UBC took a stand on the issue, but said
the board will not likely decide on a position
until after its Dec. 5 meeting. The board's
first meeting in 1986 is in February.
"It will take a few months to develop
criticisms of our investments. I want you to
know though, there is great sympathy to the
viewpoint you're expressing. You have my
and the president's word that the board will
look at this issue."
Gellatly refused to say how much money
makes up the university's investment portfolio, which includes millions of dollars in
what is known as the staff pension and endowment funds.
But student board representative Don
Holubitsky said he estimates the funds contain about $120 million, if not more.
Holubitsky — finance committee member
along with board members Richard Stewart,
Patricia Baird and Peter Brown — said he
thinks the board should let the university
community know of its stock in companies
and banks assisting the Botha government.
"Just because something is going to create
a fuss, I don't think that is a valid reason for
withholding public information. I tend to
lean towards a policy of openness and I think
public information should be made available
to everyone for use as they see fit."
Though Gellatly said he will not disclose
UBC's investments until he has the board's
approval, he indicated in an earlier interview
the university has money in the Royal Bank,
the Bank of Montreal and Noranda Inc., all
of which have business ties to South Africa.
The Royal Bank and the Bank of Montreal
no longer lend money to the apartheid state
and its agencies, according to Toronto's Task
Force on Churches and Corporate Responsibility. Both, however, still have outstanding
loans to South Africa prior to 1975. Noranda
owns the Canada Wire and Cable Co., which
in turn owns 35 per cent of the South African
Transage Cable Co., a manufacturer of
magnet wire.
The Ubyssey has been asking for the information on investments since October and did
not receive an answer from Gellatly until a
few days after McGill University decided to
divest.
Horacio de la cueva, spokesperson for
UBC Students for a Free Southern Africa,
called on the administration to release a complete list of its investments immediately and
on the board to divest of South Africa-linked
holdings as soon as possible.
"It's objectionable that the university is
not making this information public. UBC is a
public institution and the community has a
right to know."
De la cueva said the university's reluctance
to release the information proves the board
must have investments in blacklisted companies and banks.
"We can call it guilt by association. If they
didn't have any such investments, there
would be no problem in making the list
public. It looks like a paranoiac response to
me."
Students for a Free Southern Africa will
launch an educational campaign about the
issue next term and push the board to consider divestment.
"Divesting in South Africa hurts the white
racist regime a lot more than the non-white
population," he said.
DO YOU SEE any snow? No? Snort some lately? No? Too bad. We did last night.
Student gets long distance feeling
HAMILTON (CUP) — Desmond Tutu was at his Johannesburg home Nov. 21 when he got
a phone call from an inquisitive student politician at McMaster University.
Student president Roger Bat-
chelor wanted the black activist
archbishop's opinion on what the
McMaster Student Union should do
to oppose apartheid.
Student councillors at McMaster
Conference eyes access
Students from rural areas are less
likely to attend university than
those from cities, a student board
of governors representative told a
Universities Council of B.C. planning conference last week.
The conference, which was
organized by UCBC to bring
together government and university
officials, was also told there is little
duplication of services between the
province's three universities.
"They spent a lot of time talking
about student issues," said Nancy
Bradshaw.
"It's obvious that the government is influenced by the public and
the public is influenced by the
students."
Bradshaw said B.C. is a net importer of 2,000 university graduates
each year who are recruited from
outside the province.
Between 1971 and 1981 there was
an average 140 per cent increase in
jobs for people with university
degrees, Bradshaw said.
Accessibility differentials for
post-secondary education were also
discussed at the conferences, said
student board member Don
Holubitsky. The percentage of
students from outside B.C.'s
metropolitan areas is about half the
provincial average, he said, adding
the art and science programs at colleges aren't equivalent to those at a
university.
"Only 20 per cent of students
from academic programs in colleges
even attend university."
Bradshaw said Edmund Bovey,
who conducted a major Ontario investigation into universities last
year, said B.C.'s three universities'
programs complement each other
and avoid unnecessary duplication
of service.
had been under fire after they
reversed an earlier decision boycott
South African companies and products.
Batchelor, one of those who opposed a boycott, felt MSU's money
and effort would be better spent on
sponsoring black South Africans to
study in Canada.
He could think of none better to
consult than Tutu, the Anglican archbishop of Johannesburg who
won the 1984 Nobel Peace Prize for
his work against racial inequality in
South Africa.
Said Batchelor: "I wanted to find
out if he thought our money ($10,000
to $15,000 the MSU expected to
lose if the boycott went ahead)
would be better spent boycotting
Canadian companies or by bringing
South African students here."
Since advocating anti-apartheid
measures is a risky proposition and
one that can lead to jail for South
Africans, Tutu chose his words
cautiously.
According to a shorthand
transcription of the dialogue, Tutu
suggested that both McMaster proposals would help.
"If many did the small things
right, the ripple would be almost
important. It would create the right
moral atmosphere. Do not discount
something that appears minimal —
it may have a fundamental
pschological impact; it's more
significant than the economic impact," the noted activist said.
Above all, McMaster students
must be guided by the morality and
ethics of whatever they do. "You
must ask yourself: Is it right or is it
wrong? That's the primary consideration. Everything else is secondary," Tutu told Batchelor.
The McMaster president, who
surprised Tutu when he told him he
is a black Canadian with a sister in
South Africa, also invited the archbishop to speak at McMaster.
Tutu said he would consider the offer, although "my first concerns are
at home."
Following the eight-minute conversation, Batchelor said while
Tutu is not the sole voice of South
African blacks, he is among the
most eminent. He said he wants to
sponsor the studies of a number of
black South Africans because "if
we produced a few more Desmond
Tutus, that would do a lot for the
anti-apartheid movement." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3,1985
Harassing professor fined
EDMONTON (CUP) — A
University of Alberta professor has
been fined $2,000 and suspended
for six months without pay by the
university for sexually harassing six
of his students.
"The staff member's actions constituted unwanted and unwarranted
sexual advances toward female
students," said Peter Meekison,
who began investigating in June
after six women graduate students
in educational psychology filed
complaints against eight of their
professors.
Meekison dismissed seven of the
complaints for lack of evidence
and, in one case, conflicting
testimony.
Meekison said the professor's of
fences were not serious enough to
warrant dismissal and the penalty
imposed was severe enough. An
associated professor at the U of A
suspended for six months would
lose at least $19,000, he said.
But some students don't think
the punishment was severe enough.
"If the accused has been found
guilty he should be dismissed," said
Mike Nickel U of A Students'
Union president. "I would wager
money he would do it again."
Meekison refused to reveal the
name of the professor or the details
of his investigation because the professor can still appeal the decision.
Caroline Nevins, student council
vice president, said the results of
sexual harassment investigations at
the   university   are   kept   secret
whether an appeal is on or not. She
said the student council is lobbying
the U of A Board of Governors and
General Faculties Council to make
this information public.
A member of the U of A
women's centre said representatives
from the centre will be meeting with
Nickel and university president
Meyer Horowitz, but that no further action has been considered yet.
u
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Education program to be changed
By DOUG SCHMIDT
Sweeping changes to the UBC
teacher training program are proposed in an Education faculty
report now being studied by the
senate curriculum committee.
The plan, which could be in place
by next Fall, would make Education a two year program to follow
three years of studies in the faculties
of Arts or Science, or in Physical
Education.
The two current routes to an
education degree, which would be
replaced by the new plan, are five
years in the faculty of education, or
a single year of teacher education
following another degree.
Another change will see the
elementary teacher program extended from four to five years.
"Thus will be the flagship program for all of Canada," said Murray Elliott, associate dean of
undergraduate teacher education,
comparing the proposed UBC
changes with "bits and pieces" program reform approaches at other
Canadian universities.
Some of the basic concerns
leading to the proposed changes
stemmed  from the graduate pro
gram, where students enter a one-
year program in the education
faculty after receiving a bachelor's
degree in another faculty, said
Elliott.
"One academic year of eight
months (seems) inadequate to properly prepare a teacher," he said.
In Let's Talk About Schools, a
province-wide study published last
summer by the provincial government, British Columbians demanded prospective teachers receive
more real experience in schools and
better subject matter preparation.
"Our proposal seems to deal with
(this) quite nicely by addressing
some of those demands," said
Elliott.
Teachers will be required to take
a full term in teacher training instead of the current ten week program for those entering the one-
year graduate program.
"Students need enough time to
gain the skills, attitudes and particularly the confidence they'll need
to lead a class," said Elliott.
One of the reasons for the proposed curriculum changes is a
recognition of the changing
demands on teachers.
"When (UBC's education) programs were first developed, Vancouver was largely an English-
speaking area — now 60 per cent of
all students in Vancouver schools
have some other language as their
first (and they represent a range of
ethnic cultures,)" he said.
Mainstreaming, which was introduced in the mid-1970's to integrate those with learning and
other disabilities into normal educational programs, has led to the problem of forcing teachers to identify
and deal with a variety of classroom
situations.
"There has been a growing
realization that teachers have to be
apprised of some of these
challenges and difficulties," said
Elliott.
He said some courses will be
redesigned to focus on children with
special needs and provisions will be
made for the teaching of such
pupils.
Other areas of focus include:
• more   careful    work    on
classroom management: such as
educating teachers on how to run
the classroom and maintain control
and discipline;
• paying more attention to the
candidate's own skills and their
understanding of the complexities
of oral and non-verbal communication in the classroom;
• a new course for secondary
school candidates, Language and
Reading, will educate teachers to
stimulate kids to use language more
effectively.
mum:
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Jobless caught
By DEBBIE LO
Part-time students taking
daytime courses are disqualified
from receiving unemployment insurance benefits, and this is unfair,
said an unemployment action center
official Thursday.
Greg Proniuk said part-time
students taking night time courses
are eligible for U.I. while those taking day courses, regardless of
course availability, have their
benefits cut off.
"I think it's ridiculous for
students who are trying to better
themselves in their field of expertise," he said.
Jack Kent, a B.C. region
unemployment insurance official,
said basic unemployment insurance
guidelines are based on the individual's work before applying for
benefits. If applicants take daytime
courses and are applying for full-
time day jobs they^are
"automatically not able, ready and
willing" to work, he said.
"It would take too much time
(assessing claims) on an individual
basis," he said.
Current U.I. guidelines also require applicants to maintain an active job  search  record  and  en
courage applicants to broaden their
searches to include jobs unrelated
to their studies if they have not
found work, Proniuk said.
Applicants who refuse jobs in
areas unrelated to their fields of
study do not receive benefits, he added.
"If they have attained an expertise in their field of study why
should they have to go digging for
other jobs?"
Proniuk said applicants should
not be forced to work in jobs they
are overqualified for if it prevents
them from completing their search
for a job in their chosen field.
The unemployment action centre, a job search service run by
volunteers, has received an unusually high number of U.I. information
inquiries from students over the
past month.
The centre, which "rarely"
receives requests from students
helped about five this November.
The UAC also aided two individuals in appealing their U.I.
benefit removals, Proniuk said.
The UAC is a B.C. Federation of
Labor program which was set up
two years ago to help the
unemployed.
— Stephen wisenthel photo
"I WONDER IF I can get a Star Wars research grant for my work on the explosive properties of orange juice?"
Biotechnology will change us all
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canada
may have missed the boat with
other technological revolutions, but
could make its mark with
biotechnology, says the latest report
from the Science Council of
Canada.
"Biotechnology is rapidly converting science fiction to science
fact. (It) may generate the last major technological revolution of the
20th century," according to the introduction of Seeds of Renewal:
Biotechnology and Canada's
Resource Industries.
Frank Maine, chair of the Council committee responsible for the
report, says Canada's fear of
technology and dependence on its
natural resources have kept it from
joining the ongoing microelectronics revolution.
"We're well into that — we're
only seeing the beginning of it, but
Students kept out of new residences
VANCOUVER — (CUP) — New
student housing units at the university of British Columbia are ready
for occupancy but EXPO '86 will
stop most students from moving in
for another year.
Instead, the townhouses will be
the home away from home for
employees of the world trade fair
international pavilions.
UBC signed away the rights to
the townhouses in exchange for a
financial contribution from EXPO
'86 that allowed UBC to proceed
with construction earlier than planned.
"We wouldn't have the
residences if it weren't for EXPO,"
said Mary Flores, director of student housing. Flores said architectural plans had been sitting on the
shelf for several years because it was
too costly to. begin building.
Housing has always been tight at
UBC, because there are very few
houses near the campus. Currently
there is an 800-person waiting list
for single-person residences on-
campus.
Duncan Stewart, Alma Matei
Society   external   affairs   coor
dinator, said he thought the deal
with EXPO '86 "is pretty damn excellent."
UBC information officer Jim
Banham said EXPO '86 contributed the $1 million down payment on financing to the project,
which cost over $100 million to
complete. The complex contains
187 units for 780 students.
"I imagine EXPO is hoping to
recoup costs by telling the countries
this space is available at this price,"
said Banham.
But according to Flores EXPO
will make some space available to
students if there is any left over.
"EXPO officials have agreed to
let UBC rent excess space to senior
students for the winter session
only," said Flores. Students will
have to move out for the summer
months but will be able to move in
again in September rather than
November when the EXPO as a
potential source of casual tenants
. . . but they say student and
university needs will be met first.
"If space is still available after
students and departments have
booked, we would make it available
to   EXPO  visitors,"   said  Geoff
Ward, housing manager at SFU.
However unlike UBC, Simon
Fraser would stop casual rentals
mid-August to make room for
returning students.
we know where it's heading.
Biotechnology is much younger,
but we can see it taking its effects
before the end of the century,"
Maine said.
Use of biotechnology is so rapid
that some industries — such as
pharaceuticals — have been completely re-invented, Maine said. But
Canada shouldn't try to compete in
races already won abroad.
"The work in pharmaceuticals is
so far ahead that we're completely
out of it. Canada will have to buy
its drugs abroad," he said.
Instead, Canada should concentrate on resources it has already
developed — such as agriculture,
fisheries, and mining — and improve them with biotechnology,
Maine said.
The key to biotechnological success lies in Canadian university
laboratories, he said. "University
research is by far the most important area. If we do anything at all,
it'll be done at the universities,"
Maine said.
Maine said only a few universities, including Guelph, Alberta,
Toronto, and Dalhousie, have
taken on biotechnology research in
depth.
Of the report's 23 recommendations, six call for more and closer
links between researchers and industry.
Maine said Canada has repeatedly failed in bringing university innovations to the marketplace.
"The transfer of technology must
be carried through more smoothly.
That's where we've been weak up to
the present," he said.
According to the report,
biotechnology could affect
anything from cell cloning to finding
tastier varieties of wheat. Maine
said biotechnology could also
breathe new life into Canada's
decaying forestry and fisheries, as
well as improve the standard of living in the country.
Maine said an example of
biotechnological research is the
development of canola, a type of
rape seed that has more oil, less toxic
qualities, and is more responsive to
the Canadian climate than other
types of seeds. Rape seed is a source
of vegetable oil.
Maine said canola might
"drastically alter the seed
industry." Biotechnology as a
whole, though, will likely reap far
deeper effects in society.
"It will affect the universities,
and it will change industry.
Biotechnology will change all of us
somehow," he said.
Fraser Institute economist says:
Free trade more important to Canada than America
By DEBBIE LO
A Fraser Institute economist says
Canada should sign a free trade
agreement with the United States to
bolster the economy and gain access
to what he called a "worldscale"
market.
Free trade is a question of
whether we want to have an "inward" looking view of the world,
said Michael Walker to forty people
in Henry Angus 326.
"John A. Macdonald used in-
word looking to create a nation,"
he said. "He was against encouraging imports."
He said Canadians have to get rid
of the necessity to produce a variety
of products by one manufacturer
and added Canadians should consider  not  producing  clothing  or
wheat and import these products
from cheaper markets abroad.
Walker said the Canadian
American free trade agreement,
CAFTA, is important for Canada
to gain access to the free trade
market, and added it would be difficult to generate more agreements
with other countries such as Japan
or Australia because of "political
realities."
He estimated it would take 10
years for a free trade agreement to
be implemented. He said free trade
faces opposition from "cozy
political fan clubs who don't want
their cozy deals upset."
Walker said the U.S. is "without
a doubt" the best place to invest,
adding Canada has to become more
economically attractive to investors.
He said Canada makes up only
two per cent of the U.S. export
market and investors would be
more inclined to invest in Canada if
Canada and the U.S. were an
economic unit.
"We (Canadians) tend to ex-
agerate our own significance," he
said, adding it is much more important to Canadians then the
Americans to reach a free trade
agreement.
"A lot of people don't want to
believe in trade," he said.
People trade because they gain
from trade and trade increases
wealth, he said.
He added most of the audience
had probably read about free trade
theory in the economics introductory course texts. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1985
Violence will not produce democracy
I am writing this letter in
response to Michael Moeti's article
Blacks want freedom (Ubyssey,
Nov. 26), in which he wonders if
South Africans in exile will ever be
able to go home to a democratic
black-majority government. Such a
development would be warmly
welcomed by the citizens of the
more democratic states, and would
hearten the citizens of those states
struggling for democracy. But I
think it is necessary to inform Mr.
Moeti that democracy can never be
entrenched in South Africa by the
means he advocates.
There are no easy solutions to the
terrible problems facing South
Africa, it is idiotic to assume that
arming the masses with assault
weapons will solve the problem. It
is irresponsible and absurd to to
suggest that a "Lebanonization" of
South Africa is the answer. Please
excuse my ignorance if I admit to
not ever having heard the term
Lebanonization before, although I
think the meaning is tragically clear
enough.
Lebanon is ungovernable. In real
terms, it is no longer a nation. It is,
instead, a land of innumerable
small faction-states, each demarcated by the range of an automatic
rifle. It is a land of perennial strife
and bloodshed. What form of
democracy can be imagined to exist
there? Is it a system of 'One bullet-
One vote' that you desire, Mr.
Moeti? Who's interests would be
served by having such self-
destruction ravage your homeland?
There is no doubt in my mind that
the white-dominated apartheid
regime could be toppled by such
chaos, but consider what would
replace it. Is anyone so naive as to
imagine that once the Afrikaners
are overthrown, everyone will turn
in their AK-47s, M-16s, Uzies, and
grenades and say,  "Let's have a
democracy"?
Let's set a few things straight.
First, Democracy is not natural, it is
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The Arts Club Theatre's
Twurra
NIGHT
by William Shakespeare
Directed by Larry Lillo
Starring: NORMAN BROWNING, JOHN MOFFAT,
JAY BRAZEAU, SIMON WEBB
"An effervescent, beguiling show, " THE EDMONTON JOURNAL
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY
Thursday, December 5th, 8:00 p.m.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Tix: Arts Club Box Office 687-1644
With the assistance
"SK toglfv&"'
the Canada
Council
the cumulation of centuries of
tradition, effort, reason, and passionate defence.
Second, Peace can always be extinguished by violence. The reverse
is not true.
Third, it is easy to give a person a
gun, but it is very difficult to get
them to give it up.
Fourth, Democracies are never
created by men with guns. Can
anyone name a single circumstance
where military or other violent men
have established a state and left it
democratically entrenched. The
War of American Independance,
that often-cited example of revolutionary democracy, broke out after
well-established, elected local
assemblies clashed with the British
parliamentary government over
who had the authority to tax and
legislate. The revolution was fought
by a disciplined army and subordinate militia. The men with the
guns made only military decisions,
under the approval of the Continental Congress, which made all
political decisions.
The only route that leads to a
stable democracy is one traveled
slowly. A democratic process must
evolve at its own pace. A
democratic system must evolve at
its own pace. A democratic system
must acquire legitimacy, it must be
truly representative, before it is entitled to wield power. A fledgling
democratic institution exists in
South Africa now. It is staffed by
the collaborators that Mr. Moeti is
pleased to see murdered. Instead of
condemning them, why not join
them? Do you fear not being supported by the electorate, Mr.
Moeti? I understand that there is
still a very limited franchise, and
that may frustrate your desire to
have some immediate imput to the
system, but continued pressure will
have the desired affect. A repressive
government will always seek to
quiet criticism by attempting to appear legitimate; seen in this light, it
is inevitable that the Botha government will construct some powerless
representative house for blacks.
Power is relative. Imagine that
black assembly a forum for dissent,
a platform from which the voice of
Black South Africa is clearly heard,
consistently embarrassing the
government. Most likely the
government would disband it. So,
oh well, try again. Eventually an
assembly may form that cannot be
dissolved by any force other than its
own will. Meanwhile, an elected
alternative to white dominance will
become a tradition in the minds of
the people. And that alternative will
grow in experience and competency
until it is unquestionably the force
that leads Black South Africa.
Does the above sound difficult or
improblable? It is both. But it is the
only way that there will ever be a
democratic black-majority government in South Africa. I do not expect Mr. Moeti to endorse my
views, though, I suspect that he
would prefer to sit here on the
sidelines and cheer for blood. I also
suspect that if ever there was a true
democracy set up in South Africa,
no one would vote for him.
Honestly, Mr. Moeti, do you
wish to return home with your
democratically bestowed education,
to share in the never-ending struggle
to democratize the world, or would
you prefer to await anarchy, so that
you can set-up a petty, bitter feif in
some blood-soaked remnant of
your homeland?
Timothy S. Cahill
arts 2
Engineer's ride t
The Ubyssey article re: Godiva Ride
(Friday, Nov. 29) raises several important
issues. One that has been overlooked in
recent discussions about the ride revolves
around the significance of Godiva, or, the
woman who's hired to ride the horse. The
engineers will tell you, when pressed that
UBC THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTER
6066 THUNDERBIRD BLVD.
U.B.C.
CASUAL (DROP-IN) HOCKEY
Open to everyone 14 years and over. Non-contact rules. Colored pullovers provided. Basic hockey equipment, including
shinguard and helmet, must be worn.
Dates: Dec. 9 to 13
Dec. 16 to 20
and Dec. 23 and 27
Times: 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Fee: $1.50 per hour of play
RENTAL ICE IN DECEMBER
A variety of ice times are available for rental days and eves, in
December for HOCKEY, BROOMBALL, SKATING and CURLING, (lounge available at no extra cost). Add a spark to your
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Our premises are fully Licenced 7 days a week
Our SPORT SHOP, located in the Twin Rinks area specializes
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on a first come basis.
* CALL SHARON OR PAUL AT228-6121 *
r Tuesday, December 3,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Outrage
=rVfi3ag&ra'^:
tegrades Godiva
she symbolizes a brave woman's stance
for her villagers, against her tyrannical
husband's high taxes. The ride, it's implied, pays homage to her courage. There
are more than a few problems with this
theory.
First, the real Godiva acted independently. Second, she recognized that
a k v way to move her husbnd was to
despv'' his property, ie., herself. Third,
the villagers respected her stance and
didn't watch as she rode by. And finally,
the man who chose to make a titillating
event out of it, the infamous Peeping
Tom, was struck blind and even killed by
some stories. In comparison, the
engineers hire a woman, preferably one
who is, in society's eyes, already valueless
(ie. a prostitute), perch her naked and
vulnerable on a horse, and encourage people to come out and stare. As well as the
clear statement this makes about how
engineers perceive women, it makes an interesting one about how they view their
own manhood.
Perhaps the engineers should explain
why domination is an important part of
their public expressions of sexuality.
Perhaps, thinking about it from this
perspective they may be able to see why
people make a connection between it and
the violence women receive on this cam
pus.
Danica Gleave
Anthro. 3
UBC's administration has an obligation to the public to reveal its investments in South Africa.
The university is a public institution funded with public money and
should therefore be accountable to taxpayers and the university community.
McGill university has already taken a stand against apartheid and has
drafted a divestment policy, following the example of many public and
private universities in the United States. McGill was the first post-
secondary institution in Canada to divest, but that should not deter UBC
from taking the morally correct road towards divestment. If anything,
McGill's initiative should accelerate the administration's divestment policymaking.
For Bruce Gellatly, the vice-president of finance, to withhold information
on the university's South African investments because there is no divestment policy, is an outrage. That information should be made public so effective policies can be quickly drafted.
Rhino slams executive
The quotes printed from Jamie
Collins in your Nov. 29th issue
about my operations as a registered
agent of a registered party that "it
is a conspiracy to defraud the
government and there are no
securities for the proposal." can
not be allowed to be published with
impunity.
When 15 members of the student
council voted to endorse and promote the concept of "contributor's
choice" which guides my
Rhinoceros Party registered agent
operations, they did not do so
becuase I told them a few amusing
jokes. Collins insults the entire student council when he implies that
they endorsed a criminal activity
because they thought it was funny!
"Defraud" is a very strong word,
especially when, as an assertion of
fact, the statement is totally ignorant. I have been working for
more than a year to secure nine
pages of letters from Chief Electoral Officer, M. Hamel, and Director of Registration for Revenue
Canada, Mr. Read, confirming
unequivocally that what I am doing
is legal. I already actually did it during the 1984 election and it has been
accepted, and I am still doing it
with the full knowledge and acceptance of the authorities which interpret and enforce the Elections and
Income Tax Act.
The question is certainly not
whether it is legal; the only quesion
is how many students are actually
going to benefit from it in 1985?
Friday, Nov. 29th, I asked
the AMS president to write me a
short and simple letter stating the
exact wording of the motion council
passed to endorse and promote my
idea. In the presence of witnesses
she refused "because there was talk
of rescinding the motion".
As a member of the AMS I
observe that when the president
deliberately thwarts a motion passed by the council, then she should
be impeached. The executive has no
right to countermand resolutions of
the council! Rather than promoting, this executive is reluctant
and tardy even to make copies of
my letters from Ottawa, etc. for the
other council members.
In light of the fact that these petty bureaucrats-in-training in the offices of the AMS are morally opposed to tax payers having more
control over their own money (as is
consistent with how these officers
treat the student fee money) it looks
to difficult for me to successfully go
through the AMS executive to bring
my opportunity to the students of
UBC. I must take my operations
back to the streets, namely around
the SUB, near the Bank of Montreal.
Every student, or their friends
and family who has a taxable income, should realize that they can
save hundreds of dollars on tuition
and/or create good jobs for
themselves if they are energetic
enough to engage in a minimal unit
of political organization and
registered political activity.
Quite the contrary to Collins'
remarks, these transactions will be
completely secure. I will exchange,
in person, certified cheques for certified cheques, and/or I will open a
joint chequing account with the
contributor or anyone the contributor trusts, into which the contribution will be deposited. In this
way the contributor never loses control over their contribution.
Blair T. Longley
No. 3 2725 Melfa Road
Vancouver, BC V6T 1N4
Think before supporting land claims
I would like to take issue with
your recent editorial on the subject
of support for the Haida Indians. I
am not going to discuss the issues,
but to object to the manner of
writing. The Haida Indians are a
colourful people, very good at get-
\
THE UBYSSEY
December 3, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
It was a cold and snowy night as the four staffers sat in the printer's sauna seething with gossip.
Charlie Fidelman wearing glorious powder blue and white practical oxfords prodded definitely not cute
Debbie Lo about the pdaclause. Muriel Draisma enlightened her after giggling over two unmentionable
collective gripes. Stephen Wisenthal's head slowly flushed with red starting at the tips of his ears and
finally flooding his face over somemcone he absolutely did not wish to intimidate. Doug Schmidt remained silent during the entire inquest because he was not at the printers . . . Camile Dionne worked
quietly on the flats as a certain red head was busy elsewhere. Shari aka the woman with the longest
tale to tell told all except her true name.
ting sympathy. They have certainly
a majority of B.C. citizens on their
side. Your editorial gives no
thought to the possibility that there
may be two sides to the question.
How would it be, for instance, if
all the land claims were granted?
Much of B.C. is vertical, and the
actual land available to grant is a
small percentage. Very soon those
people who have been supporting
the claims would see how it affected
them, and would yell against
discrimination ir. favour of a
minority.
I am not saying that this is any
more correct or unbiased than the
view expressed in your editorial.
What I am saying is that your
editorial shows the type of biased
thinking which we are accustomed
to, but which is not the type of
thinking we should expect in an
academic background. Our whole
effort at UBC is surely to learn to
look at both sides of a question.
Mary G. Humphries
arts 4
THANKS TO ALL OUR
CUSTOMERS
We wish you a
Merry Xmas
and
Happy New Year
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hair and suntanning co.
SUNTANNING
10 SESSIONS-$39
HAIR    STYLING
15% off any hair service
with presentation of ad. Expires Dec. 15
5784 University Blvd.
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Ph. 224-1922
224-9116
Author Appearance
JOHN MORTIMER
playwright, novelist, lawyer and creator
of Rumpole of the Bailey, will be at
the UBC BOOKSTORE on Thursday,
DEC. 5th at 12:30 - 1-30p.m. to autograph copies of his new novel
PARADISE POSTPONED
If you are unable to attend the signing please call and we
will reserve a copy for you. 228-4741 (S 18.95 ea.) Use
Visa or Mastercard.
BOOKSTORE Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3,1985
TODAY
CHINES! STUDf NTS ASSOCIATION OF UBC
Bagfnnera Mandarin conversation clan, noon,
Buch. B317.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discuaaion, noon. Brock HaH
room 304.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Waakly masting, all are walcoma, noon SUB
216.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Last practice of term, all welcome, 7 p.m., UBC
Aquatic center.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Exec meeting, noon, E.I.S.A. office, SUB.
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
Installation   of   new   presidsnt   Dr.   David
Strangway. 2:15 p.m., Wer Memorial gym.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 213.
UBC SHOTOKAN KARATE
Regular practice, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Paula Ross
Dance Studio, 3488 West Broadway.
WEDNESDAY
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Duatin Hoffman in "Straw Dogs", 7:30 and
9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Lecture. Title: "A moment for living — explore
the potential of being here now." Bill Wilkinaon,
noon, Buch B221.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m.. Gallery lounge.
THURSDAY
FILM SOCIETY
Film: "Ledyhawke", 7 p.m., SUB auditorium.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Pre-Christmaa lunch party drop-in, noon, St.
Mark's College.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
Christmas crunch tournament for fort camp
hockey league; 7:46-8:46 p.m. top women's
teems play; 9-10:15 p.m. — top man's teems
play; 10:30-11:45 p.m. top residence/fraternity
teems play. Thunderbird Winter Sports center.
CHINESE STUOENTS ASSOCIATION OF UBC
Intermediate Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7 p.m., 1868 Knox
Rd.
DEPARTMENT OF CREATIVE WRITING
Poetry reading by Canadian poet Al Purdy,
author of the Govenor General'a award winning
"The Cariboo Horeea", and recently published
"Piling Blood". Sponsored by Prism International, Canada Council and Thee and Walter
Koemer lectureship. Noon, Buch A100-
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night, featuring Cameron Wilson, 8:30-11
p.m.. Graduate Student centre. Garden room
lounge.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Prime time meeting — Christmas party and commissioning of project to Guatamuala, noon.
Brock hall 302.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Last general meeting of 1986 — refreshments
and snacks provided, noon, SUB 125.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 215.
William G. Black
MEMORIAL PRIZE
William G. Black Memorial Prize — a
prize in the amount of $1,250 has been
made available by the late Dr. William G.
Black  for an essay on some aspect of
Canadian citizenship. The topic will be
designed   to  attract   students   from   all
disciplines. The competition is open to all
students    who    are    enrolled    in
undergraduate programs and who do not
already   possess  a  graduate  degree.   A
single essay topic of general nature related
to Canadian citizenship will be presented
to students at the time of the competition.
Duration of the competition will be two
hours. Candidates should bring their student card for identification.
Time and Place:
SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1986
BUCHANAN 104
10:00 a.m.-12 noon
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Amagrapi?
Phone now for vour complimen
tary sitting, free 4"x5" color photo,
choose   from   18 previews   iproofs:
732-7446
3343 WEST BROAOWA Y
Resume photos as low as 75c in
colour.
CofrMpc
A POET
A WRITER
A COFFEE
DRINKER
NOW A FRENCH
CAFE
Alma at 5th
732-1454
,' 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Tues.-Thurs.
10a.m.-11 p.m., Fri.-Sun.
FRIDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION OF UBC
Beginners Cantonese conversation dees, noon,
Buch B317.
FILM SOCIETY
Film:  "Ledyhawke",  7 and 9:30 p.m..  SUB
auditorium.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC men play host to Multnomah College. Last
home game. 8:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Speek to your government, club booth,  10
a.m.-3 p.m., SUB lobby.
Feeling treed by the issues? You
are invited to attend a task
force/conference on issues related
to forestry. Sponsored by the B.C.
New Democratic Party, this event
will take place at Douglas College
(8th Street and Royal Ave., New
Westminster) on Dec. 6, 1-5 p.m.
and Dec. 7, 9-5 p.m. For further information, contact Bill Walters at
526-1140.
Reid's Art Materials Ltd.
"everything for the artist"
1U /0 discount for students
Acrylics, Alkyds, Oils, Pastels, Watercolours,
Gift Certificates, Easels, Sets, Framing
5847 Victoria Dr. (at 43rd)
Vancouver V5P 3W5 321-9615
Grand Opening Special
1/3 Off All Salon Services
Priced Right For Everyone
(Kids Welcome Too!)
Call Debbie or Ken
Hair Styling
4384 W. 10th Ave.
224-6434
(Across from Earl's)
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
* passport pictures
• specialty papers
* volume discounts
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th8-9       Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
FASHiONWORKS!
4476 West  Tenth Avenue ■ FOR MEN & WOMEN
SARAH'S
GOURMET
COFFEE   &   TEA
COME AND VISIT US FOR CHERISHED GIFT IDEAS
FROM $9.95 AND UP.
— AT YOUR SERVICE SINCE 1929 —
4441 W. 10th Ave.
(Across from Duthie's)
224-0331
2297 W. 41st Ave.
261-2939
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
738-2024
'THE CLASSIFIEDS^
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; Additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50; Additional lines 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
11
FOR SALE - Private
70 - SERVICES
CALGARY: Return airfare, $134 Dec. 20-30.
Phone 255-8371 evenings.
1 RETURN TICKET to Toronto May 7 to 10.
Then to New York 10 to 19 Vancouver.
Must sell $425 firm. Phone Laurel 467-4734.
Real deal.
20 - HOUSING
ACCOMMODATION is available in the
U.B.C. Student Residences. Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s newest residence facility, is
accepting applications from students who
are 23 years of age by December 31st, 1985
or who are graduate students. Totem Park
and Place Vanier Residences have immediate vacancies for men and women of
any age for room and board accommodation. Come to the Student Housing Office,
2071 West Mall, or phone 228-2811, for
information.
KITS - Wanted mature N/S student to
share deluxe townhouse, cat lover, $375 incl. util. 733-0671 after 5 p.m.
AMIABLE PERSON to share pleasant family
home. Near UBC gates, 1 block from beach
& walks. Pleasant den. Quiet vicinity. $450.
224-0584.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
FEBRUARY 15, 1986 LSAT
on January 21, 25, 26, 1986
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT PREPARATION COURSES.
1-800-387-1262
FORMER LANGUAGE TEACHER wishes to
exchange English conversation/lessons for
French. Tel. James, 734-4128.
30 - JOBS
1986 B. COMMERCE
AMIS GRADUATE
If you are interested in working
in a small but growing office of a
national accounting firm send a
copy of your resume or application for employment to
Peat Marwick
Suite 212-4800 #3 Rd.
Richmond, B.C.
V6X 3A6
Attn. D. Wootton
APPLICATIONS are now being accepted for
a delivery man with some "shop" experience. Aplicants must have a truck or
large car and be able to work two mornings
(4 hrs.) per week. This position is only open
to registered UBC student. Applications
can be picked up and returned to SUB
Room 266.
35 - LOST	
LOST—1 blue "Note-Tote" binder; contains
civil eng. notes; name inside is "Steve
Dent". Very Important! Contact at
224-9706.
70 - SERVICES	
GOT A PROBLEM? NEED TO TALK? Drop
by Speakeasy on SUB Concourse or Ph.
228-3700. Confidential, anonymous.
LICENSED ELECTRICIAN for hire. New installments, rewire and repairs. No job too
small. Phone Maurice, 591-6137.
BIOTECHNOLOGY IDEAS? Possible applications? Investigate with a business plan.
Contact Don 734-7941.
HAVING A PARTY? From Neanderthal
cave stomps to the latest computer chip
cha-cha, CITR can deliver it right to your
next party with its mobile sound system and
the rates are fantastic! Call 228-3017.
DOUBLE DATE
ADVENTUROUS! Discover Doubledate.
You & a
friend, with someone else & a
friend. A
friendly foursome having fun.
Hot Air
Ballooning,  Texas  BBQs,  Boat
Cruises.
736-4444
80 - TUTORING
85 - TYPING
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (Micoml. Theses
rate, $1.50/dbl, sp. pg. Tables & equations
(Chem., Engineering, etc.) at $14/hr.
201-636 W. Broadway. 876-5333 (Jeeva).
WORDPOWER —Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue. 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING: Spelling, grammar
expertise. Days, eves., wkends. Student
rates. Call Nancy 266-1768.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027.
TRI WORD SPECIALISTS-Word processing experts; student rates, pickup &
delivery. 438-0737^
TYPING IBM SEL II. Essays, term papers,
theses, mscpts. $1 per page. 263-4036,
261-7320.
TYPING & W/P: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech. equa., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES
Papers,  letters,  theses & resumes,  day,
evening & weekend. Tel. 872-3263.
EXPERT essay, theses typing from legible
wk. Spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829,
10 a.m.-9 p.m. King Ed. bus rte.
TYPING/WORD PROCESSING. Experienced typist. Reasonable rates. Call
Mari-lou, 421-0818 (near Lougheed Mall).
MY WORD! PROCESSING, on IBM-PC +
(hard drive). 12th Ave. 6- Commercial. Call
Kerry Rigby: 876-2895.
NORTH VANCOUVER. Fast service, carefull
atten. to academic detail, $1.40 dbl. space
page. 985-4929.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Council responsible if Godiva ride goes ahead
By horacio de la cueva
Student Council, as an elected
body of student representatives is
empowered to make financial,
political and economical decisions
on behalf of their constituency.
Besides making this type of decisions they should also be looking
after the image of the student body
in the community.
On the Student Council Meeting
of Nov. 27th the Coalition Against
Sexism on Campus (CASC) presented Council with a motion to
a horse. The so called Godiva Ride.
CASC does not object to a parade
on campus, CASC objects to the
implicit sexisms and violence that
accompany the ride. CASC even
defined what was offensive about
the ride "a scantily clad of naked
woman."
The result of the vote on this motion that would prohibit this
criminal, public nudity is a crime:
five in favour, nine against and IS
(fifteen) abstentions.
Fifteen abstentions and 14 votes,
result: most of the Student Council
representatives at UBC do not have
the guts to make a moral decision
and stop a crime. Their abstinence
in the vote does not solve the problem and does not exempt them
from any responsibility or consequences of the Godiva Ride.
At the time in February when a
woman is paraded naked on a horse
and the engineering students start
their offensive chants against those
of us who will be there to protest
their repugnant act, the Student
Council will be as guilty as the
engineering students of any violence
generated by those in red jackets.
Student Council has the power to
stop a criminal and sexist act and
refuses to use it. Student Council
will be guilty by its inaction.
If Student Council refused to
vote because they do not know how
many people are offended by the
ride, they abstained for the wrong
reason. If an act such as the ride, is
offensive, it should be stopped.
Sexist acts are not defined by a majority ballot. They are sexist and
discriminatory on their own and
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A Variety of Handcrafted,
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Come and Take A Look!
CHOICE DEAL
Book-of-10 Lift Tickets.
Only $200.00 (or $20.00 singly)
until Dec. 6, 1985
Dec. 9-Dec. 30
Only $215.00 (or $21.50 singly)
Available to U.B.C. Students
Only
A.M.S. BOX OFFICE
MAIN CONCOURSE SUB
9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
V,
WHISTLER
MOUNTAIN
should be stopped.
If Student Council members
refused to vote because they are
afraid of what the EUS might or
might not do if the ride is stopped it
means Student Council is not
capable of handling student affairs
and is of no use at all.
If Student Council members
refused to vote because although
they find the ride immoral or offensive but their vote might ruin their
political career they are people with
little   principles   and   hungry   for
power. They cannot be trusted.
Student Council still has the time
and the power to stop this criminal
and sexist event from happening.
Student Council should take a stand
on the issue. Student Council, and
everybody else in the campus, cannot ignore the riede and hope that it
will go away. The Godiva Ride is a
reality of this campus that discriminates against women and it should
be stopped.
horacio de la cueva is a grad student who does not believe in
leaders.
S
SHAMPOO, CUT, BLOWDRY
9.95
3621 W. 4th Ave.
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
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Lower Level
Student Union
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Hours: Mon.-Fri.
8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
Visa Er Mastercharge
Accepted Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1985
Volleybirds slay Vikings
Our third ranked Thunderbird
volleyball team visited McKinnon
gym at the University of Victoria
Saturday night and destroyed the
ninth ranked Vikings in straight
games 15-7, 15-9, 15-7.
The 'Birds totally dominated the
Vikes and quieted a partisan crowd
on their way to raising their Canada
West record to 6-1. Chris Frehlick
led UBC with 18 kills, Han Joo
Eum had nine kills and many
sparkling defensive saves, and
freshman Kelly Bukowski came off
the bench to record five massive
stuff blocks.
"I was especially pleased with
our two veteran co-captains Brad
Willock and Chris Frehlick.
Willock, our setter, made many
great set selections and displayed
excellent leadership during the
match. Frehlick played his best
match of the year and seems to be
rounding into top season form,"
said 'Bird mentor Dale Ohman.
Dave Risso, the Vikings captain led
Victoria with 19 kills.
Next up for the Thunderbirds is
their South Korean tour from
December 20 to Jan. 3.
"We will be playing some of the
best players and teams in volleyball
crazy Korea," said Ohman. "I
think that this competition should
SPORTS
"i
Basketbirds score net loss
Christmas didn't come early for
the UBC varsity men's basketball
team on a trip south of the border.
Friday night UBC lost 81-76 in a
close battle with Southern Oregon
State College. Ken Klassen continued his scoring streak, netting 32
points for the T-Birds.
In their second game UBC kept
within reach of Oregon Tech (tied
43-43 at the half) but didn't hold
on, losing 89-80.
UBC's injured list grew as back
spasms forced Ken Klassen to leave
the game with 15 minutes remaining
in regulation time. Guard Mike
Hodgins suffered a knee injury the
previous weekend and will be out
until the new year.
Paul Johansson was the team's
leading scorer with 32 points.
Klassen still managed to get 21
ponts.
It is not yet known whether
Klassen will be able to play Friday
night when the T-Birds play their
final pre-season home game against
Multnomah College from Southern
Oregon. Game time is 8:30 p.m. at
War Memorial gym.
STUDENT SPECIAL
20% OFF
THE REGULAR PRICES
OF ALL MERCHANDISE
IN THE STORE.
With a copy of this ad
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Big savings on hockey equipment, soccer   boots,   racquets,   running   wear,
sports bags, day packs, etc. etc. etc.
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733-1612
OPEN SUNDA YS NOON TO 5:00 P.M.
raise our team's play to an even
higher level and enable us to
seriously challenge for this year's
CIAU championship."
CANADA WEST STANDINGS
MW ML GW GL Pts
Saskatchewan 6     0   18     1    12
The Ubyssey tries to cover campus sports, paying attention
to all UBC teams. You could help by working towards the currently vacant position of sports editor. If you are interested In
getting Involved in sports and learning the finer points of
writing about athletic events and Issues, drop by SUB 241k
and talk to one of the staffers you might work with. If you
understand grammar and have great piles of enthusiasm,
now Is the time to make impossible time committments for
this Spring.
UBC
6
1
19
8
12
Victoria
2
3
6
9
4
Calgary
2
3
6
9
4
Alberta
1
5
5
15
2
Lethbridge
0
5
1
15
0
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Your Intramural Sports Program, in cooperation with
Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd., is pleased to bring you
"The Grouse Mountain Campus Pass
Buy your ski pass at the Intramural Sports office
before December 20, 1985 and, for $100, you will get:
unlimited day & night skiing from
date of purchase to January 5, 1986
(every day through the holidays!}
unlimited day and night skiing
Fridays to Sundays from
January 6 to season's end
50% off ski ticket prices
Mondays to Thursdays
from January 6 to season's end
This is the best ski pass offer you will find anywhere so, for a frugal
holiday season of unlimited skiing, get your pass early! After
December 20, passes will cost $130 and will be available at Grouse
Mountain only.
Passes available now at:
The UBC Intramural Sports office • Room 66 •
Lower SUB Concourse
Phone 228-6688
Grouse
ITJou^tain .
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