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The Ubyssey Jan 26, 1967

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Array Dialectic
banana
Vol. XLVIII, No. 40
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  THURSDAY,  JANUARY  26,   1967
cum u-fTgJfr n»ur. 224-3916
ACTION DEBATE ERUPTS
B r a und retreats,
Mac hits vote
— kurt hilger photo
PICKETS PRACTISING for student strike turned their energy to Mardi  Gras and swill
Wednesday,   while   student   councillors   and  university administrators blew their  collective cool. Mardi Gras is Saturday, strike is only guessing.
HEALY SYMPATHIZES:
'Give grants to girls'
By VAL THOM
Girls attending university need equalization grants, says arts dean. Dennis Healy.
Healy was addressing the first general
arts undergraduate society meeting of the
year. The meeting was combined with an
education action week pep talk.
Healy was referring to the brief to be
presented on (Friday to the legislature.
The brief points out that females earn
less during the summer than males and that
females have fewer summer job opportunities.
"Growth is the most serious problem the
universities have to face," he said.
"Faculties grow, buildings expand, and
enrolment rises.
"All these things strain the budget."
He emphasized the drain put on the time
and energies of the faculty to meet the demand of a rapidly growing university.
"The faculty also wants time for research,
as well as lectures," Healy said.
"There is a terrific demand for more
faculty, but there isn't the supply."
Healy also referred to the serious money
problem that the university faces.
Fee raise no answer
"A growing campus needs a computer, a
first-class library, and teaching assistants.
"These all need money to be implemented."
Healy said a fee raise is not the answer
to rising costs.
"The fees would have to be inordinately
high to meet expenses," Healy said.
Healy commented on the quality of instruction at the universities.
"An anti-calendar is an answer to improving teaching, but it doesn't answer all
the problems faced by the lecturers."
The obstacles to good lectures cited by
Healy were lack of research materials and
lack of time for research.
(Healy said smaller classes and a better
student-professor ratio was not the answer.
"There is not the money, professors, or
space to implement such a plan."
Impersonality prevalent
Student attitudes also affect the quality
of teaching Healy said.
"Students want to be treated with uniformity and impartiality."
Healy felt that animosity and impersonality was quite prevalent at UBC.
"Students who don't have definite goals
at UBC often feel an alien and sometimes
hostile attitude here."
Healy concluded that the main problem
was size.
"It will take the co-operation of faculty,
administration, and students to create a 'new
university'."
Alma Mater Society president Peter
Braund spoke briefly on the university brief.
He stressed the need for more money
from the provincial government.
He urged all interested students to march
on Victoria Friday.
Braund also said he will make a public
statement on the proposed strike ballot
Monday.
He suggested other courses of action if
the strike did not occur. These included:
getting faculty opinion of the financial situation, presenting this in a statement to the
government, and soliciting the opinions of
other B.C. universities to see if they supported UBC in its stand.
Healy concluded the meeting by observing that university students are not protected
by child-labor laws, trade unions or parent
groups.
"I think students meed a syndicate,"
he commented. "Maybe something can be
done about beginning one here."
By TOM MORRIS
Ubyssey Ass't. City Editor
Student opinion stirred from its usual silence Wednesday as debate over student action concerning education
erupted  across UBC
The controversy centers around whether to strike the
university in protest against the government and whether to
march on Victoria to present an education brief to B.C. education minister Les Peterson.
AMS president Peter Braund directed a council meeting
Monday evening in support of strike action against the government.
Vancouver City College student leaders said Wednesday
they would support any action taken by UBC students.
Friday's march will be
bodied by Simon Fraser Academy, the sponsoring B.C.
Association of Students, B.C.
Institute of Technology, and
University of Victoria.
MARCH ALL GO
About 150 students are expected from SFA and BCIT.
UBC's goal is 200. A total of
600 more are expected to
march from UVic.
Plans are definitely set for
the march on Friday. It is
the strike action that has run
into greatest student protest.
The AMS voted Monday
night to strike the government through the university
if the government does not
vote $66 million to higher
education in B.C. next year.
Students will be asked to
vote on a referendum, for or
against the council strike
plan, on second slate elections Feb. 15.
"WOULD YOU PICKET"
The referendum as worded,
which council has pledged to
support, is as follows:
"If the B.C. government
does not allocate $66 million
to higher education in B.C.
as recommended in the Macdonald formula, would you
support an AMS-sponsored
week of concern including a
strike within that week and
would you serve on a picket
line." TO PAGE 2
The   referendum   needs   a jee "Strike"
JOHN MACDONALD
. . . 'irresponsible'
total turn-out of 20 per cent
of students and a two-thirds
majority of those voting to
pass.
But council's plans received immediate criticism.
UBC president John Macdonald claimed the strike
idea was completely irresponsible.
"Any talk or threat of
strike by the students is completely irresponsible and inconsistent with our form of
parliamentary    government,"
VICTORIA   MARCH
KER-TROMPS  ON
Marchers to Victoria Friday — hoping to save
themselves up to $50 — will board buses in front of
Brock Hall at 9:20 a.m.
Several hundred students are expected to pay
half-price of $3 for the day's island excursion. Aim of
the march is to convince the provincial government
students support UBC President John Macdonald's
request for a $66 million government grant to education.
Students will catch the 10:30 a.m. ferry at Tsaw-
wassen At 2:30 p.m. they will congregate at Centennial
Square where they will be addressed by students and
politicos.
Tickets for the march are available all day in the
AMS office, south Brock. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  January 26,   1967
AT McMASTER:
Black Zero' blackout
HAMILTON (CUP) — McMaster University Film Board president Peter Rowe was
axed and a controversial student movie banned at a six-hour student council meeting
Friday.
The film, Black Zero, directed by former
McMaster student John Hofsess, received
somewhat notorious recognition when the
Toronto morality squad demanded to see the
film while it was at a Toronto processing
laboratory two weeks ago.
The morality squad said it might lay
charges against the film's maker on the
grounds that an eight-minute segment showing a partially-draped woman in bed with
two men was obscene.
However, no further action was taken
until council met to discuss the McMaster
Film Board and its much publicized production.
It was discovered that more than 50 per
cent of bills directed to the MFB had been
signed by, or addressed to, Black Zero director John Hofsess.
Furthermore, the film had incurred a
debt of $1,000 although the MFB's total
budget for the year was less than $300, most
of which is still in the bank.
Rowe however, was not fired for allowing Hofsess to exceed the budget, but for
violating  a  council by-law which  prohibits
GRAD CLASS
HITS STRIKE
The 1967 grad class wants students to
vote against the strike referendum.
In a statement on student action issued
by grad class president A. K. MacKinnon,
the grad class stated its support for president
Macdonald in declaring the strike "irresponsible and harmful to the university."
The statement said students should censure the AMS for its stand on Education
Action Week.
"A student has no right to be proud of
an education that was given to him," continued the statement.
"In place of the abolishion (sic) of fees,
we feel that a system of grants based an
academic qualifications, need, and an honest
effort to aid oneself, is a more desirable
goal."
MacKinnon encouraged students to vote
against the strike, to support president Macdonald's stand, and to make known their
disapproval of the action proposed by AMS.
non-students from having signing authority
in any student organization.
Since council has forbidden that Black
Zero be shown until all bills are paid. Daryl
Duke, producer of CBC's Sunday has been
forced to cancel the planned Sunday-night
showing of the film.
Salon soliciting
Entry forms are now available for the
annual UBC salon of photography to be held
March 20-31.
The salon, named for UBC photographer
in the late post-war years, the late Ben Hill-
Tout, is open to students, faculty, and staff
of research institutes on the campus.
Entries for the salon must Ibe submitted
not later than Friday, March 10.
Entry forms are available from the UBC
Camera club in Brock Hall, the extension
department, and Lasserre 201.
Fuller speaks
The man with the "giant testicle" speaks
again tonight.
Buckminister Fuller, who spoke to a
packed house at the armory Wednesday,
delivers a Dal Grauer lecture at Totem
Park at 8:15.
Fuller's geodesic dome is often compared by experts to "the archetypal giant
translucent testicle." The dome is featured
at the U.S. pavilion at Expo '67.
Fuller's topic tonight is How the World
Could be Made to Work.
Teams tug, bleed
Holy Artsmen! Blood and Beer!
The athletic artsmen have challenged the
burly aggies, engineers, and foresters to a
giant tug-of-war to mark the opening of
Blood Drive Week.
The gruelling contest will take place on
the grass in front of the library at noon next
Wednesday, in support of the two-week drive.
The undergrad presidents, acting as
anchor men, will lead their twelve-men teams
in the struggle. Winners get two cases of
beer and the losers will receive a quart of
milk and a box of wheaties to insure a
stronger showing next year.
Before consuming their respective prizes,
the teams will go to the armory en masse
and donate blood.
Strike pickets illegal?
he said in a statement Tuesday.
"The decision in respect to
the size of grant to the universities is exclusively a decision of the government and
the legislature placed in
power by the people of this
province."
Braund said the strike
should  not  be  prolonged.
"I think a lot of people
have been talking and there
is a strong negative reaction
to a week-long strike," he
said.
"The only group that will
suffer in a week-long strike
is the student body."
First vice-president Charlie
Boylan came out for a one
week strike in Monday's
council meeting; but today
from his hospital bed, said a
one-day token strike would
be more suitable.
Braund said he would
make revised recommendations to council at its next
meeting Jan. 31.
"I will recommend the ref-
FROM PAGE 1
erendum remain but the
wording be changed and that
students have a wider decision than just yes or no,"
he said.
"The first plan was passed
because of lack of thought
among councillors. They lost
sight of the implications of
what they were doing.
"The AMS lawyer says if
we set up picket lines then
each university union will
have to vote for strike action
or else cross the picket lines.
"Apparently the university
administration could charge
the AMS with interfering
with an agreement between
the administration and UBC
workers.
"I think the mass of students would want to get into
important labs and classes.
It will probably end up a
women's-type shopping picket line," said Braund.
"This   wouldn't  be power;
it would be a farce.
"The next AMS council
meeting should be pretty
rocky," said Braund.
Science undergraduate
president Frank Flynn said
he wants the AMS to withdraw support of the referendum.
At present the AMS is
pledged to support a "yes"
vote on the referendum.
Both Braund and Flynn are
expected to retreat from this
position on Monday.
A total of 50 students of
Fort Camp sent a petition to
The Ubyssey Wednesday
claiming they "utterly rejected" the stand of the student council on the issue of
a student strike.
On Tuesday in the speech
from the throne, the official
government statement of
policy for the coming year,
education received three minutes in a one hour speech.
No mention of universities
was made.
VILLAGE
CAFE
"Where good friends and
fine food meet"
5778
University Blvd.
(In
the Village)
224-0640
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
WANTED FOR UBYSSEY
The Publications Office requires several ambitious
students (2nd or 3rd year) to sell advertising for The
Ubyssey on a part time basis. This is an excellent opportunity to gain sales experience and to earn worthwhile
commissions. Applicants must be desirous of working
Feb. and March and all next term if employed and
results prove mutually satisfactory.
If interested apply to A. Vince, Manager of Student
Publications, Brock Hall  (after 2 p.m. only).
r
i
GRADUATE PHARMACIST
Applications are being accepted from Pharmacists graduating this spring for the position of assistant to the
Chief Pharmacist in a 326 bed, fully accredited hospital.
The area has a modern expanding University Centre.
Excellent fringe benefits. Applications with full particulars should be addressed to:
I
Mr. G. O. Scott,
Personnel Director,
Sudbury General Hospital,
Sudbury, Ontario.
-\
GRADUA TE PHYSIOTHERAPIST
Applications are being accepted from Physiotherapists
graduating this spring to work under the Chief Physiotherapist in a fully accredited, 326-bed, hospital. The
area has a modern expanding University Centre. Excellent fringe benefits. Applications with full particulars
should be addressed to:
L_
Mr. G. O. Scott,
Personnel Director,
Sudbury General Hospital
Sudbury, Ontario.
ll
TIME IS
MONEY!
A CLICHE?    CERTAINLY!
But, nevertheless, true! Each moment represents an investment for the student who is absorbing vast quantities
of data while attending university.
READING DYNAMICS has enabled thousands of students,
teachers, businessmen—in fact, people from every walk
of life—to at least TRIPLE their reading speed!
May we help YOU save time—and money.
Attend a FREE Demonstration of
Reading Dynamics
Tomorrow  Night
JANUARY 27th - 8 P.M.
In The Prospect Room
Bayshore Inn
READING DYNAMICS
OF B.C. LTD.
Main Office 549 Howe St., Vancouver
Suite 210 685-2374 Thursday, January 26, 1067
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
INVENTOR SAYS:
Man born into space'
The man known as the visionary of the
twentieth century said Wednesday that humanity  is  just  being  born.
Buckminster Fuller, inventor of the geodesic dome, told 800 persons in the armory
that in exploring outer space man is "coming out of the womb which is the biosphere
(the earthly environment)."
"This biosphere is so large and complex
that we do not realize its extent. We must
now reduce it to a few cubic feet in size
so that we can send man into outer space
with it."
Fuller was giving the second of the Dal
Grauer memorial lectures. The first was
given last term by economist John Galbraith.
The architect invented the famous hemispherical geodesic dome more than 50 years
ago.
The dome, supported on the outside with
a lattice of triangular frames, has no internal supports.
Compared with any other structure, it
Boylan's nose
out-of-joint
AMS first vice-president Charlie Boylan
and science student Iraj Beheshti are in hospital today following a three-car collision
late Tuesday night.
Passenger Boylan suffered head cuts and
a broken nose and is in Wesbrook hospital;
driver Beheshti, science 3, has a badly smashed left knee and is in Vancouver General
Hospital.
Boylan and Beheshti were driving toward
the university on Tenth Avenue at Blanca
when their Volkswagen was struck on the
left side.
Drivers of the other two cars involved,
Peter Ellis and Dino Miloff, were not injured. Neither are students.
covers the greatest area with the least support.
Fuller has designed 5,000 geodesic domes
all over the world in the last 50 years. The
latest is the shelter for the American pavilion at Expo '67.
He commented on the apparent alarm
from the older generation at a youth which
says it has no loyalty towards its own
country.
"But what they are feeling is a larger
morality concerning all of mankind which
is a much more beautiful kind of morality,"
he said.
"Older people are not adjusted to this
sort of morality."
Fuller declared he is not a technocrat.
"Science does not try to reform man,
it tries to reform his environment. Life was
born with a much higher potential than
we have ever realized. The question is,
how do we organize a more favorable environment  for  life."
"The Wright Brothers, Bell, Marconi and
Edison were not elected politicians but they
nonetheless changed things in the world",
he said.
On war: "The reason for war is that
there isn't enough to go around for the half
of humanity. So long as there is not enough
to go around there will be war," he said.
He pointed out the significance of technology in the progress of modern nations.
He said Britain, an early starter in the
use of technology, has now fallen behind
because unlike the modern nations it has
an old time investment to protect.
The more modern nations come into a
ready made technology of jet power and
transistors and consequently, he said, America was able to achieve as much as Britain
in less than 200 years. Russia in 80 years,
and China in 25 years.
"Take all the machinery of technology
and put in all into the ocean and within
six months two billion people will die of
starvation," he said, "but send all the politicians and political tracts into an orbit
around the sun and the world will go on
eating."
'Nobody cares, that's why
says high school students
By MURRAY McMILLAN
The secondary school memibers of the
B.C. Assembly of Students will present a
brief outlining their views to the provincial
government Friday.
The nine page document is not a statement of facts and desires, but is an outline
of what the students feel their aims and
goals might be.
"It is probable that this brief has neither
the interest or support of the vast majority
of students. And it is very likely that it does
not represent them," it opens.
It also states that it does not want to
criticize, give arguments or say it is right.
It continues, giving definitions of educa
tion from both the philosopher's and lexicographer's viewpoints.
The brief criticizes the universities for
setting up questions about administration
for the secondary schools, feeling that the
questioning should have come from inside
the secondary institutions themselves.
"Planners should attempt to stimulate
the student, political clubs should be allowed
in the schools, more importance should be
placed on the capablities of students' councils to improve the system themselves," the
brief says.
The final page of the brief expresses
concern that so few students are interested
in their own problems. — "And that's the
problem," the brief concludes.
— al harvey photo
THE MOUNTAIN didn't move, even after all that concerted staring, but it sure would \^e nice if it fell into the
sea and eliminated a few ruddy submarines. Later Wednesday, it snowed.
Birdland rally to hear
two B.C. party leaders
At least two leaders of B.C.'s political parties will address
Friday's student rally in Victoria.
Liberal leader Ray Perrault and NDP boss Robert Strachan will speak from the legislature steps on the problems
of higher education in B.C.
"Perrault said if he couldn't speak because of commitments to the legislature he would send another representative,"
said AMS president Peter Braund.
Braund also announced that the AMS was trying to get
as many public leaders as possible for the rally.
The Victoria rally is planned to demonstrate against rising costs of university and the whole structure of education
in B.C.
Education speechless
Little mention of education was made in the throne speech
opening the 28th B.C. Legislature Tuesday.
The speech, read by Lt. Governor George Pearkes, announced changes in the Public Schools Act relating to regional
colleges.
Pearkes did not elaborate, but the amendments will likely
broaden representation on regional college councils, and change
cost-sharing arrangements.
The financial change would require areas closest to the
colleges to pay most of the cost for them.
The address also promised creation of a government department of tourism and a move to combat air pollution. THE mSttf
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Get your facts first and then you
can distort them as you please.
— Mark Twain.
JANUARY 26,   1967
fr«\      i*^   *    -"-.V*}-   V
It's your move
Okay. Now what ?
President Macdonald says B.C.'s universities are in
serious financial trouble and $66 million will  solve it.
Student council agreed — if the provincial government doesn't put up the whole $66 million we've had it.
Fee hikes will be the smallest part of the calamity
of a drastically cut education budget; far more important
is the resultant suffering of quality and the necessary
strictures on improving what we've got now.
Students seem to agree — in the past, they've
marched and petitioned and briefed for higher education.
Now everything gets lost in a welter of irresponsibility charges, strike calls, marches to Birdland and
reaction against the word strike.
Strike is a kind of action that effectively and forcefully says students are concerned about the fate of
education, and are concerned enough to do anything
they can ensure the future of education in B.C.
It does not mean violence nor does it mean irresponsibility — as the Canadian labor movement has
shown.
The Canadian tradition, no matter what else it may
be, is filled with men who knew their situations and
found courses to make their positions and their strength
known.
It would be nice if briefs and reasoned argument
alone impressed the provincial government. Historically,
we know that's not enough.
Irresponsibility is a loaded word that nobody knows
the meaning of. It can be used by a university president
to denounce a boat-rocking action, or by a radical
activist to denounce the anti-boat-rockers, or by a moderate to denounce both.
To us, irresponsibility is a statement of position
without a commitment for action to make that position
clear.
Irresponsibility is to state a crisis and not work to
solve it.
We don't care if students do not march to Victoria,
but the logical next step after a march is a one-day
strike — or a boycott, or a day of concern. Call it what
you will, it's still a rose by any other name.
The strike is a course of action proposed by student
council and pushed by a group of students.
The irresponsibility criers have two choices: propose another course, or quietly accept whatever fate the
provincial  government plans for three universities.
The results of a strike would be a clear view among
students of their own situation and the situation of
education in B.C., as well as an opportunity to deluge
the public with information about education.
Maybe a march to Victoria, which is very hard for
anybody to call irresponsible, would serve the purpose.
If so, that's great — and scrap the referendum.
If not, then what ?
Tuum est. It's your education.
Silver
screen
blues
Holy  presidential   race —  Ronny   Reagan
Clarke Kerr from the University  of California.
Wanna trade, Ronnie?
sacked
EDITOR: John Kelsey
New*  .......       Carol Wilson
'ty       .   ------      Danny Stoffman
>d        Powell Hargrave
Friday    _    .        Claudia Gwinn
'•-.          Kris Emmott
\ '    - - Sue Gransby
ttew* Al Mrate
Jity          Tom Morris
V Bert Hill
Slushing thru slush after truth,
these wrote: Val Thom, Margaret
Ladbury, Julian Wake, Morguer
McMillan, geodesic Dave Cursons,
Shannon Lester, Charlotte Haire,
Val Zuker, David Hastings, Bo
Hansen, Norman Gidney, Don
Stanley, and the irrespresible but
totally sickening Wang Ming.
"Don't put me in the masthead,"
said Judy Hirt, so we didn't.
Fotoggs Kurt Hilger, Chris Blake,
John Tilley and Al Harvey fo-
togged.    Responsible   people   quit.
ItA fcHWD WE
TilSTTf^W-TlpST
m PrVTIEtvtt
WITH THOSC
rr-ihs —then
IffcOTS-C.vML
DtSOfcEDVfcNCE-
ftHDTHE*..-
Thln jv<rr dqht
se.em to Realise
BETTER. u>PrNT0
lSOUvE THEIR
PROBLEMS.....
*J^SOL\l£DTHE
R.ESERMftT!0Ms\
You destroy me, Bert'
By  TOM MORRIS
Class of '67
This is in reply to A. K. (Bert) MacKinnon's statement on student action by
the 1967 grad class.
It's pure crap, MacKinnon, and deserves
few further comments. But as you took the
liberty to speak for me, I'll return your
worldly wisdom.
You  claim  the  "Grad Class"   of   1967
Strike vote
'most asinine'
in AMS history
By MIKE COLEMAN
In AMS president Braund's opinion, the
call for a strike vote is "the most important
decision in the history of this institution."
In my opinion, it's the most asinine.
If the referendum fails, first vice Boylan
says it will prove the student body is wishy-
washy.
In my opinion, it will prove the student
body is a helluva lot more concerned and
aware than the AMS council.
Here's why:
The object is supposedly to support the
cause of higher education. The only effective
way to do this is to put pressure on the provincial government.
Thus far, council's reasoning is accurate.
Then it goes wildly berserk.
For the only way to solidify pressure on
the government is to convince the electorate
of the universities' needs. When I was on
AMS council during the 1963 Back Mac
campaign, this was recognized as the politically effective purpose; suggestions for a
strike, or even the hijacking of a B.C. ferry
(" to dramatize our position"!) were, thankfully, thrown out.
Now Boylan and Braund seem determined to shatter the popular support which has
been growing for our cause. A strike by students would play directly into Bennett's
hands. The public is not going to see a strike
as a display of concern, but as a display of
hooky-playing irresponsibility. The reserve
of goodwill for the province's universities
building up throughout B.C. will nosedive
if our student leaders are so stupid as to
advocate strike action and to carry the students with them.
The strike proposed by Boylan and
Braund is not only flagrantly irresponsible,
it shows an incredible ignorance of political
realities in this province.
. I urge students to vote "no!" on the strike
referendum.
finds itself unable to support the AMS in
its "Education Action Week" program, in
respect to both the society's goals and its
methods.
When was the grad class consulted on
this grand piece of policy-making?
I can't remember voting on any statement faintly resembling this one of yours.
You refer to the program, as a "brainchild of a radical element." And I can only
presume yours is the brainchild of a long
session of navel contemplation.
You say "change for change's sake may
be exciting." Your powers were originally
to direct grad class organization. You must
find it very exciting in your new role of
policy maker for over 3,000 grads.
You go on to say that "change for
change's sake may be exciting, but it is
seldom, if ever constructive."
You destroy me, MacKinnon. You destroy all my beliefs in your once fatherlike image. You destroy my faith in a
democratic grad class which has never had
a policy meeting.
I recommend that you make an 'honest
effort to aid yourself' and reconstruct the
faith we all have in your illustrious leadership.
Please don't destroy me any more, MacKinnon.
Take a shower
to task today
By STAN LEIBOWICZ
It's clear the North American public Is
swinging away from the old fashioned bathtub and turning on showers.
This is a result of the efforts of Madison
Avenue to sell us, the great washed, new
plumbing fixtures.
Once everyone has disposed of his bathtub in an antique store the emphasis will
switch back. It won't be hard to do, both
have advantages ready to be tapped.
With a bath in your home, you don't get
doused with cold water after the morning
fumble to and fiddle with two taps.
And although the theory of getting clean
in a bath is defeated by the fact that you
wallow in your own dirt, it creates a new
area for the camp crowd.
Camp this week is lying in a bath reading
an old copy of Time, listening to CKLG,
and daring to eat peaches. Thursday, January 26,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
WE GET LETTERS
AND MORE LETTERS
Strike, no; von Thadden, si
'Print  true  issues'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In Tuesday's Ubyssey the
point of the strike referendum was entirely missed. The
point to students is not
whether the hayseed establishment in Victoria forks
over the needed $66 million;
it is that there will undoubtedly be a sizable fee increase
if at least this sum is not
provided.
Also, you should elucidate
more fully the new tax-sharing deal and the new form
federal grants come in, so it
will be clear to everyone
that Bennett and Peterson
are not more than doubling
the universities' grants but
only making a bare, measly,
scrape-through increase. Provided they choose to follow
the Macdonald formula.
If any decisive action, such
as the strike, is to be realized,
Widespread student sympathy
must come about. The Ubyssey is the only medium _cap-
able of bringing the true issues and real point to light.
JOHN PLOMMER
arts 4
MARGARET   WECHERLE
arts 2
Too controversial'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Those who drew up the
four point program for the
education action march have
given us a program too idealistic to be politically effective.
Two of the points, grants
for out of town students and
an independent grants commission, are good solid demands, but the others are too
controversial to get immediate public support.
People are not yet convinced that students ought
to be involved in running the
university nor are they convinced that tuition fees ought
to be abolished — though
iStudeMts
AGAIN/ST
they   may   agree   that   fees
should be reduced.
What we must demand is
what we need — $66 million.
To antagonize the public
over issues which are not
understood and are not immediately relevant is politically foolish.
Let's get a program which
Bennett and his crew can't
dismiss as 'student radicalism'.
KENZIE  HOAR
Arts  3
Tree Ferrari
Editor, The Ubyssey:
So everybody is marching
on the legislature. Great fun,
but who really believes that
what is demanded should be
received? If ever there was a
case where individuals wanted to get something for nothing, this must be it. What is
advocated is not only abolition of fees, but a bonus of
600 bucks for booze.
Don't misunderstand me. A
university should not be the
domain of the rich. Equalization of opportunity is a good
thing, but how do people
who want equality define
that term?
If a student can't earn
enough money during a summer, he can take a loan. This
equalizes opporunity from a
financial point of view. Living allowances for out-of-
town students equalize opportunity from the regional
standpoint and grants to girls
equalize opportunity on a
sexual basis.
What do you want? A free
Ferrari to boot!
PIETER   TRAAS
Arte 4
'Strike  vote  no
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Help, everything's coming
up scarlet! Once again the
student body is being intimidated into succumbing to the
fanciful whims of Charlie
and his courageous chorus.
"Wishy-washy" indeed! The
student body that blindly follows the lead of an indecisive
ruler is certainly wishy-
washy.
The strike vote is certainly
a ridiculous idea in the first
place — completely without
precedent or reasoning. For
the student body to be
coerced into voting yes is unthinkable. Rally to the cause
of a democratic student society — vote no on your strike
ballot on February 15.
MICHAEL D. HEWSON
Science 3
'Sheer foolery'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
After reading your sensational excerpts from the
'Plummer cans Von Thadden'
telegram, and being somewhat shocked by its amazing
mutilation of historical facts,
I went around campus trying
to determine what others
felt.
Among the more extreme
comments were:
I don't read that rag—it's
Commie controlled.
I know Plummer—he  isn't
°n STRIKE
stupid enough to write something like that unless he's
forced to.
One can see that liberalism
extends only towards the extreme left, the press believes
rightist politics are bad per
se.
Serves the murdering bastards right.
And so on.
In .general, however, the
opinion was that Plummer
had made a serious mistake;
many were willing to believe
that Von Thadden is a Neo-
Nazi; however, nearly all felt
that the reasons given by
Plummer were sheer foolishness.
The main objection to
Plummer's approach is his
very biased viewpoint and
his attempt to force this upon
the student body. In over
fifty years Germany has been
the flogging boy of the Western World. Now when the
Germans are finally making
a serious effort to regain the
status of a mature nation
they are received like this by
their supposed friends.
I think Plummer should retract his statement, catch up
on his study of German History somewhere else than in
Bertrand Russell's speeches
of 1966, and produce a more
plausible explanation of his
actions.
Maybe he should reply to
the article which recently appeared in The Ubyssey by a
Canadian exchange student
in Germany.
CECIL  von  HABU
Science 4
'Resign,  council'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re students' strike.
If students continue to act
in an irresponsible manner
they will lose what little public support they have. The
taxpayer will not be happy
if he has to give another $33
million, especially since income tax just went up one
per cent.
If the strike occurs in
March as planned only the
student comes out on the
short end. Neither the government nor the administration will suffer. They are not
going to give the student a
week of grace on final exams;
they have lost neither face
nor money.
I urge all students to vote
NO and then ask for council's resignation as council
will no longer have student
confidence.
RONALD  KANEEN
Science 3
Hear von Thadden
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It angered me to read in
Saturday's Vancouver Sun
that the invitation to Adolf
von Thadden to speak at
UBC was suddenly retracted.
Brian Plummer, chairman
of the AMS special events
committee, said the committee reached this decision. The
Sun quotes him as saying the
policies of Von Thadden and
of the West German government are detrimental to the
cause of democracy and
peace.
Let me ask, first of all,
what was his source of information?
That is, in whose opinion is
MORE  LETTERS
—page   10
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS:
THE COLLECTOR
Today — Aud. — 50c
12:30 - 3:30 - 6:00 • 8:30
SUMMER EMPIOYMENT
British Columbia Forest Products Limited anticipates
several openings for undergraduates of any faculty, any
year, for summer employment. Locations are sawmills at Victoria, Lake Cowichan and Hammond, and
pulp and paper operations at Crofton.
There will a number of jobs available at Crofton
in maintenance and engineering for Mechanical, Chemical and Electrical Engineering undergraduates in the
classes of 1968, 1969 and 1970.
Interested students are invited to register at the
Placement Office for interviews February 1, 2 or 3,
when Company representatives will be on the campus.
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MARDI      GRAS      EDITION
Tuesday, January 24,   1967
1058 ALBERNI
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ALL RATES PLUS GAS
(Ages 21-25 Collision Insurance Extra)
SPECIAL  RATES   FOR   TEAM,   CLUB  AND   OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
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566 SEYMOUR - 685-2271
PRESENTING ...
JUDY WHITE
. . Alpha Delta Pi
LYNN MORTON
, Alpha Gamma Delia
MARION KEYES
. Alpha Omicron Pi
LORNA  WATSON
. . . Alpha Phi
SANDY HILL
. . Delta Gamma
SHARILYN   BELL
. . Delta   Phi  Epsilon
ANN  POLLOCK
. . Gamma Phi Beta
JANET  BOUGHTON
. . Kappa Alpha Theta
DARRELL SABA
Kappa Kappa Gamma
CHRISTIAN
TEACHER'S CORE
is the subject of
;'JHfc
BILL SHARP
returned
Missionary Teacher
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THIRSDAY NOON - ANGUS 410
ALL WELCOME
DON'T MISS
THE COLLECTOR
Today — Aud. — 50c
12:30 - 3:30 - 6:00 - 8:30
STUDENTS!
FULL  RANGE  OF  STUDY  MASTER
NOTES NOW AVAILABLE
OPEN DAILY
From 10 a.m.
to MIDNIGHT
(Noon-to Midnight Sunday)
Out-of-towners:
Send for
catalogue.
: 891 Granville St.   Tel. MU 5-5814 Tuesday, January 24,   1967
MARDI      GRAS      EDITION
Page 7
... TUESDAYS PUZZLE SOLUTION
JAMIE WALKER
. . Alpha Delta Phi
ROGER HANNA
. Alpha Tau Omega
JIM BERRY
. Beta Theta Pi
GARY KING
. Delia Kappa Epsilon
BILL MASON
. . Delta Upsilon
LEN SLADE
. . Kappa Sigma
JAY CORDER
. Phi Delta Theta
DAVE FOURNIER
. . . Sigma Chi
MIKE CHECHIK
. . Zeta Beta Tau
ROSS SINCLAIR
. . . Zeta Psi
NURSING
First Year Arts or Science
students interested in entering First Year Nursing in
September are invited to a
meeting (for information
concerning the program)
in Wesbrook 201,  on
Monday, Jan. 30th
at 7:30 p.m-
DAVE RAHT
. .Phi Kappa Pi
BOB DAWSON
. Phi Kappa Sigma
JIM  MACDONNELL
. . . Psi Upsilon
VOTE FOR YOUR CHOICE TODAY
Mardi Gras week continues today with
the pep meet at noon in the War Memorial
Gym.
Their candidates in skits and fraternities will present their candidates in skits
along the comic strip theme. The Pep Band
and the UBC cheerleaders will help provide two hours  of riotous  entertainment.
Tonight, Mardi Gras moves to the Show-
mart building for the charity bazaar. The
floorshow will be presented for the first
time and there will be booths offering
everything from pie-throwing to dice-throwing. It's all for charity nad promises to be
a very enjoyable evening.
The able staff handling all arrangements at the Showmart is headed by Lou
Southam and well-known Mardi Gras committee veteran Stan Webber.
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RE 1-4901
2028 West 41st
261-9394-5 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 26,  1967
CROSS-CANADA   ROUNDUP
».*,«►
CUS   B OF G   CAPERS
York demands open Board decisions
TORONTO (CUP) — Lack of student representation in university government and
closed decision-making are again under fire
at York University's Glendon College.
More than 400 students turned out to
hear the administration students' council air
their views on the university president's controversial Advisory Committee on Student
Affairs.
Students' council vice-president Rick
Schultz contended the IB-man committee
required more than five student representatives and said he could find no justification
for holding private committee meetings.
Speaking for Glendon students, Schultz
said: "We submit that free inquiry, open discussion, a sense of values and the courage
to defend them publicly are integral parts
of education within the college community.
"Secrecy promotes distrust and cleavage
within the university community. Such representation without openness would, in the
words of the DuffnBerdahl report, 'effectively
silence the student representative and drive
a wedge between him and his fellow students'."
Henry Best, student affairs director, represented the administration's stand on the
ACSA issue.
Although Best would not concede to the
students' demands for a more representative,
open committee, he said he felt the university president had accepted the principle of
more student responsibility.
"We went to see all parts of the university take a full role in the decision-making
process. That principle is not the problem,
but rather the means by which student responsibility can be best achieved," he said.
Although Glendon's ACSA affair remains
up in the air, the students have succeeded in
gaining representation on the board of governors-senate liaison committee.
The committee says it has not yet decided
how the student representatives will be
chosen.
Second Century Week:
We've
• •
ta
little deal
for anyone
with 15 friends
If you can get them all to go with you for Second Century Week celebrations, Air Canada will let you fly free. Isn't that great?
And the way we figure it, it shouldn't be too difficult getting them.
After all, Second Century Week is the biggest project Canadian
university students will have during Centennial Year.
Second Century Week will be held in Calgary and Edmonton from
March 6-11. Which doesn't give you much time to start planning.
Even if you haven't got 15 friends, come in and see us anyway.
Or go see your Travel Agent. You can still take advantage of our Fly
Now-Pay Later Plan, Family Fare Discounts and all the other little
things that make it so easy for you to come with us.
Al R CANADA ®
We have all the details!     Call anytime
HAGEN'S TRAVEL   SERVICE
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2996  W.   Broadway 736-5651
President backs UGEQ
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill University's Students'
Council president made an unexpected about-face when he
came out in favor of McGill joining L'Union Generate des
Etudiants du Quebec.
Jim McCoubrey, who until last week said he favored McGill retaining its membership in the Canadian Union of Students, reversed his opinion just three weeks before the Feb. 8
referendum in which McGill students will vote yon retaining
CUS membership, joining UGEQ or staying out of both organizations.
"I am definitely in favor of entry into the union, the
time is long overdue for English-speaking students to assume
a role in Quebec affairs," he said after a dinner meeting with
UGEQ president Robert Nelson and his executive.
'Open board'bid fizzles
WATERLOO   (CUP)  —  A  threatened  sortie   into   the
realm of closed decision-making at the University of Waterloo sputtered and died Wednesday night.
Waterloo council president Mike Sheppard, who planned
to defy university authorities by attending a closed board of
governors meeting Jan. 19 failed to gain support for his plan
at an eleventh hour council meeting Wednesday night.
The confrontation, billed as the first attempt by Canadian
university students to gain entry to a closed board of governors meeting, flopped as the result of the plan's rejection by
council.
The student leader had hoped to take part in a board of
governors discussion arising from a student-faculty committee
brief on possible changes in university government at Waterloo.
But the council's failure to go along with Sheppard's plan
plan sent it to the wastebasket.
224-4391       5700  Univ. Blvd. (on campus)
Earth mover speaks
A leading Canadian geophysicist will open a new science
lecture series sponsored by SUS at noon today in Hebb Theatre.
Dr. John Wilson will speak on "The comparison of the
earth and other planets and the moon and some very new ideas
on continental drift."
He will also speak at 4 p.m. today in Hennings 201 on
"Did the Atlantic Ocean close and then reopen?"
Wilson is director of the Institute of Earth Sciences at the
University of Toronto and author of three books on his subject and travels.
Your SKI MYSTERY Entry
n
CAS A
presented by
CYVR RADIO-ubc radio society
duMAURIER     INTERNATIONAL
I 9 6 7 AT WHISTLER
EVENTS     ORGANIZED     BV     THE     CANADIAN     AMATEUR    BKI     ASSOCIATION
The Clues to date:—
1. Birds of a feather flock together.
2. Person, Place or Thing are clues of which you
need remember two.
3. From Sea to Sea Canadians love to ski.
4. Mt.  Orford  and  Whistler are a  park — bring  them
together and you have a  start.
Listen to CYVR for daily clues
AMS Entry Boxes are provided.
Prizes
1. Pair of ski*
1. Dinner for two atop Grouse
3. Months supply of cigarettes.
YOUR OFFICIAL ENTRY
All entries become sole properly
of CYVR. Judges decisions final.
First 3 correct answers win respective  prizes upon  receipt of entry.
ANSWER     	
NAME     	
ADDRESS PHONE	
All UBC Radio Society Members & Employees of duMaurier are Ineligible. Thursday, January 26,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
SORRY, LYNDON'
Co-editors reinstated
WASHINGTON (UNS) — Johns Hopkins
University revoked the suspension of two
campus newspaper editors here after they
apologized for publishing a satirical article
referring to President Lyndon Johnson as
"last year's top mass murderer."
The two editors, Melvin I. S. Shuster, 20,
and Henry J. Korn, 21, were reinstated after
appearing before an ad hoc committee of six
university administrators led by Johns Hopkins' president, Milton Eisenhower.
A statement issued after the hearing said that the
co-editors "indicated their regret for
having published
an article which
by any standards
exceeds the bounds
of good taste."
The   statement
also asks the stu-   PRESIDENT JOHNSON
dent    council    to
establish a student    •  •  •   mass murderer
committee with faculty advisors "to recommend  permanent  and  depenable  structure
and procedure for the publication."
The article which resulted in the editors'
suspensions mimicked the Time magazine
style, and named Johnson as "man of the
year" along with Charles Whitman, Richard
Venezuela army
raids university
CARACAS, Venezuela (UNS) — Central
University here has been purged of alleged
Communist organizers.
In a raid Dec. 14, ordered by Venezuelan
president Raul Leoni, the national army
seized military equipment, plans, and lists
of assassination prospects held by students.
(Until the raid, Central University had
been an autonomous institution, closed to
military and police personnel.)
Police claimed evidence was found of the
university being used for trials and torture
by communist leaders.
Student communist leaders were reprimanded by party officials for their action in
speaking against the national party president,
when he stated the activities had ibeen financed from student funds.
Leoni decreed that police and the national
guard would be responsible for law and
security on state campuses, but the admistra-
tions would have academic autonomy.
Speck, and an unidentified Cincinnati
strangler.
Some of the article's references to Johnson:
"Last year's top mass murderer was a
Texas plowboy who has come a long way
in the American crime business . . .
"Lyndon Baines Johnson of Johnson City,
Texas, graduated from his humble origins
... to the American presidency where he
killed John F. Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald,
Jack Ruby, and 13 other people whose names
have been withheld by request.
"Johnson, an easygoing ex-school teacher
whose hobby is bombing defenseless people,
culminated a remarkable five years when on
Dec. 25, he told Jack Ruby to suddenly die
of cancer."
Peter Koper, news editor of News-Letter,
said that the article "was meant as satire,
and was not meant to be libelous."
Korn said many students thought the
article was in bad taste, tout added that many
also "were very shocked to learn the administration would go to such an extent in
showing its displeasure by suspending the
editors."
National talkfest
centennial project
Anyone for a free trip to Calgary to
discuss the brain drain, Canada and U.S.—
two countries on one continent, or student
leaders?
Second Century Week is Canadian university's centennial project and offers this
program to all interested students.
Seminars take place in Calgary and Edmonton from March 5 to 11. Applications
have to be submitted by Jan. 30 and are
available at the AMS office.
Sports run Friday
B.C.'s largest sports car rally gets under
way Friday as 35 entries depart on a 1,100
mile run.
The rally, sponsored by the UBC Sports
Car Cluto will be officially started toy Socred
minister Phil Gaglardi at 9 a.m. in front of
the Pacific Press building, 2250 Granville.
Rigid safety rules must fee followed, including carrying of flares, first aid kits, and
fire equipment. All cars must pass a technical safety inspection before participating.
Over 1,500 calculations will be required
to determine the winner, due to the intricate
judging procedure.
International
Ball
Friday. Jan. 27, 9-1 Regal Ballroom, Hotel Georgia
INTERNATIONAL FLOORSHOW
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The Unforgettable
Father Murray
People said he had "the mind
of a Greek scholar, the vocabulary of a dock worker and the
soul of a saint." Today, everyone in western Canada knows
about Athol Murray's miracle:
how he built a high school and
college in the midst of the
Depression. Read the heartwarming story of this unusual
priest in February Reader's
Digest. It's told by a man who
entered the school over thirty
years ago ... stayed there to
teach in a ragtag collection of
buildings in a windswept wheat
town. Don't miss "The Unforgettable Father Murray"—
about a man who believes
"Every human life is insignificant unless you yourself make
it great." In February Reader's
Digest now on sale.
A Challenging Career Opportunity
A representative of
The British Columbia Probation Service
will interview candidates
for
Probation Officer Positions
Appointments may be arranged at The University Office
of Student Placements for February 8 or 9, 1967.
ISRAEL
BARGAIN
Special cheap student flights from:
COPENHAGEN DUBLIN LONDON
PARIS BRUSSELS VIENNA
AMSTERDAM BASEL ROME
ATHENS ISTANBUL MILAN
Explore Israel, have fun, see new and old sites and
make friends with Kibbutz members, hike in the Desert,
bath in the fabulous Red Sea and enjoy Israel
hospitality.
For complete Student Travel Kit write to:
ISRAEL GOVERNMENT TOURIST OFFICE
1117 St. Catherine St.  W.
Montreal, Quebec Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 26, 1967
UBC  STUDENTS
OF   OBJECTIVISM
For admirers of AYN RAND who are
interested in meeting and discussing
her novels and philosophy call:
DAVID GOLDER        224-6357
or BILL PAULL AL 3-1767
"HANS"
TO HELP
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Hans Henneken
Factory-trained specialist.
8914 Oak (at Marine) 263-8121
MORE  LETTERS
FROM  PAGE  5
...one/ an ignored dance
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
The election of the Executive of the Students' Council 1967-68 will be held as follows:
First Slate: for President, Secretary, Second Vice-
President. Nominations open January 25 and
continue to February 2, 1967. Election will be
held on February 8, 1967.
Second Slate: for First Vice-President, Treasurer, Coordinator. Nominations open February 1 and
continue to February 9, 1967. Election will be
held on February 15, 1967.
Germany headed towards
Fascism? Let us remember
that West Germany, along
with the United States, Great
Britain and others, is our ally
in the defense of peace and
democracy. Could it not be
that the threat to peace today
is not fascism but communism which has been shown to
be just as, and if not more,
ruthless than Fascism?
If this is so, why are those
who advocate this ideology
and the overthrow of our system of government allowed
to be members of our society
and to speak on campus?
I submit, Mr. Plummer,
that they are allowed because
this is, in effect, a democratic
society.
We   are   saturated   on this
campus with literature,
speeches, and teach-ins which
are slanted to the left. Why
not hear from the other side
also?
I am not pro Nazi or pro
von Thadden, but I believe
he should be given a chance
to speak.
A. T. ATAMANENKO
P.E. 4
Goddam  doors
Editor, The Ubyssey:
, I tried it on the library —
oomph! I tried it in the education building — thump!
Wherever I go — oomph!
thump! bump! Why in the sam
hill are half the doors on this
campus locked?
I'm not referring to half of
the doors in each building, I'm
JULIANBREAM &
LUTE MUSIC    -""■.
FROM THE ROYAL
COURTS OF EUROPE
LIFE Magazine has described Julian Bream as "the
successor to the great Andres Segovia himself."
Nowhere is his brilliance more clearly displayed than in
this performance on the lute of these 16th-century
airs and dances by eleven composers. Such music as
Dowland's Queen Elizabeth's Galliard and Besard's
Air de Cour achieves its authentic flavor in Bream's
hands. Here, in fact, in Bream's latest album, is a royal
feast for modern ears—for every music lover!
RCAVlCTOR#
®The most trusted name in sound    =_fc_^
referring to half of each door.
Class over, everybody out.
Half of the class tramps
through the left half of the
door. I make the mistake of
expecting to go through the
right half.
Conditioning is beginning
to have its effect. I'm beginning to seek out the left halves
of the doors now.
*But I wonder what would
happen in the event of a fire
and subsequent mass exit . . .
KEITH PURVIN-GOOD
Science 4
'Crystal ball?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
If you haven't heard about
the Crystal Ball this Saturday
in Brock, it's because posters
have been removed, boards
erased, our Brock banner
stolen.
A definite scheme? — could
be — (but why? Whoever is
responsible for this thievery
ought to have guilty feelings.
We are a small club trying to
raise money, tout how do we
pay for our band, entertainment, and food when we have
no advertising left to inform
students of this activity? If
students are obsessed with
sign stealing, how about after
the dance, not before.
DESERET CLUB
Film Society Presents
THE COLLECTOR
with
TERRENCE STAMP and
SAMANTHA EGGAR
Today — Aud. — 50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
DIAMMO - WtOOM6 RINGS
Illustrated is but one of the more
popular styles with the younger
folks. A smooth and elegant
combination of the traditional
wedding band with an exquisite
Solitaire. Available in plain or
brushed 10-UK Gold.
From $125.00
Special  Dfscount for  U.B.C.
Students and Personnel.
1A* Shut, wOi tA /tumrd/kmt'i:
flttlWs
655 Granville Street.
47 West Hastings Street.
Vancouver, B.C.
622 Columbia Street
New Westminster, B.C.
EXTENDED TERMS Thursday, January 26,  T967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
— kurt hilger photo
DISCOVERING WHICH WAY the wind  blows, puzzled Canadian pauses before unstable
sign in front of  Brock. Alert photographer snapped picture as wind blew toward the left.
Profs poo-poo Mme. Mao
and 'Guard' terror reign
By MARGARET LADBURY
Although there is no current "reign of
terror" in China, a UBC professor said "serious conflict is beginning."
Dr. Bill Wilmott, Dr. Rene Goldman and
Dr. Jan Soleski, all from UBC, spoke on
China at UN club seminar Tuesday.
"The revolutionaries in the party came
from rural China after 1920. These peasants
of the pre-industrial north are in conflict
with the intellectuals and technicians of the
more cosmopolitan south," said Goldman.
"In 1957, during the Great Leap Forward
program, Mao and the party attempted to
reconcile and subdue the new technological
bureaucracy and intellectualism. Mao wants
a return to the old revolutionary enthusiasm.
Goldman said the results of such emphasis of "Redness" over "expertness" was
economic disaster. More realistic programs
enabled the economy to recover by 1964.
"Mao's paranoia is fear that the revolution will degenerate and the memory of the
U.S.S.R. haunts him. The replacement of the
Young Communist League by the Red Guard
is a expression of this fear," Goldman concluded.
Against this (background of confused aims
and internal party strife, Solecki sees three
main factions in conflict.
'Wao, his wife and Lin Pao emerge in one
group with the support of the army and the
Red Guard.
"They take an idealistic approach to
China's problems, demanding self-sacrifice
and duty.
"Chou En-lai's middle group, made up of
top government officials opposes the impulsiveness of Mao's group. However it will
probably side with Mao if open conflict
breaks out.
"Lu Chu leads the groups most in opposition to Mao's.  They differ in their eco-
UBC faces U of A
in McGoun debate
Is world federation the hope for mankind?
This topic is contained in the final resolution of this year's series of McGoun Cup
debates, this Friday night in Brock.
UBC will face University of Alberta,
while another UBC team exchanges fighting
words with debators from the University of
Saskatchewan at Saskatoon.
The McGoun Cup title represents supremacy in university debating for all of the
western Canadian provinces. UBC has held
the title for the past six years.
nomic and social views although they are
in positions of control," he said.
Wilmott threw some doubt on the whole
matter.
"Our main source of information of China
is American news syndicates. These are often
as reliable as Tass reports from Havana describing the racial troubles of the southern
United States."
Wilmott deplored the conformity of
thought that is growing in China.
"China is afraid of American escalation
of the Vietnam war," Solecki said. "Few
people are aware that it was China who made
a concerted effort to have friendly relations
with the U.S. which were refused.
Solecki described the behavior of the
people's cultural revolution as "economic
insanity" which may ultimately cost Mao his
leadership.
PLUMMER ADAMANT:
'No Nazis'
By BO HANSEN
Brian Plummer and his critics sparred
face to face Wednesday but the decision is
far from clear.
Special Events chairman Plummer appeared at a United Nations Club-sponsored
discussion of his action in cancelling an invitation to neo-Nazi Adolf von Thadden to
speak at UBC.
He said that "by focusing attention on the
'extremist' von Thadden, we would obscure
the fact that the Nazis in Germany are not
a minority threat, but are in fact already in
control in many areas of German policy."
As sources, Plummer cited James Cameron of the New York Times, David M.
Nickel of the Toronto Star, Carl Dow of the
Toronto Telegram and the Potsdam Central
Archives.
Plummer faced a barrage of criticism
on the text of his press release which contains his reasons for cancelling the invitation.
His sources were seen as inadequate and
one-sided. It was charged that since he could
not read German, Plummer's research could
not give a fair appraisal of the- German
situation on which his action was based.
Plummer defended himself saying that he
couldn't possibly research every proposed
speaker as deeply as he would like.
He stated he accepted that he was not
an expert on the subject but that his information was sufficient to make the decision to
refuse to foe a party to the invitation while
not damning van Thadden forever.
.
BALLROOM DANCING
Room for more — see Mr. Vincent any morning in
Memorial Gymnasium, upstairs foyer.
BADMINTON (Mixed)
M.  W. 1:30. MEM. GYM
F. 1:30, 2:30, 3:30 WOM. GYM
No Charges — Instruction Free
FACULTY and GRADS WELCOME
School of PE & REC,
Voluntary Rec. Program — Phone 228-2401
Going skiing at Fabulous Tod? Stay at
WHITECOURT SKI   LODGE
6 MILES FROM TOD -
FAMILY  STYLE,   HOME-COOKED   MEALS   ...
SPECIAL RATES ON  LODGING AND MEALS TO
BUSLOAD   GROUPS
For information write
MRS. F. 1. BRADY
Whitecroft Ski lodge
Phone Heffley Creek 3-G Heffley Creek, B.C.
JANUARY CLEARANCE SALE
20% to 40% Off
• SKIRTS •  SWEATERS
• BLOUSES •   SLIM  JIMS
• EVENING SKIRTS and TOPS, etc.
•   PANT SUITS
TOP QUALITY WOOL SKIRTS
Reg. to $16.95 $Q.88
SALE      °
ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS
An  additional   5%  Off  All   Prices
With This Coupon. This Weekend Only
THE /-rV*fg--t SHOP
jfciaZfc*
OAKRIDGE SHOPPING  CENTRE      AM 1-1034
\¥
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15, 1967
TUESDAYS   —
WEDNESDAYS -
FRIDAYS   —
SATURDAYS   —
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 -
2:00 -
7:30 -
3:00 -
7:30 -
3:00 -
7:30 -
12:45
7:30
2:45 p.m.*
3:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
9:30 p.m.**
5:00 p.m.**
9:30 p.m.
2:45 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
*Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
Students .35
Students .50
Adults .60
Adults .75
ADMISSION: Afternoons
Evenings
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
eaitt
RESTAURANT
and
Dining Room
4544 W.IOth Ave.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
• Full Dining
Facilities
• Take
Home
Service Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 26,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Filmsoc rolls Collector
FILMSOC
Four showings of The Collector   today   in   the   auditorium,   at   12:30,   3:30,   6   p.m.,
8:30. Admission 50 cents.
COLLEGE LIFE
The film  City of Bees  will
be shown at meeting tonight
at 9:01 in Haida lounge.
CUSO
The   film   You  Don't  Back
Down   concerning   a   medical
team in Nigeria will be shown
today at noon in physics 200.
DEBATING UNION
McGoun  cup   finals   Friday
at  8:30  in Brock lounge.  Resolved   Worldwide   Federation
is the winner for Mankind.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Meeting   Friday  at noon in
Ang. 207. Bring psychoses.
GEOPHYSICS
Dr. J. T. Wilson of Toronto
University   discusses   Did   the
Atlantic Ocean Close and then
Re-open,  today   at  4  p.m.   in
Henn. 201.
VOC
Faculties   must   register   in
the   gym   by   Feb.   1   for  the
intramural ski meet to be held
Feb. 5.
MUSSOC
Those interested in ushering
for   How   to   Succeed,   please
sign  list  in   clubroom  above
auditorium.
ARTS US
Poetry contest for best original   creative   works,   cash
prizes. Further information in
Brock 359.
INTERNATIONALISTS
Clive   Ansley   speaks   on
China   and U.S.   Press  Coverage, Friday at 8 p.m. in Salish
House lounge, Totem Park.
WORLD FEDERALISTS
Garth Edge discusses World
Peace    through    World   Law,
'Neglected' totem pole
to come in from cold
The Kitwancool pole won't rot.
Dr. Harry Hawthorn, head of the anthropology department, said that the pole would be moved into the
storage shed at Totem Park next Thursday.
The pole became the center of controversy when
Vancouver sculptor Peter Ochs complained the 40-foot
pole was being neglected.
Hawthorn said there would then be no space available
on campus for future consignments of poles.
He said the poles now on display at Totem Park can
be preserved indefinitely if they are treated every five
years.
Rough plans have been drawn for a museum to be
located on the grounds of the fine-arts centre which could
house and display the totem poles.
Hawthorn stated, however, the museum would cost
about $1 million and the project was far down on the
university priority list.
_-/v *Jjiamond with L^onfldence
"FWt"
INM
$190
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S
•MMTWOOO
PARK  ROYAL
Friday at noon in Bu. 202.
HISTORY LECTURE
Dr. Roger Anstey will speak
on Patrice Lumumba and the
Nature of African Nationalism, Friday at noon in Bu.
100.
GETTING MARRIED?
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME.    .
DDRESS
MR. ROY YACHT, Consultant
1
™* card shop
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
WALLET LOST IN OR NEAR
Buchanan Tuesday morning —
Reward! Phone Mark Gibson at
736-0878.	
TAKEN! CHEM 311 NOTES FROM
Mall bench, Tues., noon, ph. 732-
5444.  Reward!	
WALLET LOST BY HITCHHIKER
when he ripped pocket getting
into black TR-3 Jan. 19, 4:30.
Driver took him home down 8th.
Would driver please check, 224-
5958.	
17 JEWEL GOLD WATCH WITH
cheap band lost between Freddy
Wood and the Library Friday,
Jan. 20 — phone Marilyn at 224-
9984 — thanks.
REWARD OFFERED FOR RE-
turn of briefcase "lost" in Sedge-
Wick Lib. Fri. noon.  Ed 263-5451.
FOUND: BROWN LEATHER
gloves in car. Call Ron 228-2487,
Computer lab. in Electrical Eng.
Bldg.	
FOUND WOMAN'S RING IN
washroom across from Bu. 202.
Claim at Publications Office,
Brock  Hall.
FOUND UMBRELLA TAKEN
from Rehab. Med. student's 1956
Chev. on Dec. nine. Call Denis at
266-4554.	
GOLD CARRING, FLOWER-SHAP-
ed, for pierced ears, near Brock,
Library or Grad. Center. Reward.
224-3486.
Coming Dances
12A
MARDI GRAS CHARITY BALL,
Show Mart. Tickets on sale now
at   AMS   office.   {5.00   per   couple.
INTERNATIONAL BALL JAN. 27,
9-1 only. $5.00 couple. Tickets at
I.H.   &   A.M.S.	
CRYSTAL BALL DANCING EN-
tertainment, refreshments Jan. 28.
Brock Hall, only $3.50 cpl. Tickets
at   A.M.S. 	
IF
you read this space on Tuesday,
you know that the Shantelles will
be playing at campus A Go-Go
(revisited) — Sat., Feb. 4th. The
second group on the program will
be the Big Beat Sound of the
Shockers! And there is still a third
band to be added to that list! —
See tomorow's paper — Truly an
entertainment   extravaganza!	
DON'T MISS THE BIGGEST
Dance in the history of Vancouver. "THE WONDERFUL
WORLD OF SOUL" with the
Shantelles, Epics, Nightrains, and
Soul Unlimited. Fri., P.N.E. Gardens,   8:00 - 1:00.      	
ARTS MEETS SCIENCE MIXER.
Tues.. Jan. 31. Brock Lounge at
noon. Guys  25c.  Gals free.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM OPEN MON.-
Fri. 12:30-1:30 F.&G. 116 — come
and see our minerals and fossils.
TWO GREAT BANDS! INTERNA-
tional Ball Jan. 27. Tickets only
$5.00/couple. Available at IH and
A.M.S.	
A FEW TABLES ARE STILL
available for group bookings at
Mardi Gras. Saturday, Jan. 28
for clubs, dorms and other organizations. Call Charlie Graham,
224-9769   for   arrangements.	
A FEW SATURDAY NIGHT
Mardi Gras Dance tickets should
be on sale at the Showmart, 9:00
p.m.  sharp.	
WUSC NEEDS YOU! SHARE CAM-
paign. Advisors needed for massive February campaign. Contact
WUSC   Office.   Brock   Ext.   257.
ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM LIVES!!
Apply at AMS by Monday noon
for meeting Paradise Valley Feb.
3-5 to discuss Education with Bob
Rowan, Frank Bardacke, Alumni,
Faculty - Talk, Argue, fight 7.50
ea-	
ALL ARTSMEN — ENTER THE
Arts Poetry Contest now. Cash
prizes. Deadline Feb. 24. For further information contact Arts
Office  Brock  359.	
GIRLS! NOT GOING TO MARDI
Gras? Great! E.U.S. — Residence
Mixer Fri., Jan. 27. Meet in residence house lounges at 8:30 p.m.
for transportation.   Girls  50c.
Special Notices (Con't.)
LOWER MALL SKI TRIP FEB. 3
to Kelowna return Feb. 5. Cost
$25.00. Contact John Sigismund
224-9776   Robson   307.
HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS
Without Really Trying. Student
Performances Feb. 6th, 7th, 8:30,
9th,  12:30.  75c.	
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's —
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.
Transportation
14
HELP! WE NEED CARPOOL Vicinity 41st and Fraser. Phone
Marg,  321-8204,  or Lynn,  325-2082.
MINI BUS, SLIGHTLY USED, FOR
Sale, Aquire Auditorium, The Collector 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30. Today
only   50c.	
TWO OR THREE DRIVERS
wanted for carpool vicinity Capi-
lano Highlands, North Vancouver.
Phone  988-1925.
WANTED RIDE FROM K3NGS-
way at Middlegate, Mon.-Fri.,
8:30-5:30.   Phone   Terry  526-1373.
Wanted
15
SAILORS ON BOARD U.S.S. EN-
terprise would like to write to
Canadians. Write Richard A. Frye
AQB2,    VAH-2    DET    MIKE,    c/o
FPO,  San  Francisco,   Calif.
Travel Opportunities
16
STUDY TOUR EUROPE — SUM-
mer '67 — $750. Students under
21 years. Write M. Goodwin, 7011-
20th Ave. N.E.,  Seattle, Wash.	
TWO AMS RETURN FLIGHT
tiok.ts London-Vancouver. August 25th. Each $195.00. Phone
CA  4-3329.
AUTOMOTIVE   8c  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
USED   CAR   VALUES
'59   Hillman   Sedan  —  $350.00.
'57    Chev.    Sedan    Automatic
$550.00.
'61  Lark  2-door — $550.00.
Hammond's  Garage
Seymour & Pacific
MU 3-8451
DATSUN    DEALER
1954 OLDS' GOOD CONDITION.
Deluxe radio. Excellent motor
$150.00 or best offer. Phone Ross
224-9846.
1955 CHEV. BEL AIRE 4 DOOR
Sedan. Automatic — R & H, 4
new tires. Excellent mechanical
condition.   Phone  261-9023.
1958 PONTIAC SEDAN. 6 CYL.
Auto. New tires, (w.wf.'s) Radio
(rear speaker). Beautiful condition. $450 or nearest offer. Call
Mike   (7-10  p.m.  Thurs.)   731-6295.
1955 VOLKSWAGEN.  $100  or  nearest  offer.   Phone  224-7352.
'52 DESOTO—252 HEMI P. STEER-
ing and brakes. New Transmission. Phone 433-6370 — Bruce af-
ter 6 p.m.	
1963 BMW SPORTS COUPE AND
1961 Valiant with floor shift. Call
321-9393.
Automobiles Wanted
25
WANTED SPORTS CAR IN GOOD
running order. Reasonably priced.
PPhone   581-7525   Evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39 A
INTERNATIONAL BALL, JAN. 27,
Hotel Georgia. Moonlighters' Steel
Band & Brick Henderson. Tickets
$5.00/couple  at I.H.   & A M.S.	
GEORGE GRWELL SAYS, "ITS 17
years 'til 1984, so see the BRAVE
NEW WORLD now!" (Tuesday,
January 31st at noon.)	
SORDID SCENES IN SELLAR!
Who spent 39 days in Terrence
Stamp's Bsmt. Find out today
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30. Auditorium
50c.
GIRLS! LIVE IN TOTEM, LOWER
Mall or Acadia? Meet in Residence House Lounges tonight at
8:30 p.m. For transportation to
E.U.S.   Mixer.  Girls 50c.
JOIN      THE      INTERESTING
People at Mardi Gras on Saturday
 nighty  _ 	
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. — "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.
Scandals
39A
ARTS CHALLENGES AGGIES EN-
gineers and Foresters to a Tug-
of-War. At noon Feb. 1st on Library lawn.
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE   EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.	
Professional Typing
ARDALE  GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4530
FAST EXPERIENCED TYPIST IN
Acadia Camp. Phone 224-1441
Special student rates.	
EXPERT TYPING — MY HOME.
876-5959
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
COME AND HELP US KEEP AN
Eye on the Collector. 12:50, 3:30,
6:00,   8:30   Auditorium   only   50c.
MASSAGES: REASONABLE
rates for expert results for girls
between 18 and 22. Phone Stu
733r4577.         	
WANTED:     HOUSEKEEPER FOR
men.   Reasonable   salary  for right
girl. Fringe  benefits!  Phone Stud
733-4577.
INSTRUCTION
SCHOOLS
Music
63
FOR SALE: "LeBlanc" Bb Clarinet,
silver keys, deluxe case $225.00.
Phone  Wes  at  299-9275.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND History lessons given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S.   736-6923.
Special Classes
65
TEN   SPANISH   LESSONS   FOR   $5
in  group  of   12.   CA  4-5905.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
'65 MODEL FENDER BASSMAN
Amp. Special heavy-duty speaker
system. New condition. Student
must sell. Phone Pete eves, 224-
5958.
BRAZILIAN CLASSICAL GUITAR,
hard shell case, Berlitz Spanish
Records, Fort Camp, Hut 4, Room
23,   224-9853.	
VW   SKI   RACK   $5.   4   PAIRS   224-
0055 Dinner time.
SNOW TIRES — 13"; AUTOMA-
tic washer; pair Colonial Lampshades; Floor polisher — phone
RE   3-2395.
RENTALS  ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
SI
2 BEDROOMS WITH SHOWER
$35/month each. 2466 W. 20th
Ave.   738-9490  after  6   p.m.
Room ft Board
82
TRAFFIC PROBLEMS? MOVE ON
campus and forget them! Room
and board Feb. 1. 2280 Wesbrook
224-9986.
ROOM  AND  BOARD ON   CAMPUS
$65  per  mo.   Phone   266-4443.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
WANTED ONE MALE STUDENT,
21 yrs. to share basement suite.
Private entrance, kitchen, share
bath, $32 per month. Start now.
Phone 261-6120, ask for Bill.
QUIET RESPONSIBLE GIRL
wanted to share apartment with
two others. Near gates on 10th.
Phone   224-4267   after   4  pm.
WANTED MATURE FEMALE
student to share penthouse overlooking Kits beach with working
girl. Adequate privacy for study-
ing.   $50.00  mo.   738-3036  weekend.
GIRL WANTS QUIET ROOMMATE
to share basement house — keeping rooms. Corner Broadway and
Alma.   224-6864.	
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE
furn. suite in South Gran. 738-
6292.
Unfurn. Houses ft Apts.        84
UNFURNISHED TWO-BEDROOM
house with Basement. 13th and
Trimble   224-7929.

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