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The Ubyssey Sep 13, 1983

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Array V^i
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI. No. 1
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 13,1983
,;>:»,
228-2301
-debra mitts photo
By
Canadian
University
Press
I
Ctudent loan regulations
designed to save the provincial government about
$8.7 million this year have
created confusion for the
awards office and uncertainty for students, UBC's
awards director said Monday.
"They (the cabinet) didn't think
things through," Byron Hender
said.
Without deciding how to implement changes and on short notice,
the government changed the
minimum course load from 60 to 80
per cent and imposed a minimum 60
per cent average mark requirement
effective in 1983-84.
A new regulation which requires
students to take 80 per cent of full
course load means some students no
longer qualify for a provincial grant
but may still be eligible for a federal
loan, Hender said.
The federal government only requires students to take a 60 per cent
load. But whether or not a student
who needs a grant but doesn't have
the necessary course load can get a
loan instead is up in the air.
The regulation making students
pass nine units with a 60 per cent
average means more confusion, he
said.
"I've heard that the 60 per cent
average might be based on your best
nine units but I would like to see it
in writing first because of the way
See page 18: AID
University doors open
as students feel restraint
By
SARAH
COX
F>
I        for  the first  time  in  its
A' history, UBC may be forced
to run a deficit, says university
president George Pedersen.
The administration will seek official government approval to run a
deficit if the university cannot accommodate a $3.2 million shortfall
in the next seven months, said
Pedersen.
Universities minister Patrick
McGeer has indicated he would
support a deficit if the proposed
faculty salary increases are not included, said Pedersen. Finance
minister Hugh Curtis would also
have to give approval, he said.
But UBC will only run a deficit as
a last resort, Pedersen added.
Limiting enrollment in faculties
such as arts, science and education,
and not hiring replacements for
departing faculty and staff are
measures UBC will almost certainly
take, said Pedersen.
"I suspect we're going to have to
look at some kind of overall limitation of growth on every one of our
academic units," he said.
B.C. is the only province to impose a freeze in university funding
despite an eight per cent increase in
federal funding for post-secondary
education announced in March.
The provincial government is not
required by law to pass on the full
federal contribution.
The announcement of a funding
freeze for B.C. universities (actually
a decrease once inflation is taken into account) came more than four
months after the start of the current
fiscal year.
The Universities Council of B.C.,
an intermediary body between the
province's three universities and the
provincial government, froze UBC's
general operating grant, and
withdrew additional funds received
in the past.
The industrial arts education program is one of the areas in jeopardy. Almost 100 students are enrolled in the program.
Education dean Daniel Birch said
the program has always been funded by additional funding. This year
he was told the program would be
funded through the general
operating budget.
"We didn't receive notice that
the funds would be removed
altogether," he said.
The funding cuts are a question
of government priorities and not
one of fiscal restraint, said Birch.
"There are a lot of things parading
under the umbrella of restraint," he
said.
The education faculty has already
reduced its expenses in every possible way, said Birch. "We haven't
hired our usual two professors from
the school system," he said.
"Faculty leave has been cancelled
and faculty members are squeezing
in extra duties. Students are subjected to large classes."
Birch said the university should
distribute the cuts evenly. The
university should not cut the industrial arts education program just
because the funds for that program
are withdrawn," he said.
The medical faculty has also been
immediately affected by the funding cuts. Enrollment in the faculty
has been steadily increasing over the
years, aiming to eventually accommodate 160 new students each year.
This year the removal of the additional funding has held enrollment
indefinitely at 130 students.
Dean W.C. Webber said it was
understood that the money would
appear in the university's general
operating budget.
"The money has disappeared
from one pocket and not reappeared in the other," he said.
"If it isn't found, we're going to
have to look at things like cutting
staff and possibly faculty.
By
Canadian
University
Press
Jens  of thousands  of would-be
Canadian students face closed
I
doors this September as record numbers apply for post secondary education.
Across the country, institutions
are raising admission standards or
denying financial aid to young people seeking refuge from another
summer of unemployment.
More than one out of four young
Canadians were unable to find full
time work this summer, according
to Statistics Canada. This is an increase of 123 per cent^from two
years ago. .
Thirty-six per cent \>f the people
considered employed were only able
to find part-time employment.
The statistics do not include people who have given up looking for
work and considered others if they
were only paid for one hour of
work a week.
In B.C., the government only
allocated $10 million for their sum
mer Youth Employment Program
which created 534 fewer jobs than
last year, according to figures from
the Canadian Federation of
Students.
But the crisis for young people is
the starkest in Ontario where the
University of Ottawa has rejected
2,000 hopefuls, York University has
turned away 1,400 and Carlton
University has shut its doors to
1,000.
Almost every college and university across Canada is rejecting at
least some students, and most are
dealing with the problem by raising
admission standards. In some
faculties, students with 75 per cent
averages can not get in.
Engineering and computer
science seem to be the hardest-hit
faculties. For instance, 3,126
hopefuls are vying for the 1,200
openings in engineering at the
University of Ottawa, while 1,870
have applied for the university's 150
openings in computer science.
At Trent University, students
who missed school for a year or
more will be rejected, along with
those who did not list Trent as their
first option.
Thousands of students are also
being turned away from colleges
and technical institutes.
Complete enrolment and rejection figures from around the country were not available before the
first week of classes, but the situation is clearly the worst it has ever
been.
i^mmAMx.::.^
■: fcjsi i«fiiiSS6s»<SSd-("i»":
ai'aiSS'K.f'SL Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1983
Council Briefs
Right turn to left
By SARAH COX
Council voted Wednesday to join
The Solidarity Coalition, a broad-
based organization opposed to the
recent budget legislation presented
by the provincial government.
External Affairs co-ordinator
Lisa Hebert said the budget was a
direct attack on education and
would affect everybody at UBC.
The vote to join the coalition was
almost unanimous, with only one
council member opposed.
The student associations at
Simon Fraser University and the
University of Victoria are members
of the coalition, along with the
faculty   associations   of   all   three
B.C. unversities.
* *  *
Council debated purchasing the
land beneath the Whistler cabin for
$75,000. "We have to purchase it in
the next year or so or we'll lose it,"
said Peter Mitchell, the summer
capital project acquisition committee chair.
But some council members said
enough money had already been
spent on the cabin.
"It was only seventh on the
referendum," said rehabilitation
medicine representative Sheila
Howick. "Not many students use
the cabin because they can't afford
it or it's already filled by ski club
members."
Council decided not to purchase
the land until the Whistler Management Committee has been restructured and provisions are made for
loan repayment.
* * *
Plans for a new recreation centre
on campus are underway.
The training complex, which will
include a dance studio and racquet,
weight and circuit facilities, will be
built in stages to minimize costs. It
will be located on the field and
parking lot between War Memorial
gym and SUB.
UBC architects hired through the
work study program will prepare
drawings   and   a   model    for   the
recreation complex.
* * +
Council also voted to make
themselves more accessible to
students.
A stricter definition of the constituency member's duties will ensure
that candidates for council positions are serious about the job and
prepared to work, said Renee Comesotti, Alma Mater Society vice-
president.
Council members are now required to keep a minimum of one
scheduled office hour a week.
Students can meet with council
members during this time to voice
their concerns.
Constituency members are also
required to sit on at least one student council standing committee or
a Presidential Advisory Committee.
Pango Pango (UPS) - Hairy poce
blorgs on this tiny island community today rejoiced at the appearance
once again of the island newspaper,
The Daily Blah.
Island residents were heard to exclaim "Ooga wooga diddy doo
wah," as they raced for copies of
the Blah.
Blah co-editor Bliss Wrong was
asleep after a late production day
and so was unavailable for comment.
FRENCH LANGUAGE
TRAINING
Fall Program All Levels
Registration from now on
Alliance Francaise
Information — Registration
6161 CambieSt
327-0201
"You are invited to spend an
hour with George and Joelle
Emery, dynamic, worldwide
speakers. George and Joelle
have recently returned from
the 10th 'Human Unity Conference' in England and will
consider creative relationships and discoveries at the
transformational forefront."
Fri. Sept. 16th '83, 12:30 p.m.
BUCHA 202.
AMS CONCERTS PRESENTS
SHOWCASE WEEKEND
French Letters Rubber Biscuit
Fri. Sept 16, 8 p.m. Sat. Sept 17, 8 p.m.
SUB Ballroom SUB Ballroom
with SPECIAL GUESTS
ADVANCE TICKETS $3
Available at AMS Box Office
ALL AGES WELCOME
Social Coordinator see Bruce Paisley in SUB rm. 230A
about tickets for this event.
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STUDENT BODY SPECIALS:
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CUT YOUR
GROCERY
COST
5%
DISCOUNT
Show your 1983-84 student card and receive a
5% discount on your grocery purchases
(minimum $30.00 purchase)
Get the details at SuperValu
3250 West Broadway (this store only)
NOW OPEN SUNDAYS
10:00 to 6:00 Tuesday, September 13,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Enrolment up 6 per cent
By PATTI FLATHER
Enrolment is up and more than
ever. Standing-room-only classes,
evening labs, mixed-up timetables,
lineups and hordes of people are all
realities at UBC this year.
UBC enrolment is expected to
total 26,950 this year, a six per cent
increase over last year.
By Friday 21,974 day-time
students had registered. That is
1,456 more students than last year
and a 7.1 per cent increase, said
registrar Ken Young.
"It takes a lot to handle even a
one per cent increase," Young said.
Graduate students are still
registering this week and Young
predicted a total of 2,800 students.
Young said 690 evening students
are enrolled and "we expect an additional 1,400 or so."
It appears the faculties of aits
and sciences have had significant
enrolment, Young added. "1
understand many of the departments had to close courses," he
said.
The faculty of science is having
difficulty finding lab space for all
its students. "We've got a lot of
overloaded courses," said Dean Cy
Finnegan. "I don't know when
we'll have a solution, if any."
He said the faculty is not permitted to create new labs.
Faculty of arts dean Robert Will
would not comment on enrolment
until the late registration figures are
in. But he said "It's very unlikely
we'll be able to respond the way we
should if the number of students is
up."
More arts sections cannot be
created without additional resources, Will said.
Political science professor Lynda
Erickson, whose Canadian Politics
200 class spilled out into the hall,
said, "I'm going to have to cut off
enrolments. Depending on what we
can get for TAs we can't give as
many assignments, either." And
Erickson's section is not the largest.
One-third of the English 100 sections have been increased from 27
to   29  to   accomodate   200  extra
students, English department head
Ian Ross said. Enrolment was also
heavy in higher level English
courses.
In graduate studies, enrolment is
up as well and the acceptance rate is
up ten per cent from last year, said
dean Peter Larkin. Coping with
more students will not be a major
problem in graduate studies, he added.
Tighter enrolment_ standards in
the future -are a real possibility.
"There are certainly going to be
discussions in the next few months
on how to control enrolment,"
Young said. Discussions will likely
concentrate on the faculties of arts,
sciences, and education.
Tenure alive
but worrisome
, ^Spw'■'N&,'
CANADARM LIFTS SATELLITE out of heavily forested cargo bay of
space shuttle which brings professors back from their summer resting
place in high orbit. Special surveillance satellite searches with infrared
photo by neil lucvnta
scanners for sources of frothy amber liquids held near and dear to the
hearts of UBC engineers. Ground receiving station is heavily disguised
under occasionally red and white monolith on Main Mall.
Diseased UBC printer dies in sieep
By CHRIS WONG
A former UBC Alumni Association employee who was planning to
sue the association for $5 million,
died in her sleep Sept. 5.
Fifty-four year old Jacqueline
Ellam had throat cancer at the time
of her death. She was a printer for
the Alumni Association for 15
years.
In an interview Aug. 29, Ellam
charged fumes from printing
chemicals and poor ventilation at
her work area caused her illness.
Recommendations from the
Worker's Compensation Board to
her employer were ignored, Ellam
said.
She was planning to sue the
association on these grounds. Ellam
said the amount she chose was not
too steep. "For one person's life I
don't think that's too much. I'd
win in a minute."
Alumni Association director
Peter Jones, the main person Ellam
was planning to name in her suit,
denied the charges.
"I spent many hours on the
phone with Mrs. Ellam. I've never
refused her an appointment," he
said.
Jones said he was "terribly
sorry" about her death but there is
no evidence to suggest the Alumni
Association must shoulder some of
the blame, he said.
Ellam had no grounds for a legal
suit and she made no complaints
about the working conditions during her time of employment, he
said. "I don't think the working
conditions were that bad. We never
had any complaints in any way,
shape, or form."
The room where Ellam worked is
in the basement of Cecil Green Park
were the association has its offices.
Jones gave The Ubyssey a tour of
the area, which is now used for
storage. He admitted the windows
are high up and hard to reach. "But
anyone could have opened them,"
he said.
Ellam said she was laid, off
without cause before she became ill.
Pension money owed to her has still
not been paid, she said.
But Jones said a final settlement
was made, to Ellam. "We are ICO
per cent sure that we lived up to our
responsibilities in terms of financial
reimbursements," he said.
Economic reasons forced her
position to be terminated, he said.
The amount of work didn't justify
employing a full-time printer, said
Jones.
Because of her long years of service, Ellam was given six months
notice and assistance to find
another job, Jones said. "Ai that
time she was perfectly satisfied," he
said.   "I'm   really   sorry   for   one
reason or another she became bitter
when she left."
Ellam charged that instead of finding a replacement for her the
association had the work done in
Winnipeg at increased costs. But
Jones said the UBC Chronicle, the
association's main publication, has
always been printed in Winnipeg.
The brochures Ellam formerly produced are now printed by outside
he
firms for greatly reduced costs
said.
She met with administration
president George Pedersen Aug. 29
to voice her concerns. Ellam said
Pedersen refused to commit himself
to any action on her behalf. She was
forced to seek help from Pedersen
because her inquiries to former
president Doug Kenny and to the
Alumni Association were ignored.
By NEIL LUCENTE
& MURIEL DRAAISMA
Faculty representatives believe
tenure for professors still exists,
although they are worried about the
provincial government's proposed
intervention into university affairs.
"Tenure is alive and well at
UBC," said Dennis Pavlich, UBC
faculty association president.
"Nothing has changed. As far as
we know, the provincial government is making further changes to
Bill 3," said the association's executive officer Andrew Brockett,
referring to the fact that the Public
Sector Restraint Act is not yet law.
In early August, provincial
secretary Jim Chabot announced
the government will remove the
contentious clause which says
public sector employees, including
tenured professors, can be "fired
without cause". This would have
abolished tenure and seriously
jeopardized academic freedom.
The legislation still intrudes on
contractual agreements made between the faculty and the university,
said Pavlich in an earlier interview,
citing the proposed changes which
allows professors to be fired
"where the employer has insufficient funds or where there is a
reduction or elimination of specific
programs or a shortage of work."
Pavlich said the bill "makes a
mockery" of these agreements, but
added that his statements were
made from a purely personal point
of view.
And university administrators are
suspicious of the bill's regulations,
soon to be released.
UBC vice-president academic
Robert Smith said he is "doubtful"
the regulations will ease professors'
fears. The Bill's regulations can be
changed at the government's whim
without debate or a vote in the legislature, he said.
"I can only hope that any new
regulations will guide us more
specifically because Bill 3 in its present form is much too vague and
impairs our ability to secure permanent agreements," Pavlich said.
Students pay for AMS jobs
By ROBBY ROBERTSON
While many students searched vainly for full-time
work this summer, the five executive members of the
Alma Mater Society were hired by student council to
work on student issues.
Funding for the $1,650 a month summer jobs came
from last year's AMS student fees. Vice-president
Renee Comessotti, external affairs coordinator Lisa
Hebert, director of administration Alan Pinkney,
president Mitch Hetman, and director of finance
James Hollis were the people employed.
Students' funds were used appropriately by student council, said Comessotti. "I think students got
their money's worth," she said.
The employees established a student-run used
book store, wrote an economic feasibility report on
the possibility of building a Gage low rise, and lobbied for government action on inadequate student
aid, unemployment, and the declining quality of
post-secondary education in B.C.
The used book store is a project initiated by Com
essotti. It is located in Home Economics room 112
until Sept. 19.
"It's more impressive than it looks," Comessotti
said.
The possibility of a year-round bookstore is being
looked at, she added.
The main part of her job was "dealing with day to
day crises", said Comessotti.
Hebert was hired for the first two months of the
summer and spent most of her time organizing press
conferences, writing leaflets, and meeting with
government officials to coax government action on
issues such as student aid.
Two press conferences in conjunction with the
Canadian Federation of Students and Simon Fraser
University also spotlighted the issues of unemployment and student aid in the commercial press, said
Hebert.
Hetman initiated the plans for the Gage low rise
housing project during his employment. An
See page 11: REARRANGED Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1983
AMS concert hopes dim
By CHRIS WONG
Bruce Paisley, Alma Mater Society programs coordinator, is in the
dark over what caused the power
failures at the Sept. 5 Animals concert in War Memorial gym.
The power went out after the
band's fourth song, leaving the
sold-out gym in darkness for about
45 minutes. More failures occurred
later in the show, forcing the band
to perform without their elaborate
lighting equipment.
Paisley has no explanation for
the power failures but said the
band's equipment was not the
cause. "The band is not going to be
blamed for it."
But physical plant director
Neville Smith said the band's equipment might have triggered the
failures. "We've had nothing (no
failures) before or since," he said.
"If we find no problem we have
to conclude it was the user's equipment." Smith said.
A physical plant  mechanic was
sent to the gym when the first
failure occurred, Smith said. An
outside electrician had to be called
in after the problem persisted, he
added.
Paisley said he could not understand why an unqualified person was
sent to deal with the first failure.
Smith said the mechanic was the only one available on campus at the
time.
Power was knocked out across
campus for two hours the previous
day after a tree fell on power lines.
Smith said the power failures at the
concert were completely separate. A
full investigation is being conducted, he said.
Some complaints have been
registered by members of the audience, Paisley said. "We've had an
enormous amount of phone calls."
He said concert-goers were still
demanding refunds despite attending the whole show. No decision
has been made on refunds, he added.
Nice loop, horrible rain
UBC's new $270,000 bus loop
will leave students standing out in
the rain.
The completed B.C. Transit
capital project, located at the corner of University Boulevard and
East Mall, can accomodate up to 15
buses — but it has no rain shelters.
But the new loop provides the
larger turning radius for trolley
buses if a decision is made to extend
trolley wires into the campus.
A random survey by The Ubyssey
showed most students are in favor
of the loop, despite the lack of rain
shelters.
AMS ANNUAL BBQ PRESENTS
TACKY TOURIST
TAILGATE PARTY
4 p.m. September 16th
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM PLAZA
ROASTED PIG DINNER
$3.50 advanced AMS box office
$5.00 at door if available
FEATURING: President Pederson — over the coals
Sgt. Lucko — top cop
ENTERTAINMENT BY: Out Riggers Polynesian Dancers
Refreshments available
Followed by UBC WIFL Football'
UBC vs U of Calgary
Contest for Tackiest Tourist
€&y\ read, <5om^vuKe*'^^
•Hvat Cdv\*kA.\drv£ eat \S
out KioTV, 'btur^ev6 a d&u!
ike best   Kara btur^eh 'irv,
C&ir\2>cL& &*d SoLL-ii. -for
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of ax*Jr*e~<.
43V1   We«,+Ten+k Av/eAiA^    2ZZH34Z
CMls place
The band was only slightly perturbed when the power went out for
the fourth time, said Paisley. The
Animals may even make a return
engagement at UBC in November,
he said.
AMS concerts will be affected
most by the incident, he said.
"When you have mistakes like that,
it hurts, it hurts our reputation very
bad."
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Hairy
puce blorgs working on the island
newspaper despaired today when
told to write a filler about island
promoter Spruce Laisley. Blorgs
complained Spruce wouldn't fit into one column inch.
BRAD MARTIN
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Tel: 228-9414
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Alteration & Repairs
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• Well equipped Plant
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DISCOUNT VALID WITH INCOMING ORDERS ONLY.
NOT VALID WITH OTHER SPECIALS Tuesday, September 13, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Quebec students blue over bill 32
By VICTOR WONG
Student societies in Quebec are
beginning the year in a state of confusion as the provincial government
attempts to determine their status.
In June the Quebec government
passed Bill 32, a contentious piece
of legislation requiring student
societies to be accredited by 25 per
cent of their population.
The accreditation process requires the societies to hold referen-
dums to determine if they represent
the interests of students on their
campus. An appointee of the
education ministry must supervise
the referendum and a five person
board representing the other
associations in Quebec must
validate the results.
The confusion lies in the bill's
wording. Not all student societies
require accreditation, and criteria
for exemption are not clearly defined. And according to Quebec's
education minister Camille Laurin,
the bill also makes provisions for
departmental, faculty, part-time
and graduate associations to be accredited.
Student societies across Quebec
are outraged by the bill and have
sent letters to Laurin, Quebec's
Liberal party leader Claude Ryan
and other provincial MPs demanding its repeal.
"This will cause a civil war on the
Concordia, McGill, Sherbrooke
and the University of Quebec de
Montreal campuses," reads a letter
issued by the Association Nationale
des Etudiants de Quebec, one of
Quebec's   two   provincial   student
associations which represents about
80 per cent of Quebec's students.
When the bill was introduced, the
Quebec government only notified
ANEQ and RAOUL, the other provincial student association which is
government sponsored and
represents only a few campuses.
ANEQ immediately notified the
other student unions in the province, and began to organize a letter
writing campaign.
A delegation from Concordia's
student society, along with other
student representatives, testified at
a parliamentary commission studying bill 32. They charged that the
bill would "allow the government
to intercede in student politics and
violate the independence of existing
student governments."
Student societies are also attempting to make the new law a major
campaign issue in Quebec's next
provincial election. And they are
uncertain about observing the new
law, according to Susan Murray,
president of Concordia's graduate
student society. In a show of support, UBC's Alma Mater Society
passed a motion in late June condemning the bill.
"It could happen to us," said
AMS external affairs coordinator
Lisa Hebert.
"Universities minister Pat
McGeer is talking~"about making
fees voluntary and (Premier BiYif
Bennett is talking about right-to-
work legislation. Of course, we're
not the kind of union that Bennett
is after, but he may decide to do
something like this," she said.
Murray send a letter thanking the
AMS for its support and expressing
surprise at its familiarity with the
bill. "We haven't heard from
anyone else, only UBC. I'm surprised you're so concerned," she said in
a telephone interview.
Work study in
no trouble now
About 300 needy students had
their first opportunity yesterday to
apply for positions offered through
this year's work study program.
The program was in jeopardy
earlier this year before a presidential committee gave work study
$75,000 from unallocated funds. In
addition $100,000 has been
transferred from bursary funds.
Work study administrator Sheila
Summers said an additional
$145,000 should be available
through the provincial government.
Work study is a program for
students who qualify for student
assistance beyond the maximum
amount available. Students work in
various university departments for
union wages and do everything from
filing to computer programming.
Summers anticipates that like last
year, the first year of the program,
about 400 jobs will be filled by
students. She said about 900 jobs
were proposed by different university departments but limited funds
prevented work study from offering
many placements.
"We'll just find jobs for students
until the funds run dry," she said.
Jan Crawford, education 4 was
among the students studying the
positions posted in Brock Hall
yesterday. "The program promises
valuable work experience ir; addition to money I urgently need," she
said.
An awards office employee said
eligible students will receive their
authorization forms in the mail this
week.
New group plans
to protest budget
The recently formed UBC campus Community Alliance has set
Oct. 6 as the date for its first public-
protest against the Social Credit
budget.
CCA members will be
distributing leaflets and information bulletins up to the day of the
rally, tentatively scheduled for
12:30 p.m. at the Sedgewick Plaza
or in the War Memorial gym in case
of rain.
The CCA is a coalition of 12
campus unions, student associations and other university organizations.
According to Fairleigh Wettig,
acting CCA treasurer, the group is
dedicated to the repeal of all budget
legislation introduced July 7.
The CCA is circulating a petition
calling for such a repeal. The petition was initiated by the Solidarity
Coalition, a province-wide
organization of groups against the
budget.
The Alma Mater Society officially joined the alliance Wednesday
after a vote in student council.
"Students are a diverse group and
will be affected by many aspects of
the Socred legislation," said Lisa
Hebert, AMS external affairs coordinator.
She said students will be particularly affected by the elimination
of rent controls and the limited
funds allocated for education.
Faculty association president
Dennis Pavelich said the association
may endorse the CCA rally but they
are not willing to join the CCA at
the present. Pavelich said they are
concentrating their efforts with
Operation    Solidarity    and    the
Solidarity Coalition.
A budget coalition has also been
formed at SFU. The group is planning a Sept. 22 rally. UBC and SFU
groups held a joint meeting Friday
to coordinate their actions and elect
a joint representative to sit on the
Solidarity Coalition steering committee.
photo by nail lucente
SPINNING DISCS BACKWARDS, satanic madman plays messages to sheeplike students of SUB Plaza (Red
Square) as flies gather round. Working for Devilish organization RTIC, madman plays all time fave backward
lyrics like "Satan makes good quiche" and "Lets all get drunk, go naked, smear ourselves with Kaopectate and
lie in a pile."
Women urge general strike to defeat budget
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
The Social Credit government is
trying to force women to remain in
the home and to be dependent on
men, a childcare worker said
Wednesday.
The government's sweeping attack on social services in B.C. has
placed the economic burden of
domesticity and child raising back
on women, Ruth Annis told 200
people attending a public forum on
women against the budget.
"Women and children are being
driven further and further into
poverty. Women are going under."
she said as the mostly female audience murmured in agreement.
The B.C. government has cut
funding for government sponsored
treatment centres for sexually abused children, and axed emergency
homemakers, family support
workers and post partum counselling in a bid to return to the days
when the church and the nuclear
family took care of everything, Annis said.
"It's not an accident that women
are the main attack of the budget
and its accompanying legislation,"
she said, referring to the fact that
several feminist services such as the
women's health collective and
Transition House have had their
funding severely slashed.
"Feminist services are more than
just social services. They politicise
women," she added.
To win back their hard earned
rights, women must organize other
women   and   press   the   Solidarity
Coalition to use the "ultimate
weapon" against the Social Credit
party — "a general strike."
The highly enthusiastic audience
cheered and applauded. But during
the discussion period following An-
nis's speech, a woman representing
the nurses union warned against using the term "general strike" loosely.
"We can't have a general strike
until we have every woman behind
us. When we do, we will succeed,'
she said as the crowd broke out into
cheers again.
She suggested that everyone in
the room should talk to their
neighbours who had Socred signs
on their lawns during the recent
election, and try to win their support against the budget.
Other speakers criticised the
government for its attack on education, health and consumer services.
Tuition fees on the rise
UBC tuition fees are up five per cent this year but
the situation could be worse.
At Langara fees are up 50 per cent.
And while students were off campus this summer,
The University of Victoria and Simon Fraser increased fees 14.8 per cent and 10.3 per cent respectively.
A year of full-time first year arts will cost $931 at
UBC including the $44 AMS fee which students
voted to increase by $20 last fall.
Simon Fraser first year arts or science fees are $960
plus an additional $54 for AMS and athletic fees. A
UVic the fees are $945 without student and athletic
fees.
But the lower fees at UBC may not continue for
much longer.
Administration president George Pedersen says the
three universities should have the same fee structure.
Tuition fees in B.C. are among the least expensive
anywhere, said Pedersen, indicating students should
expect an increase for next year.
B.C.'s universities should discuss what proportion
of the budget should be born by students and should
ensure an adequate financial aid program, he said.
Last year fees accounted for 11.3 per cent of
UBC's operating revenue.
The highest fees at UBC, nearly 1,600, are in
medicine and dentistry.
First year arts or science fees at Langara, while up
50 per cent, are only $600 plus a $40 student fee. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1983
Gov't intervenes on deficit
TORONTO (CUP) — A bill to
prevent Ontario universities from
running yearly deficits of more than
two per cent of their annual revenue
was given second reading by a committee of the pTovincial legislature
Rere last week.
Described by oppostition critics
as a "massive intervention" by the
government in the affairs of
autonomous institutions, the bill, if
passed, will give the Ontario
ministry of colleges and universities
sweeping powers to audit university
books and to take control of a
university's finances if it is deemed
necessary.
Bette Stephenson, Ontario's
minister of education, said the bill
will give the government the
authority to investigate a
university's finances if the school
runs a deficit of more than two per
cent per year.
If, after such an investigation,
the institution is found to be in
serious financial difficulty, the
ministry could then take control of
the school's finances by appointing
a supervisor who would assume the
responsibilities of the university's
board of governors and president.
The supervisor would then work
with the governing body and president to reduce the school's deficit.
If these co-operative efforts fail,
however, the supervisor would have
the power to take full control of the
institution's finances.
The proposed legislation states
the university supervisor "may request the governing body and the
chief executive officer of the university to do any act that they have the
authority to do, and may do the act
on their behalf if they fail to comply
with his request."
Stephenson said a university
supervisor would not interfere in
the    "purely   academic,    non-
financial matters" of an institution.
"The appointment (of a supervisor)
would be made only in order to prevent financial insolvency," she
said.
Stephenson told the standing
committee on social development
she believes the anti-deficit legislation will prevent universities from
responding to financial restraint by
spending more than their yearly
revenue allows.
She said the proposed law will
help universities by ensuring "they
are not jeopardized by the accumulation of unmanageable
deficits."
Reaction to the proposed legislation has ranged from reluctant acceptance to outright rejection.
"We don't especially want it, but
we can live with it;" Alvin Lee,
president of McMaster University
in Hamilton and chairperson of the
Council of Ontario Universities,
told the committee.
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Bill usurps College control
Proposed amendments to B.C.'s
College and Institute Act that
eliminate community involvement
will dangerously concentrate power
in the education ministry, local
academics charge.
But education minister Jack
Heinrich claims the revisions are
needed to "streamline and improve
the delivery of education in B.C."
He describes the present college administration system in B.C. as "a
fat cat (which) just sits around in
the sunshine getting fatter, waiting
to be fed its next meal."
Bill 20 of the Social Credit
restraint package would abolish the
three management councils which
have provided community input into college funding decisions. The
education ministry would also gain
control over courses or programs
offered, currently the college
boards' prerogative, and cabinet
would appoint all board members.
(The ministry now appoints 50 per
cent plus one of all members; the
rest are community and jurisdictional representatives.)
Academics charge that the new
laws would mark the end of an era
for community colleges. "The
legislation    . . .    makes    colleges
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Adds association president Ralph
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SEPT  30th Tuesday, September 13, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
George Pedersen:
SBC's Ugh profile
president grapples
with budget
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Sitting in his spacious presidential office, George
Pedersen looks a little weary. UBC is faced with a $3.2
million budget shortfall, and as the new administration
president, he must find ways to come up with the money.
Pedersen, who assumed office only two months ago, admits the budget problem is tiring him out. But with a wide
grin and down-to-earth approach, he tries to maintain a
youthful enthusiasm for the job.
One solution Pedersen has pondered is a
deficit budget, but UBC cannot do so legally
without the approval of the universities and
finance ministers, he says.
"It's not at all clear they would approve of
us going into a deficit position. Certainly
they would not approve if there were any
salary increases, as proposed."
A spokesperson for the Universities Council of B.C., a mediating body between the
three B.C. universities and the government,
has said the president could be sent to jail if
UBC runs a deficit. Pedersen laughs when he
hears this.
"Well, it might be a more comfortable
place to be." Fewer meetings and less
pressure, he adds.
But Pedersen says the administration
prefers not to run a deficit because it would
only defer the funding problem. "You've got
to deal with it eventually because nobody's
going to excuse it. Otherwise we'd all be doing it."
The $3.2 million shortfall includes a $1.1
million liability arising from faculty increases
awarded last year, but doesn't take into account salary increases for teaching and support staff, inflation and the introduction of
new programs.
The provincial government has indicated it
will freeze university funding for the next
three to five years, and Pedersen warns that
UBC will have to take a hard look at possible
reductions of faculty and students.
"It's a fairly formidable problem because I
find it hard to imagine not granting any
salary increases to our employees over a three
to five year period. So it may well be that if
we're going to scale down the size of UBC —
put limitations of the number of students —
we may have to reduce the number of
employees in the place overall."
Enrolment in the arts, science and education   faculties   will   have   to   be   limited,
Pedersen says. "Those are the big ones where
we don't have any means of controlling
growth and where we have to figure out how
to handle that logistically."
And he says he would be "terribly surprised" if UBC's board of governors does not
seriously consider raising tuition fees this
vear.
Socreds
tell UBC
administration
to get house
in order
Like a cagey diplomat, Pedersen carefully
avoids criticising the provincial government
for its failure to pass on an eight per cent increase in federal funding for post-secondary
education. Instead, he begins to talk about
financial support from the private sector.
"The difficulty with private giving is that
it's usually one time only and doesn't help
you with a recurring budget problem. But I
think the university will have to make serious
efforts in this regard."
The board of governors recently approved
a position of vice-president of development
and university relations to beef up UBC's
contact with the outside world, Pedersen
says. He intends to draft the position's terms
of reference soon and to find a suitable candidate for the job.
And the administration will have to engage
in long term planning to ensure the 1984-85
budget will balance, he adds.
"The provincial government has made it
clear that we better get our house in order
because next year's funding will also be flat.
The expectation is it's going to be like that
for three to five years . . . Universities are
going to have to plan as they never had to do
before."
UBC has taken the initiative in this area by
starting a committee to develop
"efficiencies" in the university system. Each
of B.C.'s three universities are participants in
the process and will be asked for advice
about removing "redundancies" in the
system.
Pedersen defines "redundancies" as
departments which are available in at least
two B.C. universities and which have low
enrolment and low.productivity in research.
But he says assuringly: "There are some
basic liberal arts and science areas that are
common to any university or you can't even
remotely begin to call it a university."
Slumping in his orange plush chair, he
takes another sip of his coffee and sighs. He
says he finds himself speaking pessimistically
"a lot these days." "All your interviews are
about your problems and you don't have
enough time to talk about the positive things.
It's a bit morale destroying ..."
Concerned about the lack of student input
into university affairs and the little communication between students and the administration, Pedersen has set up weekly
meet-the-president sessions. Students and
faculty will be able to "bend his ear" for 90
minutes at the "Pedersen exchange" on most
Mondays.
Unlike   his   predecessor,   Doug   Kenny,
photo by n.j.d.
Pedersen likes to give the impression of running an open administration. Although he
plans to keep an open line to the media this
year and to encourage students to participate
in the Pedersen exchange, he realizes the
university's bureaucratic structure often
shrouds the administration.
"I like people to feel there is at least some
opportunity to talk to the president. But I
have no illusions about how major the
Pedersen exchange is as a communication
mechanism. I know it's very limited in that
regard."
When the president leaves the university
after a day's work, which sometimes begins at
6:30 in the morning and ends at midnight, he
goes home to a luxurious mansion nestled on
Northwest Marine Drive. The university has
donated $200,000 for its renovations while
another $300,000 is being solicited from
private contributors.
"We moved in the midst of it sort of half
completed, so it's still got an awful lot of
work. We've been charging around and so
on, and we've got a lot of boxes all over —
the usual chaos that goes with the move."
The lower part of the house, designed for
entertaining of the university's elite and other
V.I.P.s, is only partially finished, Pedersen
says. It won't be ready for parties until
November, he adds.
The president says he hasn't considered
having students over for tea, (a March survey
conducted by The Ubyssey indicated
students favoured the idea) and he laughs at
the thought. But he says a variety of
members of the university community will
use the facilities.
"It's a lovely home and a gorgeous location, I'm sure we'll enjoy living there once
things get a little calmer," he says. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13,1983
UBC reinvests in Noranda
By SARAH COX
Five years after selling their controversial Noranda Mine stocks,
UBC has quietly reinvested in the
company.
A major supporter of the Chilean
military government, Noranda
Mines moved into the country after
the democratically elected government was overthrown in 1973.
Dictator Augusto Pinochet
assured the company massive profits when he promised to keep
Chile's trade unions in line, said
George Hermanson, university
chaplain and a former member of
Project Chile.
Project Chile, a coalition of
groups which drew public attention
to UBC's Noranda investments in
1978, felt Canadians should not
support a company helping to prop
up a brutal regime, said Herman-
son.
Pinochet instituted a monetary
policy which increased the poverty
level by freezing wages, Hermanson
said. This made the country more
appealing to corporations like
Noranda Mines.
"Noranda was about to hire its
workers at a very cheap rate
because of wage control," he said.
Thirty thousand Chileans have
been killed and many more tortured
or forced to flee the country since
the military coup, said Hermanson.
"That repression continues. There
is still a right wing military government."
UBC finally withdrew from
Noranda in 1978, after pressure
from Project Chile and a petition to
UBC's board of governors, Hermanson said.
"I was told by senior people
within the university that as a direct
result of the public pressure, the
university eventually sold its shares
in Noranda."
But Alan Baxter, UBC's administration vice-president of finance,
denied the university sold its shares
because of the protests.
"We certainly didn't sell as a
result of that petition," he said.
As a trustee of money, the board
is only concerned that the money be
invested where it can bring a maximum rate of return, said Baxter.
"To do otherwise is irresponsible," he said. "The investment
committee does not review where a
company may be operating."
But, the board agreed to
acknowlege the problems in Chile
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and even wrote to Noranda to express its concerns, said Baxter.
This year, UBC bought 20,000
shares in Noranda Mines to increase
their exposure in the mining industry, Baxter said. "There was no
reference at all to Chile," he said.
Hermanson said the recent
aquisitions, worth $535,000, is tacit
approval for Noranda's exploitative
practices.
No ethical businessperson invests
purely for profit motives, he said.
"The university's investment
policy should reflect the highest
values that a society should attain
because that is the nature of the
university."
Some of the most prestigious universities in the United States have
established investment policies,
Hermanson said.
Other Canadian universities are
also reviewing their investment
policies. The students at Queen's
university voted in a March referendum to divest from South Africa
because of the country's policy of
apartheid. But, Queen's board of
trustees has stalled divestment and
another referendum is expected to
take place this fall.
"Given that Queen's and other
universities have responded to
public pressure and have made
changes in their investment policies,
one would hope that would the the
case at UBC," said Hermanson.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Martial law regime
restricted freedom
Wojciech Marek's internment
began on Jan. 7, 1982 with a single
document marked: "decision
number        263, regarding
internment." The document summarized the reason for Marek's loss
of freedom in a few sentences.
Marek, a teacher at the medical
school in Wroclaw, "would
threaten security of state and public
order because of his activity which
during the state of war threatens increasing social tensions on the basis
of act 42, Decree of Dec. 12, 1981
on the protection of security of
state and public order after the imposition of martial law."
With this one page statement the
militia were instructed to intern
Marek and place him in the "isolation centre," otherwise known as
Wroclaw Penitentiary.
Internment notices like this were
issued to more than 200 academics
between Dec. 1981 and Jan. 1982 in
Poland, according to a lengthy
report recently completed by UBC
Slavonic studies head Bogdan
Czaykowski. The report draws on a
variety of Polish publications and
examines the effects of martial law
on Polish universities.
Czaykowski says significant
reforms were achieved in Polish
universities prior to the Dec. 12,
1981 declaration of martial law. An
agreement struck at Lodz University in Feb., 1981 outlined the
reforms. It called for ruling
authorities to concede a number of
demands, including academic
self-government, the abolition of
compulsory courses such as
Marxism-Leninism and Russian,
and a ban on all activity of the
secret police within academic institutions.
The Lodz agreement gave "a
degree of official approval" to
other reform developments,
Czaykowski says. One of the more
important reforms was the
liberalization of censorship laws
concerning scholarly publications,
he says. This reform was embodied
in a July, 1981 parliamentary act.
Jerzy Wiatr, a professor from
Warsaw University who taught two
courses   at    UBC   this    summer,
defends censorship and says it is
necessary for protection of "state
interests."
"There are secrets concerned
with vital security interests of the
state," he said in a July interview
with The Ubyssey.
"Through censorship the government intends to exclude from public
life the expressions of total rejection of the system, and in this sense
make the media compatible with the
general guidelines of government
policy," Wiatr says.
Czaykowski notes the importance
of the Solidarity trade union as a
force behind these reforms. "It was
precisely the alliance and cooperation between workers and intellectuals that gave the movement of
reform in Poland its strength and
substance."
But all of the advances for
academic freedom were quickly and
effectively cut short when martial
law was declared.
The first measure taken was the
closure of all institutions of higher
learning, lasting in some cases until
Feb. 1982, says Czaykowski.
Suspensions of all professional and
student associations, and dissolution of the Independent Student
Union followed the closures, he
says.
"The union got involved openly
and explicitly in political activities
which are incompatible with the
constitution," Wiatr said. "They
attacked the foundationof the con
stitution and refused to change their
line."
In return for their attempts at exercising academic freedom, many
students and academics were detained and interned during the initial period following martial law.
"In short the internees constituted a
significant number of those
academics who had been ir the
forefront of autonomous intellectual life," Czaykowski says. The
students interned were mainly executive members and activists of the
Independent Student Union, he
says.
Reaction to these measures from
the academic community was
restrained, Czaykowski says. "On
the whole, rectors and senior faculty tried to calm their junior colleagues and students in the hope of
weathering the storm as well as
possible, and protecting their institutions, faculty and students
from reprisals."
But protests took place at a
number of institutions. They were
quickly and often brutally suppressed by riot police, Czaykowski says.
Arrests and several dozen trials
followed closely behind these public
displays of defiance.
Other members of the academic
community either resigned or were
dismissed. Wiatr said about one-
third of the rectors of Polish universities were put into this position
because of the controversy over the
government policies under martial
law. "Some university rectors
found it impossible to function
within the context of martial law in
Poland in the way the government
considered acceptable," he says.
The dismissals, coupled with the
growing atmosphere of suspicion
and fear created by the infiltration
of security police, had an effect on
the academic community's attitude
toward    resistance,    Czaykowski
says.
"By April, 1982 it became clear
that a substantial segment of the
academic community was beginning, after the initial shock and
uncertainty as to the real motives
and objectives of the Jaruzelski
regime, to reintegrate itself in opposition to policies that were obviously aimed far beyond the mere
averting of anarchy and civil war, as
the authorities had originally claimed," he says.
The academic community
displayed their resistance in full
force during the verification campaigns, aimed against faculties, that
went into motion by May, 1982.
The decision by the minister of
higher education to begin a "review
and evaluation of faculty" was
meant to intimidate the academic
community and provide grounds
for firing active Solidarity supporters in the university,
Czaykowski charges. "The review
was meant to raise the spectre of a
purge."
Wiatr disagrees. "As I
remember, what the universities
were doing was a review of junior
faculty from the point of view of
academic performance. The review
was not aimed at firing people for
their political positions.
"And I would not call it a campaign. It was a normal standard
procedure that was carried out in
the past regularly. It gave the
universities the possibility to know
better what is the performance of
the junior staff."
Czaykowski said the review was
unprecedented and initially aimed
at both junior and senior faculty
Only junior faculty were subjected
to it after resistance became too
strong from the academic community, he says. Slightly more than
Illustrated by Polish artist Jan Sawka
10 per cent of teachers lost their
jobs as a result of the review, he
adds.
At a meeting with rectors,
February, 1982, a representative of
the higher education ministry admitted the results of the verification
campaign were unsatisfactory. "We
did not achieve the desired internal
stabilization of institutions of
higher learning as a result of the
1982 verification or their full participation in the task of carrying out
the policies of the state," the
ministry representative said.
The academics resisted the campaign through several forms of opposition.They branded the review illegal and accused authorities of fak-
ing    democratic    procedures,
WIATR- J9i
Inside a small classroom in the Buchanan building,
fourteen summer students await a lecture on political
thought. The walls of the classroom are bare except
for one poster at the front which reads Defend our
unions — Solidarnosc — East and West.
In walks the professor — a heavy-set man dressed
in a green pastel suit. He shuffles his papers and announces the topic of the day: absolutism and the
power of the king. The students jot down notes as the
professor talks about the roles of the state and the
importance of rigid order. He speaks slowly and has
a thick East European accent. His name is Jerzy
Wiatr.
He has been labelled a close advisor to the
Jaruzelski regime in Poland and was the focus of
protests and an accompanying media blitz at UBC
during the summer. His appointment as a summer
lecturer by the political science department was
greeted with outrage by faculty and students,
members of the Polish community, and others concerned with his hiring.
Stan Persky, political scientist and author of At
the Lenin Shipyard, says the appointment "displayed
the worst kind of stupidity" on the part of the
department. Slavonic studies head Bogdan
Czaykowski says the department's decision to hire
the Polish professor was insensitive and ignorant to
the state of freedom in Poland.
Their feelings were shared by the UBC Solidarity
Study group who organized a protest outside Wiatr's
classroom July 4 at the beginning of one of two
courses he taught during summer sesison. A picket
line was set outside the class to protest Wiatr's appointment and discourage students from taking the
course. It drew about 30 protestors and almost as
many members of the media.
UBC English professor Andrew Busza says Wiatr
adopted a confusing line of defence against the protests. "The Solidarity study group has been attacking
him as a member of the Polish government," says
See page 10: WIATR
Stories by CHRIS WONG
Czaykowski says. They also turned
to underground activity with
publications and the formation of a
movement of academic self-
defense, he says.
Following the initial reviews,
dismissals continued intermittently
at Polish universities. The ministry
announced another review of all
rectors, vice-rectors and department chairs in April, 1983 as a reaction to their non-cooperation,
Czaykowski says. Once again this
review was deemed illegal. The
results are not yet known of this
review.
The minister of higher education
was able to intervene with such
broad powers because of legislation
passed in Polish parliament,
Czaykowski says. The Higher
Education Act passed May 4, 1982
appeared to give universities more
autonomy. "I believe the act is a
very major step in the direction of
greater university autonomy,"
Wiatr says.
But Czaykowski says the act gave
the minister far-ranging powers of
intervention in university affairs. A
set of general statements were
issued which gave the minister
"practically unlimited use of these
powers," says Czaykowski.
Recent developments have seen
even more powers given to the
authorities controlling education in
Poland. The new legislation, passed
July 21, 1983 to coincide with the
ending of martial law, further
erodes academic freedom in a
number of areas:
• the prime minister can annul
any decision or resolution of the
Main Council of Science and
Higher Education (a body below
the higher education ministry)
which is contrary to law or social interest.
• the minister of higher education can suspend the decisionmaking powers of university governing bodies, including university
senate and departmental councils.
• the minister can remove and
appoint rectors and other top
university officials.
• rectors or the appropriate
minister can suspend faculty and
students in cases of activities gravely detrimental to society or against
the interests of the state. In serious
cases students can be expelled.
• Students have the right to
association only in student
organizations which have been
registered before July 21, 1983. Only the appropriate minister may per-
See page 11: REPRESSION Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13,1983
Wiatr — 'seeking the truth'
from page 9
Busza. "When Wiatr defends
himself he assumes the role of the
independent scholar and argues that
they are trying to prevent him from
coming here as one. But at the same
time he's using the occasion to give
the official line. Who is Mr. Wiatr?
Is he Mr. Jekyll or Hyde?"
The main clue to Wiatr's true
identity and the reasons for the protests lie with his position in Poland.
He was appointed director of the
Institute of Marxism-Leninism in
Poland in early Dec, 1981, shortly
before martial law was declared.
Wiatr claims the institute does
not provide justification for the
regime's policies. It is involved in
"policy-oriented research which is
Poland sees the Marxism of the
Polish Communist party as a complete farce. All the discussion of
Marxism is merely an apology for
the rule of the party."
Czaykowski says doing "policy-
oriented research" means helping
the government do its job. "If that
job is the suppression of freedom
and the reimposition of one-party
control, then policy-oriented
research means helping to bring this
about."
His role as director of the institute has labelled Wiatr a close advisor to the ruling powers in
Poland. While Wiatr does not consider himself a top advisor to the
regime, he admits he is closely connected to it. "I don't deny it, I am
proud of my role in Polish politics.
Leszek Kolakowski ( ) (Ustawa z dnia 31 VII 1981
Okontroll publikacji i widowisk, art. 2 pkt. 3 (Dz. U. nr
20, poz. 99)).
Entire article censored in Polish Catholic daily indicated by clashes
taken into consideration by the central committee of the Polish United
Workers Party (Communist Party),
he says in a June interview with The
Ubyssey.
"When we do our research, we
are professionally committed to
finding the truth — to present the
truth in whatever direction it may
point," says Wiatr.
Persky and Czaykowski interpret
the institute's role in a much different light. It is part of the ruling
apparatus in Poland and serves as
an ideological front for the
repressive Communist party, says
Persky.
"Wiatr might say they're seeking
the truth, but in fact everyone in
I am sure that history will form a
mofe or less balanced verdict on
what's going on in Poland. I have
nothing to be ashamed of as far as
my contribution is concerned."
Czaykowski says Wiatr is scorned
by many of his colleagues and
students because of his part in the
Polish indoctrination process.
Wiatr wrote textbooks which were
mandatory readings for compulsory
courses in Marxism-Leninism,
Czaykowski says. "1 have heard
young people express themselves
very critically about those textbooks. They resented the fact that
they were not given a different
point of view to consider in those)
courses."
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Wiatr also refused to add his
name to the long list of academics
protesting abuses of academic
freedom in Poland, Czaykowski
says. "There have been very prominent professors in Poland who have
protested against the oppressive
measures. They risked their careers
in doing that. But not Wiatr," he
says.
But despite Wiatr's role in the
Polish government and his apparent
lack of sympathy for reformist
forces in Poland, he has maintained
a Jekyll and Hyde appearance.
Czaykowski recollects attempts
during the 1970's when Western
political scientists tried to increase
communication and find a common
ground with academics in countries
like Poland. Wiatr played a major
role in this process, he says.
The Who's Who in Poland says
Wiatr advocated a movement called
horizontal structures which surfaced during the Solidarity period. The
movement sought a more democratic Communist party with power
spread out through the lower levels
of the party — a concept defying
Marxist thought which calls for
decisions and power to be concentrated at the top.
A New York Times Article (May
10, 1983) was written about another
article in the Soviet ideological
journal, Novoye Vermya, which
criticized several top Polish officials
for their reformist leanings. Wiatr's
name was mentioned in the article.
But despite these reports,
Czaykowski is wary of classifying
Wiatr as a liberal or moderate in
Polish party circles. "He (Wiatr)
gives the appearance of being a sort
See page 11: STUDY
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STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
Faculty Of Arts
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO THE
FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) One representative from the combined major,
honours, graduate, and diploma students in each
of the departments and schools of the Faculty of
Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of First and Second Year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the
meetings of the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department
Offices, the Dean of Arts' Office, the Arts Faculty Adviser's
Office, and the Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the
Registrar of the University not later than 4:00 p.m., FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 23, 1983.         	
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Study group pleas ignored by administration
Rearranged office
From page 3
economic feasibility report of the
planned project will be presented to
the next board of governors
meeting. It is not yet known when
construction will begin.
Hetman also met with local
business people during the summer
to discuss UBC's importance to the
economic community.
In his tri-weekly reports to student council, the only means by
which the won. of the executive was
monitored, Hetman says he spent
his time writing letters and attending meetings.
He rearranged his office on two
separate occasions, he also
reported.
Pinkney dealt with SUB related
matters. He worked on a club handbook that will allow club constituencies to investigate their rights
easily and responsibilities within the
AMS. He also worked in conjunction with other executive members
reviewing changes to the AMS code
in recent years.
In addition to the daily work of
the director of finance, James
Hollis researched and purchased a
word processor for the AMS
business office. He also obtained a
radar dish that now enables movies
to be shown in Pit.
Other AMS summer projects include the overall organization and
indexing   of  the   AMS   historical
records completed by Iolanda
Weisz. AMS and club histories can
now be obtained in the special collections section of main library.
The SUB courtyard was also
opened, and the games room expanded.
from page 10
of moderate," Czaykowski says.
"The problem with such moderate
stances being taken publicly by people such as Wiatr is that you cannot
be sure to what extent they are a
mere facade."
' In a feature article in the Ann Arbor News (Nov. 18, 1982), an explanation for Wiatr's dual attitude
is offered by University of
Maryland professor, Andrew
Ehrenkreuta. "Wiatr is definetly an
opportunist, a chameleon who;
changes his beliefs and principles in
whatever direction will benefit
himself," says Ehrenkreutz.
Armed with these facts about
Wiatr's role in the Polish regime,
the UBC Solidarity study group
protested his summer appointment
and provided information to the
campus community on the state of
academic freedom in Poland.
Political science professor David
Repression
from page 9
mit rectors to register a new student
association. But Wiatr says new student associations can still be formed. "So far as.the Independent Student Union is concerned, its role is
finished. That does not mean new
student associations may not
emerge."
Whether Polish students and
academics will be able to exercise
any degree of academic freedom in
light of the new laws remains to be
seen. For now they must somehow
deal with the legislation "for the
period of overcoming the socioeconomic crisis," which took effect
July 21 and will run until at least
1985.
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Elkins, who hired Wiatr, was unmoved by the protests. He defended
the appointment by citing Wiatr's
"expert" background. A person's
political actions are irrelevant to
faculty hirings, he said.
After futile talks with Elkins, the
study group turned their pleas to
the UBC administration. Group
spokesperson Bill Tieleman, says
UBC's administration president
George Pedersen was asked to make
two statements: one to clarify
UBC's position on hiring — that an
appointment does not imply acceptance of the person's political position and one condemning academic
repression in Poland. Neither statement has yet been made.
Inaction on the part of the administration and the political
science department was topped off
by unidentified people on campus
who conducted a campaign to tear
down the • group's posters. Fraser
Easton of the study group says
about 600 posters were torn down.
"We're just wondering whether the
apparent supporters of Wiatr are
aware of the ironic situation they
are in with a complete disregard to
our academic freedom," Easton
said.
The   entire   controversy   over
Wiatr's appointment brings up the
question of the existence of solidarity among academics, says
Czaykowski. "Can we say that
freedom is divisible? Is the freedom
that we have all right for us, but
when it is denied by another should
we close our eyes?"
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Se
I O J Who designed the Museum of Anthropology?
fEj   Who is UBC's theatre named after?
C H J   VVho was UBC's first president? Is he still alive7
f AL|   Where is the computer science library located?
/§J^N How much did the AMS IBM S/34 cost?
r cf 1   UBC football coach Frank Smith admits to being ap-
L3*-*/   proached for a CFL coaching position. Where?
f G J   What is the official name of the law building?
f E J What country is UBC's engineering dean from?
Which commerce prof,  a former Socred MLA,  supported the NDP in the 1979 provincial election?
©What does the arts undergraduate society call its beer
gardens?
fCT^\ UBC's current Science dean Cy Finnegan was an assis-
Vp'v tant coach for what UBC team?
TWI 1 Flow many hours of free swimming each class day are
^a    * students guaranteed?
©
Q]   In what building is there a cafeteria serving Oriental
food and beer?
{El Which faculty traditionally is first to hold a week's
^oijf/ festivities?
®In 1963 students cried 'Back Mac' in calling for more funding and universal accessibility. Who was Mac?
©Name two of the easiest hand-jobs for three units in the
arts faculty?
ISN) Under what letter is math classified in the library?
ISLJ What is the nickname for UBC women's sports teams?
©
■ ,-,  ^   What are the three closest places serving beer to SUB
" -I   cafeteria7
E  J  How many people did student council hire this summer?
©
©
x» \ Who was the UBC graduate who moved from student
" '  radical to MP?
fALl   What distinguishes the yacht race in Arts week?
f SNJ   What are the two latin names for Marijuana?
ISL 1 Is it possible to catch herpes in the Aquatic Centre?
„ ]   What is the mailing address of the university? Where is it
located?
p  » What engineering department is it impossible to get a
■^ J four year degree in?
©
©
»w ■»  What minority of UBC students formerly could not vote
"  *  in student elections?
r.|i   How many items does the UBC library have (within
LAM   500,000)7
rc]Ui  What is the bank transit number of SUB's Bank of Mon-
Lsrsj treai7
©Universities minister Pat McGeer played on what UBC
varsity team while a UBC student?
What current UBC building is located on the site of a
former WW II wireless transmitting station?
f  E J   How many students sit on senate?
( H ) What is the name of the residence Gage towers replaced?
LALj What is the classification system used in UBC's libraries?
What former UBC science dean was involved in the
Manhattan project?
©In 1982-83, UBC teams won three national team championships. Name two.
©
©
©
0
(SNJ
(sl!
What are the proper names for the education, arts and
psychology classroom buildings?
Where is the UBC ski cabin located?
Which year's students first protested funding shortages
in The Great Trek?
Who hasn't been a writer-in-residence at UBC: Margaret
Atwood, Tennessee Williams, Margaret Laurence7
Who was the UBC scientist who investigated the effects
of marijuana on rats' reproductive abilities?
The engineer-agriculture chariot race is the annual half-
time show for what football game?
©
Name four UBC buildings built at least in part with
money voluntarily contributed by students.
Q j   What road is the Winter Sports centre on?
©
Why did the engineers call their electric car the Wally
Wagon?
®What B.C. MLA once sought student votes by calling
for free tuition?
©What is the failure rate for English 100 in Christmas exams?
®How could erosion be stopped on Wreck Beach cliffs,
according to the last proposal from Swan Wooster
engineering consultants?
©What long-time UBC football coach oversaw a winless
season?
©
G J   Where are the three liquor stores closest to UBC?
|p|   How many times does Subfilms usually screen movies
*   each week?
©
©
In what year did Jerry Rubin lead a brief occupation of
the faculty club?
What UBC graduate returned to become first head of the
department of Creative Writing?
[SNj   Who is the head of TRIUMF7
CI 1   What two methods of contraception also reduce spread
^aL,J   of disease?
©
What is the name of the field east of SUB, north of the
gym?
E )    Which AMS hack has a free video game is his office?
In what month and year did Queen Elizabeth visit UBC?
How many floors does Main library have7
©
0
fCIWl   What is the name and model number of UBC's main
*•       *   computer?
©
How far is the arts '20 relay race held in October each
year (from VGH to UBC)7
(El What is the engineers' favorite watering hole?
(HI Where were UBC's first class buildings located?
f AL) Translate Tuum Est into the vulgar.
(SN) What does TRIUMF stand for?
fSLJ What football game pits UBC against SFU?
©
©
©
0
0
0
In what room do the senate and board of governors
meet?
Which of these never played UBC: Cheech and Chong.
Jefferson Airplane, Young Canadians. Suzi Quatro?
At the time, it was said the cost of Ladner's Last Erection
could have bought every student a Timex for four years.
What is it?
What's on the top floor of main library?
What was unique about Dr. Percival-Smith's brief foray
last decade into contraceptive research.?
Last spring a UBC team won the provincial second division title in what senior men's sport?
f G J Where is the next parkade scheduled to be built?
( E J Name all five Alma Mater Society executive positions.
f H J 'n what year were the current AMS by-laws passed?
0
Name the 1982-83 dean of Arts.
®How  many departments are there  in  the faculty of
science?
SL.)   Name the head of the intramurals/rec UBC.
©
_  ,    What   geography   professor   has   run   unsuccessfully
*J J   numerous times for Vancouver school board?
©What make of car does AMS finance director James
Hollis drive?
|| J In what year was Douglas Kenny appointed UBC presi-
dent 7
[AL1 What is the usual lending period for main library?
fcfcj\ What UBC assistant dean's book is a required text for
13^7 Math 1007
0
What two UBC sports do athletes go backwards to win?
©
©
©
0
0
0
Where is the office of the university publication known
as 'The finest student newspaper west of Blanca street "7
What make of automobile did UBC's engineers hang off
the centre span of Lions Gate bridge7 and place on top
of the clock tower?
What year did UBC students offically hold a second
Great Trek designed to get the Bennett government to
increase operating funds by $15 million?
How many branches does the UBC library system have?
What is the 22nd letter of the alphabet?
What field does the men's field lacrosse team play on?
G J   Where is the Great Trekkers' cairn located?
©
£> How many students does each faculty have to have for
each student council member?
®What Pit manager resisted a price rise to 75 cents a bottle
in 19787
^VL]  How  many  y°ars have funding cutbacks delayed a
graduate journalism school at UBC?
[SNj   Which   fired  science   professor  compared   himself   to
Galileo and Christ?
0
What year did the current Pit open in SUB?
C G J   Where is student services?
(EJ   How many plays does UBC's theatre produce each year?
IHJ   What university was UBC formerly a college of?
©What was former UBC president Doug Kenny's epithet
when he was dean of Arts?
©What three types of hallucinogenic mushrooms grow on
University boulevard 7
r§Ll   What former UBC basketball coach was in charge of
Canada's national team?
©
f^ j Whet* '- the student council meeting room located?
©Who was paid to rearrange his office this summer by the
students of UBC7
(HI When is free beer given to all students by the AMS?
rALJ What per cent of the students at UBC are international?
©What are the two methods of erosion prevention that
have preserved Wreck beach?
CSLj What is the broadcast frequency of CITR7
"Trivia is the lif
campus," are the
Irving Fetish, fast
Ubyssey.
You will be ask
thousands of bits (
year, and memor'u
will count for mark
will help you to staj
quila shooters after
exam.
The best, the m
most entertaining a
of trivia about UI
assembled by the st
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(£3UUpBUI 8UIM3S
0} p3)B3ipap SUM U tember 13,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
jlood of the UBC
nmortal words of
in editor of The
I to absorb many
trivia in the next
rig some of them
. Much of the rest
ilive and locate te-
our last mid-term
st important, the
d obscurest pieces
Z have here been
ff of The Ubyssey
and enjoyment,
ith questions and
image so you can
cardboard and cut
[o your own drivel
3
§
t
©
©
©
0
0
0
Student union building, room 241K
The Volkswagon Beetle
1957
There is no field lacrosse team
3
i
©
©
©
0
Main mall in front of the chemistry building
1,500 or portion thereof
Original manager Tor Svanoe, who left soon
after
Two years so far
SNj   Convicted fraud Julius Kane
0
1973
LtYSSEY
Old Auditorium
©
f  E  1 Forestry
John MacDonald, university president
§©
*j   rjmlS Fine   Arts   125-   French   400,   Theatre   230
SJ   \~/ Theatre 330
0
Thunderbirds
^
©
©
©
0
Gage towers
17
Fort Camp
Library of Congress
SNl George Volkoff
CI 1 Football,    women's   field    hockey,    men's
l*L-' volleyball
J)
i
©
©
©
0
0
0
Neville V. Scarfe, Buchanan and Henry Angus
Whistler mountain
The ol' radicals of 1922-23, bless 'em
Margaret Atwood
Dr. Patrick McGeer
The   T-Cup   between   nursing   and   home
economics students
3
©Brock hall. War Memorial gymnasium. Place
Vanier residence, SUB, the Aquatic centre,
Thunderbird Winter Sports centre
_-,  » Main library pond is where they water people.
■Vy In the Pit they drink beer
©
fj~> Fairview   Heights,   by   Vancouver   General
" I Hospital
f AJL1 It's up to you
fSNj Tri-University Meson Facility
ISL1 The Shrum Bowl
3
i
what answer card
question card second from top?
i are well on your
pleasant moment
tion purposes we
six categories as
inment (includes
AMS), History,
ience, and Sports
; to special guest
r chairman of the
of the People's
that question cor-
er "Help!"?
>qi jo jo)U3aui ai|)
II sajiBag »Bq^)
©
3©
In Brock Hall
Fou
1 McGill University
H    ^*aL1 Doug the Thug
^0
Psylocibe  stunsia,   psylocibe semilancinada,
and psylocibe baecisti
SL J Peter Mullins
©
IS
I®
^0
0
SUB 206
Your AMS president
At the AMS general meeting in February of
each year
Less than three
Aerial seeding and stronger fences at the base
of the cliffs
FM 101.9
©The board chambers in the old administration
building
f |T J Young Canadians
( H J   Ladner Clock Tower outside main library
AL) Special Collections
He worked on a male pill until funding dried
up
Rugby
0
0
3
i
©
©
©
0
0
0
SUB lot
President, vice-president, director of administration, director of finance, coordinator
of external affairs
1979
Robert Will
10. Botany, Chemistry, Computer science.
Geological sciences, Geophysics and
astronomy. Mathematics, Microbiology,
Oceanography, Physics, Zoology
Nestor Korchinsky
3
4
Ken Denike
Mercedez Benz
©
©
©
0
0
tSL) Rowing and swimming backstroke
1975
I Two weeks
1 Robert Adams
©
3©
§©
Arthur Erickson
Frederic Wood
Frank Wesbrook and No
r-«   TALI   In an annex of the Math library
^0
0
$80,000
Winnipeg
©
H©
Curtis
South Africa
2   iHj   Ralph Loffmark
Bear gardens
0
Football defense
Three hours
3
-I
Q J  The Pit, the SUB gallery, Ponderosa cafeteria
©Five members of the AMS executive and one
archivist
f H } Svend Robinson
\\\ They serve wine instead of beer
fc»Ji Canabis   sativa   and   Canabis   indica   (the
»££/ stronger)
LpLI It depends on who you are with at the time
^
©
©
©
0
0
0
2075 Wesbrook Ave. and basement of new
administration building
Engineering physics
First year students
6.65 million
0811
Basketball
3
1
©
©
©
0
0
0
Thunderbird boulevard
In honor of Walter Gage, past UBC president
Universities minister Patrick McGeer
Usually half or more
Bulldoze the cliffs into a long grassy slope
with a freeway along the bottom
Frank Gnup
©
Fourth and Alma, Dunbar and 18th, Broad
way and Maple
E I Six times between Thursday and Sunday
3
§
i
1968
AL J Earle Birney
©
0
0
0
Former   faculty   and   student   affairs   vice-
president Erich Vogt
Condoms and abstinence
3
1
©
©
©
0
0
©
Mclnnes field
President Mitch Hetman (SUB 256)
March 1983
Seven
Amdahl V8
11 kilometers Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1983
(JUHAT?!   MOKE
CUTBACKS FOR
utJiWSiTies?!!? Dwt
you R6M1ZC HOUJ ItlPDfTAtir
uiJivezsmes are?!?
50 WHO
a/££PS u/Jiye/zsffiesf
I never ujeAir, amp'
LOOK WHAT I AH
Funding 'capital crime
Another school year has begun.
Despite the Socred budget, most of
us who wanted to come back have
been able to do so. This year.
As the ratio of grants to loans has
been decreased by the Socreds, this
means that loan-dependent students
will reach the limits of their borrowing ability in two-thirds of the time
they would have done prior to the
budget. In effect, this closes long-
term studies — medicine, dentistry,
architecture, law and grad studies,
to name a few — to loan-dependent
students.
That is, the professions are once
more restricted to the privileged
few. This would perhaps be
justifiable if money were scarce
(though even that is questionable).
But that is not so.
Anyone can verify that the new
UBC bookstore cost over $1 million
to build. If that money had been
spent on maintaining grant
amounts to $1,200 for needy
students, instead of the $600 to
which ihey have been cut, 1,667
needy students could have received
that aid, and had at least a fighting
chance to take their places in the
professions.
Instead, UBC's capital construction budget has once more
increased. Privileged students,
through this massive construction
expenditure, are now able to eat in a
refurbished SUB cafeteria, jump into a sauna or whirlpool when they
choose, and buy their books in a
brand-new bookstore, to name just
a few of the "vital" new buildings
constructed on this campus. Oh! I
almost forgot to mention the crucial
new Home Economics and
Psychology buildings.
Meanwhile, many UBC
employees have lost their jobs,
because the university can't afford
to pay them. Needless to say, most
of those laid off were women, many
with children to raise on their own.
Of course, it shouldn't be too
much of a problem for the remaining employees to take up the
slack—only children of the wealthy
will now be able to afford to attend
UBC anyway.
I understand, also, that the new
bookstore is open to the public.
Those students who will not be able
to finance their educations may
still, therefore, console themselves
with buying the books, at least, for
the courses they cannot afford to
take.
I am neither a radical nor underprivileged. But unlike our present
government, I do not consider the
accident of "good" birth any
reason for privilege. I am ashamed
of this government and of the administration of this university for
not protesting the greater importance placed on such "necessaries"
as a new bookstore, to the grievous
and long-term detriment of many of
its needy students.
Frederick Douglas wrote, in the
19th century: "Power concedes
nothing without demand. It never
did and never will. Find out just
what people will submit to and you
have found the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them. . .the limits of
tyrants are prescribed by the en-
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian . University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Chris Wong, Sarah Cox and Muriel Draaisma couldn't believe their eyes. There were Jack Tieleman,
Monte Stewart, Patti Flather and Deborah Mills, and they were all actually enjoying themselves.
"Looks like trouble to me," said Craig Brooks and Robbi Robertson as they watched Peter Berlin and
Neil Lucente smiling. John Price, Mark Wielser, Neil Parker, Vic Wong and Neil Dowie took a few sips
of Yankee beer and were soon carried away into euphoria, to the disgust of tired hacks Brian Jones,
Verne McDonald and Nancy Campbell. Paul Modzik, Thor Andersen and Noss Trebor broke into
chuckles, ruining the evening for Kelly Jo Burke and Eric Eggertson. "There'll be no such fun at Bill
Tieleman's news seminar Friday at 4 p.m.," was the snarled promose of Stephen Wisenthal.
durance   of   those   whom   they
suppress."
No one has asked us, the students
of this university, if we consider the
construction of new buildings more
important than the students
themselves. The administration of
UBC, it appears, need not even pay
lip service to the principles of
democracy.
Perhaps it is because they know
what the answer would be.
M.N. Mayer
law 2
Take a hike
through
wonderland!
We take pleasure in calling to
your attention the following which
we feel sure will be of interest. The
hiking, jogging, bicycle and walking trails throughout the Endowment Lands have been greatly improved and built up as well with
new bridges, where necessary. Most
of the main trails have name and
direction signs. There are about 25
miles of beautiful forest trails.
One very nice hike is about four
miles long; start at the corner of
S.W. Marine drive and Camosun,
enter at the Salish Trail sign, then
proceed north on Salish Trail across
the peninsula through the forest
and emerge at Spanish Banks. It is
about a two hour hike through a
variety of forest vegetation (leave a
car at each end).
Through the volunteer efforts of
our organization, the Endowment
Lands Regional Park Committee,
with public donations and government grants, we have been able to
proceed with the trail rebuilding
project.
It is the object of our efforts and
sincere hopes that this beautiful
forest will be declared a regional
park this year. The trails are indeed
beautiful — come and enjoy them.
We will be pleased to supply trail
map brochures. Please phone
266-7007 for further information.
Also, if you would like someone to
act as a trail leader, we will
endeavour to arrange it.
Henry Hersog
Endowment Lands
Regional Park Committee
Buckle up
Welcome, fellow students, to UBC flight number 007.
Though the university is striving to hold a normal course of
providing quality education to as many as possible, the captain
regrets to report that alterations have had to be made to the flight
plan.
Grants for students relying on aid will be inadequate, and loan
funds will be late, so the connection from lower income to degree
holder will be delayed several hours or years. Such procedure is
normal.
The flight path of UBC 007 has been forced toward the right
by provincial government funding policies, cutting access for those
wishing to pursue a liberal education, because of lost programs,
courses and professors. Such procedure is normal.
In spite of a great demand for seats due to lack of job opportunities, fuel allotments have been cut back and there may be some
danger for those who insist on staying for the duration of the flight.
Those seeking service from professors are reminded the cabin
crew's parachutes have been removed due to restraint measures
and they may be more nervous than the passengers.
You are asked to be patient with the overcrowding and we
assure you that placing passengers in the aisles, luggage racks and
50 to a seminar room is normal procedure.
Though the current recession might lead passengers to believe
their accomodation costs will not increase drastically, we are informed de-regulation has made it possible for huge profits to be
made at their expense. Please have your pocketbooks ready.
International students and women are advised to leave the
craft as soon as possible, as we seem to have a lean, deadly Socred
fundcutter shooting from the lip on the right.
Do not be alarmed. Any deviation from course is no doubt
temporary and accidental. We are innocent of any wrong-doing
and the Socreds are sure to see this.
We are responding to the fundcutter's signals and will soon
return to our normal flight path. We repeat, we are innocen. . .
(POW!)
As Bruce Cockburn says, there's this trouble with normal . . .
Doublethink
Here we are again, ready to usher students into Orwell's Year.
Well, it's not really like ol' George's 1984, is it? No telescreens,
for instance. Let's just check with our Teledon two-way computer
terminal . . . Hey! We didn't even go near it and ther it says on the
screen: "No, we are not watching you."
And governments aren't messing with the facts. No way they
would cut immigration during high unemployment, then call the
unemployment office an Employment and Immigration Centre.
And that silly business of changing enemies all the time. After
all, we've always been against the USSR and friends with China,
right? And we don't fight our battles exclusively in Third World
countries the way they did in the book, do we?
Nope, there's no huge bureacracies, no plans for secret police
forces and no mangling of straightforward English by the
authorities. As they say, such statements are inoperative at this
point in time.
So don't go joining The Brotherhood up in SUB 241k. You
might miss the Two Minute Hate.
Letters
UBC creates new voice
Sir:
The UBC campus community alliance, representing campus
organizations, unions, and associations concerned with the July 7
budget and proposed legislation, condemns the cuts in student aid
funding contained in the budget.
Cuts in student aid affect all aspects of the university's operations
and can force students to abandon their studies thereby weakening
the province itself.
Drastic short term actions such as those affecting student aid have
long term consequences which adversely affect us all.
These cuts must be reconsidered and funding restored to at least its
previous levels.
Michael Howlett
Secretary
UBC campus community alliance
The Ubyssey welcomes all letters
from readers, and will attempt to
publish each one so long as it is
typed on a 70-character line and
does not contain racist, sexist or
other hate material.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit for brevity, taste, libel, grammar   and   spelling.    Please   hand
deliver your submission to the letters page by noon Monday for
Tuesday issues, and 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday for Friday editions.
Please address letters to The
Ubyssey rather than some mythical
'Sir.' There are no knights here and
most of the editors are women. Tuesday, September 13,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Necklace refusal perplexes Hawaiian visitor
On a recent cruise trip to Alaska I
took with me several lovely shell
leis, all made by Polynesians and of
what I felt were excellent quality. 1
teach Hawaiian history presently in
the public schools here in Hawaii
and have also taught anthropology
at three colleges.
It seemed to me as if I were Captain Cook or Vancouver, re-tracing
their steps across the waters, into
the harbors, and I stopped at each
museum along the route and
presented a couple of shell leis. 1
thought it would be interesting to
compare the shells of Polynesia
with those found along west coast
shores and also to have a messenger
bringing a small gift to a distant
place.
At every museum except for the
Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver, I met with people who
seemed appreciative and couldn't
imagine anyone doing this. They
are so frequently asked for things,
questions all day long, direction to
displays, cost of souvenir items, but
seldom does anyone just step up
and bring a gift.
I was so thrilled when 1 left the
Museum of Anthropolgy, the last
stop we made. The lady at the desk
was so gracious and I told her that,
if no one in the museum wanted the
leis, to either keep them for herself
or to present them to some child
who might appreciate a gift of
friendship from Hawaii. She
carefully wrapped them up and said
she would see that they were placed
somewhere.
Imagine my shock when I returned to Hawaii to find this letter:
"Thank you very much for your offer to donate two shell necklaces to
the Museum of Anthropolgy. We
appreciate your thoughfulness. I
am very sorry to tell you that we do
not collect this type of material at
the present time, and so will be
unable to accept your donation. I
am returning them to you under
separate cover. Yours truly,
Elizabeth L. Johnson, curator: collections."
And, sure enough, a postman
brought a registered package to my
door with the shell necklaces returned to me. Is it any wonder that we
have a world filled with selfish,
criminal-oriented people, wanting
to go to war, fight, steal. . .to say
nothing of those who litter and
mutilate property?!
As a teacher, I try to instill sharing, appreciation- for beauty,
respect for others' belongings and
manners when visiting museums
and other places of historic value.
"Don't ever write your name any
place you wouldn't be proud to
have reproduced," I tell my
students. I also told them that I
would be taking leis of friendship to
each place I visited and would
report back to them the reaction.
I made my presentations in
Juneau, Skagway, Sitka, Prince
Rupert, and it was a joy to do some
small thing on a positive scale — to
be an ambassador of good will. I
found the museum in Vancouver to
be so exceptional, I went back to
the ship and told the crew, cruise
staff, some passengers. . .not to
miss going out to see this magnificent display and building with its
unique building site and grounds.
I was just absolutely beside
myself to find this letter and to
witness that someone would actually go so far as to send back a gift,
even if it wasn't wanted for a collection   which   would   be   perfectly
Maranatha 'narrow-minded'
In a publication called The Campus Herald, Keith Coleman, advisor to the Marantha Christian
Club, writes: "On behalf of the
Christian Clubs at UBC. . ." I want
you to know that neither the
Lutheran Student Movement nor I
as their chaplain was asked whether
they could speak on our behalf.
Marantha may have a narrower
definition of "Christian" than I
have, but the term, as used in The
Campus Herald, would imply all
the so-called Christian clubs included in the list beginning on page 35
of Inside UBC. The fact is, it just
isn't so. The Lutheran Student
Movement, Co-operative Christian
Campus   Ministry,   the   Newman
Club and the Chinese Christian
Fellowship have not been included
in The Campus Herald's list of
Christian clubs.
The reason I am addressing this
issue is to clarify for the campus
that the chaplains and the clubs
with which they are associated seek
to avoid such exclusive identities
and present a more ecumenical
aspect of the churches. The
chaplains' association and its
newspaper, The Grapevine, seeks to
include and make known not only
Christian groups, but other
religious groups as well.
While Christianity makes some
exclusive claims, we recognize that
these claims exist in tension with
God's intention to receive all people
into what we call "the kingdom." It
is regrettable that such lines of division are being drawn just after the
World Council of Churches Sixth
Assembly here, on this campus, was
commended for its spirituality by
the so-called "evangelical" churches and recognized for its openness
to other religions.
We are divided over so many
crucial issues regarding peacemaking, economic justice and
racism that we don't need this kind
of petty narrowness to divide the
strength we need for the really important battles.
Ray Schultz,
Lutheran chaplain
'tat how loif oi a mm kalliriiatioi last, Professor?
Aid rai it he as detailed as this?"
"I've hen askiig myself the same ntestioi.
Let's get ip to SUB 241k aid check it Mt."
AEROBIC FITNESS CLASSES
U. B. C. 's Oldest and Most
Popular Fitness Workout!
S.U.B. Ballroom, - Mon.-Thurs. 3:45 and 4:46
Starting September 19
$1.25/Class or Less
596-TRIM
"the fitness
professionals
rr
understandable — but not to be
able to find one person in Vancouver who would appreciate
another person who would take up
space in his or her luggage to bring
these items to each port and carry
them all around the city until each
could be presented in their own
way.
I certainly hope that Ms. Johnson
has no contact or opportunity to
meet the public or become further
involved with any public relations
matters. She must have her mind in
glass cases rather than with the personal touch!
I cannot resist sending this letter
lo two newspapers with the hope
that someone will find a bit of merit
in a "tourist" and visitor from one
academic situation, trying to enlist
just a bit of friendship and detente
toward complete strangers, so far
away in another academic institution or scientific center.
I still have not opened the "insured" box 1 received back in the
mail. I have it at the front door as a
daily reminder that it must indeed
be hopeless and useless to even try
anymore to do something
honorable or to express a bit of
generosity and "aloha". Sad that
the unusual and unexpected is such
a shock that we cannot adjust our
thinking, brighten up a day, and
give another a sense of well-being
and peace of mind.
Lerae Britain
Honolulu, Hawaii
I
MEANS MOVIES"
AMS CARDHOLDERS
j BRING YOUR STUDENTUNION CARD IN ANDJ
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Mon   Thurs
Video Recorder
& 2 Movies *10.95
OFFER GOOD UNTIL SEPT. 30 1983
one per
customer
4655 Arbutus St.
266-3306
3560 W. 41st Ave.
266-6276
4521 W. 10th Ave..
222-2324
QUICK!
take me to
e mis
2134 WESTERN R\RKWAlY
at the back of the village
where I can enjoy
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Licensed FYemises
Phone 224 5615 Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1983
Asia on zero dollars a day
By NOSS TREBOR
"And remember, when we get to
customs, pretend you don't know
me," says 27-year-old Steve, as he
gets off the plane. One of the Lo
brothers from Malaysia nods his
head at me; good luck; and is off. I
cover my Rolex watch with my
sleeve, put away my walkman, and
go on my way.
Ai customs, the Lo brothers,
Steve, and I spread out into different lines so the similarity of the
goods we are carrying will go unnoticed. Down the line, one of the
Lo brothers approaches the
counter. His passport number is
punched into the official's computer, and his previous visits fill the
display screen.
The customs officers sees this,
then searches for and finds the
brand-new    camera,    walkman,
(I reesryle)
several calculators, electronic-
games, and shavers. From the false
bottom of the bag, the officer
routinely extracts several slabs of
ivory.
I wonder how many of these false
bottomed   bags   the   official   has
i?   I
look   around   and  notice
about one-fourth of the other
passengers also carry that bag. How
many of these people are smugglers,
anyway? The customs officer is
now searching Mr. Lo and finds a
Rolex watch and yet another
calculator, but misses the gold piece
around his neck. The official places
his discoveries in a bag, to be shipped back to Hong Kong.
I approach the counter, my heart
pounding, my face frozen into an
" honest -officer-1 -don' t-k no w-a-
thing-about-smuggling" expression, with a bag identical to Mr.
Lo's. I hand the customs official
my passport and feel the strong
downward tug of my Rolex. Worth
about $8,000.00 and solid gold, it
must be the only watch that doubles
as a tie-on weight set. The officer
sees that it is my first trip to South
Korea, sees the tape in my
walkman, and decides to ask one
more question:
"Watch?" It may be the only
word of English he knows.
"Urn, er, uh, what do you
mean?" 1 innocently mumble, then
stretch out my arms so he can feel
my sleeves. Find it for yourself,
buddy. He feels my left wrist for the
watch, and I walk on, the Rolex
pinching the hairs on my right
forearm.
Although only half of the goods
passed through Korean customs,
the brothers seem content. They
made their money. By avoiding the
high tax on goods coming into
Korea, they can sell things at a high
profit.
I spent a week living on airplane
food, filling my passport with different colored stamps, staying out
of jail, and even sight-seeing a little.
I'm probably one of the best
authorities on Naritas Airport in
Tokyo; I've been there four times
but have never been into Tokyo.
At the other stops on the route,
Seoul, S. Korea; Taipei, Taiwan;
and Hong Kong, we often had a few
days to see the sights. In addition to
a plane ticket and spending money
on the circuit, I received $240 for a
week of flying Korean Airlines. I
can handle it.
On the airplane and in the streets
of  Hong  Kong,  that  paragon  of
capitalism, one begins to recognize
the substantial number of young
westerners doing the footwork for
the smuggling trade. They travel
around Asia without money, do
smuggling routes and occasionally
stop in Tokyo or Taipei to teach
English and "cool out for a while",
to clear their name with customs.
I wonder if the Taiwanese know
most of their foreign English
teachers are ex-smugglers? Because
of visa problems, most Chinese
language students on Taiwan do a
smuggling route every two months.
They not only leave the country and
become eligible for a new visa, but
make good money on their vacation.
Sound good? Too good? Not so.
As far as the many ex-smugglers I
talked to before risking this venture
knew, no one has ever been arrested
on this particular route. They don't
jail you for carrying a single
camera, or a single watch.
And if you get sick of Naritas
Airport, there are also routes going
to Thailand and India. You can
even go to Nepal and make a cool
grand on the trip. You simply wear
one coat through customs, a coat
lined with 10 pounds of Rolex watches.
Noss Trebor is a infrequent but
reliable Ubyssey staffer. Freestyle is
a column of whit, humor and
analysis open to Ubyssey staff.
Regular people get to use the
Perspectives column.
Sylvia's Choice
(your "creative" consignment store)
Merchandise priced
$1 to $200
Consignments very welcome
Come on in and see me
sometime!
HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 9:30« p.m.
Fri. 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
4576 W 10th Ave. 222-1620
€ar\ be\\e*eb\rix Motif
\*&oor patio-furrO+une.
ZZZ- 134-2
iMoifc
THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE to learn newswriting tips from the esteemed
Bill Tieleman, ex-Ubyssey, Sun, and CUP staffer, and soon-to-be ex-resident of Vancouver.
Yes, a fine tradition will come to an end Friday when Mr. Bill gives his last intro
seminar for prospective Ubyssey types before fleeing east to T.O. Our favorite scribe
will impart his wisdom at 4:00 p.m. in the Ubyssey office, SUB 241k.
See you there, Woodstein.
DATE: SEPT. 12-16
TIME: 9-5
PLACE: S.U.B. ,i.„,.o,
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— — J Tuesday, September 13,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
Nuclear power and weapons form 'Dark Circle'
By SARAH COX
Dark Circle is a movie which
would horrify even Ronald Reagan.
He would be trapped in his seat
for an hour and a half, captivated
and sickened, but unable to leave.
And for once, he would empathize
with the victims of his nuclear
policies, and he would be fearful
for the lives of his grandchildren
and the environment they live in.
Dark Circle makes you confront
things you want to pretend don't
exist. This award winning
documentary film shows how
plutonium, the most deadly
substance in the world (a piece the
size of a child's hand would give
cancer to every person on the earth)
is manufactured and used to build
hydrogen bombs.
Recently declassified footage
from U.S. nuclear power plants and
a hydrogen bomb assembly line illustrate the connection between
plutonium as a waste product from
nuclear reactors and plutonium as it
is used in nuclear weapons.
Dark Circle raises serious questions   about   nuclear   power.    It
Muddy River flows for all
By BRIAN JONES
So many stories have been told
about growing up that one would
suspect there is nothing new left to
say. The usual themes of loss of
innocence and the gaining of
adulthood are common enough to
have become cliches. But Muddy
River, a Japanese film nominated
for an Academy Award for Best
Foreign Film in 1981, successfully
deals with the topic in a sensitive
and original way.
Muddy River
directed by Kohei Oguri
playing at the Vancouver East
Cinema until Thursday
Japan, 1981, subtitled, 105 minutes.
Set in Osaka in 1956, Muddy
River depicts the friendship of two
nine year old boys. Nobuo lives
with his parents above their
restaurant, and Kiichi lives with his
mother and older sister on a
houseboat. Although the central
characters are children, the film's
multiple themes can be applied to
people of all ages in all cultures.
Perhaps the most tender, yet subtle, aspect of the film is the boys'
struggle to deal with their economic
differences.  Both quickly become
aware of the social distance it
automatically puts between them,
but their interest in each other
perseveres.
Nobuo has to deal with the shock
of his new friend's relative poverty,
and Kiichi has to face his feelings of
inferiority. In one of the film's
most touching moments, Kiichi sits
alone in a vacant lot filling his shoe
with sand and pouring it out the
hole in the toe, daydreaming of he
and his sister being welcomed by the
teacher into Nobuo's class at the
neighbourhood school.
Muddy River also compares the
friendship of children to the friendship of adults. Throughout the
film, one suspects that Kiichi will
leave Nobuo's neighborhood and
life as suddenly as he entered. While
a guest one evening in Nobuo's
house, Kiichi boasts of his singing
ability, and upon a request from
Nobuo's mother proceeds to sing a
sad soldier's lament about a fallen
comrade who lies buried in Manchuria.
Kiichi's song stirs the emotions of
Nobuo's father, a World War II
veteran, who tells Kiichi he has
never heard the song sung so well.
Just as Nobuo's father resents a war
that claimed some of his friends in
Manchuria, Nobuo will come to re
sent a world that will claim his newfound friend.
The young but fast friendship
becomes strained when Nobuo
learns that his friend's mother is a
prostitute. After witnessing Kiichi
express his anger and shame by
dunking crabs in kerosene and setting them aflame, Nobuo flees in
confusion from his friend's boat.
While sulking at home, his mother
tells him his friend's houseboat,
which has been moored on the river
directly across from their
restaurant, is leaving.
Nobuo hesitates a few moments,
then jumps up and begins his sad
and futile attempt to catch a last
glimpse of his friend. In the last
powerful scenes, Nobuo chases
along the shore after the departing
boat, whispering Kiichi's name.
Finally out of breath, he stops on a
bridge over the river as the boat
passes underneath. He calls after
his friend, but the boat just continues on its way.
The film portrays less about the
personal loss of innocence than the
realization that the world is far
from innocent. As director Kohei
Oguri intended, the muddy river of
Nobuo and Kiichi's friendship
becomes the muddy river of their
lives.
Sunny rocks commodore
By PETER BERLIN
Last Tuesday was the official first
day of all; the day the schools go
back. And, as if on cue, the
temperature dipped into the autumnal fifties on Tuesday night.
So as the crowd assembled on
Granville street awaiting the second
show by Sunny Ade it was already
dark and the smell in the air was
rich and sharp. The smart ones
dressed only in their cool dancing
duds took refuge from the unexpected chill in the McDonald's
across the street from the Commodore Ballroom. There the
mobiles hanging above the sales
counter which had been fruitlessly
advertising the Trio Tropicale all
summer looked particularly
pathetic; the evening promised only
the approach of winter and no
amount of kiwi fruit milkshakes
could break the mood.
Sunny Ade on the other hand offers more than spurious exoticism.
He offers the life power and wealth
that Africa has always given North
America. At a time when the indigenous black heritage has been
bleached lifeless by the disloyal
popular music it gave birth to, the
African beat seems a much more
likely source of renewed inspiration
than its already overworked cousin
from Jamaica.
And it is onto Ade, out of all the
millions of musicians in Africa, that
the Western music biz has latched.
It is behind Ade that they have placed their powerful promotional
machine.
But he needs little help. He needs
only to be heard.
His music will not come as a total
surprise to Western ears. It has
something in common with reggae
and a lot in common with rythym
and blues, escpecially that from
New Orleans.
ADE
exotic rhythm maker     photo by nan lucanta
Ade however is not trapped into
any of the Western conventions.
His band had twenty members last
week; four vocalists, three
guitarists, a peddle steel guitarist, a
bassist and ten drummers of various
kinds.
Although they have taken the
electric guitar from the modern age,
Ades Yoruba musicians have
adapted it. Just when it seemed that
every possible sound had been
wrung from its slender neck, the
Africans have come up with a warm
open chorded rhythmic playing interspersed with occasional lyrical
and emotional guitar solos.
Unlike western bands, the
African Beats put the drums in the
foreground — they are after all first
and foremost a dance band. The
good old bass drum is the cornerstone of it all but around it
weave the tom-toms, the amazing
talking drums and a whole host of
percussion instruments most people
at the Commodore had never seen
before. The guitars fill in the gaps
and the vocals provide a focus.
The African Beats are a dance
band in two senses. They made the
audience in the Commodore move
for two full hours and they also
danced themselves. Even the last
half-an-hour, after the guitarists left
the stage, was taken up by each remaining member in turn showing
off his moves. King Sunny himself
demonstrated his claim that dancing should only involve the lower
half of the body by keeping
everything above his waist absolutely motionless while doing
remarkable things with the rest of
his body.
Fans who saw the band last week
learned a new way to dance. It
won't be long before everyone has
learned the Ade way of dancing.
And that, after all, is what revolutions in music are all about.
touches on aspects of the industry,
which, because they cannot be seen,
are easy to ignore:
Gleaming rods of plutonium
from a nuclear reactor are Filmed in
a contained compound. They are
covered with water, and look as
though they are sitting in a swimming pool, but will be radio-active for
the next 250,000 years.
In a film clip shown to the public
for the first time, U.S. government
test explosions of unshielded nuclear reactors release plutonium into
the atmosphere.
But what makes the film so vivid
and real is the testimonies from ordinary Americans who live near
Rocky Flats nuclear power plant
close to Denver.
People   in   neighbouring   com
munities (with abnormally high
cancer rates) painfully recount their
involvement with Rocky Flats. One
30-year-old man slurs his words,
his head deformed and swollen
with brain cancer. He worked at
Rocky Flats for 10 years, handling
plutonium with long, black gloves
through holes into an enclosed cubicle.
Rex Haag, who lives three miles
from Rocky Flats, talks about his
daughter, Kris. Family film clips
portray an energetic, smiling girl,
swimming and clowning around.
Kris died from a cancerous tumour
discovered in her knee, says Haag.
He sent her ashes to three
laboratories for analysis and abnor-
See page 19: NUKES
JO KOPECHENE
hairdo from Suki's
photo by n.j.d.
Corsage blooms
By PETER BERLIN
Two of Vancouver's hippest local
bands attempted to bring their
music to a larger audience at the
SUB ballroom on Saturday night.
Unfortunately they failed. Not
because they gave a poor show but
because they attracted a poor crowd
and most of them were on the guest
list.
The evening started with a showing of mid-sixties editions of the
T.V. show Shindig starring the
Rolling Stones, the Kinks, and the
Walker brothers. But the band who
were most strongly evoked during
both sets was the Velvet
Underground.
The Modernettes' music is heavily influenced by the post-John Cale
band. They played fast aggressive
pop music with a hint of menace to
it. The influence is openly
acknowledged and the band played
three of their old songs: 'What
Goes On', 'Foggy Notion' and
'Head Held High' (a typical Lou
Reed joke title). ■
The band's problem is that for all
the poise and energy of their show
they fail to establish a distinctive
personality through their music. All
the same they provide wild nonstop-dance music.
Before Corsage took the stage
more Velvet Underground music
was played over the p.a. It is not so
much the Velvet's that Corsage
resemble as the band Velvet leader
Lou Reed assembled for his live
'Rock and Roll animal' album.
They are a hard core rock band
teetering on heavy metal on the one
hand and on a crazed post-punk
rhythm and blues on the other.
For the first half of the set the
band succeeded in remaining interesting in spite of constantly
threatening to degenerate into mere
headbanging.
After that, however, it became a
little bizarre and a lot better. First
Smith brought out three female
vocalists, the Raison d'Etres, who,
after a shaky start contributed
bravely. Then out came saxophonist Chris Grove and a dwarf.
The stage began to resemble the
set of a Fellini movie but the music
began to spiral towards a great
climax of barely controlled anarchy. Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1983
Student housing scarce
By ROBERT BEYNON
Many UBC students are having
difficulties finding a place to live,
but the situation is not yet critical.
"Every morning for 10 days I've
come to the Ponderosa student
housing office and 1 haven't found
a place," said Dave Soo, commerce
4.
Soo said he was looking for an
apartment or a comfortable basement suite and was willing to pay up
to $325 a month. "But by the time I
Aid axed
from page 1
the government has kept things in
the air," Hender said.
But then again, said Hender, the
regulation may mean 60 per cent
average overall with a minimum
nine units passed.
The regulations won't apply to
transfer or college students.
The awards office has a backlog
of 1,200 unprocessed applications
as of Monday. Hender says the
awards' office's plan is to process
applications quickly and worry
about appeals later.
Nobody knows how a new appeals committee independent of the
ministry's student services branch
will work.
Alma Mater Society external affairs officer Lisa Hebert said the
changes have practically annihilated
the student aid program. Student
council passed motions condemning
the changes and asked that handicapped people and students with
dependents be excempted from the
80 per cent rule.
Hender said students with
families are getting hurt but overall
the measures haven't hurt many
people.
get in touch with a landlord, the
suite is rented. And many suites are
uninhabitable, really."
Richard Fredricks, science 2, said
he has been checking the Ponderosa
listings for a week but hasn't found
a suitable place yet. He would pay
up to $250 for a basement suite, he
said, adding the demand for housing in this price bracket is currently
very high.
Vancouver's vacancy rate is three
per cent, up almost two percent
over last year, said housing office
administrator Bob Frampton. And
applications for student housing on
campus have decreased, but not by
much, said student housing director
Mary Flores.
Last year's waiting list for single
men at Totem Park and Place
Vanier was 1,442 — this year it is
1,390. The housing office has
rooms for women available in
Totem Park and Place Vanier, but
600 women are waiting for rooms in
the Gage highrise.
About 400 families are waiting to
rent places in Acadia Camp, said
Flores, adding that number has
been static for several years.
Gage lowrise apartments,
originally meant for couples, are
being rented to single students
because couples cannot afford them
and the period for which they can
be rented is too short, she said.
The board of governors recently
approved a preliminary plan to construct new Gage lowrises for senior
students and will consider detailed
plans in October. If approved the
project could be completed by 1985,
she said.
ZZZ- 1342
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Burnaby/Coq. - 9600 Cameron Street
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421-4434 Tuesday, September 13, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
Gospel film "joyous and uplifting for all
*5
By PAUL MLODZIK
Say Amen, Everybody! was the
audience reaction Saturday night to
George Nieremberg's moving
documentary on gospel music of the
same name.
SAY   AMEN, SOMEBODY
Directed by George T. Nieremberg
Playing at The Ridge.
In all aspects of the film — the
music, the dialogue and even the title itself — Nieremberg is trying to
elicit a reaction from his audience in
order to show the true nature of
gospel music: personal involvement. The result is a joyous and
uplifting experience for all.
The film focuses on the two people who probably best embody the
spirit of gospel music: Thomas A.
Dorsey,   who   is   considered   the
father of the current musical form
and "Mother" Willie Mae Ford
Smith, one of gospel's original
breakthrough artists and a profound influence on subsequent
generations of gospel singers.
Dorsey and Mother Smith, both
elderly but spellbinding conversationalists, talk with their families,
friends and fellow singers about the
roots and growth of their music.
They also discuss contemporary
concerns such as the desirability of
commercial success. Honesty,
warmth, humour and a sense of
community is shared by these people whose music is an intrinsic part
of proclaiming their faith.
Singing is the focus of the film,
His subjects are in the unique position of performing without acting,
but Nieremberg is able to capture
the sincerity in the songs.
Dorsey and Mother Smith deliver
such gospel classics as Take My
Hand, Precious Lord and Never
Turn Back with care and energy.
Also featured are a younger genera
tion of gospel singers including the
inspirational Barrett Sisters, the
soulful twin O'Neal Brothers and
the electrifying Zelja Jackson Price,
who have all obviously learned well
from the masters.
Say Amen, Somebody is a
celebration of faith that takes one
into the heart of the people who
make gospel music.
Older tubbier Animals still grow
By PETER BERLIN
The Animals are a bunch of forty
year olds who haven't made a
North American hit record in over
fifteen years. Indeed, most of them
hardly recorded anything in that
period. An ill-fated 1978 reunion
record is the only exception.
The Animals were powerful
leaders of the mid-sixties British
beat boom along with the Rolling
Stones. During that period they had
a half-dozen big hits which were
either covers of rhythm and blues
standards or originals in that style.
In the late sixties, lead vocalist
Eric Burdon drifted out to San
Francisco and recorded several
flower power style hits with a different band carrying the Animals
name.
Nukes meet opposition
from page 17
mal   amounts   of  plutonium   were
found.
It is these testimonies which bring
the true horror of the nuclear age
into light, forcing the audience to
acknowledge the consequences of
the nuclear age.
From nuclear power plants and
Rocky Flats, the film moves to
modern Hiroshima and Nagasaki,
connecting the work done at Rocky
Flats to the horror of these atomic
bombings.
Then the movie centers on the
Diablo Canyon nuclear power
plant, where local residents organized a massive non-violent blockade
to protest the licensing of the plant.
Testimonies from women involved in the bitter struggle capture the
power of ordinary people who are
opposed to nuclear developments.
Delays caused by the protests at
Rocky Flats gave an engineer
enough time to discover a major error in the construction of the plant,
which has never been started up.
The film itself is a circle, beginning with the narrator's account of
the migration of thousands of black
brant birds. The birds fly over three
nuclear reactors in earthquake
prone areas, intersecting 40,000
years of migration with nuclear age.
The documentary eventually
moves back to the migration of the
black brant. They soar through the
air, seemingly untouched by nuclear
power plants and nuclear weapons.
But you cannot help but wonder
if 40,000 years of migration will survive the nuclear age.
TAVMZ
AlAPf-
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r*kca^ "!CCEM-tfdoe '.Ur,. C:l-my<i-
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has no fancy pic.
no fancy graphic,
no witticisms,
and no tidbits of
sardonic wisdom.
It does, however,
have a single,
straightforward
message, no less
important for its
simplicity. Join
The Ubyssey!
AMS programs coordinator Bruce Paisley addresses crowd during
power failure at Animals' concert.
Many of the people who filled
War Memorial gym Sept. 5 were
not even born when House of the
Rising Sun" was on the charts in
1965.
Usually these occasions are a
recipe for disaster. When bands of
creatively burned out middle-aged
musicians get together to earn a bit
of easy money by playing their old
hits, the audience often comes away
disappointed.
Despite four power failures, The
Animals, however, turned in a
respectable effort. Eric Burdon still
has an extraordinary voice, and
Alan Price, always the other dominant force in the band, is a strong
and distinctive keyboard player.
They were obviously aiming at a
full and raunchy modern rhythm
and blues sound that has been the
hallmark of Bruce Springsteen and
his exhumed protege Gary "U.S."
Bonds. To create his sound they added a saxophonist, guitars and
keyboards player. It worked fairly
well when the material was up to it.
They performed a wide range of
material, including some uninspiring new songs and solo hits by Burdon and Price. But the best part of
the show was the original material:
House of the Rising Sun, It's My
Life, Bring It On Home, and When
I was Young.
For a bunch of tubby forty year
olds who were plagued by electrical
problems, their performance was
pretty credible.
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SEPTEMBER 30, 1983 Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1983
Ghanaians caught f undless
MONTREAL (CUP) — Wilson
Gyamera owes $7,963 to Concordia
University and his landlord. Until
the new, unstable government of his
country, Ghana, releases the funds
his parents deposited for him a year
ago, he doesn't know how to repay
his debt.
Gyamera is one of 10 Ghanaian
students at Concordia who have
had their funds frozen, apparently
because the Ghanian government
is unable to provide foreign exchange.
Although Gyamera has been
granted a work permit, and received
some money from the Concordia
Dean of Students' Office, he calls
his survival since the fund
withdrawal "a miracle".
The students' future at Concordia is uncertain. Gyamera will not
be allowed to continue his education here until he pays his past
year's tuition fees and interest.
Myrna Lashley, a vice president
of the Concordia University
Students' Association, says funds
are being withheld partly because
Ghana's leader, Flight Lieutenant
Jerry   Rawlings,   is   seeking   to
penalize Ghana's upper classes.
There is a food shortage in
Ghana now, and Rawlings — who
has boasted that he lived on nothing
but bread during his student days in
London — is disputing the expenditure of Ghanaian money on
overseas university tuition fees.
According to Gyamera,
Ghanaian students attending
university in eastern bloc countries
experience no fund transferral problems.
Gyamera and nine other
demonstrated outside the Ghanaian
embassy in Ottawa last June to protest the fund withdrawal. Officials
refused to speak to them, and
escaped out the back door.
One official took photos of the
demonstrators. Because of this,
Gyamera fears for his security when
he returns home.
When Rawlings first took power
in Ghana in 1979, he had the support of workers and students, including Gyamera. The charismatic
leader was committed to reducing
the influence of multi-national corporations in Ghana. He introduced
legislation to undercut the business
class, especially those linked to
foreign companies.
Since then support has waned,
particularly among students. Now,
says Gyamera, even Rawlings'
highly touted "worker support"
rallies consist solely of plainclothes
soldiers.
Meanwhile, the Ghanaian
students' case hangs in limbo.
Lashley and Concordia's International Student Advisor Elizabeth
Morey are seeking aid in
negotiating release of the funds
from a number of channels, including the Canadian Department
of External Affairs.
The DINER
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For the early ones
we start serving breakfast at 8 a. m.
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FOR ALL WOMEN STUDENTS TO:
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• act in a liaison capacity between students and faculty
• offer programs relevant to the needs of women students.
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 EYE LAB	
Mon. - Fri. 8:30 - 5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112
AMS COMMITTEE OPENINGS
Nominations are now open for appointments
to the following positions:
— 5 members of the Student Administrative Commission;
— 1 student rep and 1 community rep, Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre Management Committe;
— 1 student rep and 1 community rep, Aquatic Centre
Management Committee
— 3 members of the Capital Projects Acquisitions
Committee (C-PAC)
— AMS representatives to the following Presidential
Advisory Committees:
• Concerns of the Handicapped — 1 rep
• Men's Athletic Committee — 2 reps
• Student Services — 1 rep
• Walter Gage Memorial Fund — 1 rep
• War Memorial Gymnasium Fund rep
Recommendations   for   appointments   will   be   made
Student's Council by the Selection's Committee.
to
NOMINATIONS CLOSE SEPTEMBER 27, 1983
All students are encouraged to apply for these postions.
Nomination forms are available in SUB 238. Tuesday, September 13, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 21
SPORTS
Champions trampled by Bisons
By MONTE STEWART
In Canada's most eastern prairie
province, vehicle plates bear the
phrase   "Friendly   Manitoba".
However, Manitoba was anything
but   friendly  to  the  Thunderbird
football team Saturday afternoon,
noon.
The University of Manitoba
Bisons defeated the 'Birds 12-9 in a
Western Intercollegiate Football
League game in Winnipeg. The loss
ended any hopes of a second consecutive undefeated season for the
defending Vanier Cup champions.
UBC recorded a perfect 12-0 record
against Canadian competition last
season.
The Thunderbirds enjoyed a slim
7-1 lead at halftime. However, in
the second half, the T-Birds lost the
ball three times inside the Bisons' 30
yard line while Manitoba scored a
meagre but sufficient 11 points.
With the victory, Manitoba made
amends for a surprising season
opening 27-26 loss to Alberta the
previous weekend.
(The Thunderbirds had a bye
during the first weekend of play, using their brief hiatus to defeat Carroll College 31-20 in an exhibition
contest in Helena, Montana.)
The unfriendly nature of
Manitoba was evident in more ways
than one. Three Thunderbirds suffered injuries that could keep them
sidelined for the remainder of the
season. Linebacker Mac Gordon (a
U.S. junior college transfer) suffered damanged knee ligaments.
First year receiver Andrew Murray
dislocated his thumb while, yet
another newcomer, safety Robert
Moretto, suffered a suspected
broken arm.
The loss of the three players
could have serious repercussions for
the 'Birds. "There isn't really that
much depth (on the UBC team)"
commented former 'Bird Bernie
Glier after his new team, the B.C.
Lions, had lost to the Toronto
Argonauts Saturday night.
The Thunderbirds host the
Calgary Dinosaurs in their home
opener Friday night at 7:30 p.m. at
Thunderbird Stadium.
CITR FM 102 (Cable 100) will
broadcast the game live beginning
at 7:15 p.m.
Attendance is expected to improve this year because of last
season's triumph. Team officials
anticipate a crowd of about 5,000
for Friday's game.
Grid prospects
GOOD TACKLE, SFU. . .Thunderbirds, however, upset North American champs. i>hot0 bv n'd
Soccer 'Birds net upset over Clan
By THOR ANDERSEN
The UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team defeated the Simon Fraser
University Clansmen 1-0 at
Thunderbird Stadium Sunday to
win the inaugural Diachem Bowl.
Before the game the Clansmen
had been highly favored to win.
They were last year's North
American Intervarsity Athletic
association champions while the
'Birds managed only a very
mediocre year in the Western division of the Canadian Intervarsity
. Athletic Union. It was also UBC's
first game while the Clan had
already played themselves into form
through four matches.
Although SFU enjoyed the most
scoring  opportunities,   the   'Birds
played a fine defensive game, stopping the Clansmen on numerous
plays.
"I was generally pleased with the
effort," said UBC coach Joe
Johnston. "I thought the boys
played remarkably well, considering
they didn't have a game under their
belts."
UBC forward Louis Miljanovich
scored the only goal of the game. It
was a brilliant individual effort; he
ran through the defence and shot
into the lower left-hand corner of
the goal.
Substitute 'Bird goalkeeper,
Marcello "Bun" Pavan, who relieved starter Curt Blank early in the
first half, made several good saves
to earn the shutout.
Throughout the game, a lack of
cohesion was noticeable in the play
of both teams. Sloppy passing was
also evident in the early stages of
the game but as the game picked
up, the teams shared some good
scoring chances.
"It was a little disjointed upfront
and in the midfield," said
Johnston.
SFU's best scoring opportunity
came when they hit the post after a
questionable offside call by the
linesman.
The 'Birds play their second
game of the season Wednesday
evening at Swangard stadium where
the Clansmen will try to avenge
Saturday's upset defeat.
By MONTE STEWART
The purpose of studying history
is to learn about the present by
analyzing the past. Therefore, by
studying the 1982 Thunderbird
football team, we can learn about
the current edition of the 'Birds.
The only thing that I heard Frank
Smith complain about last season
was the absence of clam chowder at
a pre-Atlantic Bowl press conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Smith also looked perturbed later
that day when he noticed that John
Musselman and the rest of the St.
Francis Xavier X-men coaches were
spying on the Thunderbirds during
a practice session at Saint Mary's
University. The angered 'Birds
showed no mercy as they pummelled SFX 54-1 in the Atlantic Bowl
the very next day. Now, class, what
have we learned from this little
episode in the history of the UBC
football club? We have learned that
it does not pay to get the Thunderbirds angry.
Last season the Thunderbirds
had very little to get mad about.
Thunderbirds scored no fewer than
19 points per game while allowing
no more than 22 — against Canadian competition.
History indicates us that, on the
basis of statistics, the 1982 UBC
squad is not as good as last year's
team because the  1982 club was
undefeated against Canadian competition and the 1983 team has
already lost one game to Manitoba.
History also shows us that the current team is different from that of
last season because they have lost so
many players; 10 members of last
year's team are now playing in the
Canadian Football League while
another, Mark Beecroft, is no
longer playing organized football.
Also, a number of players have not
returned for academic and personal
reasons.
Can we still expect the 1983 grid
'Birds to carry on the rapidly growing tradition of UBC championship
football?
You bet we can.
Last year we learned that the
Thunderbirds — all of the Thunderbirds — possessed extraordinary
determination and ambition. They
really wanted to win.
The determination and ambition
are still here. This club — especially
after last week's loss — also wants
desperately to win.
I predict that this team will equal
some of the achievements of last
year. I firmly believe that the 1983
football Thunderbirds will also win
the national title. The team will rally after last week's temporary setback and eventually they will do
what most of us expect them to.
They will repeat history.
All you ever wanted to know about UBC sports
By PETER BERLIN
There are at least thirty official
UBC teams. Some like the Football
team are well publicized and well
known, others, like golf or tennis
attract no spectators and ply their
fixtures in almost total secrecy. Indeed while the Athletic department
knows they have a golf team out
there somewhere they aren't entirely sure where their homecourse is.
Most of these teams are currently
holding tryouts or will soon begin
them.
What follows is a complete list of
all the teams sponsored by the
athletic department, their recent
achievements, their aspirations and,
for the enthusiastic, the dates and
locations of tryouts and fixtures.
Where no tryout date is given then
they've probably already had them,
but, if you're a real star go along
and pester the coach.
Of course all these entries are
written in code. In order to decipher
it you must know that WIFL means
Western Intervarsity Football
League, CIAU means Canadian Intervarsity Athletic Union, WMG
means War Memorial Gym, and
SFU are our hated cross town rivals
Simon Fraser University.
MEN
BADMINTON: Play in the Vancouver and district league.
Tryouts: Tuesday Sept. 20, 8:30
p.m., Osborne Gym A.
BASKETBALL: Just missed the
Canada West playoffs last year.
Have a new coach, Bill Edwards,
who was previously an assistnat
coach at Simon Fraser University.
Tryouts: Officially Sept. 26 in
WMG at 6:30 p.m., but they are
already in training.
FIELD HOCKEY: Play in the Vancouver first division, were 5th last
year.
Tryouts: Thurs. 12:30 p.m. at
Taylor field.
FOOTBALL: The pride of Point
Grey. They are the reigning Vanier
Cup champions and holders of the
Shrum bowl. Their hopes of
repeating last year's perfect 12-0
score against Canadian opposition
were dashed on Saturday when they
lost their conference season opener
in Manitoba.
Next Game: Fri. 7:30 p.m. against
Calgary at UBC.
GOLF: There is a golf team...
GYMNASTICS:   Last   year   the
tumblers were 3rd in the West and
8th at the Nationals, led by Mark
Byrne who was individual runner-
up in the West.
Tryouts: Thurs., 4:30 p.m.,
Osborne Gym G.
ICE HOCKEY: Jack Moore's team
posted a respectable 17-18-2 record
last year. But, despite an improvement they were still last in their conference with a 9-15 record in league
play. Hopes are, as usual, high for
this season, the team has just
returned from winning a tournament in Japan.
Tryouts: Fri. 12:45 p.m. rm. 211
WMG
ROWING: Last year the lightweight eight enjoyed great success
in competition. They should continue to be one of the dominant
forces in West Coast rowing.
Meeting: Fri. 5 p.m., WMG.
RUGBY: Do not have any CIAU
competition, but Donn Spence's
fifteen still collected a lot of
trophies as the racked up a 26-1-2
record. The chief of these was a half
share in the McKechnie cup.
SKIING: Compete in both downhill and cross-country. Won the
North West Collegiate ski confer-
rence last year. Ready to start land
training.
Tryouts: Tues, Sept. 20, 4:30 p.m.,
Osborne Gym B East.
SOCCER: Absolutely mediocre last
year, they have a 1-0 record so far
this season with an upset win over
S.F.U. on Saturday last, which may
indicate better things to come (on
the other hand...)
Tryouts: Coach Joe Johnson is still
See page 23: MORE Page 22
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13,1983
^
<U0#?<
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
Information interviews for internships in social
planning,   public    health,    writing,   television,
museum work, etc. 8:30-4:30 daily, Brock Hall
room 213.
BALLET UBC JA2Z
Super-salel Come try classes & get into shape
before our regular dance season, only $1 per
class, Sept. 12-21. For class schedule, come to
SUB216E.
TUESDAY
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre conference room.
CITR RADIO
Orientation meeting for new members, 7:30
p.m., SUB 211.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
OF CANADA
General meeting, anyone interested may come
in, noon, Buch A202.
WEDNESDAY
AMS EXTERNAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
Budget   and   provincial   legislation,   5:30  p.m.,
SUB 224.
ZETA PSI FRATERNITY
Bzzi garden. 4 p m., SUB 207-209
THURSDAY
AMS WOMEN'S COMMITTEE'
First meeting of the year, noon, SUB 130
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
BRITTON T.V.
& STEREO
Service • Sales • Rentals
We buy broken down T. V. 's
B&W - Rentals - Colour
2345 W. 4th Ave.,
736-4823.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
INTERNSHIPS
PROVIDE
SENIOR STUDENTS
IN THE
FACULTY OF ARTS
WITH
WORK EXPERIENCE
BEFORE GRADUATION
IF INTERESTED IN NON-PAID,
STUDY RELATED
WORK-PLACEMENTS
IN VANCOUVER
SEPTEMBER - APRIL
COME TO
THE OFFICE OF
INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS
ROOM 213. BROCK HALL
TELEPHONE     3022
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
First general meeting, noon, SUB 212.
UBC
Lost and found sale of unclaimed articles, 11
a.m. - 1 p.m.. Brock Hall 206
WARGAMERS
General meeting, noon, SUB 216.
ZETA PSI FRATERNITY
Welcome-back party, 7:30 p.m., SUB partyroom.
FRIDAY
INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Meeting with George & Joelle Emery, directors
of the Foundation of Universal Unity, noon,
Buch A202.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
T-Birds vs. Calgary Dinosaurs, 7:30 p.m.,
Thursdays Stadium.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Pre-football game barbeque, 4 p.m., Thunderbird Stadium plaza.
MONDAY
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Organizational meeting for Clubs Day, anyone
interested in cycling welcome, noon, "Cages"
(SUB) basement).
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film: "If You Love This Planet" and discussion
of this year's activities. All welcome, noon, SUB
205
Hey, what's happening?
Jeez, no sweat, Betty and Archie,
everything every student needs to
know about every coming event,
dance, speech or orgy is contained
in 'Tween Classes in The L'bvssev.
Yisfet
fytfbM.
Go to New Westminster. Close
your eyes. Now try to walk to UBC.
It will not take long to realize that
blind student Susan Robertson has
a problem. She has to get to classes
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
mornings by 9:30 a.m. and needs a
ride.
Robertson is willing to contribute
toward gas and will also monetarily
appreciate a driver who will come to
her door as well as help her to find
Buchanan in the new maze UBC
planners have built since she last attended.
If you've got an empty seat from
New West, give her a call at
526-5991.
•
"And, lo, many things will be lost
and will roll behind refrigerators.
"And fathers will come unto their
sons, saying, Where is that little
box about this big, with little legs
FREE EXERCISE
CLASS
(with this AD)
''//y
<*»?£,?
M
1
\X
1
1
s
s
-   Ml AM
ii) on am
..'/ "
\ 1  Ml I'M
<,  M) V\\
t   HI I'M
..'.X "
. .'.* "
m
COST: $40.00 —  Choose any of the classes listed above as
many times a week as you like, any time.
any location, any intensity.
$   2.00 —   Drop-in per class
SeSSIOn:   First Term -Sept. I9-Dec.9<83
Second Term - Jan.  I6-April 4,  1984
Registration: First Term - Sept. 6-16; Second Term - Jan   3-13 at
Intramural-Recreational Sports (Rm   203), War
Memorial Gym or late registration during first week
of exercise class.
Sponsored by Recreation U.B.C.   For Fitness Information • 738-4169
* VALID UNTIL SEPT. 24/83
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents
WAITING FOR GODOT
by Samuel Beckett
SEPTEMBER 23 - October 3
(Previews Sept. 21 & 22)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Thursday Matinee/September 29 — 12:30 p.m.
[STUDENT SEASON TICKETS - 4 Plays for $12]
1983/84 Season
Sept. 21-Oct. 3       WAITING FOR GODOT (Beckett)
Nov. 9-19
Jan. 11-21
March 7-17
BOX OFFICE
LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST (Shakespeare)
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST (Wilde)
THE SUICIDE (Erdman)
*    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    *    ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
and nice scrollwork on the corners,
not too gaudy?
"And no one will answer."
All articles, including textbooks,
lost before June 1 will be sold in
Brock 208 Thursday from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. Proceeds will go to bursaries
for needy students, who have been
losing as many things as possible in
hope of a big sale.
So if you've been wondering
what happened to that Eddie Shack
drinking shirt, you can get it back
and pick up two more real cheap.
m
bpb:
!iSl!Sr
Active
Components
NUMBER ONE IN
QUALITY
SERVICE
AVAILABILITY
THE WORLD'S MOST
COMPLETE PROFESSIONAL
AND HOME ELECTRONICS
ENTHUSIAST INVENTORY
* Semiconductors + Memories
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* Microcomputer Systems + Peripherals
* Passive Electronic Components
* Hand Tools, Wire Wrapping;
Soldering Equipment + Hardware
•^mmm
10% DISCOUNT
-I OFF ALL BOOKS
. resent your student I.D.
V     and receive 10% OFF
1 all purchases of books
"  from Active's Data and
Reference library.
Open Mon. to Thurs.   9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday 9:00 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
3070 KINGSWAY — VANCOUVER
TEL.: 438-3321
AMPLE FREE PARKING
VISA AND MASTERCARD WELCOME
Book Discount valid until Oct. 15. 1983.
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS-
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
m^mmmmmmmmam^mW^m^mam^mmmm^
m
5 - COMING EVENTS
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCE CLAS
SES: Wednesdays, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Beginning and Intermediate levels. Campus and
Community Members welcome, no partner
required. UBC International House information, Marcia Snider, 738-1246.
TOUR TIME
at Main & Sedgewick
LIBRARIES
EVERY DAY THIS WEEK
10:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.
Meet in Main Library Entrance
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judith Alexander.
Graduate of Juilliard School of Music.
731-8323 or 261-8514
30 - JOBS
SOCIAL WORKER, preferrably at Master's
level with prior experience in dealing with
patients with neurological disease. Needed
for parttime 10% involvement in research
project. Phone Kathy Martinson, 875-2157.
40 - MESSAGES
WANTED: Women to play rugby. No experience necessary. Practices Tuesday and
Thursday, 5:30 p.m. at Balaclava Park
(West 30th & Balaclava). Everyone
welcome.
10 - FOR SALE - Commercial       65 - SCANDALS
10,000 DIFFERENT ORIGINAL MOVIE
POSTERS. Catalogue $2.00. Mnemonics
Ltd. Dept. Z *9, 3600-21st Str. N.E.
Calgary, Alta. T2E 6V6.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
79 HONDA HAWK. 15,000 mi., very good
cond., Helmut & Fairing incl., $780.
321-1675, Harel.
'75 DODGE COLT. BCAA tested. Good
cond., 81,000 mi. $2,000. 669-7105.
'63 MGB. With '67 Datsun engine & 5
speed. 228-8333 or 888-0879 after 6 p.m.
Suitable for restoration.
20 - HOUSING
4-BDM. EXEC. HOME. Richmond. Washer/
Dryer. $350/mo. Utilities incl., non-smoker.
Avail, immed. 271-7813.
FREE ROOM
AND BOARD
in exchange for 15 to 20 hrs.  housesitting.
25th & Arbutus, 738-8685.
CONGRATULATIONS to the men in RED
on a magnificent start to the year. Pat.
70 - SERVICES
"MODE COLLEGE OF BARBERING AND
STYLING". Students - $4.50 to $6 50.
M7-601 West Broadway, 874-0633.
LSAT. GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing, 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
85 - TYPING
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
FAST,    ACCURATE,    PROFESSIONAL
typing.    Double-spaced   page,    $1.50.
Audrey, 228-0378.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Essays, reports,
projects. $1.00 per page min. Contact
Louise, 731-0594. Tuesday, September 13, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 23
more of all you wanted to know about sports
From page 21
seeking more talent, contact
through WMG.
Next   Game:    Wed.,    Swangard
Stadium, against S.F.U.
SQUASH: The first team went 24-0
last year and won Division 3 of the
Vancouver City league.
Tryouts: Thurs. 12:30 p.m., Squash
courts, Winter Sports Arena.
SWIMMING AND DIVING: 4th in
the Nationals and 3rd in the West
last year.  Tyler Cant who set  a
Canada West 100 butterfly record,
Mike Blondal and Mike Ball were
the outstanding individuals.
Training:  5:30 p.m.  daily at the
Aquatic centre.
TENNIS: They're out there
somewhere.
Tryouts: Tues. Sept. 20, 4:30 p.m.,
Armouries.
TRACK, FIELD AND CROSSCOUNTRY: The track team enjoyed some success in the 1983
season, the cross-country team will
soon   begin   competing   every
weekend, in preparation for the
Canada West championships they
are hosting.
Tryouts: Today, 4:30 p.m.,
Osborne Gym E.
Fixtures: Canada West at U.B.C.
on October 19th.
VOLLEYBALL: Won the national
championships in front of a
hysterica] crowd at the WMG last
spring. They have just returned
winless from a tour of Japan.
Tryouts: Wednesday 7:30 p.m. and
Thursday 4:30 p.m.,WMG.
Fixtures: Nov. 18. WMG. Canada
West.
WRESTLING: The team has lost
Martin Gleave who won four national weight class championships.
Still the prospect is there for a continuation of their slow growth.
Tryouts; Wed. 4:30 p.m., WMG
bleachers.
WOMEN
BADMINTON: Play in the Vancouver City league, local competi
tion and open tournaments around
B.C.
Tryouts: Tues., Sept. 20, 8:30p.m.
Osborne Gym A.
BASKETBALL: Jack Pomfret's
team improved considerably last
season. A 10-19 record may not
seem like much, but it was 10 times
better than the previous year's and
included wholly unexpected success
against Canadian University opposition. The word is that this years
rookies are as good as last years excellent crop, so maybe they'll climb
out of the Canada West basement.
Tryouts: Mon. Sept. 19 WMG.
CROSS COUNTRY: Compete in
local meets, Canada West Exhibitions and the Canada West tournament which is here this year.
Tryouts: Today, 4:30 p.m. Osborne
Gym E.
CURLING: Won the Canada West
championships last year for the second year in a row, they can't do
any better because there is no national universities' championship.
Run Don't Walk to The Ubyssey
Tryouts: Mon., Oct. 3rd, Winter
Sports.
FENCING: A university team still
in its infancy. Half an AMS club
half an Athletic Department team,
they host the biggest fencing
tourney in Western Canada.
FIELD HOCKEY: To women's
sport what the football team is to
the men's side. They are the senior
women's team and the CIAU champions. As well as dominating
university competition last year
they also won the Vancouver city
1st division.
Fixtures: 1st Canada West tournament is at Calgary on Sept. 24-25.
GYMNASTICS: The fourth of
UBC's national university champion teams. The gymnasts trained
by Alena Branda, beat Western
rivals Alberta to take the championships. They were led by Patti Sakaki
who won her fifth consecutive individual title in the process.
Tryouts: Thurs., 12:30 p.m.
Osborne Gym G.
ICE HOCKEY:  Won the  Lower
Mainland 2nd division last season.
Tryouts: Tues., Sept. 20, 5:15 p.m.
Winter Sports.
ROWING: UBC has some fine individual rowers, like Lisa Roy. the
usual fall recruitment drive is on for
the women's eight.
Tryouts: Fri., 5:00 p.m., Rm. 211
WMG.
SKIING:   Won   the   North   West
Region this spring.
Tryouts: Tues., Sept. 20, 4:30 p.m.
Osborne Gym B East.
SOCCER: The team showed well in
both   league  and  cup  competion
around Vancouver last year. Now
they await the first ever Canada
West competition.
Tryouts:    Thurs.,    4:30   p.m.
Wolfson Field.
Fixtures: Canada West, Oct. 28-29,
University of Victoria.
SQUASH: Play in the city league.
Tryouts: Tues., Sept. 20, 5:00 p.m.
Winter Sports.
SWIMMING AND DIVING: Led-
by freestyler Ronda Tomasson the
team  placed  4th  in  the  CIAUs.
Diver Nancy Bonham was 2nd in
the Nationals.
Training: the team trains daily at
5:30 p.m. at the Aquatic centre.
TRACK AND FIELD: The indoor
season starts in January.
Tryouts: Today, 4:30 p.m. Osborne
Gym E.
VOLLEYBALL:   Placed  third  in
the CIAUs last year.
Tryouts:   Wed.,   7:30   p.m.   and
Thurs., 4:30 p.m. WMG.
Fixtures: Canada West Tournament
at UBC Nov. 18.
We're swamped by athletes who
want their names in lights. Even on
our way to the Bowie concert, our
heels are dogged by determined glitter hounds. The problem — a lack
of writers. Granted not everyone
can handle the delicate temperment
of a prima shot putter, it takes a
special kind of journalist.
Does the smell of sweat socks fill
you with a sense of warmth and
nostalgia? Would you stand in the
pouring rain for three agonizing
hours while healthy young sportifs
do their best to place others in traction? If so, why aren't you writing
for The Ubyssey? Something has to
be done with you before you hurt
somebody, and being a sports
writer is a safe vent for that sort of
thing.
We love you, we're your friends
and we can help you at the Ubyssey.
Look for Peter Berlin. He needs
you. He needs something. Let's not
get into that.
* THIS WEEK IN INTRAMURALS *
LEISURE SPORTS
- OUTDOOR VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT -
- SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT -
SAT. - SUN. SEPT. 24-25, MclNNES FIELD
REGISTER SEPT. 14-21, WMG RM. 203 - $10
- DROP-IN VOLLEYBALL -
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1983
1983-84
AMS budget
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Balance Sheet
April 30, 1983
(With comparative figures for 1982)
ASSETS
Current assets:
Cash and term deposits
Accounts receivable:
Publications advertising
Sundry accounts and advances (Schedule 1)
Accrued interest (Schedule 2)
Inventories
Loans to subsidiary organizations,
current portion (Note 2)
Prepaid expenses
Total current assets
Investments, at cost (market value — $122,657;
1982 - $61,427) (Schedule 2)
Total current assets and investments
Loans to subsidiary organizations, non-current portion (Note 2)
Art Collection
1983
1982
$   543,694
676,069
39,826
52,148
47,658
87,843
37,532
40,762
103,500
102,456
115,000
7,013
7,436
894,223
124,631
Total general funds assets
Buildings, at cost less depreciation:
1,018,854
130,396
104,663
1,253,913
Cost
Student Union Building $ 3,619,625
Winter Sports Centre (Note 3) 1,507,247
Whistler cabin 234,480
Aquatic Centre (Note 4) 1,007,472
$ 6,368,824
2,630,950
Total student facilities assets
See accompanying notes to financial statements
3,737,874
$ 4,991,787
966,714
74,631
1,041,345
85,648
104,663
1,231,656
Accumulated
depreciation
1,215,000
1,170,000
144,900
101,050
2,404,625
337,247
89,580
906,422
2,485,625
412,247
107,580
928,422
3,933,874
5,165,530
Revenue
Student Fees
$   784,000.00
Building
59,063.00
Games
104,616.00
Copy Centre
15,267.00
Info Ticket Centre
17,050.00
Vending
22,252.00
Pit
60,999.00
Lounge
(11,344.00)
Investment
65,000.00
Temporary Personnel Service
630.00
Typing Service
137.00
Total Revenue
$1,112,670.00
Non Discretionary Allocations
CPAC Reserve
$367,500.00
Investment Reserve
6,500.00
Intramurals Reserve
110,250.00
Registration Photos
6,000.00
Art Fund
1,500.00
Management Reserve
13,500.00
Total Non Discretionary
$505,250.00
Discretionary Revenue Subtotal
607,420.00
Less: Constitutional margin (5)
(30,371.00)
Total Discretionary Revenue
$577,049.00
Discretionary Allocations
Students' Council
80,270.00
SAC
36,780.00
—Whistler Cabin
25,702.00
—Art Gallery programs
1,000.00
External Affairs
10,330.00
Student leadership
2,000.00
Programs
30,125.00
Ombuds Office
3,300.00
Speakeasy
2,950.00
Volunteer Connections
1,000.00
Women's Committee
4,708.00
Business Office
227,934.00
Publications
89,114.00
CITR
61,411.00
$576,624.00
Net Deficit (Surplus)
$(       425.00)
LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS
General Funds
Current Liabilities:
Accounts payable and accrued charges
Due to clubs and societies (Schedule 3)
Total current liabilities
Special purpose reserves and provisions (Schedule 5)
Total current liabilities and reserves
Retained income, per accompanying statement
Contributed surplus — Art Collection
Total general funds liabilities and surplus
Student Facilities
Bank demand loan, less cash in bank, secured
by assignment of Aquatic Centre fee levy
of $5 per student year (Note 4)
Loan from General Fund (Note 2)
Equity in buildings (Schedule 7)
Total student facilities liabilities and equity
Commitments (Note 6).
1983
1982
$   343,295
217,341
224,438
190,977
560,636
415,415
457,685
582,524
1,018,321
997,939
130,929
129,054
104,663
104,663
1,253,913
1,231,656
-
214,512
121,618
3,616,256
3,719,362
3,737,874
3,933,874
$ 4,991,787
5,165,530
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure
Year ended April 30, 1983
(With comparative figures for 1982)
1983 1982
Revenue:
Student fees
$ 294,311
274,926
Aquatic Centre levies
118,132
113,562
Grad class fees
26,692
26,332
Graduate Students' Association levies
3,957
3,720
Undergraduate Societies fee levies
75,489
55,871
Investment income
95,764
147,365
Building operations (Schedule 8)
343,625
190,604
Sundry
1,377
959,347
857
813,237
Non-discretionary allocations:
Aquatic Centre                                  $
118,132
113,562
Grad class fees
26,692
26,332
Graduate Students' Association
3,957
3,720
Intramural fees
36,220
33,763
Undergraduate Societies fee
levies, including special levies
75,489
55,871
Registration photos
5,585
4,998
S.U.B. Art Fund
1,500
1,500
Management reserve
12,613
12,444
Repair and replacement reserve
9,576
289,764
14,737
266,927
Discretionary allocations:
Interest — special purpose reserves
and provisions (Schedule 5)
669,583
32,500
546,310
16,000
637,083
530,310
Expenditure:
Student government (Schedule 9)
206,501
174,590
Business office and administrative
expenses (Schedule 10)
331,582
268,378
Publications (Schedule 11)
97,125
635,208
$    1,875
87,154
530,122
Excess of revenue over expenditure
188
See accompanying notes to financial statements.
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Retained Income
Year ended April 30, 1983
(With comparative figures for 1982)
1983 1982
Balance, beginning of year
Add adjustments relating to prior year
Excess of revenue over expenditure during the year
Balance, end of year
See accompanying notes to financial statements.
$ 129,054
128,080
786
129,054
1,875
128,866
188
$ 130,929
129,054

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