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The Ubyssey Sep 24, 1976

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX,    No. 6
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1976
43
228-2301
Nursing school in trouble
HEY FELLER, look at that! Gears team is half way through annual
forestry week boat race, held outside SUB Thursday. For first time in
—doug field photo
decades Ubyssey failed to win — but only because paper tigers slept in
and missed big event. We'll be back next year, though.
Murray should quit, say colleagues
Rick Murray should resign from
UBC's board of governors because
he is no longer a student, two board
members said Thursday.
Board member Ken Andrews
said he thinks that although
Murray is acting in good faith by
not resigning, no one has the right
to remain in an elected position
they no longer qualify for.
And member Pat Chubb said she
didn't see how Murray could
represent students or work for
their interests if he is not a student.
Murray is serving his second
term on the board as a student
representative although he
graduated in May and is now
working full-time for the Vancouver  engineering   department.
Andrews, elected by university
staff as their representative on the
board, said: "If I cease to be a
member of the full-time staff of the
university I would immediately
resign from the board.
"Neither I nor anyone else would
have the right to make the decision
to stay on," he said, adding that if
Murray does not meet University
Act requirements for board
members he should resign.
Chubb said she thinks the
procedure for electing students to
the board should be changed to
prevent a graduating student
unsure about returning to campus
from running.
She added: "I think if he
(Murray) resigned it might be a
good initiation for someone to be
elected for one month and then be
re-elected.
"A month's breaking in might be
an advantage for a beginning
board member."
Basil Peters, the other student
representative on the board, said
he is "very unsure" of the ethics of
Murray remaining on the board.
"Foremost in my opinion is that I
don't think he can be replaced,"
Peters added. "I'd much rather
have a former student with me on
the board than have no one at all
and represent the students by
myself."
Other board members contacted
Thursday refused to commit
themselves to a definite stand on
the question.
Administration president Doug
Kenny said he felt it would be
"inappropriate" for him to com
ment on any elected or appointed
board member.
Nor would he comment on the
question of having a non-student
represent students on the board.
Both George Hermanson and
Gideon Rosenbluth said it was up
to students to decide whether
Murray should continue to
represent them.
But they both indicated they
would support any Alma Mater
Society motion urging Murray's
resignation.
AMS lawyer Don Sorochan has
interpreted the Universities Act to
mean that a non-student cannot sit
as a student representative on the
board.
The student representative
assembly- Wednesday tabled a
motion to endorse the legal opinion
after Murray protested he was not
told of the opinion before the
meeting.
If the opinion is endorsed by the
SRA, it would force Murray off the
board unless it is challenged in
court.
Board members George Morfitt,
Benjamin  Trevino   and  Pearley
Brissendon   praised   Murray's
performance on the board and said
See page 2: MURRAY   .
By HEATHER WALKER
Two UBC nursing students said
Thursday the Registered Nurses
Association of B.C. has threatened
to forbid second year nursing
students to write RN exams.
The students said the RNABC
made the threat because of the
lack of clinical time for students in
the program's first two years.
Both nursing program director
Muriel Uprichard and RNABC
president Thurly Duck, contacted
Thursday at their residences,
refused to comment on the
students' statements unless contacted during their office hours.
When the four-year program
began in 1974, the RNABC approved it and allowed students to
write RN exams in August after
two years of training.
Students who pass the exam are
considered competent to work in
any B.C. hospital as registered
nurses.
'But an RNABC decision to withdraw approval of UBC students
writing the exam after two years
would imply the RNABC does not
consider them properly prepared
to be registered nurses.
A second year student who
declined to be identified said
students were told of the RNABC's
position at the beginning of the
year by program director
Uprichard.
"The RNABC let the school know
in August that the program was up
for review, and said they wanted
they felt the kids
needed more clinical skills before
they could write their RNs," she
said.
She said the nursing department
was trying to change the program
to increase the students' clinical
time, and that The RNABC will
review the program in January.
"But if the RNABC doesn't like
the changes, the second year
students won't be able to write
their RNs when they planned to,
and it could mess up a lot oi
people's plans," she said.
This year is the first year all
UBC's nursing students will be on
the new program, the student said.
Previously, some students were
stall enrolled in the department's
old five-year program.
The program currently allows
students to graduate after two
years, write their RN exams and
go to work.
After the initial two years,
students can continue in the
program to receive a bachelor of
See page 2: SKILLS
UBC clubbers like lories over Orits
By IAN CURRIE
The score was Tories 74, Grits 64
as young Liberals and Conservatives vied for prospective
members at clubs day Thursday.
Progressive Conservative Andy
Stark said 74 students came to the
Tory booth in SUB mall and signed
their names to indicate interest in
joining the party. The Tories
collected only 30 names at clubs
day last year, he said.
A recent Gallup poll showed the
federal Conservative party leading
the Liberals with 49 per cent of
those polled indicating they would
vote for the Tories if an election
was called immediately. The poll
showed 29 per cent would vote for
the Liberals.
But the results of Thursday's
recruitment drive did not match
the results of the Gallup poll, with
the Liberals signing up almost as
many prospective members as the
Conservatives.
A few booths down from the
Tories 14 people spent $2 each to
join the Liberal party and 50 others
signed their names to indicate
interest in joining, Liberal Jay
Currie said.
Stark said the increased interest
in-the Tory Booth was no surprise
considering the current unpopularity of prime minister
Pierre Trudeau and his government
Stark said disillusionment with
the Trudeau government and its
anti-inflation program are the
reasons for the increased student
interest in the P.C.s.
"There  seems  to  be a lot of
discontentment on campus with
the anti-inflation program and this
was demonstrated by students
when (federal labor minister) John
Munro spoke on campus last
Monday."
But Liberal Currie said students
are not disillusioned with the
Trudeau government. Currie said
the large number of students
seeking to join the Liberals this
year indicates support for the anti-
inflation program.
Although attendance at the
political booths was up from last
year the ski club booth remained
one of the busiest.
UBC ski club chairman Ken
Goodwin said 100 to 150 people
bought memberships in the club.
"People would rather ski than
vote," he said.
Films about skiing, ski equipment displays and free ski information combined to make the
ski club booth a popular attraction,
Goodwin said.
The UBC musical society
(MUSSOC) booth was also a big
success, spokesman Kim Butchart
said. By handing out information
about the club and free buttons the
booth managed to draw about 225
interested students.
Over two dozen clubs set up
booths in and around SUB this
year. Due to the strong response
from UBC clubs, the student administrative commission decided
that for the first time in years to set
up booths on the second floor of
SUB. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1976
Skills missed
From page 1
science in nursing degree as well
as an RN.
Both the second year student and
a fourth year student who was also
interviewed said they agreed first
and second year students did not
Murray doubts
From page 1
it would be a loss to the board if
Murray had to resign.
None of them were prepared to
comment on the legal or ethical
aspects of Murray representing
students on the board, because,
they said, they were uncertain of
what the Universities Act says
about it.
Murray said he has not decided
what his actions will be in the face
of the upcoming SRA motion to
accept the legal opinion that would
force him off the board.
He said he wants to discuss with
the SRA the implications of the
motion, which he said would effectively disenfranchise the entire
graduating class.
Murray has repeatedly said it
would not be in the best interests of
students if he were to resign with
less than four months remaining in
his term.
He has also said he doubts the
value of electing a replacement
who would sit in on only one or two
board meetings before the term
was up, and has claimed he is still
serving student interests on the
board.
Start fall
on the right foot.
Or the left foot.
If you're hiking, climbing,
camping, or just plain
walking,
Roots has a
, sandal
or boot
that
will
make
Roots
Vancouver
Victoria
766 Robson St.
689-9916
1202 Wharf St.
3834811
have enough clinical experience.
Clinical experience is the time a
student spends in a hospital
wroking with patients and learning
nursing procedures in a hospital
rather than a laboratory situation.
The second year student said
second year students have 12 hours
a week of hospital experience
during the school year, and 24
hours a week in May, June and
July.
"A lot of students say they don't
feel competent at the end of second
year," she said.
"You don't pick up all the skills
you need in clinic time. If you're
there when something happens,
you learn something, but it's hard
to have enough time to practise
procedures."
The fourth year student said she
felt the problem of clinical time
was especially acute for third year
students.
"Many students go out and work
at the end of their third year. In
third year students learn about
community health, and don't spend
time in the hospital. So they don't
have a chance to learn skills they
may have missed in their second
year, and they don't get a period of
reinforcement in the hospital," she
said.
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DISCO
SATURDAY, SEPT. 25th
8—12 P.M.
SUB BALLROOM
Members 50*        Non-Members $1.50
(MUST BE OVER 18)
ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY
TICKETS AVAILABLE IN ROOM 210 S.U.B.
(SKI CLUB OFFICE)
OR
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Engineering is one thing.
Engineering for us is quite another.
There's nothing dull about engineering your own
challenge. And that's where your Engineering career
in the Canadian Armed Forces begins. From there,
your career possibilities are unlimited. In the Canadian
Forces, the different engineering disciplines are
divided into 5 major classifications:
Maritime Engineering
Military Engineering
Land Ordrlance Engineering
Aerospace Engineering
Electronic and Communications Engineering.
You'll work with varied and sophisticated
equipment on challenging projects in many parts of
the world, face the responsibilities of leadership
entrusted to you as an officer in the Canadian Armed
Forces, and you'll enjoy the opportunity of working
in all fields of engineering without being overly
limited to any one.
Accepted qualified applicants will be given officer
rank on entry, and an excellent salary along with
many benefits. Security, promotions and opportunities
for post-graduate training all add up to a worthwhile
and personally rewarding career. If that's what you're
looking for, it's time we got together.
Write, including your engineering qualifications to date, to the Director of Recruiting and
Selection, National Defence Headquarters,
Ottawa, Ontario, or visit your nearest Canadian
Armed Forces Recruiting Centre, listed under
"Recruiting" in the Yellow Pages.
THE CANADIAN Friday, September 24, 1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC disagrees
on LSAT review
By DEB van der GRACHT
A company called Canada
Testing and the UBC law faculty
disagree on the value of review
courses the company is.offering to
prepare people for law school
admission tests.
Brian O'Sullivan, an articling
law'student working with Canada
Testing  said he's never  had  a
Anthro museum
floating away
By JOHN CARTWRIGHT
Four months after its opening,
UBC's $4.3 million Museum of
Anthropology is still leaking, according to museum director
Michael Ames.
But he denied suggestions that
architect Arthur Erickson exerted
dictatorial control over the display
of Indian artifacts such as masks
and totem poles.
"The museum staff was completely in charge in the final,
dictatorial stages," he said.
Tony Carter, museum consultant
and author of several books about
Indian culture, indicated Erickson
gave orders against his wishes to
move a display of Indian masks he
had set up near the museum entrance.
Ames admitted there is leakage
in the building's roof, and water
marks are evident in several
locations around the building. He
said water leaks are common in
new concrete buildings due to
expansion and contraction of
concrete.
Problems with the air conditioning system are still being
studied, he said. "We are
analyzing figures."
Carter said the museum gets too
hot some days, but the problem is
less serious than during the first
month the museum was open.
Carter also was in charge of
putting up the totem poles situated
between the museum and the Point
Grey cliffs. He said it was impossible to arrange the poles in the
traditional manner because the
museum is too far from the water,
where totem poles usually stand.
He rejected suggestions that
Erickson considered only
aesthetics in locating the poles.
But Carter admitted there was a
controversy about the
arrangement of museum displays
shortly before the museum opened
May 30. "There was a lot of smoke
for awhile," he said.
complaint about the course's worth
but Paul Ayriss, UBC law faculty
administrator said the benefit of
the course is minimal.
The 20-hour weekend seminar
courses are held four times a year
one week before the LSATs are
written and costs $105.
"The courses are expensive and
discriminate against both out-of-
towners and people who can't
afford to pay the price of the
course," Ayriss said Thursday.
He said that according to studies
conducted in the U.S. where they
have existed for many years, the
courses have as much benefit as
writing the LSATs twice. "The
exam only costs $13.50 though as
opposed to $105 for the course.
Basically all the course is doing is
putting a lot of money in a few
pockets."
The LSAT is an 800-point exam
required by most law schools in
Canada and the U.S. which helps to
determine acceptance.
"The national average last year
was 500 points," O'Sullivan said,
"while those enrolled in the
courses averaged 600."
"Usually, people writing the
LSATs for the second or third time
improved an average of 50 to 100
points," he said. "One guy we had
went from 480 points the first time
to 725 after the course."
The course uses a 200-page
curriculum from Yale university
which deals with the principal
parts of the tests. Asked if the
curriculum was similar to the book
available in bookstores, O'Sullivan
said, "Oh no, it's vastly different
from the book that's out. Some
things in that book are out of date."
Aryiss said the book available in
the bookstore is probably worth as
much as the whole course. "If a
person works conscienciously
through previous tests, that would
be about as good as taking the
course."
He also said the course would
have the same effect as going
through aptitude tests student
services offers.
"It's a highly controlled exam,"
Aryiss said. "You can prepare
yourself for the type of structure,
but not content.
The program operated last year
in Montreal and Toronto ancTthis
year is operating in those two cities
plus Ottawa and Vancouver.
O'Sullivan said they expect about
500 people across Canada to take
the courses.
In the five days they have been
advertising in Vancouver, about
100 people have phoned in asking
for brochures, he said. "We're
banking that we cap get people
through (LSATs) successiully.
*-\..:^^<'r
—mike miller photo
HAMLETING IT UP, two members of UBC Medieval Club parade around in (medieval) drag during clubs day
at SUB Thursday. Medieval club was one of dozens of campus groups signing up new members.
Cyclists given runaround
That cycle path along University
Boulevard doesn't really end three
blocks from campus — it just
seems to end, University Endowment Lands manager Bob
Murdoch said Thursday.
Cyclists who ride to UBC have
complained the apparent abrupt
termination of the path at Toronto
Road forces them either to cross
busy  University  Boulevard   and
weave through heavy traffic to
reach the campus or to ride on the
pedestrian sidewalk.
Murdoch said there is a safe,
established bike route weaving
along backroads from Toronto
Road to Wesbrook Mall.
But there are no signs indicating
cyclists should continue to UBC by
the backroads route between
Western Parkway and Wesbrook
UBC unions follow herd
Two of UBC's three major labor
unions will walk off the job for the
Oct. 14 day of protest against the
federal governments wage and
price control program.
Both   the   Canadian   Union   of
./    .*"
*   *\ mv «* *
md
t*k
H^^gfe
—doug field photo
OKAY FRANK, YOU GET THAT TREE and I'll give that illegally-parked curbstone a ticket; then we can
call Busters and have that fire zone sign towed away for parking in a no-parking zone. That should just about
fill our quotas for today!
Public Employees and the Office
and Technical Employees Union
university locals will not show up
for work Oct. 14, the day the
Canadian Labor Congress has
designated for a nationwide protest
against the Liberal governments'
wage and price control program.
Association of University and
College Employees university
local has not yet decided if it will
support the CLC's call to walk out,
union organizer Fairleigh Funston
said Thursday. She said the local
will be conducting a mail-in ballot
among its members in the next two
weeks to decide on a course of
action.
Funston said provincial AUCE
union leaders had urged the local
to join in the protest.
CUPE university local president
Ken Andrews said Thursday that
his members have not yet decided
what they will do during their
walkout. He said they will be trying
to co-ordinate their efforts with
those of CUPE's other Vancouver
locals.
Andrews said he has not heard if
the UBC administration plans to
take any action against workers
who do not show up on the job Oct.
14. University spokesman Al
Hunter declined to comment on
whether the university would take
any sort of action against
protesting workers.
He did say the university will be
open Oct. 14 despite the protest.
Crescent. And the route stops
abruptly at Wesbrook Crescent
with no signs directing cyclists to
cross the road at nearby traffic
lights.
Murdoch admitted there have
been several accidents between
cyclists and cars on the boulevard
but said the fault lay with the
cyclists.
"A stop sign, to a cyclist, doesn't
mean anything."
He said a route has been laid out
so cyclists can continue to UBC
after reaching the end of the
boulevard path at Toronto Road.
He said the weaving route was
established when the cycle path
was constructed two years ago in
response to the demands of UBC
cyclists.
Murdoch said cyclists should
turn left alongToronto Road at the
cycle path's end, continue to
Western Parkway, then left again
at another paved cycle path that
leads to Wesbrook Crescent.
Cyclists are then supposed to cross
Wesbrook Crescent at the traffic
light.
Murdoch said the route ,is
adequate but cyclists are not using
it because they feel it is too far out
of their way.
"You can lay out a path but a
cyclist will always take the
shortest route," said Murdoch.
But there are no signs indicating
cyclists should continue to UBC by
the second cycle path between
Western Parkway and Wesbrook
Crescent or that cyclists should
cross Wesbrook Crescent at the
traffic lights.
Murdoch said the route had been
laid out with the approval of the
UBC cyclist group before the cycle
path was constructed two years
ago. He said the endowment lands
department has no plans to change
the present route. Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1976
No news is bad news
There is a serious problem
on this campus.
Is it caused by laryngitis?
Sore throat? Oncoming
deafness?
Or is it just plain old
condescending, obnoxious
stonewalling?
If you've been reading The
Ubyssey this year, it's not
hard to see what the problem
is.
An ever-increasing number
of news stories are saying
that when reporters tried to
contact administration
officials for comment,
they've been unavailable for
comment, or refused to
comment.
This is becoming a disease
of epidemic proportion. It is
spreading, like an open
running sore, from
administration president
Doug Kenny to his four
vice-presidents to faculty
deans to department heads.
The top-level brass is
infected.
We think it stinks.
And it's spread to the
lower level brass and even
some of their secretaries. It
seems that nearly everyone
we call in the administration
is in a meeting that lasts all
day, at a conference, or just
mysteriously unavailable.
In some places, this has
gone so far that reporters
encounter secretaries who
refuse to even pass on
messages to the people they
work for.
It's incredibly frustrating.
And we are beginning to
smell a rat behind all of this.
Numerous times, reporters
wanting      to      speak      to
administration figures have
been referred to UBC's crew
of information people, or, as
they're commonly known,
flacks.
That's simply not good
enough.
And it's been happening
so often in recent days that
we suspect there's a policy
afoot to direct our questions
to the flacks.
When The Ubyssey wants
to talk to a vice-president, or
a dean or an assistant dean or
whatever, we mean we want
to talk to them — and not to
the underlings and
mouthpieces who are paid to
faithfully transmit what they
say.
We want to get our
information from the people
who are responsible for
situations and who are
involved in issues.
There's a reason.
Staff
Staff. And letters.
We need both.
Staff are people who
write news stories, features,
reviews, sports, take pictures
and drink — preferably a lot,
but we give lessons.
Letters are stimulating
opinions and reactions
designed to titillate our
readers*
So bring yourself and
your friends, or drop your
letters, in SUB 241 K, the
northeast corner on the
second floor.
Come up and see us
sometime soon.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 24, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"Hot scoops!" shouted Heather Walker, Geof Wheelwright, and Sue
Vohanka as they burst through that well known door. Ralph Maurer and Ted
Davis shouted, "You idiots, you've got puddles of icecream In your hands,"
while John Cartwright, Deb van der Gracht, and Ian Currie looked very, very
amused. Not so for Lindsey Corbett, Steve Howard, Bill TIelrnan, and Bob
Krleger, who were slipping and sliding furiously on a pile of lizards in th«
corner. "Give them some golf shoes," chorused Charlie Mlcallef and Doug
McMullln as they took turns molesting Doug Field, Mike Miller, Tom Barnes,
and Paul Wilson. "We don't want any," answered Verne McDonald, Bruce
Gaugh, and Dave Morton, who really weren't there at all. The lizards were,
performed by Ted Collins, Greg Strong, and Gord Robertson. The
supporting cast of Merllee Robertson and Sharle McCune performed very
well on the Inert body of Mike Bocking. Ian Morton, Marcus Gee and Gray
Kiles were the only ones In the audience because they had found where
Aubrey Holmes, William Wheeler, and Richard Currie had hidden the beer.
The way we've always
understood it, the role of a
student newspaper, or any
other newspaper, is to act as
a source of information and
also a watchdog on activities.
We're supposed to question
people, find out what they're
doing and why, and then
explain it all to our readers.
How the hell are we
supposed to do that if we're
blocked from getting through
to the people who have the
answers in the first place?
How are we supposed to
question people about the
statements they make and
pin down what they're saying
if we're being blocked from
talking to them and instead
have to attempt the whole
process second-hand through
an intermediary flack?
As the saying goes, you
lose a lot in translation.
And we're not willing to
settle for less. Because it's
not just our loss — it affects
everyone   on   campus   who
wants to know the reasons
behind the decisions that are
constantly being made.
When the administration
president earns a $60,000
yearly salary and his four
veeps are making a cushy
$54,800, and so on down the
line, they better have time to
at least return the telephone
messages left lying about on
their desks.
Even if they don't want to
comment — we prefer to hear
it from them.
Ooops. • .blush
Ooops. Er. . . um . . .squirm . . . more blush . . .
We're embarrassed.
It really doesn't happen all that often.
Really.
But The Ubyssey has made a mistake.
On this very page in Thursday's paper, we said UBC's
teaching assistants had an opportunity to meet at noon
Thursday to discuss the raw deal they've said they're
getting from the university.
What we should have said is they can meet next
Thursday at noon in the Graduate Student Centre
committee room.
But we meant everything else we said.
Letters
More
padding
According to Basil Stuart-
Stubbs' letter in Thursday's paper,
the library is not responsible for
the Brock Hall study area.
However, some part of the
university administration certainly must be. Stubbs says his
department isn't but doesn't say
who is—or perhaps the problem is
that no one is responsible for Brock
Han.
Certainly, as a high-ranking
administration official Stubbs did
feel free to reply to my criticism
regarding the run-down appearance of the Brock study area
and especially the virtual disappearance of the once full set of
padded chairs in the area.
His reply is a cop-out.
Stubbs agrees the study hall has
become a virtual slum. But in
placing the blame he sounds like a
19th-century Christian fundamentalist, essentially saying
that Brock Hall studiers are victims of their own wickedness.
Certainly Stubbs has a point
when he says "That students
themselves (should) bear some
responsibility for the situation."
Sure.
But shouldn't the administration
also bear some responsibility?
Stubbs says the main cause of
Brock's demise is that it is not
supervised. Well, whose fault is
that if not of the administration?
A good supply of ashtrays and
appropriate signs would help solve
the problem of cigarette burns in
the rug that Stubbs mentions.
If the problem is a lack of
supervision, well then, pay
somebody to supervise the area.
And perhaps the fact that people
keep leaving their books in the
carrels is an indication that there
isn't enough permanent carrel
space available in the main stacks
to accommodate demand.
Any number of senior students
who have their requests for carrel
space rejected each year can attest
to that.
The point remains, despite
Stubbs' letter, that the university
administration is not doing its part
to provide a pleasant, comfortable
atmosphere in Brock Hall.
As long as it remains a study
hall, how about stop trying to
blame the students for its poor
condition and try taking some
initiative—and responsibility—
yourselves.
Ken Dodd
arts 4
Logo 2
We can all sympathize with your
desire to change The Ubyssey logo,
but really, when a better logo could
not be found why did you insist on
changing it anyway?
Although a change in the paper's
looks is worthy of merit, a change
for the worse is not. So let's have a
change for the better and put the
old logo back where it belongs.
And how about some response
from the masses? I've talked to
marry people who dislike the
new logo and if we're ever going to
get it changed we're going to have
to make our voices heard.
So how about getting to work on
those fiery letters to the editor that
will remove the new logo from our
pages?
Doug Field
commerce 4
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K.  \ painting
Darcus mahes his colours dance
By DAVID MORTON
It was the striking brightness of
the colours and the rather large
size of the paintings that struck me
as I entered the Fine Arts Gallery
to see the Jack Darcus exhibition.
The flagrant unorthodoxy of paint
squeezed right from the tube and
an adoring hand. Almost all of the
subjects are at ease, seated in
chairs, smiling, and are given the
warmth of colours such as red,
yellow and orange. Some of the
people are even approachable,
such as Ruth Lee, a tiny old woman
on  a   life  sized  canvas   whose
DARCUS ... is it all really worthwhile?
applied to the canvas with a wide
brush and human portraiture are
trademarks of this artist.
Perhaps it is the stark whiteness
of the gallery, the low
claustrophobic ceiling and the
irritating iron pillars that force the
paintings to jump out. Though the
faces of the subjects are real and
warm, and seem to enlarge the
room for a moment, in many cases
there is the underlying feeling of
chaos and disorder.
Even in the seemingly pleasant
atmosphere of Helen's Room, with
sunlight streaming through the
windows and flowers and other
objects scattered about what
should be a cosy room, everything
is threatened by the lines of the
room, which are twisted oddly out
of proportion. Tables balance
precariously on tilted floors, and
cracks in the walls reveal the
imminent collapse of the entire
room. And there is poor Helen
smiling pathetically, happy to have
her picture painted.
Darcus' perception of the world
is rather glum, but at the same
time his subjects are handled with
smiling wrinkled face urged me to
say in a kindly voice, "Good afternoon, Mrs. Lee."
Her wrinkles are brought out by
the thick bright colours of red,
green and white with the broad
quick strokes that are characteristic of Darcus. Forms which
are interesting in themselves
appear on her face with these large
strokes.
But for the most part, Darcus'
people are difficult to accept. The
cold severity of the faces of Hans I
and II gathers force from the
bright flat colours of red, yellow
and orange, which before were
warm and gentle but are now
fierce and infernal. I could feel
Hans' eyes burn into me searching;
for a soul and sentencing it to
death.
Similar severe faces look right
past the viewer, as if there was no
significance in his or her presence.
Jack Darcus' self-portraits are
interesting in the way they reveal
his development as an artist, or
rson. There are three self-por-
aits from the years 1967,1974 and
1976.
r
MICHAEL CAINE
JAMES CANN •
• ELLIOTT GOULD
DIAN KEATON
GENERAL
Vogue
"HARRY & WALTER GO TO NEW YORK'
SHOWS AT 12:15,2:35,4:50,7:10,9:30 415-5434
THE TRANS-AMERICAN OUTLAW ROAD RACE-
-" A DEMOLITION DERBY WITHOUT RULES!
Odeon
12:15, 2:10, 4:05. 6, 8, 10 MATURE:-R. McDonald     'V,?*^'"'
I Violence and coarse language. B.C. Director *'
_ ;	
v^
TOM LAUGHLIN
"BILLY JACK"
12:15. 2:35. 5:00, 7:25. 9:30
MATURE - Some
swearing and coarse
language. — R. McDonald,
B.C. Director
Coronet twuu
SSI GRANVILLE     eS8-6S2B
    Shows at 12:25, 2:15,
BO SVENSON-CYBILL SHEPHERD* 4:io,6:05, s, 10
.,_a_A__^___  • MATURE— Some violence and|
9m\MmWmwm7mVjLt M coarse language — B.C. Dir.
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Shows: 7:30, 9:30
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R. McDonald, B.C. Dir. »>»•■*.*■  >-■ w-wi_ 176-2747
Park
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
"THE MAGIC FLUTE'
GENERAL
ENGLISH SUB-TITLES
SHOWS 7:30-9:30
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNBAR al 30th
PALIMO PICASSO
"IMMORAL TALES"
ENGLISH SUB-TITLES
SHOWS
7:30-9:30
Varsity
214.3730«»
NUDITY AND SEX THROUGHOUT      224-3730*
:,>,...JE^S..,.  -R. McDONALD, B.C. Director 4375 w. 10th
The 1967 portrait reveals what is
perhaps a typical I960ish image of
youth. Darcus is seated on a stool,
his face wincing in frustration, and
his hands clutching two small
round objects. Much attention is
given to the anguish of the face and
the tension of the flexing hands.
The artist is surrounded by an oval
border with the top of his head
preventing the completion of the
border. This illustrates the idea of
confinement, either by social
convention or an artistic block. The
portrait reflects his attempt to free
himself.
This oval surrounding arises
once again in the 1974 portrait, only
this time in a more complicated
manner. The oval is the border of a
mirror, and the image in the
mirror is Darcus. The staring
blank eyes of Darcus, the cold blue
and grey colours of his clothing,
and the crowded, cluttered space
of the room he is in reveal a senseless, hopeless and lost artist. The
face resembles those of the
disturbing self-portraits of Vincent
van Gogh. The image is quite trite,
and the artist could be fantasizing
about his role as an artist.
The 1976 portrait shows a more
stable Darcus, but the
hopelessness has not left his eyes.
They are still empty, and with
hands on hips, he shrugs as if to
say, "Is it all really worth while?"
A typical attitude of the 1970s. Ah
yes, what is life, Mr. Darcus?
The human condition as portrayed in art is a subject that is
time worn, yet timeless. Much of
what Darcus says in this area has
already been explored by the likes
of van Gogh and Picasso. However,
what light he does manage to
contribute to the field is really
worth considering. Once Darcus
manages to assert a more impressive message, he will be an
artist to watch.
The show at the Fine Arts
Gallery continues until October 16,
1976.
Special
>pe<
(Lxtm [-^erio
nuance
Frederic Wood Theatre
WHEN YOU COMIN' BACK
RED RYDER?
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
by Mark-Medoff
8:00 p.m.
Box Office: FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE Room 207
Reservations: 228-2678
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Page Friday, 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1976 I indians I
Racism root of native crime
By TED COLLINS
Page Friday staffer, Ted Collins was
involved this summer in a research project'
for the National Parole Service in the area
of Indians and the parole system. This week
he begins a two part series on his findings,-
as well as the problems facing the Indian in
general.
In the following article, Collins details the
forces contributing to native crime.
gradual undermining of Canada's European
cultural base.
Recently I read about the statement of one
member of the Union of B.C. Municipalities
against the acceptance of Indian communities into the union, because, as he said,
the Indians already had enough privileges.
He was booed down, but it is not the first
time that I heard the sentiment about Indians in general being too pampered.
Last week I read an article about a con-
NATIVE PEOPLE . .. search for identity
I was engaged this summer in doing a
survey for the National Parole Service on
the subject of Indians and parole. I visited
prisons and spoke to native inmates and to
employees of the Canadian Penitentiary
Service. I interviewed parole officers and
native parolees in various parts of the
province. I spoke to native people who
worked from outside the system — people
from organizations concerned about the
position of natives in prison, organizations
actively engaged in helping natives that
were in trouble with the law.
Near the end of the summer I held a
workshop at Matsqui Institution to which I
invited representatives from the various
groups I had spoken to — from inmates to
directors of government departments — and
at this workshop I presented my
preliminary report.
Finally I took what i had learned in the
course of the summer, from discussions and
interviews, from the workshop, from
reading other surveys on similar and
related subjects, and I attempted to incorporate all this material into a final
report. I presented my data and my
recommendations to my employer, the
National Parole Service, and I left to return
to school hoping heartily that somebody
would read what I had written and do
something concrete about it.
Why did I see such a need for action? Try
out the following statistics: Indians compose 5% of B.C.'s population; they make up
35 to 40% of the inmates of our provincial
prisons and at least 20% of the inmates of
our federal prisons. Statistics for the rest of
country are similar. This represents, for
Indians, a major social disaster.
When I embarked upon the survey, I had
only a slight idea of the extent of the
problem, and the degree to which it tied in
with what it means to be Indian in Canada.
Because I am an Indian myself, and because
this blattered to-me, I knew about being
Indian: the bigotry you have to face, the
stereotyping, the search for pride and
identity, the struggle with poverty, the lack
of education and marketable job skills, poor
health, poor living conditions, and poor and
neglectful treatment by government. Toss
cultural shock into the above and you have a
Jekyll and Hyde salad designed to turn
almost any law-abiding citizen towards antisocial actions. The surprise is that there still
are so many law-abiding Indians.
Before I am accused of exaggerating, I
think I had better begin backing up my
arguments. First bigotry: how widespread
is it really? To answer, I need only to point
out some recent newspaper and magazine
articles.
Less than two weeks ago in an article in
Weekend Magazine, the Vancouver Sun
staff writer Doug Collins deplored the
number of coloured immigrants that were
being allowed into this country. The article
reflected a fear of racial violence and the
fidential government document, a handbook
for distribution to the employees of a prison
in the far north. What the handbook said was
that Indians are basically lazy, uncreative,
and unenterprising, in that they would
rather work for wages than for themselves.
The author of the book had similar things to
say about Inuit.
The clincher is an article from the Toronto
Star, dated Monday, August 16,1976. It tells
of a nationwide survey conducted by a
sociologist from the University of Lethbridge, whose name is Reginald Bibby. The
survey claimed that one in every five
Canadians believes that Indians have inferior intelligence and that one in ten feels
uneasy in their presence. The sample
surveyed was two thousand Canadians.
Racism is alive and flourishing in Canada
and nowadays even the middle-class is
coming out of its closet and confessing to it
openly. Some might call it having the
courage of your convictions, but to me it is
about as laudable as kicking a dog in front of
your friends, instead of waiting until no one
is around. Racism has always been popular
in some circles, as most Indians can tell you.
What of poverty?
In the study A Survey of the Contemporary Iridians of Canada, made between 1964 and 1966, thirty-five Indian
reserves were examined in terms of their
economic, political and educational needs.
Only one of the reserves studied, Skidegate
in B.C., was found to have a per capita income above the poverty line. The average
per capita income of all thirty-five reserves
was just over $300, compared to a national
average for. that time of $1400 for all
Canadians.
Things have improved somewhat in the
last decade, but I'm sure that the figures
will still bear the fact that most Indians
today are still living at or below the poverty
line. If things continue to improve at the
same rate I'm sure that most Indians, by the
end of this century, should have the benefits
of indoor plumbing.
What of native health? I'll quote a
paragraph from the pamphlet, And What
About Canada's Native Peoples?, published
by the Canadian Association in Support of
the Native Peoples.
"The average age at death of Indian
males is 41.5; for females, 43.3 The death
rate for pre-school aged children is almost
three times the national average, and for
Inuit children four times. Violent deaths
occur three to six times more often among
Indians and the suicide rate is rising. According to Statistics Canada, 28.4% of
Native deaths are suicides as compared
with the national average of 9.7%."
Hang on, there's more.
Native education? In 1974/75 it was found
that 80.9% of all status Indian children drop
out of school before completing high school.
Only 1% of all Indian students in Canada are
attending university.
Native employment? In 1971 Indian
unemployment in urban areas was
estimated at 68%. Add this to the fact that
many Indians come to the city to better their
standard of living — and a Jot of them
succeed. Life on skid row is often preferable
to what they left behind at home. It is also
oneof the few places in this society where an
Indian can feel he is at least equal to his
white, counterpart.
Okay, I think I've made my point. Now I
would like to explain in part how all of this
affects an Indian once he is caught up in the
criminal justice system.
Assume a native has been caught and
brought before the court. What happens? It
is almost certain that he will plead guilty.
This might seem praiseworthy to some, but
it results in more Indians being sentenced
than whites. The reason for the guilty plea is
an attitude among many natives that it is
hopeless to fight the white establishment.
This is an attitude that has been ingrained
through many hopeless battles with
government bureaucracies and is very
difficult to root out.
Assume now that the native has been
sentenced to a prison term. He has served
part of it and has become eligible for parole.
What happens? Again there is the defeatist
attitude to overcome. Many Indians will not
even apply for parole because they believe
they have no chance of receiving it. There is
some truth to their apprehensions.
First, in order to understand my point, I'll
have to explain how parole works. You have
have said above, but they are too complicated to explain here.
Remember that to be eligible for parole is
a long ways from actually being granted it.
What factors influence one's parole?
When a person applies, he must have a.
parole plan. The plan is an outline of what he
intends to do, how and where he intends to
live when he gets out. Indians are often ill-
informed about what is actually expected of
them by the Parole Board. As a result, they
fumble about and their plans are often
vague or unrealistic. This works against
them.
What is an ideal plan? It is one that
returns the inmate to a situation where he is
either working or educating himself. At the
same time, it must carefully sidestep the
milieu which got him into trouble in the first
place. This seems simple enough except if
you consider that it was often unavoidable
poverty and the inability to find a job that
led the Indian to prison in the first place.
Prison itself does not significantly alleviate
these problems.
On top of this, add the fact that home
environments, such as reserves that are
overcrowded, are often deemed
unamenable for the purposes of reform. On
the other hand, cities are considered pure
poison for Indians. Ever heard of Catch 22?
The system has got the Indian coming or
going, with the result that he can't move at
all, except that if he doesn't move he's accused of not trying. With rules like that, no
wonder some Indians seem defeatist.
CHILDREN ... high drop out rate
' probably seen movies where some prisoner
or other is released from jail early merely
because of good behaviour. This is
misleading. There is a process similar to
this in Canada, but it is not called parole,
and a maximum of only one third of an inmate's sentence may be suspended under
this system.
An inmate becomes eligible for parole
after serving one third of his sentence or
seven years, whichever is less. This rule
does not apply to indefinite or life sentences.
Certain other regulations modify what I
Experience
our
Ambiance
7 p.m. — 2 a.m.
Everyday
3357 West Broadway
Telephone 732-6113
**i
f"
THE OLD ROLLER RINK
Theatre Restaurant
135 West 1st St., North Van.
986-1331
In Concert: Sept. 23, 24, 25
HUMPHREY and
THE DUMPTRUCKS
Sept. 28, 29, 30
THUNDERBYRD
Starring
ROGER McGUHM
Oct. 1st & 2nd
EDDIE HARRIS
Friday, September 2A, \$76
THE
UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 I theatre
Red Ryder is sophomorie slop
By MERRILEE ROBSON
When the curtain opened on the
Frederick Wood Theatre's
production of When You Comin'
ANGEI heroine?
Back, Red Ryder?, the audience
applauded the set. Douglas Higgins
has created a run-down roadside
diner, replete with chrome, ar-
borite, thick white cups and cardboard signs describing the day's
special. He has not omitted the
broken neon sign, nor the
ubiquitous circular wall clock
which keeps time during the show.
When   You   Comin'   Back,    Red
Ryder?
directed by Stanley Weese,
at the Frederick Wood Theatre,
Sept. 17-25
Unfortunately, the performance
did not live up to its setting. When
You Comin' Back, Red Ryder?
takes place at the close of the 1960s
and ties in with the current,
overworked wave of nostalgia.
Stephen Ryder is still dressing in
tight, black pants and black shoes
with pointed toes. He wears his
shirt sleeves rolled up to his
shoulders, displaying his tattoo.
Stephen doesn't know that the wet
head is dead. He is still dreaming
of Corvettes and he wants to be
called Red, after his cowboy hero.
The rest of the world is well past
that sort of thing, having already
worked its way right through
hippies, peace and love. The play is
set in a small New Mexican town
which has been isolated (symbolically enough) by the freeway's
new bypass. The residents mention
peace and love a few times but
there are no hippies in the script. A
wistful desire for a return to that
idealism permeates the play,
expressed by nostalgia for the
more obviously past 1950s.
Author Mark Medoff seems
honestly distressed over his theme.
Unfortunately he has chosen to
present.it through characters
either too shallow or too
stereotyped to empathize with.
Derek Keurvost, in the title role,
looks marvellous. His outmoded,
starkly black and white clothing
and his slick, dark hair emphasize
the incongruity of his chosen
nickname, Red. His performance,
however, was rather unbelievable
initially. This is due partly to the
script. Stephen's first speeches are
merely complaints and empty
bravado, which give clues to his
character but supply no information to establish him as a
real person, rather than an
unhappy, greasy caricature.
On the other hand, Judith Mastai
as Angel, Stephen's fellow worker
in the diner, is delightful. Angel is
perhaps the only truly sympathetic
character in the play. She is good-
natured, fat and sad. Her concern
for other people and her love for
CINEMA 16 PRESENTS
INTERNATIONAL
Sept. 20 Death by Hanging
Oct. 4 Two Daughters
Oct. 18 First Love
Nov. 1 SmicSmacSmoc
Nov. 15 The Man With the Balloons
Nov. 29 TheNightcomers
GENE KELLY
Sept. 27 Anchors A weigh
Oct. 12 The Pirate
Oct. 25 Take Me Out to the Ball Game
Nov. 8 Summer Stock
Nov. 22 An American in Paris
D ec. 6 I f s AI ways F ai r W eather
IRON CURTAIN/EASTERN EUROPE
Jan. 10 Capricious Summer
Jan. 24 & 25 Crime and Punishment
Feb. 7 The Goat's Horn
Feb. 23 Love
Mar. 7 The Wedding
Mar. 21 The Cranes are Flying
HOLLYWOOD LOOKS AT CANADA
Jan. 17
Jan. 31
Feb. 14
Feb. 28/
Mar. 1
Mar. 14/15
Mar. 28
Blue Blazes Rawden
The Trap
Northwest Mounted Police
The Far Country
Canadian Pacific Cariboo Trail
Saskatchewan
Back to God's Country
Rosemarie
ADMISSION BY SERIES PASS ONLY
Tickets Available at:
All Duthie's Book Stores
Renoir Cinema      AMS Office, SUB   Each Series:
Film Society Office Rm. 247, SUB    Students/Staff
, Ph. 228-3698 General Public
$5.00
$6.00
RYDER ANTIHERO
Ah, look at all the lonely people"
Stephen are obvious in Mastai's
sensitive performance. Angel is
credible physically as well. Her
sweet face and untidy uniform are
familiar and appropriate.
As the play commences Stephen
has just finished his night shift and
Angel has arrived for the morning
one. The other characters are
introduced as they enter the diner
to eat; first Lyle, the owner of the
gas station across the road, then a
businessman and his wife, a
concert violinist. These roles are
all rather shallow and conventional, although Diana
Belshaw, as Clarisse, the violinist,
does achieve a quiet, believable
force as the play progresses.
Then Teddy, the villain of the
See PF 6: RYDER
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Page Friday, 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1976 I entertainment
City stage makes gothic modern
By GREGORY STRONG
City Stage used to be a popular noon hour
theatre located in downtown Vancouver.
This theatre was a converted doughnut shop
and could hardly seat seventy-five people,
not to mention the huge lunchtime crowds
that used to gather.
The new City Stage at Thurlow and
Alberni, opened in June. A large attractive
studio with deep carpeting and denim
backed chairs replaced the old City Stage,
which was founded in 1972.
Two one act plays, Canadian
Gothic/American Modern, mark the new
expanded season at the City Stage.
The first play, a Canadian version of the
traditional Gothic tragedy, has all of the
doomed characters of high tragedy but little
aside from place names to establish any real
sense of Canadian identity.
We are told that the play takes place in the
town of Cardiff, Saskatchewan and concerns
a tragic romance between the daughter of a
dentist and a Cree Indian.
Canadian Gothic/American Modern
written by Joanna Glass
directed by Ray Michel
now playing at the City Stage
751 Thurlow Street
at 8:30 and 12:15
The play has typical stock characters: the
rebellious daughter, her mother who dies
prematurely, her strict, insensitive father
and her lover who is publicly scorned
because of his social class.
Playwright Glass has saturated her play
with Canadian content, from city names to
local geography, even to the extent of
writing a speaking part for a Canadian
Indian.
Unfortunately none of these injections can
help the pretentious Canadian Gothic and
the audience is left with the realization that
only the names have been changed and a
Canadian Gothic could have happened
anywhere.
The problem of establishing a sense of
Canadian identity in our art is certainly not
a novel one, but there is a considerable
difference between writing a play with
Canadian content and creating a piece that
reflects some insights on the Canadian
experience, on discovering those features of
our life that make us the people we are.
Donna White and Zoe Alexander did give a
very moving portrait of the love between a
daughter and her mother however and these
scenes almost succeeded in creating the
intense emotion needed in this play.
The dialogue in Canadian Gothic was
weak because it was written in the past
tense, in the form of individual
reminiscences or stories by each of the
characters and had a diminishing effect of
the audience's emotions.
One example of this came in the climax of
the play when the daughter told her father
that she was pregnant. He quarrels with Ben
Red Leaf, her lover, and the fight ends in his
injury. Once more the entire event has been
related by the characters, instead of action
taking place.
The second play, American Modern, was a
witty look at urban dwellers. The two
characters were a charmingly neurotic
woman who hoards garbage and her
husband, a board executive who is suicidally
inclined.
The two characters direct their remarks
to the audience and there is little interaction
between them. One result of this is that the
very capable actress Zoe Alexander has to
make several very difficult transitions from
laughter to tears within single sentences.
The theme of American Modern—that we
as members of modern society are its
victims—is not an original insight. Neither
is the playwright's idea that "we try to fill
our empty spaces". Both of these concepts
are overstated by the characters.
BEN RED LEAF
, Canadian content
More silents please!    \       Prophet babbles
By WILLIAM WHEELER
It seems to me very sad that few funny
movies ever succeed in being funny all the
way through. It usually happens that after a
while all the jokes sound the same. Or I get
tired of laughing before the film is over. Any
way, the feeling is the same: letdown. Of
course, there are a few exceptions which
come to mind, such as Modern Times with
Charlie Chaplin. However, such a movie
contains much more than humor — that is
why it is great.
Silent Movie
directed by Mel Brooks
at the Bay Theatre
Of course, every so often a good movie
comes along which seeks only to make you
laugh.
Silent Movie belongs in this category. It is
another totally absurd movie brought to you
by Mel Brooks, the man who gave you
Blazing Saddles. It certainly doesn't make,
you laugh all the way through, but Mel
Brooks deserves an A for effort.
Like Blazing Saddles, this movie satirizes
Hollywood thoroughly. While B.S. was a
western; Silent Movie is a melodrama,
complete with a hero, a heroine and a
villain. The hero battles ill-fate, the bad
guys and the bottle; the heroine falls for the
hero and of course the villain is defeated.
Other cliches are thrown in for good
measure: two (count 'em) chase scenes, a
movie within a movie, lots of Big Stars and a
happy ending.
Of course, the whole thing is quite silly;
what  else  could  one  expect  from  Mel
Brooks? Having seen B.S. only several
months ago, I would have to say that Silent
Movie is the better of the two.
One of its major strong points is the cast.
The principal actors — Mel Brooks, Dom
DeLotdse, Marty Feldman are all masters
of comedy. Even better, the three are
usually together — like Laurel and Hardy
with a third member. Mel Brooks is
especially amusing in his self-satiric role as
Mel Funn, a former star movie director who
seeks to make a comeback. There are other
bright lights: Sid Caesar, Henny Youngman
and a number of "real Hollywood Stars"
who appear as themselves.
The lack of audible dialogue (meaning:
it's a silent movie) is truly a great gimmick.
After all, how long has it been since a silent
movie was made? However, this innovation
(date I call it that?) has also permitted a
greater use of non-verbal humour — namely
slapstick and mime. The slapstick is well
done, using tried and true routines. As a
special treat, Marcel Marceau puts in a
short appearance; ironically his is the only
spoken word in the movie.
The lack of sound forces us to become
more aware of the characters' actions, just
as blind people become more aware of the
sounds around them. Thus the movie succeeds largely because it is silent.
On the whole, Silent Movie is good but not
great — in other words three stars out of
five. Mel Brooks wants only to make a lot of
laughs (and a lot of money). I'm sure he's
succeeding. I would recommend this movie
to people who liked Blazing Saddles and to
anyone in need of light entertainment.
By VERNE McDONALD
In recent years Canadian fiction has seen
the birth of many speculative novels. Past
and present Canada would seem to be too
dull for contemporary Canadian writers to
concern themselves with; the future
provides more scope for stories, with no
messy facts to get in the way.
The Man Who Wanted to Save Canada
R.J. Chick Childerhose
Hoot Productions, Victoria, 1975
In Childerhose's The Man Who Wanted to
Save Canada the future doesn't seem too
exciting either. All of the old problems are
there: unemployment, vacillating government, Quebec separation and American
take-over. The book is sub-titled "a
prophetic novel" and earns this blurb by
taking contemporary problems and expanding or exaggerating them to the edges
of utter disbelief.
CHILDERHOSE . . . unexciting
Local movies bore critics
ByGRAYKILESand
AUBREYHOLMES
During the academic year there are two
cinemas in the campus vicinity which
program films aimed largely at the college
crowd. Both are worthy of your patronage, if
only because they are the two theatres in
town that still have student rates.
The Varsity and the Dunbar are both
managed by Don Barnes and have a
tradition of presenting foreign "art" films.
Barnes is the co-ordinator of the annual
International Festival of Films and he
draws on many of those films for his fall
schedule.
Currently playing at the Varsity is one of
the big hits of the last event, Immoral Tales.
Walerian Borowczyk's movie has no
business in a so-called "art" house. A more
appropriate venue would be the soft-porn
Eve down on Granville Street.
It consists of four short stories about sex,
that are totally unerotic and uninteresting.
Borowczyk appears to be afraid and
resentful of women, and as a result the
women in his film are treated as little better
than dogs.
What is really sad about the whole affair is
that the celebrated Polish director has only
succeeded in filming his adolescent
"naughty" fantasies at an age when he
should have grown up.
What happens when you get four or more
very talented and popular actors together
then provide them with a script and a job to
do. Usually good things, you say? That's
true, unless of course the script happens to
be totally unworkable.
Such is the case of the movie, Harry and •
Walter go to New york. James Caan and
I Elliott Gould, are the stars and manage
some very finely choreographed dance
routines and some great antics of new
humor but the overall script fails them.
Diane Keaton is stereotyped into a fast
talking reactionary and unfortunately she is
not allowed to do anything but that. Various
other bit parts are all played by persons you
might recognize from the television show
Baretta, due to the employment of the same
casting director.
Michael Caine is the best of the lot,
playing the mastermind behind a series of
bank robberies at the turn of the century.
During a stint in jail he manages to employ
the talents of two cheap clip artists, Harry
and Walter (Caan and Gould).
The two manage to steal the plans of the
next big caper that the mastermind has
drawn up for his release. The plot proceeds,
unfortunately, straight downhill from
there. Some of the mechanics of the show
are hard to take, and there are obvious
mistakes, along with some very original
funny situation comedy.
But not enough to do it any good. Perhaps
if you are just interested in seeing Gould or
Caan again—in any movie—you might
consider the evening worthwhile.
As we follow the hero, Neil Brody, through
his attempt to save the country we find that
the government has gone on continuous
coffee break, one third of the work force is
unemployed, Quebec is already in the
process of removing federal ties, and
negotiations are under way to hand the
whole mess over to the Americans. But the
main problem, which is the hardest to
believe in the face of the others, is that there
is no one around who gives a damn, thus
leaving it open for Brody to take up the flag
and issue the rallying cry.
There is something about Brody that
invites people to read newspapers over his
shoulder, then give him their deep-felt
opinions about whatever subject he is
reading about. As such contrived mood-
setters accumulate, the reader becomes too
aware of the writer's manipulation of both
the plot and his audience, something which
should be completely hidden.
In the first half of the novel, Childerhose's
technique leaves a little to be desired. There
are constant annoying digressions from the
story line as Brody is shoe-horned in and out
of various anecdotes that illustrate the
desperate straits the country has come to.
In the second half, however, Childerhose
warms to his story and becomes more
coherent and readable. A long sub-plot
about the effects of American Chemical and
Biological Warfare testing evaporates into
thin air without ever having served a useful
purpose, and Brody goes into his attempt to
save Canada.
As Childerhose starts to use drama and
suspense with adeptness, one begins to
wonder when the first half of the novel was
written. Even though Brody becomes
mainly concerned with the tedium of setting
up and running a quasi-political party,
Childerhose keeps the pace moving and
holds the reader's interest.
If Childerhose's book had stuck to being
purely speculative, much could be forgiven.
But in the last half he lets the pretense that
the novel concerns the future drop a little
and starts addressing himself almost
directly to present problems, changed only
by their already mentioned exaggeration.
The solutions and rhetoric become pure
mid-Seventies in their outlook, as does the
attitude towards government as an ever
eavesdropping police state. There are no
great thoughts forthcoming, however, and
the solutions sound a little superficial and
naive, which is perhaps how they're meant
to sound.
On the whole, this uneven book is worth
the trouble for neither the author nor the
reader. Perhaps it's time to stop hoping for
the Great Canadian Novel and instead start
thinking about the Good Canadian Novel.
These, despite the best efforts of our
homegrown publishers, are few and far
between.
Friday, September 24, 1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 ! entertainment
Ryder
From PF 4
piece, comes in to disrupt the
complacency of the diner. Affecting the local accent and
exaggerating it in a cowboy
parody, he is at first merely extremely obnoxious. But Teddy is
thecatalytic force in this play so he
has to go around rather predictably pointing out the other
characters' deficiencies. We
already know their weaknesses,
however, having already encountered these people in other
stock dramas. For the audience the
conflict conveys a little unpleasant
tension but not much else.
Lome Kennedy tackles the role
of Teddy with great energy and at
times he does manage to make us
feel some of the disgust and cynical
despair that Teddy and the rest of
the "disaffected youth" of
America are suffering. Although
Teddy is cast as the saviour/bad
buy in When You Comin' Back,
Red Ryder?, this character is as
hackneyed as the rest Teddy is a
college student and a Vietnam war
veteran.
At one point in the performance
there is a brief physical struggle
between Teddy and Red Ryder.
The skirmish ends with Teddy
holding a gun to Stephen's head
and the audience almost on the
edges of their seats. Then the
script forces Kennedy to say a line
like,' 'But your fate isn't to die Red
Ryder; it's to live," and the
audience winces.
It is true that in real life college
students are not always particularly profound but the principal
character in a drama should offer
at least some kind of novel insight
at crucial moments in the play.
When You Comin' Back, Red
Ryder?, which was first presented
in 1973 in New York, earned Mark
Medoff the Obie Award for
Distinguished Playwriting, the
Outer Critics Circle John Gassner
Award and a Guggenheim
Fellowship. Perhaps the cynicism
that playwright Medoff is so
concerned about has already affected our society so deeply that we
cannot appreciate something
which would have moved us
greatly in the innocent and
idealistic days of yesteryear.
Perhaps we have been without
heroes for so long that we do not
feel their loss.
In any case, When You Comin'
Back, Red Ryder? is an exercise in
nostalgia and better than, or at
least different from, watching
Happy Days on television.
U.B.C. Film Society Invites You
To An AIINite Rock Film Festival
Fri. Sept 24th 8:00 P.M.   $2.00 cheap
in Old Auditorium
(1) Beatlemania
(2) Cream — Eric Clapton
(3) Hendrix At Berkley
(4) Gimme Shelter — Rolling Stones
(5) Fillmore—
Grateful Dead, Santana
| Come and go as you please, bring food, bring
blankets and pillows but bring yourself. For
further info call ■•',."
228-3698 or visit SUB 247
DR. BUNDOLO
FIRST SHOW OF NEW
SEASON
S.U.B.
TUESDAY,SEPTEMBER 28
12:30 p.m.
FREE
LIVE RADIO COMEDY
a CBC production
CBU 690
VISTA
24. Dave Roberts Jazz Band will
be at the Hot Jazz Club this Friday,
9-1; 36 E Broadway.
When You Comin' Back Red
Ryder; the last two shows are
tonight and tomorrow at the
Fredrick Wood Theatre 8 p.m. $2
for students.
All Night Rock Films including
'Beatlemania', Cream's last
performance, 'Hendrix at
Berkley', 'Gimme Shelter', and
'Fillmore' with the Greatful Dead
& Santana, will be showing at
U.B.C. Old Auditorium from 8 p.m.
onwards, $2.
On The Waterfront is at Pacific
Cinematheque 1155 W Georgia at
7:00 & 9:30, $1.
Offenbach, the Montreal blues
band is at the Q.E. Playhouse at
8:00, tickets at VTC outlets $2.
Jack Darcus' Paintings are at
U.B.C. Fine Arts Gallery til Oct.
16, (see article in this PF).
Vancouver Art Gallery is still
exhibiting 'The Art of the Japanese
Package' & 'Bitsand species', and
will do so until tomorrow. Beard-
slee's Energy Alignment sculptures remain to the 30th. Graphics
by Allan Fleming are there till Oct.
3. The VAG is at 1145 W Georgia,
682-5621.
Yugoslav   Graphics   are   at
S.F.U.'s gallery. AQ 3004, till Oct.
1, 1:30-4, 5-8 p.m. Mon, 10-1, 2-4
p.m. Tue-Fri.
Plaskett & Lapierre are at the
Burnaby Art Gallery 6344 Gilpen
St., Burnaby, 291,9441.
:25. West Side Feetwarmers, Hot
Jazz Club from 9-1, see 24th.
Recent Bay Area Films, 7:00 &
9:30 at Pacific Cinematheque see
Fri.
Celebration Too with a host of
great local talent tonight and
tomorrow at the Q.E.Playhouse
8:00 p.m., $2 at VTC outlets.
26. Kathy Kidd & Kathy Stewart
piano, soprano, and drama at the
Burnaby Art Gallery 2:30 p.m.,
free.
Humphrey and The Dumptrucks,
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
8:30 p>m., $3.
Pacific Salt, C.B. Victoria, and
others; Broadway Holiday Inn, 711
Broadway, 8:00, $3.
30. Senso is at Pacific
Cinematheque at 7:00 & 9:30, 1155
W Georgia, $1.
You Never Wrote a song for me,
with Valri Bromfield and Marek
Norman, is at the VECC tonight
and till Sat. 1895 Venables, .8:30
p.m. $3.50 better reserve tickets
254-9578.
Lions Gate Jazz Band is at Hot
Jazz, 36 E Broadway 9-1.
* * *
Slim pickings this week but there
should be a better selection next
week. In the meantime, if you
consult yesterday's Straight and
tonight's Sun you'll have more than
enough to keep you off the streets.
Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays CFRO, Vancouver Co-op
Radio 102.7 FM has a show at about
5:00 that covers local happenings.
Have a good weekend!
Heidelberg
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Page Friday. 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1976 I cinema 1
Film freaks feature fab flicks
By PETER CUMMINGS
Cinema 16 is back again this year with
what they are claiming to be one of the best
programs ever presented. The society's
main aim is to provide films that would not
ordinarily be available in regular theatres,
but that are still of great interest to truly
devoted followers of the cinema.
Cinema 16 is presenting four series in all,
two in the fall term and two in the winter
term. The fall term's first series has already
commenced featuring a menagerie of International films. The other series features
Gene Kelly and is run on alternate Mondays
to the International series.
In the Spring term Cinema 16 will take a
peek behind the Iron Curtain and at Eastern
Europe. On the other side of the Atlantic
Cinema 16 has been inspired by Pierre
Burton to present a more local series,
"Hollywood Looks at Canada."
Show times are at 6:00 and 8:30 and all
series are presented in the SUB auditorium.
A pass to any one of the series costs only
$5.00 for students and staff, which is
probably the Tjest movie dear in town.
Tickets are available from the AMS
business office or room 247 SUB.
The following are the films that will be
shown in each of the series:
International Series
October 4 — Two Daughters [India]
Satyajit Ray — 1961, 114 minutes
Two short stories about the difficulties of
love,  directed  by   India's   most  famous
filmmaker.
October 18 — First Love [Germany]
Maximillian Schell — 1970, 89 minutes
■ The directorial debut of Schell is a study
on the glories and the pain of human desire,
bathed in a rush of gorgeous images and
sounds. With Dominique Sanda.
November 1 —Smic Smac Smoc [France]
Claude LeLouch — 1971, 90 minutes
LeLouch   gives   further   proof   of   his
remarkable   versatility   by  creating   the
perfect human eomedy as three shipyard
workers set off on a weekend binge to
celebrate the marriage of one of them.
November 15 — The Man with the
Balloons [Italy]
Marco Ferreri — 1964, 85 minutes.
Marcello Mastroianni searches for the
bursting point of a balloon in a film that
symbolizes man's search for the limits of his
mind — while it provides hilarious entertainment.
November 29 — The Nightcomers [Great
Britain]
Michael Winner — 1972, 96 minutes
Based loosely on characters from "The
Turn of The Screw" by Henry James, this
film features Marlon Brando in a nightmarish exercise of horror.
Gene Kelly Series
September 27 — Anchors Aweigh
George Sidney — 1945, 143 minutes
We  open   the  series   with   a  classic,
notorious for the animated sequence The
King Who Couldn't Dance, a breakthrough
in film choreography which took two months
to complete. With Frank Sinatra.
October 12 — The Pirate
Vincente Minnelli — 1948, 101 minutes
Considered by many enthusiasts to be the
most marvelous of Hollywood musicals, this
film came close to being a flop. It's reception improved when one segment considered
too erotic by L.B. Mayer was reshot.   Cole
Porter, at his best, writes the music and
Kelly teams up with Judy Garland.
October 25 — Take Me Out To The Ball
Game
Busby Berkeley — 1949, 94 minutes.
This film marks the return of Berkeley
after some years of unemployment — and is
the last film he directed. The plot concerns a
popular song and dance team who spend
each summer as members of a baseball
team. With Frank Sinatra.
November 8 — Summer Stock
Charles Walters — 1951, 113 minutes
Co-starring Judy Garland in her last work
with MGM, this film features a unique dance
segment with Kelly using squeaky floor
boards to motivate his moves and a sheet of
spread newspaper as a platform for his
footwork.
November 22 — An American in Paris
Vincente Minelli — 1951, 113 minutes
This film offers a generous sampling of
Gershwin music from all stages of the
composer's career, including the tone poem
An American in Paris which inspired the
movie and the famous ballet sequence with
Kelly and Leslie Caron.
December 6 — It's Always Fair Weather
Gene Kelly/Stanley Donen — 1955, 102
minutes
A satire on commercial television and the
advertising business which includes the
famous Kelly film choreography
breakthroughs as well as pioneering use of
the CinemaScope screen and split-screen
techniques.
Iron Curtain / Eastern Europe Series
January   10   —   Capricious   Summer
[Czechoslovakia]
Jiri Menzel — 1968, 75 minutes
A conjurer and his delightful assistant
interrupt the sleepy lifestyle of three old
friends in a small spa town.
January 24 & 25 — Crime and Punishment
[USSR]
Lev Kulidjanov— 1970, 200 minutes
Dostoevsky's classic and complex vision
of the modern soul in torment is articulately
translated to the screen.
February 7— The Goat's Horn [Bulgaria]
Metodi Andonov — 1972, 100 minutes
Acclaimed as one of Bulgaria's finest, this
film presents a robust tale of rape, murder
and  revenge  in   17th   century  Bulgaria,
during the days of Turkish domination.
February 23 — Love [Hungary]
Karoly Makk — 1971, 92 minutes
An old woman from the past world and a
young woman who grew up in different
modern circumstances engage in a joint
cultic ceremony, almost idolizing an absent
man who is the son of one and the husband of
the other.
March 7 — The Wedding [Poland]
Andrzej Wajda — 1972, 110 minutes
From   the   Polish   master   comes   this
bizarre comedy, set at the beginning of the
century. The intellectual bohemians were
experiencing  guilty  feeling  towards  the
peasants and  intermarrying  in  strange
misalliances.
March 7 — The Cranes are Flying
Michail Kalatozov — 1957, 94 minutes
A tragic story of the shattering of youthful
ambitions and love by war, this film is
directed in the kind of visually extravagant
style that had been prohibited by Stalinist
dogma since the silent era.
Hollywood Looks at Canada Series
January 17 — Blue Blazes Rawden
William S. Hart — 1918, 77 min.
Hart    stars    as    the-   character    that
establishes the roistering model of lumbermen: a man with an apparently hollow
leg and a legendary reputation. "The boss
one time he keel a bear with hees hands!"
The Trap
Robert Thornby — 1922, 67 minutes
Lon Chaney perfects the stereotype of the
happy-go-lucky   French-Canadian,   whose
name naturally,-is Pierre.
January 31 — Northwest Mounted Police
Cecil B. DeMille — 1940, 126 minutes
The main villain is a murderous 'half-
breed' who sells whisky to Indians. His
daughter Louvette commits an unspeakable
crime: luring a mounted policeman away
from his duty.
February 14 — The Far Country
Anthony Mann — 1954, 96 minutes
During the goldrush, strangers pour into
the lawless Yukon, where one mountie is left
to patrol the entire area.   February 28 /
March 1 — Canadian Pacific
Edwin L. Marin — 1949, 81 minutes
Randolph Scott stars in a film based
largely on Union Pacific, which pretends to
be a history of the C.P.R. and is anything
but!
Cariboo Trail
Edwin L. Marin — 2950, 81 minutes
Blackfoot Indians attempt to burn Ran
dolph Scott at the stake but he is saved by
the timely arrival of a vicious mule.
March 14 / March IS — Saskatchewan
Raoul Walsh — 1954, 87 minutes
The title was chosen before the story,
resulting in a movie with Alan Ladd and
other mounties riding through the mountain
country of Saskatchewan.
Bach to God's Country
Joseph Pevney — 1953, 78 minutes
Rock Hudson wades his way through the
frozen wasteland of Canada back to the
elusive   'God's   Country*   in   the   US   of
A.   March 28 — Rosemarte
Mervyn LeRoy — 1954, 115 minutes
Mounties  sing  their  way   through   the
dilemma of love versus duty.
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Friday, September 24, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
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THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1976 Friday, September 24, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
61 arrested in Edmonton demo
EDMONTON (CUP) — Sixty-one
people were arrested here last
weekend when they interrupted a
cricket match during a demonstration against South Africa's
racial segregation policies.
The demonstrators, after
picketing for several hours
Saturday, sat down in the middle of
a field during a cricket match
between a local team and an
English team that frequently plays
Work-to-rule ends
HALIFAX (CUP) — Faculty at
Saint Mary's University here have
cancelled a strike vote, suspended
a work-to-rule campaign and
resumed contract negotiations
Congress races
time to stop
arms sales
WASHINGTON (ENS/CUP) -
U.S. senator Gaylor Nelson has
introduced legislation to stop the
Pentagon from selling $6 billion
worth of weapons to 11 countries.
Nelson charged that the U.S. has
"become the world's leading arms
merchant willy-nilly without an
overall plan or policy."
The Pentagon's package includes the sale of 160 F-16 fighter
planes to Iran for $4.6 billion, $701.6
million worth of military equipment to Saudi Arabia and $241
million to Israel.
Although Congress is supposed to
have 30 days to reject weapons sale
proposals, the Pentagon notified
the legislators just before the long
Labor Day weekend, lopping six
days off the time Congress has to
act. Unless Congress can move by
Sept. 30, the sales are
automatically approved.
with the university administration.
Faculty union members had
broken off negotiations and begun
a work-to-rule campaign Sept. 15,
first day of classes, after accusing
the administration of not
bargaining in good faith.
Before working to rule, faculty
had reached settlements with the
administration on "most" money
issues, sabbatical leave and
grievance procedures.
The average salary increase has
been reported to be 9.5 per cent
across the board.
Administration proposals on
academic freedom and freedom of
speech, which union leaders have
termed "nothing less than
authoritarian," remain unsettled.
The faculty union has said the
proposed changes — under which
union members would "avoid,
discourage and repress and oppose
picket lines, information lines and
media communications" — would
threaten rights won by the union
under the Trade Union Act.
Other undecided issues are
maternity leave, appointment
procedures and tenure. The cancelled strike vote was to have been
taken Monday.
Student union president Kevin
Whelly urged students not to
become actively involved in the
dispute, saying involvement could
only be detrimental to
negotiations.
in South Africa despite a United
Nations sanction against it.
Speakers during the demonstration denounced Canada's
economic and political ties with
South Africa and the sports
competitions between the two
countries.
Cecil Abrahams of the South
African non-racial Olympics
committee, said that more than 50
Canadian corporations in South
Africa reap super profits at the
expense of the lives of the black
majority population.
"Only through the ending of all
imperialist aid to the minority
white government will this
inhuman system be destroyed," he
said.
After the sit-in on the field
Saturday, the 61 people arrested
were released on bail and warned
to stay away from the park where
the match was played.
Close to the edge
LOS ANGELES (ENS/CUP) —
The world has twice come within 60
seconds of total nuclear annihilation in the past 20 years,
according to Daniel Sheehan,
attorney for Daniel Ellsberg in the
famous Pentagon Papers case.
In both cases the U.S. was the
country that almost set off a
nuclear holacaust, Sheehan said at
a recent convention here, basing
his charges on top secret
documents he found while
researching legal cases.
He said that in 1958 a commercial airliner crossed the DEW
line, a radar network once-
maintained by the U.S. and
Canada, and was wrongly identified  as   an  enemy   supersonic
CDpioneeft
The new PIONEER SX series of receivers are now
available at the SOUND ROOM. This year's models
offer more sound value than ever. Come in and check
them out!
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till
MORE SOUND FOR YOUR MONEY
2803 W. Broadway 736-7771 Broadway & Macdonald
On Sunday, about 150 people
again picketed the games, but no
one repeated the sit-in.
Demonstrators who had been
arrested complained of police
harassment while they had been in
jail.
They said police withheld
medical and food services for
women and had threatened non-
whites  about their  immigration
status.
The weekend demonstrations
followed a rally the previous week
against the South African government and its role in hundreds of
deaths of black and mixed-race
people in the racial uprisings
whichhaveoccurred for more than
three months in South Africa.
ARTS UNDERGRADS
NOMINATIONS FOR ONE SRA ARTS REP
OPEN: SEPT. 24  CLOSE:   OCT. 1
BY-ELECTION:   OCT. 5, 1976
NOMINATION FORMS AVAILABLE BUCH. 107
missile. Defense installations went
to full mobilization status and
came within 56 seconds of launching a full-scale nuclear attack on
the Soviet Union.
During the Cuban Missile Crisis
in 1961, Soviet ships came within 50
miles of Cuba's coast, defying a
U.S. ultimatum to stay at least 64
miles offshore. According to
Sheehan the U.S. National Security
Council voted unanimously to go on
a full, first-strike attack on the
Soviet Union, a move that was
blocked only by then-president
John Kennedy's veto.
Sheehan said he decided to make
the near-disasters public to encourage social action against
nuclear warfare.
FORESTRY UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY PRESENTS
UNDERCUT *76
dress: hardtimes
place: SUB cafe
time: 8:00 — 12:30 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 25, 1976
Band: SLAN
Only $4.00 per couple
CA of couple must hold valid A.M.S. card)
PROFESSIONALS
SOMETIMES NEED TO SEEK
MORE THAN JUST ADVICE.
All the good advice in the world won't
pay the rent on office space, or keep the cash
flow of an expanding practice running smoothly.
If you're a graduate, or have already
started your career, the Royal Bank can help
you to either get established, or progress
further in the professional world. Your Royal
Bank manager is qualified to give you good
financial advice, and assistance in a more
tangible form-up to $50,000 where the circumstances warrant.
Speak to your Royal Bank manager about
our Business Program for Professionals.
Whether you're just starting out, or on your
way up, he can help you plan your future with
practical solutions to your financial problems.
ROYAL BANK
the helpful bank
Eligible professions include: Accounting-
Chartered Accountant-CA, Architecture-
B. ARCH., Chiropractic-Doctor in
Chiropractic-D.C, Dentistry-D.D.S.,
Engineering-B. ENG., Law-B.C.L, LL.B.,
Medicine-M.D., Optometry-O.D., Pharmacy
-B. Sc, PHARM., Veterinary Medicine-D.VM Page  14
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1976
log rhythm
It's as easy as falling off a log.
If you're interested in
participating or just like to watch
people get wet, the foresters
would like you to come to their
log burling and boomstick racing
competition.
The contests will be held noon
today at Empire pool. Boomstick
racing requires four to a team
while log burling is done
individually.
It is recommended that a
change   of   clothing   accompany
Hot flashes
each   contestant.   Caulks   (spiked
boots) will be supplied.
Apartheid
UBC Young Socialists and the
Southern Africa Action Coalition
will hold a forum on South
Africa: Struggles Against
Apartheid, noon Wednesday in
SUB 212.
Speaker Joyce Meissenheimer,
former South African political
activist and newspaper editor, will
talk about the four-month long
struggle of the student movement
in South Africa against the racist
white minority regime.
For further information call
688-5924 or drop in at 1208
Granville Street.
Democracy
The Committee for a
Democratic University is holding a
meeting noon today in SUB 211.
The CDU is a group of
•students, faculty and staff formed
last year to combat conservative
attitudes and open up the
decision-making process at UBC.
New members are welcome.
1
'Tween classes
TODAY
AFRICAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION '
Talk   about   southern Africa,  noon,
SUB 212.
COMMITTEE FOR A
DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
Organizational  meeting,  noon, SUB
211.
SORORITIES
Organizational   meeting  and   lunch,
noon,     Cecil     Green     Park     main
lounge.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Forum on China after Mao, 8 p.m.,
1208 Granville.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE .
Organizational       meeting,       noon,
International House.
CLASSICS CLUB
Lecture        about Egyptian
metaphysics,   .8    p.m.,   4524   West
Seventh.       Exhibition       on       the
Japanese-Canadians from 1877.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
UBC INTRAMURALS
Joggers'   two  mile  run,  noon,  War
Memorial Gym field.
SATURDAY
UBC INTRAMURALS
Men's   golf   tournament,   12   noon,
University golf course.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Barbecue picnic, 8:30 p.m., Golden
Ears Park.
UBC inYramurals
Men's   outdoor tennis tournament,
all day, outdoor courts.
UBC intramurals
Men's slo-pitch, 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.,
Thunderbird Park.
MONDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Organizational   meeting, 6:30  p.m.,
Gage   south   tower   house advisor's
suite D.
ELCIRCULO
Organizational   meeting,  noon,   Bu.
352.
AMS
Art print and exhibition sale, 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m., SUB 207 and 209.
^tA7Vp
traditional
Qttco-Roman Cuisine
Whole Wheat Pizzas
Whole Wheat
Spaghetti
Souvlaki
Mousaka
Kalamari
Game Hens
LUNCH
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
DINNER
5:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
CLOSED MONDAYS
733-6824
2222 W. 4th Van. B.C.
AMS ART GALLERY
Exhibition:   The   Brock   Collection
part two,  11:30 a.m. to  1:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
WEDNESDAY
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Stan    Corew    speaks    about    visual
illusions, noon, Angus 24.
SKI CLUB
General meeting and ski film, noon,
Angus 110.
RECREATION UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, Armories
208.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Speakers and discussion about
apartheid in South Africa, noon,
SUB 212.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
INVITES
STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
TO A SPECIAL
SERVICE OF WORSHIP
SUNDAY, SEPT. 26 AT 3:00 P.M.
At the Lutheran Campus Centre
5885 University Blvd.
We celebrate
a Decade of Ministry at the Centre.
Two decades of ministry at U.B.C.
If   you   have   a   Guaranteed      HOW  tO    NOTE:
Provincial or Canada . You will not be required to
Student    Loan    and    are D© SUT6 yOUTS pay interest charges on youi
continuing full time studies   „nnt;ni ,ne>. Guaranteed Student Loan
you must reinstate that loan
PRIOR TO THE EXPIRATION OF THE
SIX MONTH EXEMPTION PERIOD.
You do this by (A) obtaining the
necessary Reinstatement Forms from
your bank, or (B) negotiating a new
Certificate of Eligibility. It's your  -
lesponsibility to maintain close liaison
with your bank and maintain your
loan in good standing.
Right now check your latest copy of
the Certificate of Eligibility or
Reinstatement Form for the latest
academic year end date. Your
exemption period expires six months
from that date. Even though you may
have applied for further financial
assistance, this does not automatically
reinstate your loan, and negotiating a
Canada Student Loan does not
automatically reinstate your
Guaranteed Provincial Loan, or vise
versa.
If you fail to reinstate your loan within
the stipulated exemption period you
will be required to pay the interest
charges accrued up to the reinstatement
date.
continues:
until the six month exemption
period has expired. If you should
remit any payments on your loan prior
to expiration of the six month
exemption period be assured that the
payments are being applied only on
the principal, no interest charges have
been assessed by the bank.
MEDICAL and LAW STUDENTS —
Upon graduation you have a six month
exemption period. In addition, upon
application to the credit institution
(bank), a further 9 month deferment of
principal payments only may be
granted. This requires you to pay
interest charges only for this period
of time.
MEDICAL RESIDENT STUDENTS —
You cannot be reinstated to interest-
free, full-time status. A Medical
Resident Student is assessed tuition
fees paid for by the sponsoring
hospital and is in receipt of a salary
and therefore considered to be
gainfully employed.
For further information or advice
contact your bank or SFB in Edmonton
or Calgary.
/dlbcna
STUDENTS FINANCE BOARD
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
LU
MOVING & TRANSFER
Reasonable
Hales
Big or,Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
Need Some Wheels?
Call
BRENT LEANEY
our man on campus
REDUCED PRICES
Financing O.A.C.'
For U.B.C. Students & Staff
100s of New
and Used Cars
to        choose
iw
1969 Mustang
— Convert.,
maroon.
54,000     miles
1974 Nova —
blue, 8 cyl.,
auto. Super
sharp.
1971 Cougar —
2 dr. hdtp.,
green vinyl
top.	
1976 Chevettes
— New and
Used from
$3,150.
1976 Cutlass-
2 dr. hdtp.,
red.       8-track-
demo.
DICK IRWIN
CHEVROLET 0LDSM0BILE LTD
S45 Marine Drive. North Vancoi
987-5231        DL. Lie. D881
WEEKEND
REVIEW COURSE
Intensive 20 hr.semlnar classes
call 669-6323
CANADA
tET TT1TTTTIITIITTIII1
Classes Now Forming
CANDIA
pizza factory
228-9512 |   or    | 228-95131
4510 W. 10th Ave.
FAST FREE DELIVERY
Open 7 Days A Week, 4 p.m.-2 a.m.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
ANOTHER ROTATING Coffeehouse —
Saturday, September 29th — Brig-
house United, Richmond, 815 Bennett
Road near (No. 3 and Granville) —
7:30 - 12:00 p.m.
LAST CHANGE to buy tickets for
UNDERCUT today. Ask any Forester.
Ureas:   Hard Times.   $4,00/qpl.
GARAGE SALE — Saturday, Sept. 25,
12-5 p.m. — 3106 West 12th Ave.,
Vancouver.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
LARGEST   SELECTION   of   prints   end
- posters  in   B.C.   at  THE   GRIN   BIN,
3209  W.   Broadway,   Vancouver,   B.C.
738-2311 (opposite Super Value).
11 — For Sale — Private
1971 240Z. Excellent condition, automatic One owner. New muffler,
brakes, shocks. Phone 731-8482 or
731-5111. $3,500.
'ii ROVER 2000 T.C. Clean, runs well,
std., radio, ciebe's. $1200 O.B.O. Dan,
224-9700.
1965 BUICK LeSABRE. Power equipped ,radio. $350 or closest offer —
922-3682.
1970 FIAT SPYDER 124. New top. Good
condition.  Must sell. $1,300.  922-1655.
20 — Housing
COTTAGE NEAR UBC for $25.00 month;
semi-furnished. In return for preparation of evening meals and some
child supervision. 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at
our home on same property. Non-
smoker preferred. 224-5056.
SLEEPING ROOM, with light breakfast
only. For rent. Non-smoker preferred.
Call 738-1174 eves.
25 — Instruction
KARATE (Japanese Karate Association)
Shotokan Japanese instructor: Accepting new members. Call: 224-4242 —
228-0438 — 876-6659 (days).
LEARN AND SEE how to nave a good
time. UNDERCUT HARD TIMES
dance, Sat., 8-12:30.
35 - Lost
TO THE DORK that swiped my wallet,
from Sedgewick Photostating: Get it
to a lost and found.
SET OF KEYS. "SCORPIO" in Wesb
100 on Monday. Reward offered. Call
Jane, 224-9773.
70 — Services
MEET THE INFAMOUS H. Kirk CFRST)
at UNDERCUT tomorrow, 8-12:30,
SUB cafe. Only 4:00/cpl.
90 - Wanted
STUDENTS — Third year engineering
physics students need you to help
with an optics experiment involving
colour photography. Come and have
your picture taken by some great
gears. Phone Doug at 224-9585.
PEOPLE WHO WANT to earn $100 to
$1,000 per month part-time. Phone:
879-3969.
ROOM AND BOARD in exchange for
evening care for handicapped female.
West End apt. Phone 682-4319 or
263-3334.
99 — Miscellaneous
EARN $10.00 by participating in a
psychology experiment. For more information call 228-2287 or 732-1068
(evenings). Involves approximately 4
hours completing personality assessment  questlonaires.
FORSTERS   have   tickets   for   UNDER-'
' CUT. Only $4.00/opl. We want you to
have a great time. Friday, September 24, 1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 15
Gridiron clash to decide top spot
• •
By TOM BARNES
Undisputed possession of both
first and last places is on the line in
two Western Intercollegiate
Football League contests Saturday.
UBC Thunderbirds and the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
will face each other in the Alberta
city with top spot on the line. The
University of Alberta Golden
Bears are heading to Winnipeg for
a game with the University of
Manitoba Bisons. Both teams are
looking for their first win in three
starts this season.
Last year when UBC made its
annual trek to Calgary it was for
another first place showdown. The
Dinos won that one and went on to
SPORTS
the College Bowl. They are strong
again this year, but just how strong
they are, the 'Birds are going to
find out.
Dan Diduck, who led the WIFL in
both scoring and rushing last year
has left U of C. But UBC coach
Frank Smith is more than a little
worried about his replacement,
Chip Wright.
Wright has played three seasons
Soccer 'Birds post
second shutout
The UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team stayed undefeated in league
play by downing Cliff Avenue
United 4-0 Wednesday night.
The game was the 'Birds second
Train yourself
to do it at will
Is the beer getting to the paunch?
Is the cellulite weighing down the
thighs? The UBC Intramurals
sports program invites you to get
involved.
You'll find all the regular jock-
type activities such as hockey (as
Canadian as maple-syrup), football, basketball, volleyball and
badminton.
Also on the program, either for
non-jocks or those who don't have
the stamina for the above-
mentioned, there's golf, curling
and bowling. And coming up for
Thanksgiving, there's the Turkey
Trot, a semi-marathon jog.
There's lots more, so if you're
even faintly interested head for the
War Memorial Gym. Men should
go to room 308, women to room 202.
For those who aren't sure or those
who are definitely sure, there's the
co-rec office also in room 202.
win in first division B.C. Senior
Soccer league play.
In the first half, Cliff Avenue
gave the 'Birds some trouble. The
half time score was only 1-0 in the
'Birds favour. But the second
stanza was clearly all UBC as the
'Birds exploded for three additional goals before the final
whistle.
The 'Birds first-half goal was
scoredby Tom Lachlan. The additional markers went to Bob
Baker, Craig Campbell and Roy
Zuyderduyri.
The 'Birds rookie goalkeeper
Lyle Watkinson, got his second
straight shutout. His previous
shutout was during the 'Birds' 3-0
rout of the Eldorado Glens
Saturday.
The 'Birds' first home game goes
2 p.m. Saturday when they meet
the Italian-Canadian Colombus
team at Thunderbird Stadium.
Coach Joe Johnson said "If we
are to do anything this year we
have to beat Columbus. Of all the
known competition they are the
team to beat!"
Johnson went on to express
confidence in the strength of his
team. He said the 'Birds have a
very good chance of coming
through on top.
Vendors
referendum
WILL BE HELD OCT. 1st, 1976, TO ANSWER THE
QUESTION OF WHETHER OR NOT VENDORS WILL
BE     ALLOWED     IN     SUB.    POLLS    WILL    BE
CONDUCTED AT 8 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ON
CAMPUS AT THE FOLLOWING TIMES:
General Poll
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1st, 1976
in the following buildings or areas
sub McMillan building
sedgewick library buchanan building
civil engineering war memorial gym
henry angus woodward library
Polls will be open between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m.
ADVANCE POLLS-THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th at
—Gage Residences
—Vanier Residences
—Totem Park Residences
Between 5:00-7:00 p.m.
BOB GOODWIN
Chief Electoral Officer
at St. Francis Xavier in the U.S. He
went to Calgary this summer in an
attempt to make the CLF Stampeders and was a late cut. He has
decided to stick around and play
with the Dinos.
He was not in the lineup when the
Dinos were held to only 43 yards on
the ground in their season opener
against Manitoba, and he only saw
spot duty two weeks ago against
the University of Saskatchewan
Huskies. This will be his first full
game and there are those around
who wish he would spend another
week studying the playbook.
There are four other facts the
'Birds are going to have to contend
with.
First, because of the 30-man
travel limit in the WIFL it is
always tough for the visiting team
to win. Smith figures the home
advantage is worth a touchdown a
game.
Second, Calgary, like every
other team UBC plays this year,
had the bye the week before the
teams meet. This gives them two
weeks to prepare and to heal any
injuries.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Admonition president Dog Kennel
today announced that he was
resigning to work as a missionary
among underprivileged and
leperous dogs in the Southern
island of this tiny mountain
kingdom.
"Sometimes the dogs of this
world eat even worse food than,
senior citizens do," he said before
leaving on a hastily summoned jet
towards the tropics.
Third, the game will be played on
artificial turf and at night under
the lights. These are difficult
factors for a team to quickly adjust
to.
And finally the fact that both
Saskatchewan and Calgary have
road victories this season puts
additional pressure on the 'Birds if
they want to keep pace in the title
race.
But these factors are balanced
by several in UBC's favor.
First, UBC is coming off its best
offensive game of the year.
Quarterback Dan Smith had the
passing attack in high gear against
the Bisons, hitting for three touchdowns and 313 yards. His favourite
target, the slightly-injured tight
end Evan Jones, is getting
healthier every day. Jones combines with Tom Reimer, Chris
Davies, and Shaun McGuiness to
form the ablest group of receivers
in the league.
Second, the Dinos were the worst
team in the league for defending
against the pass last season. They
led the conference in yards yielded
by passing and first downs yielded
by passing.
Third, the UBC running game,
keyed around Gord Penn and Glen
Wallace, is due to break out at any
time. Penn, an all-conference
fullback last year, has been having
a slow start. Both showed signs of
getting untracked against
Manitoba last week in a pass-
oriented game.
Fourth, the UBC defence has
been extremely good all season.
The line was termed by Manitoba
coach Gary Naylor as one of the
toughest he has seen in Canadian
college football. The secondary,
while burned a few times last
week, has been coming up with the
big play all year.
Their biggest problem is inexperience, a fault that will be
remedied as the season
progresses.
Referees Wanted
for Intramurals
FLAG FOOTBALL, SOCCER, SLOW PITCH,
HOCKEY, BASKETBALL
Please contact men's office room 308 War Memorial
Gym 228-4648 and women's office room 202 War
Memorial Gym 228-5326. (GOOD PAY)
WATTS UP FOR $49900?
THE MUSIC SYSTEM 1
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NO MORE THAN   .2% T.H.D.
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WITH CARTRIDGE
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50 WATTS RMS  POWER HANDLING
CAPACITY
THE SPEAKER WITH THE LIFETIME
WARRANTY
YOU GOTTA HEAR THEM
MINIMUM 3 YEAR PARTS &
LABOUR WARRANTY
EXCLUSIVE
SPEAKER TRADE BACK POLICY
ASK US ABOUT IT
PERSONALIZED SOITNDI
578 SEYMOUR - 684-2107   chargex master charge   TSAWWASSEN - 943-3811 Page 16
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, September 24, 1976
^
ri
^
SPECIAL SAVINGS
on
TEAC
Teac — The leader in tape technology goes on sale this week at A & B
Sound. Big Savings. For the best in Open Reel and Cassette Tape
Recorders, TEAC has what you're looking for.
A-2300S
BEST SELLER
Throe Heads, Three Motors and Electronic Touch Controls. 7" reel capabilities. Best selling Three Motor Deck in the
world. Two year parts and labour Warranty. Performance Value $750.00
A-2300SD
DOLBY
The same as the 2300S with the addition
of DOLBY NOISE REDUCTION for the
cleanest, quietest recordings you've ever
heard. PERFORMANCE VALUE
$1000.00
NOW
$549-95 now      $699-95
A-3300S
10" REELS
(shown) 10to" reels for extended listening pleasures. Studio Quality Performance for Demanding Listeners. This is art
updated model of the famous A-3300.
PERFORMANCE VALUE $1050.00
A-4300
AUTO-REVERSE
An entire evening's music on one tape.
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to give hours of your favorite music, uninterrupted. PERFORMANCE VALUE
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The Yamaha CR-200 AM/FM stereo receiver guarantees 30 watts RMS, distortion less than 0.5% and FM reception
unbelievably clear. The TAYA CP-3O0
single play belt drive turntable has auto
return and damped cueing for its low
mass S shaped tonearm. Of course,
base, dust cover and magnetic cartridge
included. Yamaha's NS-410 speaker
systems incorporate a 8" woofer and
Horn tweeter in an acoustic suspension
cabinet for deep bass and clean well dispersed highs. High fidelity doesn't have
to be expensive. TOTAL PACKAGE
PERFORMANCE $660.OO
SEPTEMBER RECORD DAYS

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