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The Ubyssey Jan 26, 1973

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Array Deans pass buck on women
Saying it is not university
policy to discriminate against
Nomen, administration
r resident Walter Gage has
tormed a committee to deal
with charges by the women's
action group of just such
discrimination.
The group, in a report
compiled by former arts 1
instructor Shelagh Day, found
women
positions
university.
Women
proportion
occupy
to   men
inferior
at   the
form a small
of the faculty and
student body and are paid less
for work equivalent to that
done by men, charges the
report.
But Gage said because he'd
only received a copy of the
report a few days ago: "I
obviously cannot at this stage
respond to it point by point.
"The report will be given
careful consideration in the
months ahead and I shall refer
sections of it to the appropriate
authorities on campus for their
opinions and advice," he said,
adding in a later interview he
has appointed a committee to
examine the report.
Information services
director Arnie Myers said the
list of names of people on the
committee is not yet definite.
"There are several people
who have not as yet accepted,"
Myers said. "The final list will
probably be complete Monday
or Friday."
Dean of women Helen
McCrae said her office would
co-operate with any effort to
rectify discrepancies in
treatment of men and women.
"I would expect that the
university would correct any
discrepancies in wages for
equal calibre jobs.
"The dean of women's office
would co-operate with any
movement  or   program   on
Women
studies
OK'd
studies
granted
senate
will   be
UBC's    women's
program      was
accreditation     by
Wednesday night.
Women's studies
available next year in the form
of four three unit courses:
women's studies 222, an
interdisciplinary course;
women's studies 224, a seminar
on women in literature;
-anthropology-sociology 222, a
seminar on women's studies;
and psychology 417, a course
on the psychology of sex roles.
Students will be able to take
a full six unit program
consisting of women's studies
222 and one of the other three
or then may enrol in just
women's studies 222.
Enrolment will be limited to 60
students taking the program
and an additional 25 taking just
women's studies 222.
The program was originally
planned by a group of women
in the summer of 1971 and
presented as a extracurricular
course of studies pending
formal accreditation.
Last spring it was developed
into a formal program by an
arts department committee
working in conjunction with
the original women's studies
planners.
After being approved by the
arts department on Dec. 6 it
was submitted for
-accreditation by senate.
campus to improve the status
of women," she said.
But education dean Neville
Scarfe said there will be no
need for such a program in his
faculty.
"There is no discrimination
whatsoever against women in
the department of education,"
Scarfe said.
"Women   are   given   equal
opportunity at all levels of the
department."
And assistant dean of science
James Whittaker said
documented discrimination in
his department — only seven
per cent of faculty are women
according to the report —
would have to be proven
further before he is satisfied
with the statistics.
He said he had not seen any
conclusive evidence to back up
the allegations.
"Science does not, to my
knowledge, discriminate
against women in hiring or
promotion," said Whittaker.
He added he would "be in favor
of further appropriations for
See page 2: SURPRISED
SOMETHING'S DIFFERENT in front of Brock Hall because about
12 engineers including Alma Mater Society president Doug
Aldridge   and   engineering   undergraduate   society   president
—sucha singh photo
Harold Cunliffe carted away 12-foot totem pole in white VW
van late Wednesday night. Eyewitnesses say UBC traffic and
security officer was am hand, but didn't interfere.
Equal pay for women 'top priority'
TORONTO (CUP) — University of
Toronto female teachers may soon
receive the same pay as their male
counterparts.
Equal pay for equal work is a "top
priority" in this year's budget, president
John Evans said Wednesday.
A special fund of about $150,000 has
been established to start eliminating
salary discrepancies between full time
male and female teachers holding the
same qualifications and workloads.
"$150,000 is only an estimate of the
amount needed to start equalizing
salaries at the university," Evans said.
The money was obtained from several
parts of the university budget he added.
PaulCiadario, a student member of the
university budget committee, said
"salary differences in some
departments (between male and female
teachers) are startling, while in others
there are none." The budget committee
was "surprised how much would be
needed" to eliminate salary
discrimination, he added.
A committee composed of three men
and three women has been set up to
review individual cases for all full-time
female teaching staff. It will search for
cases where women receive less pay
than men with equal qualifications and
workloads. The method of selection of
committee members has not been
announced yet, although university vice-
provost Peter Meincke was named
chairman.
The salary review is supposed to finish
before the beginning of the new
academic year on July 1. The committee
will then recommend to vice-president
and provost Don Forster persons to
whom compensation should be made,
Meincke said.
Meincke said Wednesday he has no
figures on individual-cases yet. The only
indicator is a report produced last year
which showed average difference of
$3,600 between men and women in the
same categories.
Discrimination against female
teachers was publicized a year ago when
the commission on post secondary
education in Ontario produced its draft
report.
It included recommendations to
eliminate sex discrimination in Ontario
universities.
Three female U of T teachers,
including Jill Conway, appointed U of
T's first female vice-president Jan. 1,
presented a study to the commission
showing a large salary and promotion
discrimination against women.
Their report cited, for instance, a
marked difference between the average
salary paid to men and women of equal
academic rank — $4,000 in the case of a
full professor.
Average salary for a full male
professor, including department heads
and chairmen, was $24,272, while women
received $20,940.
There are about 300 women among U
of T's 3,000 full time teachers.
The report also suggested
discrimination in promotion was a
reality, pointing out the lower the rank,
the greater the concentration of female
teaching staff.
Evans said the university is also
concerned about salaries and* working
conditions of non-academic staff
because U of T is "a little behind" the
community in pay and working
conditions.
There is "a moderately high turnover
of staff" he said, and the categories with
the lowest pay need the most change.
Only a very small percentage of the
university's non-academic staff are
unionized. They include support staff
and library workers but not clerical
workers.
< V^!/»,t< ■*<£?& "?& tWi <bj&"<«/«*J Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 26, 1973
EUS censured for skin ride
By FORREST NELSON
Alma Mater Society council
censured the engineering
undergraduate society
Wednesday for its plans to hold
the Lady Godiva ride.
Annually a woman, topless
or in skin colored tights, hired
by the EUS has ridden a horse
around campus. The engineers
called it the Lady Godiva ride
and this year they plan it for
Jan. 30.
Council further directed a
discussion of 'Sexism at UBC
be arranged by an EUS
spokesman       and a
representative of the women's
action group. The AMS also
signed a letter by the women's
action group denouncing the
attitude expressed through the
ride.
During  the  debate   of  the
censure of the EUS, their
representative Harold Cunliffe
announced: "If council passes
the censure, there will be a ride
— for sure."
Arts rep Vicki Obedkoff
suggested if the ride goes on,
EUS funds be frozen. The
motion was later withdrawn.
Grad student rep Stan
Persky, pointed out the AMS
could join with the
administration president
Walter Gage and request
RCMP to prevent the ride. The
movers were not willing to ask
for obstruction because their
aim was to raise awareness of
the problem — which couldn't
be enforced.
In other business, the finance
committee chairman assured
The Ubyssey editors Jan
O'Brien and John Andersen,
who attended council, the
committee would accept a staff
study on alternate possibilities
for producing the newspaper.
The current contract with
College Printers ends this
year, and printing costs
escalating by six per cent a
year force consideration of an
alternate method of
production.
Council passed a motion
amending the constitution of
the graduating class so proxy
attendance and voting would
be allowed at grad class
council meetings.
"Some grad reps as in
Nursing are kept off campus
by their course of study,
involving some sort of
interning — that's the reason
for this amendment," said
AMS treasurer David Dick.
'Art has come to an end'
says fine arts lecturer
By CAMILLE MITCHELL
Modern art is at a dead end
and so are man's values,
according to a Canadian fine
arts lecturer.
Bill Dryness said modern art
is a reflection of man's values,
at a Varsity Christian
Fellowship meeting Thursday
in SUB auditorium.
"Modern art shares our
common experience," he said.
"More people are influenced
by a sort of secular,
existentialism. Man does not
want to be involved with,
himself, his family, his
community nor even his god."
Dryness criticized modern
artists for their attitudes
towards life. 1
Govt plans UEL change
In the Speech from the
Throne Thursday, the Barrett
government announced its
intentions to introduce new
laws about the university
endowment lands.
In a one sentence
announcement in the eight-
minute speech, Lieutenant
Governor John Nicholson,
speaking     for     the     New
Democratic Party
government, said bills would
be introduced in the present'
session of the legislature to
amend the statutes.
Currently the endowment
lands come under the
jurisdiction of the provincial
ministry of lands and natural
resourses.
Surprised, shocked'
From page 1
continuing study if they could
get the money."
Whittaker refused further
comment, saying he hadn't had
a chance to intensively study
the report.
But classics head Malcolm
MacGregor told The Ubyssey if
there was discrimination he
was "surprised and shocked."
"To my knowledge there is
no discrimination in the faculty
of arts. People are hired and
promoted on the basis of ability
only."
He said he could comment
further after studying the
report.
The  main  problem  in   the
faculty of law, is the lack of
women graduate students,
According to dean Albert
McClean.
Expressing disappointment
because of this, McClean
added that the situation is
improving, with women now
making up 21 per cent of law
undergrads.
Other department and
faculty heads said they would
not comment because they
hadn't had a chance to study
the report.
Those contacted offered no
opinion as to why the situation
exists, saying only they are
shocked at the results.
And of course that it doesn't
happen in their faculty.
He quoted a statement made
by pop sculptor Cleas
Oldenburg: "I did not feel safe
around people. I will create my
own reality — one that I can
feel comfortable with."
Dryness said he felt this
attitude typified what he called
modern man's total non-
involvement in the world
around him.
He also quoted a statement
made   by   abstract   artist-
Jackson   Pollock:   "Art   is
totally unjustifiable and this is
how the world ought to be."
"This attitude is a cop-out,"
he said. "It means that there is
nothing to which I am
responsible outside my own
personal experience."
Dryness quoted Pablo
Picasso as saying: 'I put all
the things I like in my pictures.
Where things are concerned,
there are no class distinctions.'
"Art has come to the end of
this development," Dryness
adds. "I think art trends will
return to images, to something
external."
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Phone 224-4391 Friday, January 26,. 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Sex difference means money
ByRYONGUEDES
Difference of sex can cost a
woman from $1,740 to $3,071
yearly, former arts I instructor
Shelagh Day told a meeting of
the women's action group
Thursday.
The meeting, . called
primarily to discuss the Report
on the Status of Women at
UBC, was presided over by
Day and a five-member panel
of those who had worked on the
project.
Day, who wrote the report
discussed in length and
answered questions regarding
the  findings  of  the  report.
Touching briefly on the subject
of tenure Day said she was
"appalled by the fact that 22
per cent of the women in the
faculties are on one-year
contracts."
Day said clerk I and library
assistant, two strictly feminine
jobs,  are  the  lowest-paying
ones on campus, at $336 a
month, while the supervising
jobs in that area all go to men.
When asked as to the nature
of the report's proposed
further study, for which a
budget of $74,500 would be
required, Day said information
on   undergraduate   women
-j^rsw
*v*"*  '>.  "^_!-*
"■■ ■ >**. ■
—mark Hamilton photo
BETTER HURRY or you'll miss free chest x-ray and skin test spon- turn-about today. The aides are friendly, the skin test doesn't
sored by provincial health department. Mobile clinic leaves SUB    hurt that much and a visit might get you off 25-a-day habit.
students was lacking.
Day said a major problem on
the university is women have
been educated under the false
impression that there have
been no discriminatory
principles in academic life,
and have not been educated as
to their own history, origins or
background.
Day said women have no
actual legal recourse to
demand reform because the
universities act is not covered
by the bill of human rights.
She said administration
response to the report,
especially by president Walter
Gage, has been co-operative.
She said Gage has purchased
one hundred copies of the
report to distribute to senate
members.
Halfway through the
meeting a group of
approximately fifty engineers
made a conspicuous entrance
into the SUB ballroom, where
the meeting was being held,
and made various attempts to
disrupt the discussion.
One unidentified engineer,
presumably speaking for all of
them, said engineers "support
what the women's action group
is trying to accomplish but do
not approve of the way you are
going about it."
After several more attempts
to disrupt the meeting by
pelting the panel and audience
with paper airplanes, the
engineers left.
Muck
The following is the first of a three part series
the problems facing the UBC bookstore by a
graduate student who is a member of the
bookstore committee.
By ETHAN SCARL
Most of us have some story to tell about poor
service, outrageous prices, and unavailability of
texts at the UBC bookstore. Last year the
bookstore did away with the only good deal it had
going — the five per cent student rebate. The
reason given for dropping the rebate was the
massive shoplifting — $125,000 in 1970-71 alone.
With all the problems students have with the
bookstore most of them might sympathize with
the shoplifters. Last year I went to the Alma
Mater Society and asked why they didn't do
something about it. The reply, from the then AMS
treasurer David Mole, was "We don't have the
manpower so why don't you do it?"
Mole appointed me to the Bookstore committee
and I began to learn answers to the question:
"Why can't a $2,000,000 operation, with a captive
market break even?"
The two major reasons, besides bad
management, are the low profit margin on books
and bad judgement on the part of faculties.
The profit margin is 20 per cent, which may
sound like a fair return but this is actually low for
the bookselling business. Downtown bookstores all
have a margin of about 40 per cent.
True,- not all books are sold at 20 per cent
profits, but the textbooks are and that's where
most of the bookstore's money is tied up.
At one time the margin used to be enough. It
paid for the original building (built in 1954),
wages, heat, water, freight, as well as three
additions to the building and five per cent rebates
for students, ten per cent for faculty and twenty
per cent for departments.
A report drawn up in 1970 stated the need for a
new building to avoid the mess in the armory
every September. The report assumed the new
store could be financed from bookstore profits.
But the release of the 1971 budget showed not
only could the bookstore not finance a new
building, but it was running into red operating the
old one. Analysis found the money was going into
higher shipping costs, higher wages and stock
shrinkage (shoplifting).
The most important reason for the deficit was
the huge backlog of dead stock; books which are
no longer saleable. Half of this backlog is being
sold in the Brock Hall sale, though the store is
probably losing $100,000 on the sale.
Due to the narrow profit margin the more
books the store must stock, the more money it
loses. Most of the books the store stocks are
ordered by professors.
The store manager Bob Smith says he doesn't
want to stock any books not absolutely essential
but most professors, particularly those in the arts
faculty, order and assign many books of
peripheral interest to students. Smith says most of
these books could as easily be gotten from the
library.
Technically the bookstore is not supposed to sit
in judgement of faculty orders but in practice it
must often cut extravagant orders. This means
taking the chance on faculty and student wrath if
too few books are ordered.
For example, the management did an analysis
of this year's chemical engineering text books.
They sold 80 per cent of the books they ordered,
but if they'd ordered what the faculty wanted
them to they'd only have sold 55 per cent. Yet the
80 per cent average is better than the usual
margin of books sold.
The armory book sale this year left 35 per cent
of the stock unsold despite the heaviest order
cutting yet.
While book prices have been spiraling, the
amount students spend at the bookstore has
remained about the same. (Around $90 altogether
— $70 on books, $20 on other supplies). They just
buy fewer hardcover books, and often fewer books
altogether.
The bookstore has been trying to tell faculty to
clearly distinguish between required reading and
recommended reading. These requests should be
amplified by students who should not feel
pressured into buying books they can get from the
library.
There are countless tales of faculty and
bookstore antagonizing each other. The bookstore
loses an order, a professor orders a book then tells
students they need not buy it as they will only need
a few Xeroxable pages.
There are many cases where books already in
stock are ordered in a different edition or format.
It is profitable for authors and publishers to put
out revised editions as frequently as possible and
their agents are paid to convince the faculty the
updated editions are an absolute must.
For some arts faculty books the store many
have as many as eight editions and prices on its
shelves of what is basically the same thing.
The professor may want a particular book
because the page numbers match his notes, or for
its five page introduction, or because it is an
elegant volume "worthy of a premanent place in
the student's future library," or he may simply
have been suckered by some publisher's agent.
The faculty should be made to realize it is
strongly to the advantage of the bookstore and
students to keep using the cheapest edition as long
as possible; the bookstore can get rid of its stock-
over a few years and students can buy and sell
used copies until they are worn out.
One of the things working against a professor
doing this is publishers' agents, who are paid to
see professors order lots of books.
Agents have a clever device to aid them in their
sales pitches — desk copies.
Desk copies are textbooks supplied free to all
lecturers, discussion leaders, lab instructors and
paper graders by the publisher, as soon as the
professor in charge agrees to use the textbook for
the course. As well, the professor gets an advance
promotional copy to help convince him to order.
The book is free to all these people but the
publisher adds 15 per cent to the student price to
cover desk copies regardless of how many are
ordered. This is an unfair practice but nothing has
been done about it so far.
Obviously departments should refuse desk
copies and instead supply them from their own
funds. In all cases students should demand to
know whether or not they are paying for desk
copies and if so pressure departments or their
professor to stop the practice.
So far I have been talking as though the store is
invariably stuck with anything it can't well. In
fact most publishers will accept returned goods,
but impose restrictions on the quantity that may
be returned (commonly 20 per cent of the amount
ordered) or the period of time in which they will
accept returns. In all cases the bookstore must
pay freight both ways.
I came across one case where a professor
ordered several hundred computer information
cards from IBM. He did not realize they sold for
$1.25 each. His enterprising students bought only a
few, Xeroxing the rest they needed. IBM permits
no returns so the bookstore is now left with $300 in
unsalable merchandise.
Recently the store has circulated a list of
publishers to be avoided because of problems
returning stock and while generally faculty is
sympathetic, in some cases (like IBM) there is no
alternate to order from.
So, when the bookstore orders something, it is
generally stuck with it, if it can't sell it. Even if it
is able to return unsalable stock it takes a loss in
discount and freight rates.
For example, the store is only getting a 50 per
cent return at the Brock hall sale but if it were to
try and dispose of the stock through a wholesaler
it would only get ten per cent.
m Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 26, 1973
Without the coW and desolation of winter
there could not be the warmth and splendor of spring.
- No Chi Mhth
Vietnam
"We have achieved peace with honor in
Vietnam." So said the man on the screen. «ci •      ■
He was referring to U.S. involvement in a war     &%CK>
which has made familiar the words My Lai, napalm,
defoliation, strategic hamlets, daisycutters, Green
Berets and many, many more.
The U.S. role in Vietnam began with a lie. It
continued behind a curtain of lies and now has
ended with the biggest lie of all — peace with
honor.
Peace, perhaps. But never honor.
Sports
It seems Canadians have learned little from the
debacle of the Russia-Canada hockey series. We
remember Canadian athletes were widely
condemned for various animal acts perpetrated in
the name of hockey.
Well, nothing has changed. Read the story in
the sports section under the headline Kick him in
the nuts.
Behavior like that described in the story should
be stopped.
We suggest a sports federation be set up to
train and administer coaches. Anyone wishing to
coach the game in an organized league would be
required to pass strict examinations on the
fundamentals of the sport. Any gross misconduct
would result in the offender be barred from
coaching.
A rule like this may reduce the number of
coaches. However we feel this is preferable to
allowing a few individuals the opportunity of
turning every hockey rink in the country into a
gladiator training schooL
We suggest the UBC sports department, as part
of a supposedly enlightened institution, be the
initiator of such a federation.
7/yf UBYSSEY
JANUARY 26,1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
People, humble and proud, came from all corners of the earth to pay their
final respects to the Great Mam; people from places with strange names like
Lesley Krueger, Ryon Guedes, Vaugh Palmer, Camille Mitchell, Deborah MacNeiH,
David Schmidt, Phil Magnall, Len Johnston, Steve > Brown, Forrest Nelson, Ken
Dodd, David Mars, and Ario the Wonder Amoeba. "He was more than a leader
and a father-figure for us", wailed Simon Truelove, Kent Spenser, Mike Sasges
and Lorri Rudland. "He made the best goddam watercress sandwich you've
ever eaten!"
I am an engineer at this
university, but I feel I am quite
different from many of the
others. I represent the
minority of engineers who are
against the type of immature
displays put on by the
engineering undergraduate
society.
I myself have never worn a
red jacket and I don't intend to
ever start for I feel it is the
symbol of a malignant growth
which tries its hardest to stop
people from making their own
decisions in life.
I went into engineering
because I happened to enjoy
the material involved. I will
continue to enjoy my subject
material but I refuse to be
forced to dehumanize other
people.
It disgusts me to see others
around me get their kicks
through racism and
exploitation of women. These
men are so nice and polite to
the women they take out and
then they turn around and
write papers and other such
items degrading these same
people that they supposedly
love.
I myself love humankind and
I refuse to tag along with the
sick crowd. I denounce the
EUS to which I am forced to
belong.
A disgusted Geer
(I will not sign this for I
know the tupe of consequences
facing a person who goes
against the EUS.)
Disgust
An open letter to the
engineering undergraduate
society and the University of
British Columbia:
We write this letter to invite
the EUS of UBC to cancel the
Lady Godiva ride. We forward
this invitation because we
believe that to cancel this ride
means one less dehumanizing
act in the world. We further
would suggest to the EUS that
your society might well
remember Lady Godiva by
inviting the whole of the
university to consider the
plight of oppressed groups
today and to discover how we
might creatively respond to
present issues.
This ride is considered by
some to be playful and
inconsequential. Compared to
Letters
many events in the world today
it is miniscule. We see it as the
tip of an iceberg and
represents for us a whole
series of dehumanizing events
which take place in our society.
The Lady Godiva ride is
dehumanizing. Someone will
be paid to expose themselves.
We fear that the EUS and other
participants will not see her as
a person, but rather as an
object. "You pay your money
and you get your services." To
be viewed as a person is to be
loved, cared for and respected
for our full human potential.
We ask members of the EUS if
they would be supporting this
ride, if the woman on the horse
was their sister or girlfriend.
From the perspective of Christ
she is my sister . . . your
sister. This is very different
from viewing her as a "chick"
whom we hired.
We suggest that this is the tip
of an iceberg. We as
individuals and as a society do
this much of the time. We treat
people as objects rather than
persons.
Mentally retarded children
are not seen as someone to love
and from whom to receive love,
but rather in embarrassment
we say: "Isn't he a cute little
fellow?"
Beryl Fox's documentary on
Vietnam, Mill of the Gods,
demonstrated how soldiers
depersonalized those against
whom they fought, in order to
be able to survive killing
others.
Jean Vanier's book Eruption
to Hope carefully describes
how our consumer society
depersonalizes and uses
everybody, in particular, those
on low incomes.
Racial prejudice is allowing
our stereotype of people to
captivate our minds that we
are unable to see a black man
or an Indian as a person, a look
at early writings demonstrates
how slave traders treated
blacks as worse than cattle.
And this continues to happen
today.
The Lady Godiva ride is
about these issues because , as
many women remind us, they
experience this same
depersonalization. Because of
our attitudes and the roles
society assigns women they
are not recognized for their full
human potential.
We suggest that the iceberg
is very large and admit that we
are also touched by it in our
own lives as chaplains. We
freely admit that we need to
learn much as individuals and
as members of our society.
From our heritage in the Old
Testament and from the life of
Christ we are reminded of how
we are all called to repent and
return to the life that God
intended. This tradition calls
us to deal with people as
brothers and sisters and not as
objects.
Finally, if the EUS proceeds
with this ride we would suggest
to the rest of the university that
we respond in the tradition of
the peasants of the first ride,
who turned their backs so as
not to dishonour Lady Godiva.
As a sign of our unwillingness
to perpetuate this
depersonalizing act we call on
the members of the university
community to absent
themselves from this event, or,
if you find yourself in its
vicinity, to turn your back.
Peter Fribley
George Hermanson
Don Johnson
[campus chaplains]
Dave Elviss
Clayton Vogler
Ormsby
Of the three full professors in
the faculty of arts who are
women, two are about to retire.
One, Margaret Ormsby, was
subjected gratuitously to
ridicule in Art Smolensky's
column in The Ubyssey of Jan. *
16. Ormsby will be
remembered, as she is known
by her students and colleagues,
for her scholarship, her
teaching ability, and her
service to the academic
community.
Since Smolensky and his
anonymous friend know that as
well as the rest of us, the
characterization of Ormsby
printed in The Ubyssey tells us
not about her but about
attitudes of these two persons,
attitudes which may have
something to do with the fact
that there are only three full
professors in the faculty of arts
who are women.
Helen Sonthoff
for the Women's Action Group
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be addressed to:
Letters, The Ubyssey, Room
241K, Student Union Building,
UBC. Friday, January 26, 1973
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Cunliffe
An open letter to Penny
Newman.
I received your letter on
Friday morning delivered by
none other than The Ubyssey
delivery truck. "When I read
your letter, I was struck both
with anger, frustration, and
hurt."
I am angry, Miss Newman,
for reasons obvious to myself
but seemingly not so obvious to
you or any people like you who
launch vicious and blind
attacks with little thought or
concern of the consequences.
I, Miss Newman, did not
compose that letter. Nor did I
contribute to it, nor did I write
it, nor did I sign it, nor did I
have knowledge of it, and, as
you so aptly pointed oit, nor did
I deliver it.
In light of this, there are
several inconsistencies that I
feel I must point out.
Firstly, I can sympathize
with you in assuming that this
letter (presumably signed by
me) did in fact come from me.
But upon considering the
"many occasions throughout
the year" when we have "had
personal, intelligent and
friendly discussions", I cannot
imagine why you would not
consult me prior to taking
action. Our relationship has
indeed been open and friendly.
Secondly, surely The
Ubyssey (being the pillar of
righteousness that it is) would
at least try to verify "my
letter". This is not only their
responsibility to me, but more
importantly; to you Penny. I
would think that as your
friends, Penny, the editors
would do their utmost to
prevent you from unjustly
issuing libellous statements
that are highly defamatory to
any person's character. Both
The Ubyssey and yourself are
clearly open to legal action.
I shall dwell on The Ubyssey
longer. I have submitted
letters to the editors prior to
this. My signature is on those
letters and they should be on
file. That leaves two
possibilities open — either all
critical letters are filed under
"garbage" or the editors
displayed a definite lack of
concern to "tell it the way it
is". I will not say this is
sensationalism, but will only
leave the readers to speculate
and decide for themselves.
This can be further
substantiated by noting that
apparently no effort was made
to contact me prior to Friday's
publication. Both my on-
campus and off-campus phone
numbers are available to The
Ubyssey and I have, on a
number of occasions, received
phone calls from Ubyssey
reporters at odd hours of the
night. Most odd that they chose
to leave me out this time!
But I suppose that this sort of
editorial concern and
responsibility has become so
predominate on this campus
that this incident is only
another turd in the dung heap.
Also, good readers, consider
these questions. In the light of
the upcoming AMS elections,
who gains sympathy? Who will
gain recognition? (not of the
rather dubious nature that has
been heaped on Penny and
myself) Watch the names on
the election posters. This is
only junior politics but they
sure use all the stuff you find in
the big league.
Finally, it is I who deserves
, an apology, Penny, and I will
be   pleased   to   read   it   in
Friday's Ubyssey. You and I
have been used, Penny, and
will continue to be used by
those wishing to exploit our
misunderstanding.
Another point deserves
clarification. Friday's attack
will "not leave your victim
cowering in a corner". Lady
Godiva will ride displaying to
the campus two valuable
attributes which so much
typify the spirit of engineering
— fairness to all and
undaunted bravery.
Harold Cunliffe
EUS president
personally I would entreat you
to stop displaying your
ignorance. If you continue
writing articles, try doing it in
a gentlemanly manner and get
the facts correct.
Ruth Hodgins
p.e. 2
[I
At present the provincial
government regulations
pertaining to teachers who
begin to teach for a school
district are undemocratic.
When a teacher signs his
GEARS AND SILLY GRINS . . . take Lady Godiva for a ride.
Reply
The smirk behind that tone of
injured innocence makes us
sick. The letter was printed in
the honest belief that it was
written by you. But you claim
you had no knowledge of the
letter and we accept your word
and apologize.
Assuming that the person
who wrote the letter was an
engineer, we suggest you do a
little digging and find out who
did write the letter —
presumably someone who
knows both yourself and Penny
Newman.
The rest of your letter is not
worth replying to.
Wrestle
I would like to make a few
comments regarding the
Friday, Jan. 19 article
covering the wrestling meet
between UBC and Simon
Fraser University.
It is obvious that Mr. Nelson
is either unaccustomed to
covering sporting events in a
mature manner, or is unaware
that some people do appreciate
an unbiased report.
You may quickly argue my
point by replying that it was
"tongue-in-cheek";
nevertheless, it was a very
poor display of UBC's
sportsmanship. Upon reading
the article I felt embarrassed
to admit my association with
this university.
Your article was based upon
much misinformation
regarding the SFU team and
until you know these people
contract to work in a school
district, he knows that after the
first month he may at any time
be placed on probation. During
his probationary period which
lasts until the end of the school
year, June 30, he may be fired
anytime after 30 days' notice.
Teachers may be placed on
probation by the school board
only after consultation with the
district supertendent of
schools. Upon dismissal a
teacher may have a right,
under the school law, to consult
his superintendent and
principal to discuss reasons for
their harsh actions.
At no time does a 'teacher
during the first year of
appointment with his school
board have the right to obtain
an impartial appeal held by a
independent authority to
justify these administrative
decisions. To simply say to a
fired employee that he can
discuss with his employer
reasons for such cruel
treatment is not only
frightening and humiliating
but an insult to one's
intelligence.
The teacher in question may
have several years of teaching
experience with satisfactory
inspection reports. Still, he
must suffer through this nerve-
wracking process which could
ruin his reputation and career
overnight. Where is the
fairness of so-called
democratic legislators who
have imposed this unjust
procedure?
Richard Mark
Sparwood, B.C.
Women
The recent issue involving
the engineering undergraduate
society and their plans for the
Lady Godiva ride brilliantly
underlines the convention of
sexual discrimination against
women which remains
strongly and overtly enforced
by the EUS. The use of the
university campus as a theatre
for such spectacles is an
affront to all those in the
university community
concerned with respect for
human beings.
The Report on the Status of
Women at UBC documents the
almost complete exclusion of
women from engineering.
Engineers perpetuate this
situation with a vengeance by
initiating and supporting
activities which exploit,
degrade and mock women. One
woman alone is not the object
of their abuse; the attitude
behind such actions affects any
woman teaching, working or
learning in such an
environment. It is completely
inhospitable to woman and is
clearly an obstruction to any
movement towards equal
educational opportunity at
UBC. Since the parties
initiating these kinds of
activities do not seem fully
aware of the mean of their
attitudes and actions, it is the
responsibility of other
members of the university
community to indicate their
disapproval and censure.
graduate students association
abortion action committee
arts undergraduate society
speakers and education
committee
women's studies collective
dean of women's office
union of anthropology and
sociology students
women's action group
Young Socialists
Anglican-United
campus ministry
EUS exec
An open letter to Penny
Newman.
We, the under-signed
members of the EUS
executive, sincerely regret the
embarrassment and personal
anguish which you have
experienced, as a consequence
of the letter sent to you,
purportedly written by Harold
Cunliffe, and which was
published by The Ubyssey on
Jan. 19. No such letter was
authorized by this executive,
and we entirely dissociate
ourselves from both the letter
and its contents. We deplore
the publicity that this entire
matter has received, since an
examination of the letter in
question must result in some
doubt as to its authenticity.
The date, Feb. 30, does not
exist. [We were aware the date
Feb. 30 does not exist. Eds.]
The young woman who
performs the ride will be
highly paid for her part in the
event, in full accordance with
the terms of a business
agreement between herself
and the EUS. No debasement
of women is implied ' or
intended. This is a traditional
event which commemorates a
courageous gesture by the
original Lady Godiva, a lady
who, we feel sure, would never
have wanted her actions to be
construed as being degrading
to her sex.
EUS executive
BURAU
mike
happiest  at the
Burau
An open letter to Karl
Burau:
I have never sent any letter
to The Ubyssey's editorial
page before. I do it this time
because I am moved by your
lengthy "farewell plea" in The
Ubyssey.
You let people know that you
have become a man full of
disappointment and "utter
frustration." Well Mr. Burau,
even though I have never
known you, but from what I
read, I believe there is more to
it that just that.
I am referring to your
planned departure from
Canada.
Disappointment, yes.
Frustration, yes. But why are
you leaving Canada now, after
all these years; after all the
efforts you have spent in
"leading the Canadians to the
light" so to say?
Is it, I ask you if I may,
because you are tired, now you
have reached your '60's. Is it
that you have lost your faith in
what you preach; no, sorry,
discuss. May I be so bold as to
ask if it is because of your
stubbornness, obstinacy that
brought your frustration to
you? What is that third and
greatest danger that you seem
to be the only one who can see;
that "vitality?".
I hope that I am speaking in
the same terms with you. I do
not know you well, so I may
have misinterpreted your
words. But I hope that I have
the correct idea about you. If
you think that I have
misunderstood your "farewell
plea" please ignore this letter.
Lastly, a little piece of my
thought. I know that you would
agree with me that there are a
lot of frustrations flowing
around this world, especially in
UBC. But what do they do
about it? You sir, certainly a
man of a philosophical mind
should know that patience is
the strongest muscle in a man.
I have frustrations too, sir,
with the Canadians and UBC
but I learn not to be
disappointed. Mind you, I am
not boasting myself, just
saying things as needed. I
know that if you guess at my
age you are bound to be wrong.
Also, my discussion club, if
ever founded, shall never have
any president, honorary or no.
A good, meaningful discussion
only results from all members,
not one, two or three persons
who is (sic) known to be know-
it-all men by their titles. A
chairman is what is needed to
control the discussion.
I shall sign off here to make
my letter short. I hope that I
have not offended anybody
here. Please, please, forgive
me if I do.
Respectfully yours,
Cornelious Young,
ex-UBC grad, food science Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 26, 1973
In America
The sound of security'
By PHILIP WEST
LOS ANGELES (CUPI)—
Some call them "whirlypigs".
The cops themselves call the
noise from their helicopters
"the sound of security."
Every night they fly over Los
Angeles, armed with spotlights
and sometimes machine guns,
to ensure people 1984 is
approaching on schedule.
during an  "internal security
emergency."
American citizens are
checked in any case by the
utterly necessary social
security number, without
which the resident is not a
proper citizen. No bank
account can be opened without
one, no employment can be
taken, and even infants living
"Attention .. . attention
..." over the high whine an
incessant whep of the rotor
blades. "This has been
declared an unlawful
gathering and you are ordered
to disperse immediately and
return t* your homes."
Not a demonstration, not a
riot, but a -party that turned a
little noisy.
Alone, it visually illustrates
the control placed on citizenry
in the U.S. to ensure
maintenance of "law 'n'
order." But it is only a small
part of the Orwellian reality
gathering momentum in
America.
Biggest brother of them all is
the FBI, with fingerprints of
more than 86 million people, or
data on more than one-third of
the population, with no
distinction recorded whether
the arrested person was found
guilty or innocent.
In addition, federal
investigators have access to
overlapping information
contained in 264 million police
records, 323 million medical
case histories, 279 million
psychiatric dossiers, and 100
million credit files. The justice
department is now attempting
to pass a law enabling federal
law enforcement officers to
check indentification of
'suspects' by "fingerprints,
palm prints, foot prints,
measurements, blood
specimens, urine specimens,
saliva samples, photographs
and lineups."
And, says the Washington
Post, the FBI maintains an
"agitator index" containing
the names of at least 10,000 so-
called ''potential
subversives" — to be used as a
basis for "federal arrests in
the event of war or an 'internal
security emergency'." A new
computer intelligence system,
planned for full operation by
1975, will give law enforcement
officers the capability to
determine instantly the
suspect's subversive rating
off their parents' welfare
payments are required to wear
one.
Television surveillance
systems have been installed in
a number of U.S. cities to
televise "suspicious persons."
In San Jose, Calif., in Hoboken,
N.J. and in Mount Vernon,
N.Y., television cameras
located in the cities' business
centres can discern a man-
sized object in extreme
darkness from more than half
a mile away.
Illegal telephone tapping is
widespread and undertaken by
private concerns — such as
Bell Telephone itself — as well
as government departments
(as proven by the many
charges dismissed because of
illegal wiretaps). Grocery
stores fingerprint customers to
ensure their cheques won't
bounce.
Except for the latter, none of
these practices is more openly
chilling than the sight of three
or four helicopters in the night
sky, their spotlights sweeping
the streets. Airborne
surveillance has undergone
national proliferation since the
success of a trial project in Los
Angeles in 1966.
Seventeen police
departments in the area now
use helicopters equipped with
spotlights and public address
systems, and the latest ones
ordered by the nearby San
Fernando sheriff will also be
armed with sub-machine-guns.
The environment suffers as
well as the people. In
Huntingdon Beach, near Los
Angeles, where the cops use
straight wing aircraft, a long
line of palm trees have been
chopped on top to permit
adequate airborne
surveillance.
The helicopters are
supported in Los Angeles by
ground police armed with
machine guns and automatic
rifles. And part of their
psychology includes  what  is
unassumingly titled the Basic
Car Plan.
Simply explained, it
alienates one strata of society
and uses it as informants
against   another    lifestyle.
Helicopter use is not
confined to cities. In many
states, speeding drivers on the
nationwide network of defence '
department interstate
freeways, are clocked from the
air over marked distances and
highway patrol cars are
dispatched to ticket the
offending drivers.
The cops are happy with the
results of helicopter use.
Sergeant Danny Shea of the
Los Angeles police department
says the aircraft have allowed
elimination of decoy squads —
to encourage and then trap
victims — while still reducing
the number of muggings and
rapes.
"If we spot something going
on, we just flash the light on a
take a look. Some of the guys
don't like that much, but the
girls always smile and wave so
we'll know everything's all
right.
A more intellectual
colleague extolled airborne
surveillance as "a tremendous
psychological tool — a sort of
silent persuader."
Helicopter manufacturers
Bell and Hughes Ltd. have
promised police quieter
aircraft within a few months to
eliminate protests like the one
from more than 1,308 residents
in Newport Beach,
complaining about the noise.
At the same time, police here
and in cities such as
Washington, D.C. and San
Diego are issuing propaganda
to sell residents on helicopter
noise as "the sound of
security."
Shea has a much more
simple defence: "Just think, if
the good people don't like the
noise a police helicopter
makes, imagine how it scares
hell out of the bad guys."
They beal him.
They deprived him.
They ridiculed him.
They broke his heart.
But they couldn't
break his spirit.
**
vs
66
kes
TONIGHT & SAT.
7:00 P.M. & 9:30 P.M.
SUN.—7:00 P.M. Only
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SUB FILMSOC
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"kes"
directed by Ken Loach
with
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Freddie Fletcher, Colin Welland
"Shows all too clearly the
tragic waste of a system that
discharges children after ten
years captivity without the
remotest idea of what
education is really about,"
"Infinitely sad in its total
implications, it is also
immensely funny in much of
its detail."
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
NOMINATIONS
for the following AMS
Executive & Senate positions
are now open:
President
Co-Ordinator
Internal Affairs Officer
Secretary
s»d
Three Senators At Largs ^
Deadline for Executive nominations is 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, February 1, 1973. Deadline for Senate is 12:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, February 7, 1073.
For eligibility form and information woutd yen please
come to the office of AMS Secretary, Sally Clark, SUB 250. I
am most likely to be there Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday afternoons. I would appreciate meeting all the
candidates before the closing nomination dav.
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You sure you don't have a cousin in the Bronx?
Barney and . ..
Last of the Red Hot Lovers
by Neil Simon
Directed by Otto Lowy
at the Arts Club
Her svelte lithe thighs ripple beneath the thin flimsy
material. Sharp jutting breasts tantalize: seductive peaks
steeply rising from flat firm tummy and curvaceous hips.
You rage and burn, fire coursing through your veins. She is
swept up in your arms, and you crush her yielding body
against yours. Mouths hungrily search for each other,
breaths are gasped for, and then . . .the both of you trip
over the couch, rudely squelching love's passionate
embrace.
That's the closest Barney, played by Owen Foran,
comes to climax in the first act. And although Elaine
(Gerry Claman) isn't as voluptuous as our fantasies would
like her, she is superbly sensuous and sleek.
What are the ingredients for a successful comedy? This
question raises numerous replies, all of which could be
justified. No matter what ingredients would be agreed upon
however, Neil Simon has the knack of putting them all
together for hit after hit. Promises, Promises, The Odd
Couple, Barefoot in the Park . . . Simon has nine or ten
successes to his credit. The general recipe includes a
situation milked to the last laugh, condensed characters
who are short on depth but long on idiosyncratic humour
and a degree of truth cleverly whispered to the audience
beneath the laughs.
Last of the Red Hot Lovers is from the Simon cookbook.
Barney is a middle-aged business man, married and
mothered, whose conception of an uncontrollable desire is a
cold pepsi after a game of handball. The general situation is
his feeble attempt to initiate an extra-marital affair.
The premise does not change. Barney has three acts to
get three women into bed with him, each woman a different
act. Elaine is a superficial, hard and cold castrator who
uses men. "I happen to like the physical act of making
love," she says. "It warms me. It stimulates me. It makes
me feel like a woman." Gerry Claman is dressed in brilliant
reds, and she is ceaselessly roaming the stage, on the prowl.
She handles the vituperative, callous Elaine well.
Bobbi (Pia Shandel) is a dum-dum blonde who is
sexually attractive in a rather pathetic manner. Bobbi is a
difficult character, for her strength lies in her artificiality
and extravagant phoniness. Pia Shandel plays the role in
Marilyn Monroe style, and is quite effective.
Doris Chillicott assumes the role of Jeanette, an old
friend of Barney's. Jeanette is neurotic and hypocondriac, a
menopausal meloncholic who gives Barney a pain in the
ass. Chillicott does the role admirably.
None of the three female roles is favourable. They're
one dimensional and contrived, but Simon uses them to the
play's best advantage and drains every laughable ounce
from their behaviour.
However, the men get the shafting as well. Barney is a
blundering, blubbering buffoon, who is in over his head in
his attempt to be another Don Juan. Owen Foran does a
superb job. We witness Barney's gradual metamorphosis
into a suave, overweight, balding charmer, but underneath
it all is soft malleable Barney the push-over.
Simon is a comic, not
convert a painful truth i
audiences to laugh at then
his plays above crassitude
At 47, he feels the "good Iii
by. "Shouldn't life be I
despairingly. He's trapped
a last stab, Barney's last
did not merely exist, but
. . . th
The Tempest by Shakesp<
the Metro Theatre.
French playwright Eu
a speech delivered in Sal
women
We have forgotten the i
are no longer able to set
proximity or the remote]
the pleasure of looking ;
look around us and abo
discover again the fres
wonder that would mak(
again as on the first da
Nothing can match the irr
joy  that result from  a
Tempest.
How refreshing, aftei
into the grim, horizon-less
Godot to experience Mirai
at first sight for Ferdinai
I mij
A thing divine; for'nc
I ever saw so noble.
and her child-like wonde
foreign visitors to Prospe
0
How many goodly cr«
How beauteous mank:
That has such people
If The Tempest is  t
unobtrusive must the dire
might impede the flight
against the audience's tota
rich words of the play si
might not allow for a s
rejected.
John Gray's "musica
Tempest currently being
much to recommend it. (
absence of scenery on stag
are several rather annoyii
seem to produce a genera
For example, the pr
directly behind the actors
forget that one is in the 1
should forget until Prospe
us to applaud the perforn
world of art to 'real' life:
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 26, 1973 Shakespeare
. . . release me from my hands
with the help of your good hands.
Also, the fine recitation of Yeats' poem 'The Second
Coming' at the beginning of the production is unnecessary.
Although the chaotic, "unnatural" world evoked in the first
scene of the play finds a parallel in that modern world
described in Yeats' poem and the quality of tragic gaiety
_ characterized in 'Lapis Lazuli' is a sort of poetic parallel to
the tragicomic perspective of Prospero, The Tempest
stands on its own. It does not need to be made relevant for it
is essentially timeless.
Otherwise, this production, though not totally magical,
is good entertainment. Barbara Clayden plays a suitably
innocent, modest, beautiful and totally delightful Miranda.
She charms us with her belief that, "all is for the best in
this, the best of possible world." David Hinks as Prospero
keeps a nice balance among the numerous demanding roles
he plays: as magician, educator, philosopher, puritanical
father and Duke of Milan. Larry Lillo is a sufficiently
villainous Antonio. Suzie Payne is a hideous, slimy,
rebellious, querulous and poetic Caliban. Brenda Sheerin
and Helene Bouvier, alternating as the Airy Spirit Ariel, are
not sufficiently airy but make up for it in enthusiasm. The
other actors turn in good, though not outstanding,
performances.
Blue jeans, capes, colourful robes comprise the
costumes which are neither contemporary to Shakespeare's
time or fully contemporary to ours. They are appropriate to
the never-never land atmosphere of the play. The music by
the Cast Ensemble which includes percussion, a jazzy piano
and a light, dancing flute, and the energetically delivered
sons sprinkled throughout the plays, approach the desired
quality of, in Caliban's words, "Sounds and sweet airs that
give delight and hurt not". —RobertPerry
osopher. Yet his ability to
laughing matter; getting
3, is the facet which raises
ey is unhappy with his life,
if not already, passing him
than nice?" he queries
le knows it. The affairs are
3 convince himself that he
—Stephen Morris
Hrected by John Gray. At
anesco recently claimed in
that as modern men and
tg of contemplation. We
Ve cannot see either the
our world. We have lost
ind yet, if we really did
and within us we could
of wonder, a child-like
rorld as fresh and young
reation.
to wonder and the painful
ig of Shakespeare's The
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Friday, January 26, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 1 Records1
Revamped rock
Bubble Rock Is Here to Stay/Jonathan
King. U.K. Records UKS 53101.
To many people Jonathan King is a mere
memory in the music field. Those who think
back to 1965 will probably remember his
hit, Everyone's Gone To The Moon. To
many others he is known also for his record
producing talents. It was he who was
responsible for It's Good News Week by
Hedgehoppers Anonymous.
However, since the mid sixties he has
been heard little of in North America as a
recording artist. But Jonathan King is not
to be forgotten, just as 'old gold' rock music
will not be forgotten. So what should come
crashing back into the public eye but a
collection of some of these million sellers,
with King Jonathan at the helm.
As a warning to those who love to wallow
in nostalgia, this is no ordinary 'eap of
'onourable old 'its that has been hurriedly
thrown together. Each number has been
completely re-arranged and revamped in a
humorous, original and somewhat
eccentric way, making it a fun album to
listen to.
Satisfaction, by Jagger and Richard, is
given a strong country flavour by King,
believe it or not! Forceful but bouncy
guitar strumming is supported by a banjo
and violins, and King's vocal has touches of
the style of Sonny Bono.
With Dylan's Mr. Tambourine Man, King
thinks it only natural that tambourines be
used as accompaniment. Consequently, he
uses 15 of them, assisted by a single
accoustic guitar, to provide the musical
backing. Joining in eventually are rich,
crisp violins followed by bass and finally
the full orchestra.
An echo effect, produced by multi-
tracking the vocal, is created in Bobby
Vee's old hit of about 10 years ago, The
Night Has a Thousand Eyes. The beat in
this number has been intensified, and a
supporting orchestra has been introduced
to infuse into it some new life.
King does not seem to have made too
much improvement on the Honeycombe's
old hit, Have I the Right?, though the tribal
war drum beat at the beginning and the
brass interlude change its flavour a little.
How many are ready for Bill Haley's
Rock Around The Clock in a 1-2-3 waltz
style? For the benefit of non-believers,
King has done exactly that on this record,
complete with barrel organ, harmonica,
and waltzy strings. As if this was not
enough, King adds a semi-falsetto vocal
reminiscent of the singer of the old
Temperance Seven.
Roy Orbison's momentum-gathering
voice is parodied in reverse by King's
discreet and barely audible vocalizing in
It's Over. The main responsibility for the
melody therefore falls to the horn, which is
supported by a Hollyridge Strings-type of
cascading violin sound.
The original tempo of Sweets For My
Sweet, formerly by the Searchers, is
retained though it features a lead violin
doing the rocking and rolling. With the
support of pounding drums, fuzz bass and
electric guitar, the results are pleasantly
surprising.
For real connoisseurs of the rare and
unusual, try Twist and Shout with a string
quartet and an echo chamber vocal! Can
this be the prototype for a new direction in
chamber music? Approximately half way
through, the quartet is joined by a full rock
band and orchestra, and the vocal changes
to talking, in an apparent attempt to
persuade the listener to twist and shout.
This album may not be everyone's cup of
tea but, besides being fun as a novelty, it is
musically well-produced and is very
pleasant to listen to.
—Robert Mitchinson
BLEED
TODAY!
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WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
1
m
The University of British Columbia
Centre for
Continuing Education
READING & STUDY
SKILLS PROGRAMS
Reading Improvement Program
(RC 11)
The Reading and Study Skills Centre offers individualized courses
for those who wish to improve their reading and study skills for
academic, professional and personal reasons.
Course work emphasizes increase of reading comprehension and
rate, previewing, skimming and scanning, flexibility, study habits,
critical reading skills and special interest areas.
The   fee   scale   is  $30  for  secondary   students  and   full-time
university students and $60 for non-students. Classes meet for 18
hours and commence the week of February 5, 1973. Enrolment is
limited to 15 people per section. Classes meet in East Mall Annex.
CLASS SCHEDULE
Section             Time
Day
Room             Type
1         12:30-   1:30
M. T. Th.
119         Student
2          3:45- 5:45
M. W.
119        *Special Student
3         7:00- 9 p.m.
M. W.
118        Student
4          7:00- 9 p.m.
M. W.
119          Non-student
5         7:00- 9 p.m.
T. Th.
118          Student
6         7:00- 9 p.m.
T. Th.
119         Non-student
7          9:00-12 noon
Sat.
119          Non-student
8          9:00-12 noon
Sat.
118         Secondary Student
'Reserved for students with
non-English backgrounds.
Writing Improvement Program
(RC 12)
Writing Improvement is an 18-hour non-credit course designed to
improve essay writing and composition skills. The course is open
to university and college students of all years, to persons who are
planning to resume their studies and to persons generally wanting
to improve their writing for personal or professional reasons.
The course will deal with common problems in writing such as
essay organization and structure and punctuation. Students will
be encouraged to bring their writing assignments to class for
discussion.
The fee scale is $30 for full-time students and $60 for
non-students. Enrolment is limited to 15 persons per class. Classes
commence the week of February 5, 1973 and meet in the
Buchanan Building (Room 3248).
CLASS SCHEDULE
Section Time Day Location
1 7:00-10 p.m.,     Tuesday       Rm. 3248 Buchanan Bldg.
2 7:00-10 p.m.      Wednesday   Rm. 3248 Buchanan Bldg.
For further information on either program please write or telephone:
Reading and Study Skills Centre, Education-Extension Programs, Centre
for Continuing Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8,
B.C. Telephone 228-2181 (local 220).
REGISTRATION FORM
Reading Program (RC 11) Writing Program (RC 12)
Name of Program   Section	
Name (Mr. Mrs. Miss Ms.)	
Surname Given Name
Address City	
Occupation     Employer  	
Student Student No  . Institution    ...
Telephone (Daytime)   (Evening)	
Fee:   $30.00 students
$60.00 non-students
Please make cheques payable to the University of British Columbia and
mail with this form to REGISTRATIONS (RC 11, 12), Centre for
Continuing Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Cheque
enclosed $ . .
Cash
paid $.
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 26, 1973 Friday, January 26, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
Pit plans discussed
By DEBORAH MacNEILL
Student reactions to plans for
the new Pit may not affect the
design but Council held a
meeting Thursday to gather
them anyway.
. Thirteen people attended
student council's meeting,
chaired by SUB building
manager, Graeme Vance. The
basic plan, architect Donald
Towers' design, has already
been passed by council. Vance
said he hopes the preliminaries
and floor plan will be published
in two weeks. Any drastic
criticism or revolutionary
proposals to change the design
will be considered Vance said.
Council decided three years
ago to begin the project for
SUB redevelopment, setting a
budget of $350,000. Last year's
council had the plans for a new
Pit drawn up and displayed in
the SUB foyer earlier this year.
The speculated cost is $250,000.
It will not raise Alma Mater
Society fees. Eliminating
bureaucratic red tape the new
Pit will be open by September,
1973 Vance said.
The new Pit will be housed in
the southwest corner of SUB
basement. It will cover 7,000
sq. ft. and have a capacity for
380 people. The liquor
dispensing will be the same as
it is now, bottled beer sold five
days a week between five and
12 p.m.
The      plans      displayed
Thursday show an L-shaped
room with three circular
seating areas, a bar, and food
dispensing counter. The
largest central circle will also
function as a stage cum dance
floor.
Vance said there is still the
possibility of students' opinion
affecting minor aspects of the
design or suggestions for
possible functions of the new
area. Changes will be
expensive Vance said, but if
anybody cares to suggest any,
council will hear them out.
'No effect' seen
By RYON GUEDES
Administration president Walter Gage-said Monday he
believes the restructuring of the provincial education ministry
will have "no significant effect" on UBC.
Education minister Eileen Dailly told university
administration presidents and principals of technical and
vocation schools and of community colleges in a Jan. 5
memorandum that the superintendent of post-secondary
schools' position was being switched to the jurisdiction of the
minister from deputy minister Joe Phillipson's supervision.
Gage told The Ubyssey UBC has, under the University Act,
always been dealt with separately by the government, and
unless the act itself were to be revised, there would be no real
change.
Asked if the regional colleges and other areas concerned in
raising their standards of higher education would benefit more
from the changes, Gage said he thought they would.
"Prior to this, they had less contact with the government
and now they have a chance to air their problems and
differences," Gage said.
Among Dailly's other plans put forward in the memo are
the appointment of a deputy-minister of post-secondary
education, and of division officials who will supervise
administration, funds, academic planning;, and research.
When asked if he anticipated the eventual setting up of a
separate ministry of higher education, Gage said it was "a
possibility, but, I think, unlikely."
Fly with student-run AOSC
ByPHILMAGNALL
The Association of Student Councils travel
bureau has opened for the first time at UBC this
year, with a program of money-saving flights.
The association's introductory schedule
offers trips *» London this sumner on different
dates «t considerable saving* t© university
students.
One way Vancouver to London costs $114 on
any of six departure dates and return on any of
three at the same cost.
A $7 booking charge is added, but those
booking 90 days before departure will get a $10
refund.
So a round trip — on regular rather than
charter airlines — can cost $225.
AOSC's western region, can be found in the
travel bureau's booth in the SUB's main lobby.
Aside from the London flights, director
Trevor Tilly said other possibilities include
Toronto and Mexico, ski trips to places like
Banff and eventually camping tours similar to
those already enjoying success in Europe.
The AOSC can offer these programs at the
lowest possible rates because it is non-profit
and owned by the students of the mere than 50
universities and colleges laelonging to it.
The AOSC is ate© a member <rf the student
air travel association, which enables students
to get discounts on travel a nd tours all over the
world.
Its roots are in Hie now-defunct Canadian
Union of Students travel service and s» AOSC
has been serving eastern Canada far many
years.
The SUB office has a number of folders and
brochures for those interested in a number of
non-AOSC tours, but the sei-vice only deals in its
own programs unlike a regular travel bureau.
This, is rarely of any disadvantage, as the air
travel association gives access to thousands of
flights each summer, Tilley said. Last year
20,000 students took advantage of the trips
available.
Those interested should contact Tilly about
applying for an international student card and
additional information.
Those interested in a part-time job to help
finance their trip can apply at the AOSC office
for the one part-time job minding the counter
available there.
OFY ups ante to $40 million
The opportunities for youth
budget has been increased this
year to $39,970,000 from
$33,978,000.
This budget is divided among
five Canadian regions with
B.C. receiving about one-tenth
of the total budget or about $4
million.
OFY project officer Greg
Macdonald said the program
operates on the same basis as
last year, that of youth
initiating and implementing a
project.
"The OFY grant is given to a
project that provides some
type of service or asset for the
community but other than that
there is almost no stricture on
the type of project submitted."
Macdonald said OFY grants
were not granted to subsidize
private interests or cheap
labor projects.
"We're not interested in
supporting partisan political
organizations whether they are
the Young Liberals or Maoists,
cheap work projects, or
private research projects such
as might be initiated by
students wanting to compile
statistics for completion of
their M.A. thesis.
"Somebody must be
receiving a service other than
just the person applying for the
grant."
Because seven out of eight
applications were rejected last
year, Macdonald said he wants
to encourage only those
projects which were really
meaningful and innovative and
discourage individuals who
were not really committed
from applying.
Four major types of projects
have received OFY grants in
the past under the headings of
ecology, recreation, research
and cultural projects.
"But in the past we have
sponsored such varied projects
as transportation studies,
community attitude surveys,
recycling depots, free medical
BLEED
TODAY!
RED CROSS  BLOOD DRIVE
IN   BROCK
FORESTRY U.S.
$4.00 FEE REFERENDUM
Held Jan: 22, 1973
85.3% In Favour
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
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r
SATURDAY
IMPORT OWNERS — Make an appointment now to have a
Spring Tune-up done on your automobile — Saturday or any
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290 S.W. Marine Drive
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Next Week at HILLEL
Monday, Jan. 29, 12:30
The Grandfather of Yiddish Literature"
ALEX KLINER
4t
Tuesday, Jan. 30, 12:3«
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Thursday, Feb. 1, 12:30
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ALL EVENTS ATWLLEL-EVERYONE WELCOME
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M
clinics, food co-ops, legal aid,
and theatre groups," Macdonald said.
Counsellors and application
forms are now available at 1276
Howe, phone 688-7791. Applications must be in March 1.
SEXISM at UBC
OPEN FORUM
Monday Noon, Jan. 29
SUS LOUNGE
Engineering Undergrad and Women's
Action Group have been asked to chair
Do Something For Someone —
TWO-WEEK UBC
BLOOD DRIVE
NOW  ON
BROCK HALL — 8:30- 4:30 Continuous
NEXT WEEK IN SUB
Do Your Part To Help! THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 26, 1973
City politics: pre
By KEN DODD
A Citizen's Guide to City Politics is a well
documented and well written exposure of how what
Toronto author Jim Lorimer calls the property
industry effectively influences and dominates civic
government.
When the book was published in late November
last year it received an unfavorable review from the
Sun. Upon reading the book it becomes apparent
why — the daily media is an integral part of the
property industry.
Lorimer defines the property industry which
includes the media as all the businesses and
professions involved in supplying accommodation in
cities. Their common interest is making the highest
possible profit from supplying this accommodation.
A Citizen's Guide to City Politics, by James Lorimer
[James Lewis & Samuel, Toronto, 1972] 224 pages,
$3.95. . .    -
Included in this group are developers, land owners,
real estate agents, construction companies, plus
banks, utility companies, trust and loan companies,
life insurance firms, and real estate lawyers.
Lorimer charges the security and financial
independence of small property owners is being
undermined by the government, public agencies or
large developers (with the aid of government) who
want their land.
Thus he sees the ordinary citizen as being the big
loser. Seeking to find out why the costs of consumers
of housing have been rapidly increasing, Lorimer
has uncovered some disturbing answers.
While we regularly hear developers moan over
the rising costs of construction, which they say
regrettably forces them to raise rents and prices,
Lorimer says the real reason lies in the high cost of
urban land. And such high cost benefits only a small
group — land speculators and developers — who are
already well-off. The third reason has been the;
higher cost of borrowing money. He provides
statistics which show that in the period between 1961;
and 1971, a time of rising costs and the land boom in;
Canadian cities, construction costs increased 48 per!
cent, land cost 88 per cent and the cost of borrowing;
money 98 per cent.
He also feels the housing shortage is partially a
calculated move by developers and builders to;
charge higher prices to cover higher costs and to;
make larger profits. !
He notes the trend is for the property industry to;
acquire more and more urban land, often in a;
ruthless fashion. Blockbusting is favorite technique.;
Developers buy small bits of blocks in a;
neighborhood, and let them deteriorate to force
prices down and get the neighbors scared so they'll
sell to the developers.
The property industry maintains common
interests to make sure they prosper:
1) protecting property values to make sure they
never drop. Once achieved, high prices should never
be allowed to decline. Civic growth and expansion
should be supported as booming business conditions
ensure steady growth.
2) Property values must be maximized. City
council should restrict land supply so existing
property values will rise. Local development and
population growth should be encouraged as this
creates new construction. Such development is
especially encouraged in agricultural land such as
Richmond and Delta. Development in these
periphery areas reaps the most dramatic increase in
land values, produces the greatest profit, and
produces urban sprawl.
3) The economic status quo must be maintained.
The power here rests not with the civic government
but at the federal and provincial levels. Here lies the
power to regulate mortgage funds, take over large
corporations, regulate house prices and rents and
require public ownership of land in new
developments.
The lack of restriction on developers is not
surprising if one examines the backgrounds of
various key personalities in the Liberal and
Conservative parties. The ties of these two groups
and the property industry are great. For instance
that man of all parties, presently a Tory, Paul
Hellyer, made his millions as, a developer. James
Gillies, who stands to be minister of finance in any
imminent Conservative cabinet, is a director with
two major Toronto developers.
Such major cogs in the property industry as the
Bronfman and Eaton families (who combined to
form Cemp-Eaton, the developers of Pacific Centre),
Bank of Montreal, Canada Life and others are huge
campaign contributors to both parties.
Lorimer cites the case of Eddie Goodman, a
prominent Toronto lawyer with connections to both
the Conservative party and major land developers.
He could be described as a super-version of ex-Non
Partisan Association mayoralty candidate Bill
Street. A prominent Tory bagman in Ontario (along
with hockey magnate Al Eagleson) he is also past
national president of the Progressive Conservative
party of Canada and as such presided over the 1967
Conservative convention where Robert Stanfield was
elected leader. f
Goodman is also a director of Cadillac
Developments, a major property developer in
Toronto. And a la Street he has regularly
represented many important clients — such as
Eatons — before Toronto city council and at public
hearings. Goodman also collected funds for such pro-
developer mayoralty candidates as Nathan Phillips
and William Dennison.
Lorimer also charges the media with direct and
indirect implication in the property industry.
"The property industry would be in very serious
difficulty if the news media were not sympathetic to
PEOPLE POWER . . . 1971  poster in front of Toronto's city hall
it, its interests and its program for city
government."
He documents how major owners of newspaper
chains are also closely linked in the property
industry. Lorimer gives the example of FP
Publications Ltd., which owns the Vancouver Sun,
both Victoria newspapers, the Calgary Albertan, the
Winnipeg Free Press, the Ottawa Journal and the
Toronto Globe and Mail among others. Three of the
five directors have strong links in the property
industry. Max Bell, who died this past summer was
the major shareholder in the corporation as well as
director of the Bank of Nova Scotia and Canadian
Pacific Ltd., both major firms in the property
industry.
R. H. Webster another director, owns the Windsor
Hotel in Montreal and is the president of Imperial
Trust Company. Their fellow FP director R. S.
Malone is also a director of Monarch Life, a
Winnipeg life insurance firm.
Lorimer also points out 70 per cent of newspaper
profits come from advertising. Large retail stores
such as Simpsons-Sears and Eaton's are the largest
advertisers and also the biggest downtown property
owners in all major Canadian cities. News stories
concerning these companies are almost always
favorable he charges.
Lorimer cites the case of a Montreal Gazette
reporter who was fired after having written a
humorous article on the Santa Claus parade in 1967
because two senior Eatons executives had
complained to Charles Peters, the publisher of the
Gazette.
The third connection is that the news media often
own large and valuable pieces of downtown property
themselves. Here are located their editorial offices
and printing plants.
And fourth connection is the interest of huge daily
newspapers in promoting local growth and
development — which helps their circulation.
One could not really expect such organizations to
be objective and unbiased in their reporting of city
hall and the property industry.
He complains city hall news is reported on face
value and such things as voting blocs or patterns are
rarely interpreted. Also the property industry is
subtly promoted by "a general enthusiasm for
growth . . . usually expressed openly in editorials
and in columnists spaces." An example is the strong
editorial support the Province has given to the 3rd
Crossing.
Lorimer also presents evidence showing how the
city planning department is controlled by the
property industry.
The largest part of their duties is to recommend
the uses for land development.
Needless to say, as Lorimer notes, this
department, like the whole civic bureaucracy is "a
key element in the regulation of urban land use, a
city government function crucial to the industry." So
controlling the civic bureaucracy, especially in cities
such as Vancouver where the city council has
traditionally acted as no more than a rubber stamp
for the proposals put before them by the bureaucracy
allows the property industry to control city hall and
develop almost at whim.
The control of the city planning department is
actually in the hands of city planning board which is
dominated by people from the property industry.
The board controls the senior appointments and
promotions within the department. This means the
people who head the planning department are people
whom the property industry dominated board feels
will act in the best interests of the city. Need we
mention what they feel to be the best interests of the
city?
Many civic bureaucrats have great expectations
toward their meaningful contributions to making the
city a better place to live. City planners are an
especially idealistic lot. So not surprisingly there is a
steady stream of resignations from junior and
middle level people in the planning department.
Most leave disillusioned, their ideals shattered,
crushed by the power structure they find around
them. Lorimer cites the case of Peter Mees, a
member of the Vancouver city planning department
for eight years, who quite bitterly resigned this past
spring. Mees is quoted as saying he was disappointed
at "the lack of direction and leadership, the absence
of courage of conviction, whether right or wrong, the
politically-colored recommendations" that emerge
from the planning department. Mees said certain
developers get away with "anything short of murder,
while the little man gets the book thrown at him."
Lorimer then analyzes the reasons behind the
huge transportation schemes becoming so
commonplace in North American cities in the 1960's Friday, January 26, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
fiteers vs. people
NO TRESPASSING . . . Winnipeg woman locked out
of her own house by municipal authorities who
repossessed house for sewage treatmen*  plant
and that are only being opposed in any strength just
recently. He charges the main motivation behind
huge urban transportation schemes is not "to
prevent congestion" or provide "easier access to
downtown" as we're told. Instead Lorimer says they
are built to provide easy access from one building to
another.
This raises the value of urban property and
benefits major property owners and developers. The
rationale is that people pay more to live in a place
with good access.
Canadian cities, he laments, all look the same.
"Canadian cities look more and more the same,
more and more like Toronto and Montreal, more and
more like Chicago and Los Angeles. In Vancouver,
this trend is obvious and well-established. In
Winnipeg only the early signs are visible. All seem
destined, if the property industry has its way, to
become Developer City."
But Lorimer does see an alternative emerging to
this*domination of madness, in the form of citizen's
groups. Citizen's groups have been around for a long
time, in the form of ratepayer groups from solid
middle-class residential areas. But today there are
more citizens' organizations of a greater variety and
from a wider range of neighbourhoods. Thus their
nature has changed.
Today "they are making tougher demands on city
politicians, their tactics are improving, and they are
proving less willing to accept defeat or a token
victory and to give up up than they used to be. They
are also better organized and on occasion even have
professional organizers working for them."
But still there seems a reluctance by citizen's to
get together, collectivize in their struggle against
city hall or the senior governments, he says. In a
society stressing the ethic of individual action it is
predictable that almost all people who have a
complaint to raise with government do so on an
individual basis. Only as a last resort, when their
issue of concern has reached the level of desperation,
do they seek help, get together and form into citizen's
groups.
Lorimer sees the increasing power struggle now
in process between citizen's groups and the property
industry as inevitable and unavoidable, because the
basic interests of citizen's groups directly conflict
with the basic interests of the property industry,
"Citizen groups of all kinds are a threat to the
property industry because they seek power at city
hall, power to influence decision-making so that city
government will take better care of their interests.
That is the basis of the conflict between the property
industry and citizen groups: it is a struggle for
power. One side can gain only at the expense of the
other."
The "basic interests" of such citizen's groups
are:
1) city government actions should not harm
existing communities within the city. Large
developments and city-dividing expressways are
certainly counter to this wish.
2) the interests of city hall should be to make the
city more liveable for people, not a pawn for
profiteering developers.
3) land and housing costs should be minimized.
In analyzing the reactions of property dominated
city councils to the; demands of citizens' groups
Lorimer sums it up in one word: "guise".
He says "in order to maintain the public image of
democratic city government controlled by the
citizenry" the council expresses sympathy with the
complaints of the groups, listen to them at a public
hearing or in the council chamber, then arrogantly
go right ahead with their original plans; perhaps
including a token compromise or two to appease the
masses.
Increasingly however citizens' groups are seeing
through the guise and counter with strategy of their
own, usually trying to embarrass city hall by
demonstrating and gaining wide media coverage,
which increases the scope and numbers of their
support.
After such opposition tactics city politicians come
out from under the subterfuge and show their real
colors. Such was the case with ex-Vancouver mayor
Tom Campbell's famous attack on opponents of the
Third Crossing proposal. The emotional, wild-eyed
Campbell launched into a harangue you may
remember saying the $200 million crossing project
was in jeopardy because of opposition from "Maoists
. . . communists . . . pinkos . . . left-wingers . . . and
hamburgers." Campbell defined a hamburger as
anyone who doesn't have a university degree.
Now, with the propery-industry dominated NPA
majority out and the reformist The Electors Action
Movement in, the daily media tells us things will be
different. Government will be for the people, by the
people. Lorimer doesn't think so. He describes
people such as Toronto's new mayor, David Crombie
and groups such as TEAM as moderates. Moderates,
he feels are ineffective and will bring little
significant, radical change in the structure.
While Impressed with the spirit shown by the
TEAM movement and others like them such as
Toronto's now dead Civic Action Group (of which
Crombie was a member) he feels that no city in
Canada "has a citizen group movement that is
certain of not being bought off or defeated in the next
few years."
"The TEAM group is a collection of middle-class
reformers, though 'reformers' is really too strong a
term. TEAM'S strongest members have the same
business and professional alliances to the property
industry that NPA aldermen have, and their basic
political position (apart from TEAM alderman
Walter Hardwick) is identical to that of NPA. The
difference between the two is one of style, not
content."
So, Lorimer looks back to the citizens' groups as a
grass-roots movement that must better organize
themselves and become still more militant. Perhaps
the end result will be to have a group like COPE
running civic government but Lorimer underlines
one vital condition that must be met if the people are
really to rule. It is necessary he says, that politicians
"must be controlled by them (citizen's groups)... in
formal and informal ways just as property industry
politicians are controlled now by the industry."
He recommends several possible tactical
activities citizens' groups could use to bring this
desirable position about.
One necessary development must be the
emergence of more citizens' groups from working
class neighborhoods. He feels more full-time
community organizers are needed for this to happen.
And he criticizes; Canadian universities for
producing social workers who are taught to organize
community groups within the status quo rather than
how to create groups that challenge the established
order.
Also more community publications are necessary
to develop "a more informed understanding of the
political situation" by ordinary people, especially in
working class areas.
As well he underlines the importance of using the
professional expertise of people who become
involved with citizens' groups. Tapping this resource
would aid in producing reports documenting such
things as the links amongst the property industry,
the economics and financing of development projects
and the careers of city employees and politicians, to
discover possible conflicts of interest in public
projects.
Among his recommendations for direct action are
the establishment of non-profit neighborhood
housing corporations, revival of the use of squatting
on vacant and unused land and the instigation of
action projects such as providing bike paths or parks
when they have been refused by authorities.
In other words he is saying that sometimes the
elected representatives of parliamentary democracy
are not responsible to the people and at such times
the people must take action into their own hands in
order to improve their living environment.
He also feels coalitions between citizens' groups
and labor unions and credit unions are necessary and
desirable to build good housing for working class
people and the unions and credit unions have the
funds.
So, Lorimer is really not advocating anything
new. His message is a call to. participatory
democracy that should not be ignored.
His analysis of the corporate interests that
completely dominate our lives is crisp, well
researched and well-written. His proposals for
alternative agencies of action are sensible and
viable. But most important of all his book relates
the problems it deals with on an intimate,
neighborhood level that all people can relate to —
even people who normally can't comprehend such
things.
"A Citizen's Guide to City Politics" is an essential
book at an essential time. We need more books like
Jim Lorimer's.
LITTLE BROTHER
Toronto  repeat
Vancouver's Black Tower is a Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 26, 1973
Hot flashes
VU     .- JV^lAu
'Gears, people
discuss sexism
Engineers and people are
invited to attend a discussion
in the SUB lounge noon Thursday chaired by engineering
undergraduate president Harold Cunliffe and a spokesperson for the women's action
group.
Discussion will centre on
sexism on campus and ways
to combat it.
Muzak money
The women's committee of
the Vancouver symphony society is sponsoring its annual
scholarship competition for advanced students of strings,
brass, harp, woodwinds and
percussion instruments.
Rewards will be $1,000 for
the winner of the violin class
and $1,000 for the winner of
the other classes combined.
Applicants must be under
24 and have been B.C. residents for one year.
The competition will be held
in Vancouver April 28 and 29
and applications must be post-
Tween
classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Panel   discussion   on   report   noon
BioSci extension 3460.
WOMEN'S ACTION  GROUP
Panel   discussion   on   report   noon
SUB 215.
PRE SOCIAL  WORK
Meeting noon,   SUB J.05B,  speaker
from Crisis Centre.
RED  CROSS
Blood drive, 8:30 to 4:30 in Brock.
FED  UP CO-OP
Benefit,  Tillicum  Warehouse,   1603
1603 Franklin, 9:00 p.m. Adm. $1.00.
Music by Brain Damage.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
General     meeting,     noon,     upper
lounge I.H.
MONDAY
KUNG  FU
Practice, 4:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
CONSERVATIVES
General meeting, noon SUB 211.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting, noon SUB 105B.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Judge Nancy Morrison speaking
on women and the law, 7:30 p.m.
SUB ballroom. Adm. 25c if not
registered.
GERMAN  CLUB
Sign up for skit trip noon I.H.
room 404.
CUE
Meeting,     noon,    Mildred     Brock
Room, Brock Hall. M. Blom speaks
about writing term papers, essays.
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN  SCIENCE
Testimony meeting noon SUB 224..
THURSDAY
SPECIAL EVENTS
Concert, The Northwest Company,
noon, SUB ballroom. Free.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
French   film:   "Un   pay   sans   bon
sens", noon, Buch 102.
GERMAN   DEPARTMENT
German  Opera   Film,   "Der   Frei-
schutz", noon, Buch 102.
marked by midnight, Feb.   18
and include a $5 entry fee.
For further information
phone scholarship committee
chairman R. Van Nus 263-
4823.
Phoenix
Next week the Phoenix will
spread its tiny wings and fly
away . . . er, try that again.
Next week is Phoenix week
on campus. Activities will be
sponsored by the 14 frats and
sororities and include a speach
b y provincial Conservative
leader Derrill Warren next Fridays noon in SUB 207-209.
Included in the program are
neato ski films noon Thursday
in the SUB auditorium and a
pub night at the Ponderosa
8:30 Wednesday, "carnival
and games atmosphere" it
says here. Hmmm. Fifty cents
admission.
'Extravaganza'
A multi-cultural evening entitled "International Extravaganza", sponsored by the international student programming committee, will be held
in SUB Ballroom 8:30 p.m. Friday evening.
The   program   will   feature
foreign dance groups, singers,
national groups and a steel
band.
Admission is $1.50.
Argentina
Argentine student Daniel
Zadvnaisky will speak Monday on repression in Argentina
and the ways to combat it.
Sponsored by the Canadian
committee for justice for Latin
American political prisoners at
UBC, the talk will be presented
at noon in the SUB clubs
lounge.
Chess
I ntroductory and advanced
chess lessons will be given at the
centre for continuing education
by Canadian Chess champion
Peter Biyiasas and chess master
Jonathan Berry.
The introductory course costs
$30 and runs from Feb. 6 to
March 27 from 7-10 p.m. Bu.
3224. The advanced course also
costs $30 and runs Feb. 7 to
March 28 in Bu. 3206 also from
7-10 p.m.
Applications should be mailed
to registrations, centre for continuing education, UBC, Vancouver
8, B.C.
City Nights Hieatre
150 E. Hastings - 685-5831
99c - TONIGHT and SATURDAY - 99c
MARILYN MONROE in
"SOME LI KE IT HOT" - 7:30 p.m.
GLENDA JACKSON in
"MARAT/SADE" - 9:30 p.m.
The Royal Shakespeare Company        	
99c- MIDNIGHT SHOW TONIGHT AND SATURDAY
"MARX BROS. AT THE CIRCUS"
99c
99c - STARTS SUNDAY FOR ONE WEEK - 99c
JOHN STEINBECK'S
"THE GRAPES OF WRATH" - 7:30 p.m.
Dir. JOHN FORD, HENRY FONDA
JOHN HUSTON'S
"THE AFRICAN QUEEN" - 9:30 p.m.
HUMPHREY BOGART (AA) - KATHERINE HEPBURN
Kashmir Curry Restaurant
For the Finest Food of India
STUDENTS!! We offer 10% concession on a full dinner. Groups
of 6 or more — 20% concession.
LIMITED OFFER - SO VISIT US SOON
Open every day 5 p.m. - 11 p.m. — Free Delivery of Complete Dinners
3934 Main at 23rd Phone 874-5722
€t*&$edad* m mi mseptetf by tekptom md ate pepebk is
ad^mce.lhxtMte in U:S0<Lm,^ day before mbecotian. .
PubMcetiow&0ce,ft<>0m24IS.ttB.,t/BC,VM.8,&C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-FM stereo receiver, turntable,
base cover, cartridge, two speakers,
2-year guarantee, list 1200, your
cost $125.00. Carry AKAI, A.G.S.,
Zenith color TVs at savings. Call
732-6769.
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/Wk. Ph. 732-
0174 eves, or before 8 A.M.	
LET IT BE THE BEATLES FRX,
Jan. 26, 7:00 - 9:30. 75c. Place Vanier Common Block.
SKI TODD
Mid-Term   Break:   Transportation,
Motel,   Three   days   skiing  —   $53.
Phone   Deedee,  987-4807.	
BREAK THE CIGARETTE HABIT
comfortably — No weight gain or
nervousness. Smoke Watchers, 688-
5821.
Special Events
15A
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE  NOW
BUY  YOURS  TODAYI
Bookstore and SUB
THE POPPY FAMILY WITH PAPA
Bear is coming on Friday, Feb. 9,
8:30 p.m., War Memorial Gym.
Tickets only $2.00. Poppy Family,
Poppy Family, Poppy Family, Pop-
py Family, Poppy Family.	
Travel Opportunities
16
"GOING TO EUROPE?" STUDENT/
Faculty discounts available on
purchase/lease/rental of any car
in Europe. Write Auto Europe, P.O.
Box 728, Dept. SG, Mercer Island,
Washington 98040 for a free 44-
page brochure.	
EXPEDITION ACROSS THE
Sahara leaving March. 1942 Mc-
Nicoll Ave. 733-6707 after 6 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
EX-WIFE'S CAR. 1962 VAUXHALL
Victor Deluxe Sedan. Good condi-
tion, city tested. $395.00. 921-7202.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
Hens mb Abutter
Camera*
SPECIAL
EXACTATWINTL
35mm Single Lens Reflex
50mm Fl. 8 with case ...$189.95
Exactar 28mm F2.8 .... 78.50
Exactar 35mm F2.8 .... 69.50
Exactar 135mm F2.8 ... 69.50
Exactar 200mm F3.5 . .. 79.50
Exactar 300mm F5        109.50
3010 W.  Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reason-
able Rates. Mrs. Ellis, 321-3838.
ESSAYS TYPED. NEAT ACCURATE
work. 35c per typed page. 325-9976.
If I'm out leave your phone num-
ber.	
TYPING; ESSAYS, THESES. CALL
Donna, 266-4929, Kerrisdale area.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF ES-
says and thesis. Reasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-5235
weekends  and   evenings   263-4023.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
COUPLE   FOR   PART-TIME   MAN-
aglng,   13   unit   West   End   apartment  block.   %   rent  credit  for  2
B.R. manager's suite. Children welcome. Telephone 327-1554 after 6:00.
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
83
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
GETTING ENGAGED?
SID HAULING LTD.
Diamond  Importer*
Watches and Repairs
•
40% Discount to University
Students on Diamond Rings.
SERVING UBC STUDENTS
SINCE 1954
543 Granville St.
Suite 800
8 CASSETTES ON "THE ART OF
Negotiating", from Advanced Management Research Inc., New York.
Phone  738-4744.	
73' SKIS FOR SALE. HART ROGUE
200, Tyrolia Step-in 2000-3000. Only
used once.  $150.  Ph.  731-5137.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
COMFORTABLE FURN. BASE-
ment room with view, share facilities. Babysitter preferred. Feb. 1.
228-9370.	
ROOM FOR MAN ONLY. BSMT.
Warm, quiet, private entr., near
gate—ready now—224-7623.	
CAMPUS DOUBLE ROOMS, $50.
Kitchen, etc., $90/couple. Phone
Frank, 224-9549. Visit 5745 Agronomy Road.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity
House, 5765 Agronomy Rd. Reasonable rates. Color TV. Laundry facilities. Ph. 224-9691 after 5:00 for
details.	
ROOM/BOARD ON CAMPUS. 224-
9620. $99 month. 5725 Agronomy.
Good food, T.V. Ask for Bob or
John.
Furnished Apis.
MATURE, INDEPENDENT FE-
male wants roommate, same. February-April, West End apartment.
Partial transportation provided,
684-3770.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Friday, January 26, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
'Gimme shelter'—Birds
'Kick him
in the nuts'
The following article was written by Nick Andriash, phys.
ed. 4, who works both minor [10-12 years] and junior hockey as a
referee.
People tend to minimize the importance of coaching in
minor hockey, and as a result the children involved are
suffering. When they reach the junior level, it becomes
increasingly difficult for them to unlearn any bad habits
acquired through faulty coaching during their minor hockey
period. Consequently, these bad habits (unnecessary roughness
in their style of play) stay with them into professional hockey.
During this past Canada/Russia hockey series, a lot of fans
criticized the Canadian players for their rough style of play.
However, the players are not the ones to blame, for they have
not been exposed to any other style of play since the beginning
of their hockey careers. They know no other way.
The most frequent advice given to players in minor
hockey today is "keep your head up". You'd better believe it. If
you don't, they'll take it right off.
The most frequent advice given to players in junior
hockey is "two high sticks into the left nostril is better than one
on the ice".
Rough play is prevalent in today's game, and it gets dirtier
as the calibre increases. If it is to be stopped, we must start at
the minor hockey level; peanut division.
While I was a referee in minor hockey, I witnessed some of
the most appalling incidents I ever care to view. During a
Midget game, a defenceman gave an oncoming forward a
rather close-up view of the detailed paint work on the corner
boards. In so doing, he himself fell to the ice in a straight-leg sit-
up position. At that moment, the attacking teams coach issued a
verbal command that to this day I still do not believe. He said,
quite vehemently, "kick him in the nuts." I'm not saying that
this type of coaching is prevalent throughout minor hockey
associations, but it does exist. There are a great number of
concerned coaches who have a genuine interest for the overall
betterment of minor hockey. Their effort should not be
overshadowed by the sick-minded few, but it is.
In one other incident, a coach, whose name I do not care to
mention for obvious reasons, thought he had a better
understanding of the rules than the refaree, and as a result
pulled his team of 12-year-old boys off the ice because the
referee gave a game misconduct to a player for acting as a
peacemaker during a fight. He insisted that the rule on a
peacemaker applies only in the National Hockey League, and
carried out his infantile stubborness to the limit. It is this kind of
thing, this egotistic dramatization of the big times that is
obscuring and playing objectives the kids might have.
The incredibly high incidence of spearing, butt-ending, high
sticking, elbowing and roughing in Pup and Pee Wee (10-12 year
olds), forces me to question the coaching objectives in minor
hockey. Perhaps the coaches should re-examine their
objectives, for they tend to view each win or loss as a personal
triumph or defeat. At such an impressionable age, these
youngsters should be taught the fundamentals of the game
rather than the rough-house tactics of the professionals.
Sports for all seasons
By SIMON TRUELOVE
Men's basketball started Monday and volleyball, snooker,
and hockey are still going strong.
Unfortunately, the program has been plagued by defaults.
In volleyball particularly, it is incredible how people will sign
their names to a list (presumably keen volleyball players) and
then never take the time to find out when their games are.
If a team does not show up, it is not fair on the opponents
who have wasted their time, so any teams defaulting are
automatically thrown out of the league. It would be nice if
players would refrain from signing lists when they are not going
to play.
In the hockey super league, a much improved phys. ed.
team beat commerce 1-0, and pharmacy trounced grads 5-1.
The gears beat Agriculture 4-3 in Division I, and arts stunned
the world by beating education 3-1. Forestry are in a slump at
the moment, having lost 5-0 to science.
In volleyball, only one Div. I game has been played so far. It
was won by education over the engineers.
If you are one of those nuts who gets off on grovelling in the
mud after an odd shaped leather ball, get a rugby team together
— the deadline is February 2. You need at least eight men for a
team (more if you think you might get tired) but the standard is
notoriously low, so in reality, anyone can play.
Snooker is played Tuesday and Thursday from 7-10 p.m., so
if you are signed up it is time to come out and play.
All Curlers should now be in intensive last minute training to
beat forestry in the bonspiel starting 7 a.m. Saturday to 7 p.m.
Sunday.
Other events coming up are the tug-of-war, cylce drag, and
track and field. If you need information, come to War Memorial
gym 308 or phone 228-4648.
The hockey Thunderbirds
return, home sweet home, at
Thunderbird arena 8 p.m.
tonight, following a no-point
three game road trip last
weekend.
The UBC Birds lost three
games on the road, slipping
from first to third place. They
lost to the Saskatchewan
Huskies 4-3, and to the
Edmonton Golden Bears by
scores 8-5 in overtime and 3-2.
But at home they have lost only
one league game, so it is great
to be back home for this must
game against second place
Calgary Dinosaurs.
UBC plays seven of its last
eight games at home so they
have a good run at first place
being only two games back of
Edmonton.
The Birds have been plagued
with injuries and sickness.
They will be missing Doug
Buchanan, their captain and a
top scorer, who is out with a
separated shoulder. Warwick
Reid is expected to be back
after being out with a
separated shoulder.
Score card
TODAY
Golf
12:30-2:30 p.m. Wolfson Field team
practice—all   spares welcome.
Swimming
6   p.m.    Percy    Norman    UBC   vs.
SFU.
Hockey
8   p.m.   Thunderbird   Arena   UBC
vs. Calgary.
. •-;•'{ A44   ,■*#«
UBC GOALIE Fred Masuch kicks
Goaltender Fred Masuch,
recovering from a bronchial
infection, is expected to be
reasonably healthy for the
game. Missing also is Bob
Trenaman, an outstanding
defenceman, who quit school
after Christmas.
SATURDAY
Intramural   Curling   Bonspiel
7 a.m.  Winter Sports Centre
Soccer
12:30   p.m.   Empire  Stadium   UBC
vs.  Paul Taylors.
Basketball
8:30 p.m. War Memorial gym UBC
vs.  Alberta.
SUNDAY
Men's  Field  Hockey
Finals   of   the    UBC    invitational
tournament 1:30 p.m.  Armouries.
out black dot -sucha singh
New-comer Len Ircandia
expects to see more action
adding some muscle to the
team.
On Saturday at 3:15 p.m., the
Birds host the Powell River
Regals in an exhibition game.
Basketball
2 p.m. War  Memorial gym,
UBC vs. Alberta
$2 fee increase
The school of physical
education voted 75 per cent
Jan. 17 in favor of a $2 fee levy.
The turnout was 66 per cent.
HIKERS, CAMPERS
CLIMBERS, SKIERS
WAREHOUSE SALE
Vs to % OFF HIKING and CAMPING EQUIPMENT
50% OFF LEFT-OVER SKIING EQUIPMENT
Vs OFF CLIMBING ROPES, CRAMPONS
HIKING BOOTS and ACCESSORIES
UP TO 50% OFF CLOTHING,
INCLUDING HIKING and SKI JACKETS,
PONCHOS, SOX, SKI PANTS ETC.
USED CAMPING RENTAL EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE
ALSO CANOES - PADDLES, ETC.
TEPEE RECREATIONAL CENTRE
1605 W. 5th Ave., Vancouver, B.C. Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 26, 1973
Daycare at UBC
No funds, but crowds, rules
Daycare facilities at UBC are underfunded,
crowded and haphazardly regulated.
The UBC daycare council has six daycare units
with total places for 96 children. Some of these places
can be used for two children by having each spend
one-half a day in the centre.
According to a daycare council brief at least one-
third of the students at UBC are married and one-
sixth have children. For a university of
approximately 20,000 students UBC campus daycare
facilities can accomodate at most 110 children.
The brief further states that the board of
governors and university administration in general
do not believe it is the responsibility of the university
to provide daycare for students' children.
The foundations who might be expected to
support daycare do not believe it is their
responsibility to fund daycare centres but rather that
it is the university's responsibility.
As a result the only funds available from the
United Community Services fund have been in the
form of loans which are expected to be repaid with
grants pending from the provincial government.
While the university does not acknowledge any
responsibility for funding daycare facilities they
have made certain buildings available for use by
campus co-op daycare centres.
The university has given the UBC daycare council
the use of four huts in a quadrangle between Malfa
Road and Acadia Road, rent-free; the rent on the
other buildings is about $50 per month.
Each of the six daycare units on campus is
independent and organized under four societies (coops have to be called societies in B.C. to keep the
lawyers happy). All three of the daycare units for
children between 18 months and three years are in
one society and each of the other three units is under
a separate society.
The daycare centres are -organized in an
unofficial UBC daycare council which makes
representations to the government and does what it
can on very limited funs to co-ordinate the activities
of the individual units.
Each of the six units is operated by the parents of
the children as a co-op. Each of the six elects a
president and treasurer and two members sit on the
council.
Provincial regulations limit the number of
children in a centre for children under three to a
maximum of 12. For centres with children between
three and five years old as many as 24 children may
be in one unit. Because of these limits the centres
cannot expand and the only way to get a place for a
child in a daycare centre at UBC is to wait for an
opening or start up a new unit.
Acadia daycare centre was originally licensed to
care for 30 children — the license was later cut back
to 24 without any apparent reason, according to
daycare council chairperson Roderick Barman.
Each parent in the co-op is required to do
volunteer work for about six hours per month but the
centres all have trained staff to care for the children.
The provincial government will only recognize
qualifications from Britain, Australia and Toronto
for head teachers in units for children under three
years, he said. There are no facilities in B.C. for
training teachers for these positions and there have
been no moves by the government to set up such
training centres despite a clear need for them.
STORY by DAVID MARS
PHOTOS by SUCHA SINGH
This might be explained by the fact that if
training facilities are available then the combination
of trained staff and parents anxious for new daycare
facilities might expose the government to unwanted
pressures.
The monthly fees for the units range between $75
and $100. The provincial government has subsidies
available on three plans, ranging from $1 to $4 per
day.
The department of rehabilitation and social
welfare is introducing a new daycare program
effective Feb. 1. Effective as of December of last
year the units were allowed to bill the province on a
monthly instead of a daily basis for the subsidies,
and in February a new uniform rate will be
introduced.
Teachers in the daycare units are now in the
Social Services Employees' Union of B.C. Those
members of the union working in Acadia and
Tillicum received salary increments averaging 25
per cent in September of last year and the other
centres will soon be paying similar salaries, says
V.H. Bradley, treasurer of the Acadia centre.
Under these new scales a head supervisor is paid
$595 per month and the salaries go down to $425 per
month for assistants in training. Salaries represent
80 per cent of the costs of Acadia, the percentage in
each unit depending on the staff to children ratio.
Acadia operating expenses have gone up about 20 per
cent due to the salary increases, he said.
Some of the units have raised their attendance
fees from $75 to $100 but they are hoping to meet
much of this increase in operating costs through an
increase   in   provincial   subsidies.
About 55 per cent of the income for the campus
nursery society comes from parent fees and the rest
is provided by government subsidies.
The campus daycare units are open to students,
staff and faculty of the university but the bulk of the
members are students. It is unlikely that the
students with children in the units will be able to
absorb the entire cost of the salary adjustment for
the teachers. The centres cannot trim their staff
because of the provincial government regulations on
the staff to children ratio.
Barman said while the council is greatful to the
university for the buildings provided, he hopes the
university will increase aid to the centres.
He said he hopes the university will provide
daycare for the students in the same manner that
they now undertake to provide student housing. He
said he believes this is particularly important if the
university wants to attract more part-time students
and older students returning to the university on a
full-time basis.
Simon Fraser University's board of governors see
it as their responsibility to provide daycare for the
students, Barman said. The provincial government
is much more receptive to boards of governors than
to unofficial councils.
Regardless of their financial position, Barman
said, UBC students simply cannot find any daycare
facilities for their children. Planning for daycare on
campus is frustrated to some extent because there
are no figures available on exactly how many staff,
faculty and students need daycare.
Barman said he is hopeful the two new units,
Tillicum and Campus Co-op 3, will each qualify for
the $2,500 grant available for equipment and
furnishings in new facilities.
On the strangth of the government's statements
regarding grants for new centres the UCS gave the
council an interest free loan of $5,000 to be used for
the two new centres and to be repaid in April. Grants
totalling $2,400 have been received from the Hamber
Foundation, the graduate students' association, the
Alma Mater Society, B.C. Forest Products Ltd. and
Richmond Plywood Corp.
He said he is particularly anxious to have the
obscure and often unwritten regulations governing
daycare centres set down in a clear form with
procedures for fair implementations of these
regulations. When the first daycare unit for children
under three years of age was set up at UBC it was the
first in the province and there were no regulations
governing this type of facility.
In a brief to the provincial government, the UBC
daycare council expressed their position on what the
government should do in the daycare field.
The council wants the university to commit funds
for daycare centres on campus, provide permanent
buildings for the units and generally recognize their
responsibility to provide child care centres on the
same basis they now provide student housing.
The centres for children under three years old
require heavier subsidies than those centres for
older children because of the higher ratio of staff to
children in the nursery units. The brief suggests that
because of the wage increases of approximately 25
per cent the parents will be unable to meet the
increasing costs.
Regardless of any new government programs
from Victoria, UBC is going to have second-rate
daycare facilities as long as the board of governors
refuses to acknowledge the responsibility of the
university to provide daycare for students' children
on the same basis that housing for students is now
provided.

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