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The Ubyssey Nov 4, 1965

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 The last
was
MS UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 21
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  THURSDAY,  NOVEMBER 4,   1965
CA  4-3916
—norm   betts   photo
STICKY AND ITCHY after a bath of honey an d feathers frosh president John Wheaton tries
to snarl at his enemies, the first-year engineers. The red coats abducted Wheaton from
his office Wednesday noon, gave him his bath and tied him to the Brock totem pole.
Referendum
to decide
fee position
By STUART GRAY
Student council has come out strongly against the withholding of second term tuition fees.
A referendum will be held Wednesday for students
to decide whether or not they want to withhold their fees.
The wording of the referendum, decided on at Monday's
council meeting,  will  be:
"If the present negotiations with the Board of Governors do not result in a fee reduction to the 1964-65 level,
would you be willing to withhold your second term fees?"
AMS against withholding
Peter Braund, AMS second
vice-president, said Wednesday
the AMS is against withholding
fees because "we don't feel it
is the best way to get into a
collective bargaining position."
"Nor do we feel it is the
best form of protest."
Braund said the UBC General Information Bulletin designates the deadline for paying
second term fees as Jan. 14,
1966.
"The administration can retaliate swiftly," said Braund.
"Cancellation of a student's
registration can be done
easily."
The Bulletin says non-payment of second term fees by a
student will result in cancellation of the student's registration, and to reregister, a
student must pay a reinstate-
men fee of $10 as well as all
outstanding fees.
CUS looks optimistically
at Quebec breakaway
BRAUND
.  better way?
Petition forced hand
IThe withdrawal of three
English-speaking universities
in Quebec from the Canadian
Union of Students has drawn
a mixed reaction from the
CUS western regional president.
McGill and Sir George Williams   universities   and   Mar-
ianopolis College were admitted to the Union Generale des
Etudiants du Quebec.
Eduerd Lavalle said Wednesday night: "The official
CUS position is that it favors
english speaking institutions
going into the UGEQ."
"But   CUS   also   hopes   to
Buses ready for students
but council has no takers
Have buses, no riders.
This is the situation facing the Alma Mater Society,
which has chartered buses to take would-be out-of-town
federal election voters home for half fare.
But so far they haven't got one would-be passenger.
AMS second vice president Peter Braund said Wednesday that unless enough names are submitted to the
AMS office today, the buses will be cancelled.
If a* student wants to take advantage of the buses,
he can ask at the AMS office for a Federal Election Transportation Form  said Braund.
The buses are due to leave Friday afternoon.
UBC president John Macdonald has already excused
out-of-town voters from classes Monday, if they go home
to vote.
negotiate with the UGEQ so
these institutions can enjoy
membership in both UGEQ
and CUS."
The three English-speaking
Quebec institutions agreed to
withdraw from the CUS at the
next CUS congress in ten
months as a condition of
UGEQ membership.
"I personally think it's a
good thing for these institutions to go into the UGEQ,'
said Lavalle.
He said the UGEQ would,
with the membership of the
English-speaking institutions,
be able to approach the Quebec provincial government as
a unified body representing
all university students in Quebec.
"But I don't like the idea
of the UGEQ being a uniling-
ual group, in contrast to CUS
which acknowledges bilingualism," .said Lavalle.
"I think, however, that a
good working agreement and
good . relations can, and will
be, worked out between CUS
and the UGEQ."
The referendum, was originally announced at a Fee Protest Rally in September by
AMS president Byron Hender.
The AMS is against such a
referendum, but it must be held,
because of a petition signed by
a thousand students.
This petition demanding a
referendum, was handed in the
day after the September rally.
Braund said the AMS's constitution states that any petition proposing a referendum,
which is signed by more than
500 students, must result in the
referendum being sponsored by
the AMS.
AMIS co-ordinator Graeme
Vance said Monday night: "You
could get a referendum passed
on anything on this campus."
"We could probably even
pass one to have Braund incinerated."
VANCE
. too easy?
Cruise   blasts   council
Bob Cruise, AMS first vice-
president, said Wednesday he
was "strongly critical" of what
he termed "councils" negativism."
"I think this is a dangerous
thing for council," he said.
"Instead of being always
negative, council should be
positive."
"In the case of this referendum, they should include a
mandate asking support for a
fairly strong program to replace withholding fee," said
Cruise.
Braund said about 75 per cent
of UBC students haven't paid
place   withholding  fees,"  said
Counting people who have
paid, and who are obliged to
pay because of scholarships
which they would otherwise
lose, 10 thousand students could
withhold second term fees he
said. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November 4,   1965
PART OF THE BEAUTY of International Fall Fair is this group of co-eds modelling their
native costumes. They will be part of the E ast Meets West fashion show Friday night in
the armory.
UBC Fall Fair introduces
international flavor
International Fall Fair
comes to UBC Friday and
Saturday.
The fair will feature dancing and singing from foreign
lands, teas, display booths,
and a fashion show.
A tea and reception will be
held Friday for all new overseas students from 4:00 to 5:30
p.m. at International House,
i-it. Gov. George Pearkes will
officially open the fair in the
armory at 7:30 the same
night.
A floor and fashion show
will follow. The fashion show,
East meets West, will feature
Phrateres modelling western
clothes and girls from overseas in their national dress.
The sponsoring organizations hopes the fair will give
Canadian students an insight
into other lands and people.
The display booths set up
in the armory will feature
some of the crafts and foods
be manned by people from
from foreign lands and will
those countries.
Some of the booths displayed will represent India ,
China, Phillipines, the Slavonic countries, Finland,
Spain,, Greece, and Israel.
The floor show, which will
be   held   daily,   will   feature
the native dances and folk
songs.
Greek students plan to perform four festival dances
which originated in different
parts  of their  country.
The Phillipinos are to perform a variety of dances
which involve balancing and
timing skill.
Singing with the accompaniment of native instruments will be part of the
program offered by the
Chinese students.
The second part of their
performance will be a demonstration of shadow boxing
which is carried on as a part
of the physical fitness in
China  today.
Tari, a dance involving
both men and women at wedding festivities will be enacted by the Malaysian students.
The  French   students  plan
to   sing   songs   about   drink
and love.
A colourful display of old
folk dances and Russian and
Polish songs are features of
the Slavonic countries' students.
Saturdays activities start
at 3:00 p.m. in the armory
and International House.
The admission is $1.50 for
adults, $1 for students, and
50 cents for children. Advance tickets are available
at the AMS' office and at
International House.
10% OFF CORSAGES
To All UBC Students
ORDER   EARLY
VOGUE   FLOWER  SHOP
2197 W Broadway   736-7344
THE WHEELERS
SALES  AND   SERVICE
4395 W. 10th Ave.   224-4914
HONDA SPECIALISTS
SPECIALS:
RAIN SUITS  ... $ 2.99
HELMETS $10.95
AUTO HEADRESTS 5.95
10% Down and
24 Months to Pay
Western Canada's Largest
Formal Wear Rentals
Tuxedos White &  Blue Coats
Full   Dress Shirts   &   Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue Blazers
Directors'   Coats 10%   UBC   Discount
OVER  2300 GARMENTS TO  CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608 Granville (at 10th)   4691  Kingsway (Bby.)
RE  3-6727 (by  Sears)   HE  5-1160
®
B.C. HYDRO
& POWER AUTHORITY
requires
ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL and
CIVIL ENGINEERS
for its expanding activities
There are excellent opportunities for graduates to obtain
a variety of training and experience in many locations
throughout the Province, leading to promotions and
increased salaries commensurate with responsibility.
Please consult your bulletin board and our brochure
"Engineering the Future" for background information
and description of B.C. Hydro's diverse activities and
engineering career opportunities.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS: Nov. 8, 9, 10 & 12
We are looking forward to discussing your career plans
with you and in exploring how your interests and talents
could be best utilized in this rapidly expanding organization. Please arrange an appointment time through the
Student Services Office.
WHAT ELSE IS NEW?
70  policemen
disperse students
The Council Committee of Wastda University formally
decided on Oct. 15 to abolish the Journalism and Public
Administration   Departments
Science and Economics.
Some 3,000 students of the
School held a protest meeting
against the decision and
abandoned their lessons.
of   the   School   of   Political
The following item is reproduced in its entirity from
the Waseda Guardian, newspaper "for international student friendship'," published
by Waseda university, Tokyo,
Japan on Oct. 15.
The Committee was held at
Akasaka Prince Hotel at 2
p.m. About 80 students stormed the building and crowded
round President Nobumoto
Ohama to plead their protest
against the decision.
The authorities asked the
help of police at 5 p.m., and
the students were broken up
by about 70  policemen.
AMS thanked
by Mrs. Lett
In a letter read to student
council Monday night Mrs.
Sherwood Lett thanked UBC
for the Great Trekker Award
presented to her Saturday.
Mrs. Lett is the wife of the
late Chief Justice Sherwood
who received the Great Trekker Award in 1957.
"My deep interest in the
university was in no small
degree due to the part my
husband always played in its
development, and it has become par.t of my life too,"
she said.
When the university opened its doors on the Point
Grey campus in 1925, she enroled as a post-graduate student.
Mrs. Lett is back at UBC
again this year as an unclassified student.
V
Chevron Standard
Limited
CALGARY, ALBERTA
Offers Careers In
Petroleum Exploration
and will conduct
Campus Interviews On
November 8, 9 & 10
POST GRADUATES - GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
in
ENGINEERING — Chemical, Mechanical, Civil
—Permanent and summer employment in engineering.
HONOURS GEOLOGY
—Permanent and summer employment in geology.
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
(Options 1, 2, 3)
—Permanent and summer employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
GEOPHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
PHYSICS and GEOLOGY
—Permanent and summer employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
HONOURS PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
-^Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
Arragenmenls for Personal Interview may be
Made Through  the
UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE. Thursday,  November  4,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
IDEAS
AT
LARGE
By BILL  GRAF
It's well-known that universities profess to embrace
individuals of all kinds.
Indeed, independent
thought and responsible dissent in, every degree are the
classic concepts.
Our own self-image is one
of non-conformity.
But who do you know
that is Really different? How
many original ideas have you
come up with today ?
We are a generation of
parasites, feeding on other
men's ideas and regurgitating our own particular syntheses of them whenever
necessary.
• •   •
Perhaps after 100 centuries man has exhausted his
supply of original ideas. Or
there is so much to learn
that one must spend a lifetime absorbing ideas before
he can produce any of his
own.
Or an impersonal and utilitarian society has superimposed its values on the university.
•     •     •
Sit in your class of 250
people and dare to ask a
time-consuming question ?
See your prof after lectures
and expect individual help ?
Read a novel or a text a
week, memorize your class
notes and hand in your term
paper on time.
• •    •
But don't stop to consider
what you have read and
don't follow up an aspect of
the course that happens to
interest you.
There isn't time.
Absorb, absorb, absorb
for four or six or eight years
and hurry to get your degree. Take your place in society.
But don't stop to think.
There isn't time.
Non-union
printers
win yearbook
A non-union shop has been
awarded the $11,000 UBC
yearbook printing contract
for the second consecutive
year.
Totem editor John Tyrell
said a contract was signed
Monday with Mitchell Press,
of Vancouver.
Last year Vancouver Labor Council and the B.C.
Young Democrats urged a
boycott of Totem for employing a "scab" shop.
"We invited eight Canadian firms to submit bids,"
he said—seven of them union
shops. "Mitchell Press' bid
was $500 lower than the
others."
I THINK I'LL OBJECT in a minute. Somebody's got to stop
this silly argument thinks AAAS first vice-president Bob
Cruise at last Monday's council meeting. Oh well, at least
he's paying attention. (See page nine for more pictures).
—denls  gone  photo
THE SWEET END "I'm tired of being maid," says Fifi, the
well-Frenched moid, played by Ann Chislett in "Her
Scienceman Lover," by Eric Nicol. Play is running noon
daily at Frederic Wood Theatre.
FROM CUS
Treasure van sales
help impoverished
By PEGGY STEIN
Ever wanted to own a sword concealed in a cane, a
wine flask, Peruvian slippers, or an Eutruscan doll ?
IThese articles are all here,
as part of the World University Service's Treasure Van at
International House.
Admission is free and the
varied display remains on campus until Friday, open from
noon to 5 p.m. and from 7 to
10  p.m.
Organized and sponsored by
WUS, the concept of a Treasure Van originated after the
Second World War.
The stock comes from 30
countries by land, sea, and air
to Toronto, from where it is
distributed to the universities.
Sent by commercial exporters, and local handicraft merchants, the supply is as original
as the method of collecting it.
The proceeds from the Trea-
| sure Van,  Hamilton said, are
channelled back into the general fund of WUS for diverse
purposes.
Much goes toward WUS
scholarship and seminar funds.
Since its inauguration in 1952
the (Treasure Van has gained
popularity as a, program of
international co-operation between students, and a means
to make Canadians aware of
the crafts and cultures of other
countries.
Hamilton said the Treasure
Van has an "off-beat" supply,
accounted for by personal connections in many countries.
The gift items range in price
from five-cent bangles to a
$150 Yugoslavian rug, appealing to students and off-campus
interests.
Quebec schools
breaking away
QUEBEC (CUP) — Three in and one to go.
That's the latest box score in the rush of English-
speaking universities and colleges to join 1'Union Generale
des Etudiants du Quebec.
McGill and Sir George Williams Universities and Mari-
anopolis College were admitted
to UGEQ at a recent congress
of that body.
Loyola College in Montreal
had also applied for membership in UGEQ but announced
Oct .30 it was withdrawing its
application to join the French-
speaking union.
Loyola student council withdrew when UGEQ refused to
make a firm commitment to
favor UGEQ affiliation over
loyalty to the Canadian Union
of Students.
THREE MORE
The other three English-
speaking Quebec colleges
agreed to withdraw from CUS
at the next CUS congress in ten
months as a condition of UGEQ
membership.
The split in the Canadian
student body has now resolved
into one between Quebec students and those in the rest of
Canada, replacing the traditional French-English division.
PROVINCIAL MATTER
The decision by the English-
speaking colleges to join UGEQ
appears to be based on the premise that since education is a
provincial responsibility, a provincial body such as UGEQ
would better support their aims
in Quebec.
Sharon Sholzberg, president
of the McGill students' society,
said in choosing between the
two she felt a Quebec union is
needed to pursue her council's
priority issue, education.
DIFFICULTIES
The transition for either the
applying colleges or UGEQ has
not been without its difficulties,
however.
There has been a constitutional hassel over the status of
the membership of the English-
speaking schools in both UGEQ
and CUS at the same time.
At first UGEQ gave McGill a
year to sever their relationship
with CUS and then changed
this to require them to leave
CUS at the next CUS congress
in ten months time.
Meanwhile, it appears that
the English-speaking members
will be able to use their own
language at UGEQ meetings,
and that body will not insist on
unilingualism.
FUTURE?
It would seem, then, from
the latest developments, that
the future path of UGEQ may
not be as smooth as it would
like.
The question of legality of
the members who are sill affiliated with CUS and possibly
the question of languages could
provide grounds for further
lively action.
Perhaps the decision of Loyola to withdraw is a symbol of
rough waters ahead.
SPECIAL || EVENTS
presents
Charlie Mingus
Quartet
Friday — 12:30 — Auditorium — 50c
November 9th
The Kaleidoscope  Players
on North American Tour
1
performing "UNDER MILKWOOD" by Dylan Thomas
Tickets on sale now at AMS Office: $1.00 and $1.50 mnrsstt
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office,' CA 4-3242,
.Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Pounding member, Pacific
'Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage  in  cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4,  1965
"The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction." -Wm. Blalm.
Ride em, Don Wise
Two terse sentences from the latest Men's Athletic
Committee minutes have got us pounding our desks in
wild applause.
We quote: "The secretary submitted a request from
Don Wise that rodeo be accepted as an MAC activity
"Moved that the MAC cannot expand its program
to include rodeo at the present time. Carried."
Now, we sure weren't clapping because Don didn't
get rodeo listed as an official MAC sport at UBC.
But shucks, pod'ner, we gotta admire the get-up-
and-go demonstration by Wise's plumb audacity at asking the august MAC for a chance to put sawdust in the
stadium and hitch broncos to the back of Brock.
We knew Don Wise wasn't the quiet-looking fellow
you might take him for at first sight, ever since he
hitch-hiked east to take part in the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association meet at the University of
Alberta last month (see The Ubyssey, Oct. 26).
This fourth-year arts student had tried to get money
from the AMS to represent UBC there. But when they
didn't come across with the money, he scrounged up
enough for a registration fee, and hit the rodeo trail,
anyway.
And now, here he is again, right in the middle of
MAC minutes, between a motion by AMS president
Byron Hender about a proposed rugby tour to Eastern
Canada, and a suggestion by MAC councilman Ian
Donald that UBC give top priority to football and basketball to keep up with Simon Fraser Academy.
What we like about Don Wise is he doesn't consider
the AMS an organization which takes his $29, throws out
a Ubyssey at him, and gives him an ID card.
Somewhere between Main Mall and the ol' corral,
he realized the organization was there for him to take
a part in. The fact he picked a somewhat bizzare — to
Brock minds — opening into the active world of extracurricular activities, shouldn't dissuade anyone from
trying.
Along the same line, we note that a club organized
to Stamp Chit Moths Methodically held a successful first
general meeting yesterday.
Now if Don Wise could only ride moths bareback ...
Butterflies
Not to bore you with constitutional trivia of the
usual kind, there is one gaping hole in the AMS constitution.
So far this year, your AMS council has spent many
happy hours wrangling about whether wording on a
petition asking for a referendum determines the wording
for that referendum.
As the constitution now stands, if 500 active members of the AMS petition council to hold a referendum
about something, council must hold  a  referendum.
What the constitution neglects to mention, is how
that referendum is to be worded, or indeed what it is
to be about.
As things are now, someone could petition a referendum on the dissolution of the AMS, and council could
call a referendum  on whether butterflies  are  blue.
That is, they could do so constitutionally.
Whether they could do so morally is another problem. Which is what led to interminable debate last
Monday as to whether or not it was correct for the AMS
to print a "Vote NO!" message right on the ballot.
As it was, they decided not to include that gentle
hint.
We think this was the right decision. But for sure,
let's clear up the uncertainties with regard to wording
at the next general meeting.
IN
— from The Manitoban
News item: Treasure Van at International House to Saturday.
Letters
CMR
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In regards to your article
in the Oct. 15 issue of The
Ubyssey entitled "UBC sports
fading away", I would like to
make the following comments:
At le College Militaire
Royal de St. Jean we have
less than 400 cadets.
We also have extra-mural
sports. This works out to
about 26 cadets for each extramural team.
In your article you stated
that UBC has extra-mural
sports, "the most extensive in
the country."
This program is supported
by a student population which
is, I believe, in excess of fifteen thousand.
This is approximately 555
students for each representative team.
And you feel that your "energy, attention and finance
are spread out and dissipated
on an astonishing number of
sports." I am sorry but there
is no sympathy from this
quarter.
Thank you very much for
sending us your very excellent
newspaper.
Our journalistic efforts, I
regret to say, are very sparce,
due to the demanding life at.
CMR and the size of the cadet
wing.
You should, however, be receiving our first issue very
shortly.
O/C R. G. BAIRD
English Editor
Le Rempart,
College Militaire Royal
PILLS? PHOOEY
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
After reading the articles on
"the pill episode" and the
comments on it I have the following solutions to offer:
1. If the problem is just a
matter of relieving "tensions"
(I prefer politeness) may I
suggest certain ladies downtown who will, for a small
charge, act as conveniences for
you. But, you say, that could
be dangerous — you've seen
the posters about that. Well,
then —
2. Get married. But, you
say, that's expensive and you
don't feel that certain of your
feelings toward your present
young lady. Well, there's still
one left —
3. Let the girl use what she
can find and worry every
month (by the way, it would
only take one little slip even
with the pill) till she knows
for sure.
•    •    •
Why should you care? All
you really want is the relief
and pleasure (?) without any
responsibility.
The answers to the first two
suggestions above are the
usual ones and anyone who
would use a girl to satisfy his
own lusts — there !
I said~it—which is what all
these "frustrated" young men
(?) are doing, have to find
some balm for their consciences.
The answer?
Everything would be fine if
we could remove all worry
from the poor girls.
Phoooey!
» •    •    •
As far as I'm concerned the
whole argument is so ridiculous that I am surprised that
any reasonably intelligent
female could be taken in for
more than 30 seconds (the
time required to take a deep
breath in order to laugh resoundingly in his face).
Self-respect seems to be out
of fashion.
Two years ago I didn't feel
quite "in" at UBC. Maybe
this is what I was missing.
Thank heaven I missed it.
MRS. K. A. MARTIN
LYTTON. B.C.
P.S. Why should university
students have something denied to those in the outside
world?
As well as being irresponsible, self-indulgent, and self-
deceiving the attitude is an
attempt at special pleading—
let's classify university students with lunatics and the inmates of certain other institutions and deny them the
the vote; some of them are
obviously trying to class themselves with one or the other.
THE
EAR
By IAN CAMERON
There are, according to the
Canada Year Book, 2,900
pagans in Canada.
In the same
issue, there is
a thing saying 2,800 people in Canada
married   peo-
^J^4U ple of <differ-
—"«'« ent'  religious
faith,     faiths
CAMERON unnamed.
So it occured to me, what
happens if a good Christian
girl marries one of these pagans?
And I was going to write a
column about this, when
someone said: "Why don't you
write something about the
campus? You're a campus
columnist."
So here's the scene.
AMS co-ordinator Graeme
Vances office. Graeme is
speaking to a tall, dark man
dressed in a long black cape.
"Lookit, you can't do that.
It just won't fit into the uni-
versiy picture.
"What would people think
if we gave you a place to
practice black masses?"
Tall dark man speaks:
"Why not? We are registered
as a practicing faith. We feel
that we should be allowed to
spread our message to students like all the others."
(Scene changes to Hender's
office).
"Mr. Hender, we would
like srjace to spread our faith
on the campus."
Hender: "Oh, no. What do
you guys want? More marchs?
Less fees?"
Man: "No, nothing that desperate. We would like to
have a place where we can
set up an alter and conduct
sacrifices."
Hender: "Well, as long as
it hasn't got anything to do
with fees, all right."
One week later, there is an
alter set up on the library
lawn, and the black mass is
in full swing.
As proof of the power of
his religion, the man in black
(who now wears a full length
black suit and has a cat on
his shoulder) chants loudly.
As he finishes the chant,
president Macdonald comes
running out of the administration building, and, with a
glazed look in his eyes, abolishes fees.
Immediately, 15,998 students become pagans, the
only holdouts being a couple
of law students.
The sun sets on a mass
sacrifice starring the AMS
council and the Board of
Governors, and the students
trek homewards licking their
fingers and belching quietly.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
Newi  _  Ron  Rlter
Auociate   George  Reamsbottom
City    _. _    Richard   Blair
Photo _    Bert   MacKinnon
Sports       Ed  Clark
Ass't News     Dan   Mullen
Robbi West
Ass't  City     Al   Donald
Page Friday _  John  Kelsey
Managing  _    Norm   Betts
Features    Mike  Bolton
CUP     _..   Don   Hull
Working Wednesday were Kathy
Hyde, Teri Brown, Susan Grans-
by, Pat Hrushowy, Peggy Stein,
Sheila Dobson, Vivian Gigun,
Stuart Gray, Brent Cromie, Danny
Stoffman, Ann Ratel, Bill Graf.
Where the devil are Anne Balfe,
and Gordon MacLaughlin among
others? Thursday,  November 4,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Whoopee, money, trouble
made at Lower Mall dances
By   DOUG   HALVERSON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The day of the two step
and waltz seems to have vanished from UBC forever.
In their place we now have
the work-out. We can frug,
jerk, watusi, swim or convulse in any other way that
pleases us.
One of the strongholds for
the frenzied dance society are
the residence ball rooms and
one of the greatest of these
ball rooms is Lower Mall's
Common Block basement.
By means of wide campus
advertising Lower Mall's
dances have become more
than entertainment for resident groups.
They bring off campus students back to campus after
hours, over-flowing the ballroom to the financial pleasure
of the Lower Mall student
council.
• •      •
L M S C president John
Woods said that both of Lower Mall's dances this year
have been big successes
money wise.
He said that dance atten-
dence this year is up all over
campus. Not just in his own
residence.
Woods said last year's dances
started off strong too, but
tapered off during the year.
He doesn't think this year
will be the same.
• •     •
"More  people  seem  to be
dancing and most of them
dance the same way," he said.
"Other years older students
have come and jived or not
danced at all. Very few people jive now. Either they're
staying away or learning the
new dances.
"Now the more crowded
and hot and sweaty the place
is the more they seem to like
it,"  Woods said.
The heat however, seems
to be bothering the campus
fire department. Lower Mall
Council has been told that
the attendance at dances will
have to be limited to one person per 15 square feet according to the fire regulation.
This means only 300 to 350
people would be allowed in
for a dance and this would in
turn take away from the
crowded feeling that seems
so important.
Along with any large group
of people you're bound to
have your problems. Lower
Mall's biggest problem is people sneaking into dances
without paying by transferring the admission stamp
from the back of one person's
wrist to another's.
Woods estimates $50 per
dance  is   lost through  this.
•      •      •
The second, and most glamorous, problem is that of
drinking dancers.
Woods said the first dance
this year was worse than the
last for this. He considers
the beer, strike to be the cause.
People could conceal the
hard stuff easier.
Woods said nothing has
been broken at any of this
years dances, and the biggest
hardship the drinkers cause
is the mess which must be
cleaned up by the dance sponsors the next morning.
The sponsors are usually
one  of  the  houses  in  the
PEACEFUL ENOUGH Lower Mall residences look quiet
enough iii this shot of two of the women's dorms. But beneath that calm exterior, people are probably planning
another of those swinging dances.
Hoot This Saturday
with
John  YLVISAKER
From Minneapolis
and THE ROYAL HEIRS
Totem Res. Aud.
8:00 p.m.
No Charge
residence complex. The profits from the dance are usually split 70 per cent to the
sponsoring house, and 30 per
cent to Lower Mall council.
If the sponsors don't clean
the mess up Buildings and
Grounds does and this means
the profits are cut.
•     •     •
The average take for a
dance is $300. This is after
$75 to $150 has been paid for
a band, and about $20 for
advertising.
"There is no off campus
advertising as this brings on
trouble," said Woods.
It is still usually off-campus
people that do the most drinking and cause the most
trouble.
At the last dance 150 people were turned back at the
door.
the
3£ay
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spectating, or lodge lolling ... all geared for
fun on the slopes or apres-ski!
Shop the Bay Chalet, second floor and
Women's   Sportswear,   third  flood Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4,  1965
Varsity outdoor club
urges park development
By  PAT  HRUSHOWY
The UBC Varsity Outdoor
Club wants more areas in the
provincially-owned Garibaldi
Park developed for public
use.
Gordon Soules, of the VOC
conservation    committee    said
Wednesday: "The demand for
outdoor recreational facilities
in the Lower Mainland is in
creasing at an enormous rate."
"Garibaldi Park will have
to bear much of the burden
of this  increasing  pressure."
Bob   Wordsworth    of   the
VOC committee said: "If more
areas   aren't opened   up   the
Black   Tusk   meadows   and
Garibaldi  Lake  regions   will
be  ruined  by  overuse."
At   present   these  are   the
Profs flunk critique
at U, ot Washington
SEATTLE, Wash. (UNS) — Students at the University
of Washington now have their own anti-calendar.
In a survey called "Course Critique", the Associated
Students graded 600 professors on an alphabetical scale
from A to E.
Only 34 professors rated an A grade.
The first 1,000 copies of the survey sold out in less
than an hour Monday.
The students plan to publish 7,500 copies of the
survey, which was compiled from about 6,000 questionaires.
Nelson new head
of Quebec union
QUEBEC (CUP)—Robert Nelson, a fifth year engineering student at the University of Montreal, was elected president of the Union Generale des Studiants du Quebes, Oct. 31.
he
Last summer he 'was coordinator of the Travailleurs
Etudiants du Quebec, a provincial Peace Corps, begun by U
of M students and assisted
financially by the Lesage government.
Generally considered a pra-
gmatist, Nelson told a postelection press conference that
UGEQ will probably lose its
image as an apparent strong
supporter of separatism, but
will retain its drive for a better
society in Quebec.
He was elected president of
the one year old union following the admission of McGill
and Sir George Williams Universities and Marianopolis College to membership.
UGEQ now represents 70,000
Quebec students, about 15,000
of these English speaking.
Nelson's slate of candidates
for the other positions won all
but one post on the UGEQ executive.
Daniel Latouche of the University of Montreal succeeded
in defeating the slate's candidate for the post of vice-president for international affairs.
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1206 Granville
presenting
Don Crawford
Nightly
Latouche's victory is expected to result in an active
external policy for the union.
He favors UGEQ affiliation in
both the International Student
Conference and the International Union of Students.
only areas in Garibaldi Park
accessible to the general public.
The statements came after
Arthur Laing, Federal Minister of Northern Affairs and
Natural Resources, proposed
the joint federal-provincial
development of Garibaldi
Park at UBC, Oct. 28.
Laing said that as a federal
park, Garibaldi would receive
$5 million for development,
almost double the amount
spent annually by the provincial govenment on all B.C.
parks.
Soules said, "We are not
getting our share of federal
park expenditures on the
west coast."
VOC, with other lower
mainland outdoor clubs built
a trail to Cheakmus Lake,
in Garibaldi Park.
"The provincial government would be several years
getting trails into the same
area," said Soules.
VOC sent a brief of recommendations and suggestions
regarding provincial parks to
provincial Minister of Recreation and Conservation Ken
Keirnan in December, 1964.
"The Garibaldi Lake area,
with its spectacular but vulnerable beauty, is a region,
unsuited to intensive development, but other areas in
the park should be devoted
to different kinds of activity,"
Soules said.
Wordsworth said: "There
should be no commercial development by private interests within the park boundaries."
NOW
Oh4 SALE
THE     UNIVERSITY    OF
BRITISH    COLUMBIA
STUDENT  TELEPHONE  DIRECTORY
1965 - 1966
GET YOURS TODAY
Present Pre Sole Tickets To Publications
Office, Brock Hall
Cash Sales at Book Store
Publications Office, College Shop, etc.
THE CAUSE of all the trouble
at Totem park isn't unlocked
parking meters. It's not that
they're open, just that they're
there. Students don't like
the idea of paying five cents
to pick  up their dates.
Metered mall
maddens men
Who wants to pay five
cents to park a car while
picking up a date?
This is the situation at
Lower Mall and Totem Park
residences. Without any
warning, parking meters
have appeared in front of
the common blocks at both
residences.
The meters were placed
there by the buildings and
grounds department at the
orders of the Traffic Office
and without Housing's
knowledge.
The only advantage of the
meters is that they stop off-
campus cars parking there
for the day free.
Students have protested
by placing paper bags over
the meters, but these soon
disappeared.
(Sompanj |pmttrt>
CALGARY
Offers
Career Opportunities
to Graduates
in the fields of
• PROCESS & PRODUCTION ENGINERING - All Disciplines
B.Sc., M.Sc.
• PIPE LINE ENGINEERING - All Disciplines - B.Se.
• GEOLOGY — Honours, Majors, Geological Engineering
- B.Sc., M.Sc, Ph.D.
• GEOPHYICS —   Geophysis,   Geophysical   Engineering,
Geological Engineering — B.Sc.
• ACCOUNTING — Commerce, Accounting and Finance
Majors *» B.Comm.
INTERVIEWS
PRODUCTION - November 8, 9, 10.
PIPE LINE - November 18, 19
GEOLOGY - November 25, 26
GEOPHYSICS - November 25, 26
ACCOUNTING - November 25
UNDERGRADUATES
Summer training opportunities will be available to undergraduates in the following departments:
•  PRODUCTION   and   PIPE  LINE - All   engineering  disciplines, 3rd year and 2nd year.
•GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS - next to final year.
INTERVIEWS
GEOLOGY - November 25, 26
GEOPHYSICS - November 25, 26
ACCOUNTING - November 25
Appointments for interviews should be made through the
Placement Office. Thursday,   November  4,   1965
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
IN QUEBEC
Policy issues
left wide open
QUEBEC (CUP)—The congress of the Union Generate
des Etudiants du Quebec adjourned Nov. 1 without adopting
policy statements on the two most, controversial areas of
discussion:  education   and  international  policy.
The final session of the congress ended by referring remaining resolutions to the
union's co-ordinating committee when the departure of
numerous delegates caused the
loss of the assembly's quorum.t
The education resolutions,
passed in incomplete form by
a commission meeting Oct. 31,
will give headaches to the central committee.
Shifting majorities in the
commission had passed some
sections of the statement on
free education which favored
student salaries, as well as
other sections calling for bursaries instead.
Among the resolutions recommended by the international affairs commission was
a statement opposing "the American war against Vietnam"
and offering the hospitality of
Quebec students to young Americans refusing to be drafted.
Much of the debate in the
four-day congress of the Quebec student union centered on
internal and structural problems, as well as on their philosophy of student unionism.
A complex scheme of re-
gionalization was passed, affecting the union's many members
in classical colleges, technical
institutes and teachers' colleges. Following the boundaries
for school regions recently
adopted by the Quebec government, the union will set up 11
regional student associations
throughout the province.
DR. MACDONALD
. . . concerned
Married
students
housed?
New married student housing is rapidly becoming a
reality at UBC.
In a speech to student council Monday night, married students' housing committee chairman Jim Slater said UBC president John Macdonald has appointed a faculty-administration committee to plan a married student housing project.
At present there are no students on the committee, but
Slater said he hoped when the
architectural program was
being planned a student would
be appointed.
Slater said Dean of Graduate
Studies Ian McTaggart-Cowan
has stated 100 units each housing one family will be needed
by next September.
By next summer, 70 to 30
of the present Wesbrook units
will be torn down to make way
for the planned new medical
centre.
UBC bashes away
in private war
The first battle in UBC's private war against moths
has been won with the successful implementation of d,
mothodic plan to exterminate at least one of the enemy per
month.
I JUST CANT eat and look at
those hungry brown eyes at
the same time thinks Joe Student as he carefully avoids
looking at UBC's always-
hungry mascot Thunder.
Symposium
needs you
Fall Symposium needs at
least 30 more applicants.
Symposium chairman Larry
Cohen Wednesday said deadlines for applications to attend
was Tuesday.
"I expect 80 to 100 persons
to attend the symposium," he
said, "so far, 50 have signed
up."
Theme of this year's symposium, held Nov. 12 to 14 at
Rosario Beach, Washington, is
"Commitment and Beyond."
Cost of the weekend is $6.5.0.
Application forms are available
at the AMS office in Brock hall.
ANNUAL
BARNACLE  BALL
SEMI  FORMAL
3 BARS and DINNER
HMCS DISCOVERY - NOVEMBER 13th
9:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Tickets AMS and Armouries - $4.00 CPL
NATIONAL      RESEARCH      COUNCIL
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
1966
Applications and information booklets are now available in the
Placement Office and in Departments.
Please submit your applications by  15 November 1965 in order
to ensure fullest consideration.
to
EMPLOYMENT OFFICER,
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL,
OTTAWA 7, ONTARIO
This is the purpose outlined in the provisional constitution of SOMM SOC—"The
Stamp-Out Moths Methodically
Society."
The society has been formed: "To promote the destruction and ultimate elimination
of all moths and like undesirable   lepidoptera   on campus."
Membership is open to all
who are sincerely interested
and determined to kill a fixed
quota of moths per month.
At the close of the first general meeting in Bu. 100 at
noon, the membership reached
25.
The kill quota was set at one
moth a month to start.
Leigh Trafford, arts III, said
the quota was set low because:
"We are still amateurs."
Club disposal officer Chris
Dubetz Sc. I, says the quota
should be raised in a couple
of months after the members
have discovered some effective
killing methods.
Plans include organization
of major hate campaigns
against months brought in, and
the disposal of any and all
pro-moth  literature.
Special committees will
come into immediate effect if
a  crisis occurs.
A crisis is a large-scale invasion of the university endowment lands by moths. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4,  1965
HEY DAD, how come she has a run in her nylon? Obviously dad won't tell and neither
will we. But you can find out by attending the UBC drama student's presentation of
Eric Nichol's Her Scienceman Lover. All this week at noon at the Frederic Wood
Theatre.
DOCTORS  UPSET
Council knifes
medic program
Student   council   amputated   a   vital   pa^t   of   medical
science's research program Monday.
——— '      At least in the eyes of medi-
Special  events
loses  on  dance
The Special Events Committee lost $850 on the Tuesday night performance of the
Erick Hawkins Dance Company.
"Even with the good publicity only about 550 persons
attended," Special Events
chairman Murray Farr said
Wednesday.
"But," he said, "Special
Events will continue to have
artistic shows like this so
students will have the opportunity to see them."
"We are programed to take
continual losses like this
since we are not out to make
money.
"We lose $6,000 annually."
We are listed in
"BIRD  CALLS"
under  "FLORISTS"
STRATHCONA FLORAL CO.
5555  Weat   Blvd.
AM 1-7271
cine undergraduate president
Con Michas and Igor Grant
of the Medical Student Research   Society  it  did.
Grant wanted council to increase from $93.40 to over
$300 a grant to send delegates
to the west coast Medical
Student Research Day in Oregon in February.
A $300 grant would allow
eight students to attend.
AMS treasurer Mike Sommers said that he could not
balance his budget if people
tried to go over his head to
council.
Council discussed the situation of the medical students
but decided against the increase.
They first defeated a motion
by Michas to have the original
sum doubled to $186.00. They
then pased the original grant
of $93.40.    *
Grant said UBC was the
only university that consistently fails to send the standard number of representatives.
He said most schools send
a minimum of eight and usually 11 delegates a year.
"UBC has sent a total of
five people in the last three
years,"  he said.
U.B.C THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
3:00—5:00 pjn.
7:30—9:30 pjn.*»
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.*»
12:45—2:45 pjn.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*   Special student admission: 15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov. 19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION: Afternoons   —   Students .35*   Adults .60*
Evenings — Students .50* Adults .75*
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:  The  Centre will be closed  all day Christmas Day
and Good Friday.
For further information:  Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
FILM SOCIETY
Maltese Falcon with Humphrey Bogart today at noon, 3:30,
and 8 p.m. Auditorium. Admission 50 cents.
PRESENT THIS COUPON
and  receive from
PETERS
ICE CREAM PARLOR
3204 W. Broadway and Park   Royal
ONE SUNDAE
of Your Choice
at half price
GOOD UNTIL NOVEMBER 13. 1965
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Fall Symposium
Applications  are  available  in the AMS Office
Subject:    "Commitment and Beyond"
Place:    Rosario Beach, Anacortes, Washington
Time:    November 12, 13, 14.
Cost:    $6.50 all inclusive.
Deadline:    November 10th.
Plan now for an
EXCITING CAREER
in
COMMUNICATIONS
with
B.CJEL^
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
Nowhere on the continent are there greater rewards for
University graduates than in British Columbia. Register now
at your Student Placement Office for an interview with a
British Columbia Telephone Company representative and
discover the exciting and rewarding opportunities in the field
of communications.
Management training opportunities are available in:
ENGINEERING
MARKETING and SALES
DATA PROCESSING
GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Our interest is in graduates in Applied Science  (Electrical,
Mechanical and Engineering Physics); Commerce and Science
(Mathematics and Physics).
B.C.TEL
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY Thursday,   November  4,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
YOUR STUDENT COUNCIL IN - UH - ACTION
AMS PRESIDENT BYRON HENDER and secretary Joan Curtis wait with baited   breath for the word from document-pondering Bob Cruise, first vice-president.
FOURTH ESTATE, out in force, consists of Ubyssey editor Tom Wayman (left), who is
also non-voting member of council, and reporters Carole-Anne Baker and Doug Hal-
verson.
GUITAR-TOTING STUDENT is one of varying number of
visitors who come to council to watch or talk. Not all of
them bring guitars.
ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE PRESIDENT Art Stevenson   manages tp  look  bored  amid  bevy of friends visiting
council. Friends just look bored.
. . . AND LAW UNDERGRAD
president Peter Hyndman
wonders if that's really the
coffee wagon coming to
council's  relief. Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4,  1965
OPINION
Bud and Travis
make us blush
By BRUCE BENTON
Bud and Travis are returning to UBC for a repeat
performance — for free.
Why? Because the sound equipment in the armory
was so poor during their Saturday night performance that
few heard them.
They said Wednesday they
would give a benefit show
and the money taken in
would be used to start a fund
to buy new sound equipment
for UBC.
As a student I find this
rather embarrassing.
Why should entertainers
coming here have to donate
their talents to purchase
sound equipment?
This is something UBC
should already have.
When people come here to
entertain their purpose is defeated and our money is wasted if no one can hear them.
Prime Minister Pearson
could not be heard in the
gym,
The Three D's, the Freddy
Red Trio, and Sonny Terry
and Browniet McGee were
inaudible in Brock.
These people don't want
to perform where they cannot be heard, it's harmful
to   their  professional   image.
Brock, where most of these
functions are carried out, has
to    be    entirely    redone.
If UBC is going to continue
to have top talent entertaining here they are going to
have to provide better sound
equipment.
Peterson
urges help
for students
Education Minister Leslie
Peterson Tuesday night called
for Prime Minister Lester
Pearson to proceed immediately with the $5-per-capita
grant for higher education, as
recommended by the Bladen
report.
* •      •
He said there is no need for
further conferences on the report's recommendations. "What
is needed is action."
Peterson, speaking on behalf
of Bert Leboe, Social Credit
candidate in the Cariboo riding, said the B.C. government
acts quickly on recommendations it receives.
• •      •
He said B.C. already had
promised to implement all recommendations by the royal
commission on workmen's compensation, even though the
final report still is to be submitted.
This Year's
GRAD BOOK
. . . will be a combination of "campus life" and the grad
edition.
. . . 300 picture-packed pages in a hard board cover.
. . . advance orders receive an 8-page graduation supplement of your graduation ceremonies—mailed to YOU
in June.
. . . all this is yours for only $5.00
CAMPUS LIFE . . .
... 1 44 pages of you and your campus.
. . . photos and photo essays with a record of events as
they happen.
. . • for undergrads - only $2.00
BUY YOUR TOTEM NOW
Avoid disappointment
At AMS business office and totem office BE 168
You can't beat
the taste oS
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes.
Life Is Short!
Fulfill Your Ambitions!
Relieve Your Frustrations!
Here's an Opportunity For You to Meet,
Hear and Experience Other Lands;
Meet Our International Classmates.
Let Them Meet You.
Like further Brotherhood, Man.
Peace Marchers Welcomed, Too!
i
8th ANNUAL
INTERNATIONAL
FALL FAIR
November 5 & 6
UBC ARMOURIES
STUDENTS $1.00 Thursday,   November  4,   1965
THE
UBYSSEY
Page  11
THE
FRAT
RAT
Gordon Taylor is The Ubyssey's own, live fraternity
columnist with all sorts inside dope on fraternity scandals,  (sometimes.)
Who says fraternity life is
all parties and no exercise.
The Inter-fraternity Council has come up with an idea
to keep fraternity pledges in
shape.
Realizing that running is
a good form of exercise, it
has decided that all 250 of us
should have a chance to improve our physical condition.
So today, we run.
At 12:45 pjn. there will
be a mob heading out of the
stadium. The object is to pass
the runner ahead. And finish.
• •     •
The route alone indicates
the thoroughness of IFC's
planning.
First all of us crowd into
the stadium and then leave
through the narrow exit at
the same time.
A' few are bound to be
ground into the dust.
IThat's good for our character. It teaches us humility.
After rounding the corner
of the home ec. building, we
head for the Ponderosa.
• •     •
The Ponderosa — food. But
it's best, they tell us, to run
on an empty stomach.
At Agronomy Road we
head east. Wesbrooke Crescent is the half way point.
Half the distance covered and
I'll be more than one-half
dead. I'm thinking of taking
a break here.
But no, must push on —
for the good of the fraternity
and all that.
Past the Patrol office and
down the wooded path to
Brock only yards to go now.
The stadium is in sight.
But first I must past Brock.
Who says coffee isn't the substance of a student's life?
Right now I could use one
cup black and a new pair of
legs.
HEE, HUM,   HO
Battle of words
erupts in Brock
The battle of promises shook
Brock Hall Tuesday noon at
Circle K's all-party political
forum.
All parties were invited and
were represented except the
Progressive Conservative Party.
On Medicare, Dr. Pat McGeer, Liberal, said, "Experts
will introduce a national
scheme by 1967." He also said,
"Health care is a provincial responsibility and therefore negotiation with the provinces is
necessary."
Dennis O'Sullivan, Social
Credit, said, "Naturally we are
for medicare but we must ensure that medicare does not become a bottomless bucket of
waste."
William Stewart, Communist
candidate for Vancouver South,
said there is considerable evidence building up that if the
Liberals are elected they intend
to scuttle the medicare program. He also felt that the Liberals should have introduced
medicare before going to the
public.
Ray Parkinson, NDP running
in Vancouver Burrard, said
medicare is one of the prime
things that he has been fighting for from the beginning of
the campaign. The Hall Report
he called ideal because it could
be implemented fairly quickly.
Talking about the Quebec
activity said, "All we are having is a family adjustment and
the Trench are only fighting
for economic dominance in
Quebec."
Stewart said he views the
crisis of national unity quite
seriously. Quebec is not a province among ten, but a nation
among two nations.
Parkinson called the Quebec
premier "a fine man, trying to
lead the people of Quebec out
of the barricade they have
faced for years." Parkinson
also said we must recognize
the right of French Canadians
to be master in their own
house.
McGeer said, "Everyone in
Canada probably agrees that
federal aid to education in Canada is necessary. But aid
to education must be tied to the
provinces, as education is a
provincial responsibility."
VOTE
as you please, but please vote
on November 8, 1965
Vote now
for      CONSERVATIVE      prices
with   LIBERAL trade-in allowance
or
N.D.P.
(that's no down payment, Charlie)
and use       SOCIAL   CREDIT      security
with the purchase of a new Volvo or a good used car
at bank interest rates from
VANCOUVER VOLVO SALES
1090 W. Georgia   St. MU 2-4708
or 1080 Marine Dr., N. Van. YU 7-4458
Acorns poetry
is  proletarian
The proletarian poet of
Canada, Milton Acorn, will
give a reading of his new
work noon today in Bu.
217.
He earned his title as
'proletarian poet' for out-
spokeness in expressing his
political interests in his poetry.
11
IT   YOURSELF   WITH
ft     SHELF
SPACERS
"modular
ITS EASY TO BUILD
YOUR OWN
BOOKSHELVES —
ROOM
DIVIDERS —
COFFEE
TABLES —
OCCASIONAL
TABLES —
OFFICE STORAGE UNITS.
You simply drill 3/t" holes in the shelving and assemble by hand as
the spacers screw into each other—no screws, nails or other hardware required.
Precision turned of solid oak. Will take true stain of Mahogany,
Walnut, Teak, etc.
A wide range of lengths at low cost to create a thousand fresh ideas
for the modern home.
Ben's Carpet Centre Ltd.
Cor. 4th & Burrard RE  1-8913
If you can help
us move faster
we need you
(An open letter
to '66 grads)
Northern Electric is moving faster today than any self-
respecting'70:year-old should. Away back in the late 1800's,
before autos or airplanes, or radio, or television were invented, a few men started a business that later grew into
Northern Electric. For years we relied upon American
sources for most of our technical development. But back in
1958 a rather disturbing thing occurred: Linus threw away his
blanket. Northern began to do her own research and development: began to plan aggressively for technological change
and an active penetration into world markets.
The last seven years have been exciting ones. A new air
has permeated the atmosphere at Northern and developments are taking place that present a challenge in every
sphere of our activity. To meet this challenge we need university grads—top-notch university grads!
We need engineers—electricals and mechanicals especially, but we've room for civils, metallurgicals and chemicals. None of our departments has asked for a mining or
forestry man yet, but don't bet on it!
We need B.Comm.'s—mostly for accounting and business
administration, but our Marketing Division, International
Operations and Wage Practices are always coming up with
requirements for a good B.Comm.
We need B.Sc.'s—not only honors grads, but those majoring in chemistry, maths, physics and related disciplines.
We need B.A.'s—in a wide variety of areas:—For sociological and economic studies, personnel work, public relations, training programs.
And because we're pushing into so many experimental
areas, we need Master's and Ph.D.'s, people who can spearhead the attack on the more complex problems that face us.
If you want to become part of Northern's exciting future,
see your Placement Officer. He'll give you more detailed
information and arrange an interview for you with one of our
recruiters who will be on campus in three weeks.
Northern Electric
COMPANY LIMITED
3 Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 4,  1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Indianapolis re-lived
SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting noon today
in Chem. 250. 1965 Indy film,
1955 Belgian Grand Prix. Economy run, Sunday, 8 a.m. at
B.A.^Station, N.E. Marine &
Gilley. Includes three laps at
Westwood.
• •      •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK  CLUB
Field trip to Willingdon
leaves noon today from Graduate. Centre.
• •      •
STUDENT CUBAN
FRIENDSHIP  COMMITTEE
Dr. J. Lindsay, recently arrived from Cuba speaks and
shows slides noon today Bu.
102. *      •      •
DESERET CLUB
Tape recorded speaker Hugh
B. Brown, Profile of a Prophet
noon today in Bu. 2205.
• •      •
CUSO — S.C.M.
The Rev. Walter Maclean
(volunteer co-ordinator for
West Africa) will talk noon today in Bu. 220 on Student volunteers overseas. All welcome.
• •      •
SAILING CLUB
General meeting noon today
Bu. 203.
• •      •
ISIS, ISTC
Meeting today noon in Bu.
202 for those interested in taking a job abroad next summer.
CLASSICAL GUITAR
Tuition   up   to   Advanced
Level   -   Segovia Technique
W. PARKER
Recltaliat. 682-1096
BAY
Starts Tomorrow
TAKE HER, SHE'S MINE
James Stewart, Sandra Dee
Plus
YOUNG BLOOD HAWK
James Franciscus
Suzanne Pleshette
Student rate 75c
DELTA
Starts Tomorrow
THE RAIDERS
Robert Culp, Brian Keith
Plus
THE LIVELY SET
James Darren, Pamela Tiffin
UBC MUSIC DEPT.
Wind ensemble concert Friday 8:00, Brock Hall. Music of
Shostakovich, Franck, Rimsky-
Korsakoff. Free.
• •      •
LATTER-DAY SAINTS
CHURCH
Deseret club meeting to be
held noon Thursdays in Bu.
2205.
• •      •
POETRY READING
Milton Acorn reads noon today in Bu. 217.
• •      •
GERMAN DEPARTMENT
Free film today in Bu. 102.
Buddenbrooks. In German.
UBC SOCREDS
Coffee party Friday noon in
Brock Hall with Lower Mainland Socred candidates.
• •      •
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Special return buses to Diefenbaker   speech   leave   Brock
Friday 11:30.
VCF *      *      *
Informal sandwich supper
tonight 5:30 to 7:00 in Mildred
Brock. Speaker Cathie Nicoll.
All welcome.
* •      *
UN CLUB
Professor Kuicek speaks
noon today on The Rhodesian
Crisis.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
 Publications  Office:  Brock   Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost fc Found
11
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publica-
Uona office. Brock Hall. Local 2«,
124-1242.
IP YOU PLAY BANJO OR BASS
and you want to form Folk Group,
phone  TE 4-5328.
ONE COPY REPRESENTATIVE
Cordates, Weichert. Phone Wayne.
224-7230.
POUND — Keys with Tab Quebec
7B0996. Claim at Publications
Office,  Brock Hall.
LOST — SATURDAY NIGHT ON
Campus, Gold Waltham Watch,
engraved R. Kocher. 988-7003.
Reward.   Sentimental  value.
LOST — LONDON-FOG Rain Coat,
Blue-black zipper inside for lining-
glasses in pocket. Phone Russ,
AM 1-7390 evenings. Lost at Field
House   (Homecoming).
LOST — "MAMOR" CHEMISTRY
Text book in Chemistry Bldg.,
Thursday, Oct. 28. Phone RE 3-5654
after  6  p.m.
LOST — GREEN JADE RING, 18
carat gold setting. Maybe in vie.
of Henry Angus. Keepsake. Reward.   Phone   Pauline,   733-3803.
piuiigus ^
»< < inborn!
tonight!!!!
res. 731-0722
5
]azz   ai   she   blue 5
horn-3625 w.bwy
FOUND — 2 WHITE SHIRTS, 1
green wool scarf, on Wesbrook.
Phone  224-3714.
DOST — SET OP KEYS, probably
between Graduate Centre and
Buchanan. Tagged name Jonkel.
Call   266-4672.
FOUND - IN FREDERIC "WOOD
Theatre. Wednesday morning, 10.20
a.m., black-rimmed glasses in
black case. Call at Ubyssey Publications Office,  Brock Hall.
AUTOMOTIVE   fc MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE. 1956 Pontiac, 4-dr. sed.,
6-cyl., std., real good condition.
Phone Ken  at  224-7230  after  5.00.
'53 HILLMiAN in good condition.
Ask for Bob at 224-1570 after 7.00.
p.m.
1960   VW   DELUXE,    excel,   cond.,
$875. TR 9-3649.
'56 PONTIAC 2 DR. HARDTP V8,
radio, auto, excellent condition.
Phone  Alex  after  6,   TR 6-1811.
MUST SELL, '61 RENAULT GOR-
DINI, goad cond., $450. Phone
Brian Bruser,  224-9001.
1962 MORRIS MINI MINOR, perf.
cond., $850. AM 6-8037. Perfect
cond. inside and out.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters * Repairs
42
Special Notices
13
THE FABULOUS MR. BARRY,
hypnotist exceptional. One more
hilarious show. Fri., Nov. 5, To-
tem Park,  at 8:30 p.m.  	
GOT A CAMEL you want saddled?
A wife you want lead? Need a gift
for your dog or mom? Try Treasure Van — all week long in International House — 12 p.m.  on.
TWO SEATS available on charter
to Europe at Xmas. Phone Susan
224-5332 or Mrs. Smith 681-8581.
3 weeks; leaving Dec. 19, $350.00
return.
'TWIRP DANCE (the lady is requested to pay), Nov. 6, Dance
Lounge, 8-12 p.m. 50c per person,
$1.00  per  couple.
INFORMATION ON WORKING &
Studying Abroad. Available Canadian Union of Students Office,
B.E. 258. This includes: Work
camps, summer trainees, camp
counsellors, care of children, and
summer courses  at universities.
WILL DINO GAIN SUPPORT OF
THE ATHLETES? IF NOT BEWARE   OF   RAMPAGING   DINO.
EXTRAVAGANZA STAGE SHOWS
feature Song & Dance from Exotic
Lands at Fall Fair '65. No'-. 5. 6,
Armouries. Tickets AMS Office or
Int'l House.
Transportation
14
STAFF REQUIRES RIDES, 2nd and
Larch. "A" lot preferred. Call
Irene   after   5:30   p.m.   RE   6-9350.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8.30 Classes
from Area around Crystal Pool.
Phone Pat, 681-2665.
RIDE~WANTED TO CAMPUS from
vicinity 14th Ave. & Discovery St.,
Mon. to Fri. to arrive by 9 a.m.
Phone Local 2885, 9 a.m. to 12
noon, or 224-4823 after, or eves.
Mrs. Newton.
URGENTLY NEEDED, RIDE from
West End for 8.30's. Ph. 224-5556
after 6  p.m.,  Gary.	
RIDE WANTED from Lynn Vallev.
M.W.F. Call Maureeta at 922-5507.
RIDERS for carpool wanted. 4th and
Blenheim, 8:30 to 5:30. Mon. to
Fri. Stay out 4 nights per week.
Call Bob,  733-3290, leave message.
RIDE wanted from Lynn Valley.
M. W. F. Call Maureeta at
922-5507.
Wanted
15
INTERIOR TEACHER NEEDS History 201 notes for Winter Sup.
Buy or Rent.  Call 874-7173  eves.
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
TYPING OF ALL KINDS DONE
at Home. Call AM 1-8887 after 5.30
ask for Miss Garland or Miss
Elliot.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LIMITED,
70th and Granville. Phone 263-4530.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
tl
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at the
Pizfca Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and West Van.
PS:   New  outlet   coming   close   to
U.B.C.
COMMISSION AGENT TO SELL
Charter and Group Bus Trips —
phone MU 1-7545,  Mr. Parke.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS^THE MOST USE-
ful book on the campus. Student
telephone directory. Now available. Limited number. Buy Your's
Today—Only  75c.	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you have a good
driving history you qualify for
Allstate Insurance's good driver
rates.   Call   Ted.   Elliott,   224-6707.
BALL   AND   CHAINS!    15-45   LBS.
from $7.95. AM 6-2869 after 6 p.m.
Rooms
81
ROOM AND BREAFAST FOR ONE
girl, preferably Senior Student, to
share a house with 3 other girls.
14th and Alma. Phone 224-3692.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR THREE,
one block from gates.  Phone  224-
6084.
Furn. Homes & Apts.
83
$75 PER MONTH, NORTH VAN-
couver. Can accommodate 3-4, will
also sell furniture and household
equipment.   Phone   987-6914.
'#■#
FALL SYMPOSIUM:
"Commitment and Beyond
NOVEMBER 12,  13,  14
-Rosario Beach, Anacortes, Wash.
$6.50 ALL INCLUSIVE
Apply at A.M.S. Office Before Nov. TO.
Information available gt 224-4044 — 5.00-7.00 p.m.
Union Carbide Canada Limited
Interviews for 1966 graduates
Monday November 15
Tuesday November 16
Wednesday November 17
Thursday -November 18
Friday November  19
Complete Descriptions of Positions at the
Placement Office.
Our Representatives: G. W. HATFIELD and G. E. BROWN
HEAR
DIEF
11 il
• • • •
John  Diefenbaker climaxes an historic election
campaign in a major rally
FRIDAY NOON
at the
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
A warm invitation is extended to all UBC students
FREE TRANSPORTATION:
SPECIAL RETURN BUSSES
LEAVE BROCK
11:30 A.M. FRIDAY

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