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The Ubyssey Sep 9, 1975

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Array Wreck UBC fee ends in September '76
Students will again this year pay
for their extracurricular athletic
activities administrated by
Recreation UBC, but the board of
governors has agreed to absorb the
costs next year.
The fee, first levied in 1972, will
again be $5 and includes the use of
UBC gyms and sport facilities and
instruction in activities.
But the program and the fee
have been unpopular since introduced because recreational
facilities were free of costs to
students until 1972.
A prepared news release said the
decision to stop the fee next year
was  taken  at  a  Sept.   2  board
meeting, but did not say why the
move was made.
Board        members were
unavailable for comment Monday.
But the decision surprised at
least one member of the program
who was expecting the board to
fund Rec UBC this year.
"We didn't expect to have to run
the program again this year," said
program co-ordinator Ed Gautschi, who made the now famous
statement that only serious
athletes were wanted in the
program two years ago.
"We don't have the cards ready
or anything."
A committee of which Bob
Osborne, physical education school
director, was chairman recommended in August that the board
fund Rec UBC.
The news release from the board
said the board cannot finance the
program this year because "the
budget allotments had already
been made."
Jake van der-Kamp, Alma Mater
Society president, said he hopes
the end of fees will lead to more
healthy students.
"It provides for wider use of
more facilities by a larger number
of people," said van der Kamp, a
well-known bonerack and  heavy
smoker of rollies. "The general
level of fitness will go up."
He also said he would use the
circuit once the training program
was free.
(But AMS presidents rarely
complete their academic years and
are sometimes refused read-
mission to UBC.)
"It's a good way to start the year
off," said van der Kamp. "I hope
there is a fairly large publicity
campaign so first-year students
will know what they can do."
He said most of the credit for the
change should gp to the physical
education school. Physed students
were most affected by the $5 fee
because they needed extracurricular gym time to practise for
their classes.
"They worked hard for it," said
van der Kamp. "That's commendable."
The program runs from 8:30
a.m. to 11:30 p.m. daily and includes instruction in tennis,
swimming, figure skating, golf,
yoga and weightlifting and keep-fit
classes for men and women.
About 500 professors and 2,800
students belonged last year.
The board's news release did not
say if professors would continue to
pay a fee next year.
THE UBYSSEY
Dailly asks for
residence $$$
LACK OF DIRECTION hits epidemic proportions during registration
week and first week of classes. Only known antidotes to first-week
—marise savaria photo
fever is friendly point of finger or peak in registration guide produced
by administration to avert complete confusion.
BoG fo build $4.7m pool in steps
The university board of governors voted Sept. 2 to begin construction on the First stage of the
planned $4.7 million covered pool,
even though the university has
obtained less than half the funding
needed.
Key to the decision was the pool
planning co-ordinating committee's recommendation that the
pool be contracted and built in
stages as money becomes
available.
This reverses a July 4 board
decision to hold off calling tenders
until board members were sure all
the money needed to complete the
pool was forthcoming.
The board vote may commit the
university administration to
contributing money for the completion of the pool if the money
cannot be raised through other
sources.
At the most recent board
meeting, board member and
economics professor Gideon
Rosenbluth said, "once Stage I is
built there will be irresistible
pressure to complete the project."
He said it wouldn't even be such
a bad idea to use money from the
academic building fund to finish
the pool, if it proved necessary.
However, administration
president Doug Kenny denied
Monday that the university had
committed itself to finishing the
pool. He said he was optimistic
funds to complete the pool could be
raised through the public and
federal and provincial grants.
"I have a bit of (Montreal)
mayor Jean Drapeau's bungling
optimism," he said.
He labelled as "idle speculation"
the suggestion that the university
could end up paying for completion
of the pool with academic building
fund monies.
However, in the Monday issue of
UBC Reports, the administration
public relations newspaper issued
the same day as Kenny's
statement, an article on the pool
said, "While Stage I is under way
the fund drive will continue, additional contributions will be
sought from the federal and
provincial governments, and the
university expects to be able to
make a further contribution."
Current cost estimate for the
pool is $4.7 million, of which the
university has raised $925,000 in
student money, $925,000 from the
administration and $333,333 from a
provincial government Community Recreation grant.
The community recreation grant
is contingent upon the university
raising the rest of the money
needed for the pool.
But Alfred Adams, executive
secretary of the Resource Council,
UBC's fund raising organ, said an
official in the recreation department which awarded  the grant
indicated to him recently that the
proviso was a formality in UBC's
case.
Doug Aldridge, planning coordinating committee member,
said, "if UBC decides to tender
then I think that would be good
enough (indication that UBC is
serious about building the pool) for
the B.C. government. The real
concern is that it will be tendered."
Adams said the university hopes
to obtain $1.6 million from  the
federal Winter Works program, a
$300,000 B.C. Physical Resources
See page 9: POOL
By .MARK BUCKSHON
and MARCUS GEE
Education minister Eileen Dailly
said Monday she is approaching
the federal government for funds
to build new residences on B.C.
campuses.
She talked with The Ubyssey
from Regina, Sask., as more than
2,000 UBC students continue
searching for a place to live in the
worst housing crisis in years.
Dailly, in Saskatchewan for the
Canadian Ministers of Education
Conference, said residences aren't
being built because of a lack of
interest on the part of the federal
government and its. Central
Mortgage and Housing Corp.
But B.C. Universities Council
chairman William Armstrong, who
urged Dailly to take action on
several occasions this summer
said Monday residences won't be
built unless university administrators ask for them.
"The problem is, none of the
universities have set housing as
their highest priority," Armstrong
said.
"Unless universities say it is a
high priority, there's not going to
be a great deal done about it."
(UBC administration president
Doug Kenny, in an August sparring
match with mayor Art Phillips,
said the university doesn't have
funds for student housing and plans
no' action on building new student
residences in the immediate
future.)
See page 2: STUDENTS
Hullo from
The Ubyssey
This is The Ubyssey, the campus
newspaper.
Michael Sasges, in a story on
page 5, recounts the 57-year history
of The Ubyssey.
You can become part of that
history by joining the staff. If you
are interested in being a news
reporter, sports reporter,
photographer or cartoonist, come
up and see us in SUB 241K.
We also need a copy runner.
Unlike the aforementioned occupations, a copy runner gets paid a
little bit. For more information,
see page 18.
And watch this space for an
announcement on a lunchtime
beerfest in the Ubyssey office,
coming up real soon!
Gridders snap win drought
ByJEDANDZEKE
Does anyone believe this? Not
likely.
Is it fair to tell them? Given the
shell-shocked expressions on some
of the students on campus during
the last hectic week, it could be too
much for their psyches to take
after endless hours of queueing,
approvals, disapprovals, referrals,
deferrals, and bleary-eyed
rescheduling work done on paper
already six times erased.
However:
Hear ye, hear ye, all puissant
ones  and  peasantry  assembled:
The UBC Thunderbird football
team, with no help from either
Divine Providence or Frank Gnup
(they may be the same),
demolished the University of
Manitoba Bisons 38-7 before 1,200
See page 12: SHOCK Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1975
Students 'nix' listed housing
From page 1
At UBC, about 100 students
Monday added their names to the
list of those seeking accommodation through the student-
operated off-campus housing
service.
Manager Dave Johnson said an
approximately equal number of
new listings are coming in every
day, but the accommodation offered is not what students want.
Students who can find a place
often are moving into substandard
accommodation or are paying rent
increases of as much as 100 per
cent over last year's level —
despite the 10.6 per cent rent
freeze.
In the telephone interview,
Dailly said "student housing is a
particular concern to B.C." and
said she has met with provincial
housing minister Lome Nicolson to
work out arrangements for new
residence construction.
"Up to now the department of
housing of the federal government
has put student housing at a very
low priority," she said.
Dailly said she approached
CMHC through the federal housing
minister's office.
A senior CMHC official said from
Ottawa that Dailly's correspondence is being considered by officials in the corporation's policy
and program branches.
Robert Admanson, special advisor to CMHC's president, indicated policy changes are possible
but said he wouldn't be able to
comment on any changes because
"ordinarily the prime minister is
the one who would make any announcements."
Admanson said Dailly did not
specify in her correspondence with
CMHC how much money she feels
is needed or how many residence
units she would like built.
UBC administration housing
director Leslie Rohringer and
housing  minister  Nicolson  could
not be reached for comment
Monday on the Dailly statements.
Universities Council chairman
Armstrong said off-campus
housing services (which the
council helped fund) are "band-
aid" solutions which don't solve the
real problem.
He emphasized that the federal
government will have to provide
most of the funds if new student
housing is to be constructed, and
said new projects would have to be
considered in perspective with
other community needs.
He also said proposals to build
new residences "depend a good
deal on the provincial economy."
But Armstrong said precedents
have been set for provincial
housing department involvement
in university residence construction, as the B.C. Housing
Management Commission (a
provincial,    organization)     is
responsible for some community
college residences.
"I've talked on many occasions
with the provincial government
(about student housing)," Armstrong said.
"But many people feel housing is
a community problem not just a
university problem."
Alma Mater Society president
Jake van der Kamp said he was
pleased to see Dailly taking action
to get student housing.
"This (residence) is one of the
things the student population has
wanted out here for some time."
Meanwhile, housing service
manager Johnson blamed the
present housing crisis on unfair
zoning by-laws, the destruction of
many housing units previously
occupied by students, and an influx
of 80,000 new residents to Vancouver this year.
"The housing situation is worse
this year from a student standpoint
since he or she has to compete with
newcomers," Johnson said.
Johnson said he and the other
AMS housing committee members
think city by-laws which prohibit
more than two boarders in private
neighborhoods should be revoked.
Johnson said students also have
been hurt by the conversion of
many housing units in Kitsilano to
condominiums and high rise
apartments which students can't
afford.
In other housing matters, a UBC
plan to rent downtown hotel rooms
for student accommodation has
failed to attract interest.
Johnson said only a few students
have taken rooms at the Sands
Motor Hotel, which offered space
on two floors after an appeal for
housing by the UBC administration.
Housing director Rohringer said
earlier this summer all ideas from
his office to solve the housing crisis
failed because of inadequate funds.
This year, residence accommodation rent increases were
limited to 10.6 per cent, in accordance with the Landlord and
Tenant Act.
The university was forced to
reduce its planned increases of 15.7
per cent for Gage Towers, 19.8 per
cent for Place Vanier and 21.2 per
cent for Totem Park after the
provincial government rejected
UBC's application for exemption
from rent ceilings.
A few vacancies remain in some
UBC residences because of what
officials said was the
discouragingly long, 2,000-name,
waiting list which causes students
to think attending the daily room
allocation call is hopeless.
Make Your Christmas
LONDON
December 11 - January 8              $359.00
Flight Booking
s Now!
December 17 - January 7             $377.00
TORONTO
December 18 - January 1              $379.00
December 21 - January 6
$179.00
December 21 - January 5             $379.00
SYDNEY. AUSTRALIA
December 23 - January 9              $379.00
Additional Dates Available
December 17 - January 5
$758.00
*Plus $8.00 government transportation tax.
A^nf^cJ^
ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT COUNCILS
drp!MMr^
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
Sr        ^S^Z*r^^^
224-0111
Happy 10th Anniversary
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY
L
You are invited to a series of lectures on "The Future of Education
at Simon Fraser University Theatre.
WED., SEPT. 10
2:30 p.m. — Dr. A. Corry of Queen's University
8:00 p.m. - Dr. P. Larkin of U.B.C.
THURS., SEPT. 11
2:30  p.m. - Dr.  R.  H. T.  Edwards of the Royal Postgraduate Medical
School, University of London
FRIDAY, SEPT. 12
2:30 p.m. — Dr. J. Eayrs of the University of Toronto
8:00 p.m.  - Dr. W. A. S. Smith,  Dean of Arts, S.F.U. will moderate a
seminar of the above speakers
yy
J Tuesday, September 9, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Data centre moved to C-lot
One of UBC's parking lots has
been chosen for the site of the new
library data* processing centre,
allowing Brock Hall to remain the
haunt of creative writers and
studying students.
Brock Hall was chosen as the site
last March but at a Sept. 2 meeting
the board of governors voted to
locate the centre at the north end of
C-lot, between Woodward Library
and East Mall.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs said Monday he is satisfied
with the new site. "It's not as
convenient (as the Brock site) but
of the somewhat remote sites
studied it's the best."
Stubbs said it is a five-minute
walk between the C-lot site and the
main library and library staff will
commute regularly between the
library and the centre.
Alma Mater Society president
Jake van der Kamp Monday
praised the administration's
handling of the site choice.
"As far as I'm concerned (the C-
lot location) is much better
because it avoids space here in the
central core of the campus.
They're putting the building where
it is more appropriate.
"The administration is setting a
precedent for keeping buildings out
of the central core of the campus.
It's a clear way of coming out
heavily and saying there's no sites
for buildings in the central core
any more."
He said students were able to
exert    pressure    on    the    ad-
Aid cuts stay—Clarke
A student delegation to Victoria
Monday failed to convince
provincial education department
bureaucrats that last summer's
tightening of loan and bursary
grants should be revised.
Dean Clarke, co-ordinator of
student services for the education
department, said he was not
convinced by B.C. Students'
Federation representatives that
new financial aid restrictions
should be loosened.
UBC financial aid officer Byron
Hender said Monday the new
restrictions, which require
students to save an increased
amount of money in the summer
and for the first time account for
private assets, are resulting in a
doubling of the number of loan and
bursary appeals from last year.
And while the students met in
Victoria, Education Minister
Eileen Dailly and her deputy Jack
Fleming arrived in Regina for a
conference which could result in
long-range student aid policy
decisions.
BCSF representatives Mark
Jarvis, Glen MacKenzie and Ian
Booth were travelling late Monday
and could not be reached for
comment about the Victoria
meeting.
But Clarke admitted the
students' request for revisions in
the restrictions was denied.
He said students can bring individual cases of discrimination or
hardship to his department's attention, and if their complaints are
reasonable, the education
department will change its policy
affecting the individual or group of
individuals.
When asked what was achieved
during the meeting, Clarke answered: "One thing I hope we did
establish is that we are willing as
far as the student service branch is
concerned to meet with students."
Monday's meeting was the
second between Clarke, other
student services branch officials,
and BCSF representatives.
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator
Lake Sagaris, who attended the
first meeting in late July, said last
week the meeting failed to achieve
anything substantial because
student services branch officials
claimed they could not make high-
level policy decisions.
Clarke said he "wasn't aware"
of the Regina conference of
education ministers, where
federal-provincial student aid
programs will be discussed.
In a telephone interview Monday, Dailly declined to discuss
details about what proposals or
demands she would make to the
other education ministers.
A federal-provincial task force
on student aid is privately
preparing revisions' in student aid
programs, which could result in
students having to pay a greater
proportion of education costs by
getting between $10,000 and $15,000
in loans rather than subsidized
tuition.
Student representatives have
been barred from task force
discussions.
Sagaris said students want to
have membership on a provincial
committee to decide aid policies,
but she said the provincial
government hasn't responded to
their requests.
Hender said students who own
assets such as real estate, expensive cars or stocks are for the
first time being penalized by the
student aid program.
He also said women students are
being treated equally as men for
the first time in that their expected
summer savings are being
calculated at $720 rather than $480
as last year.
Clarke said the lower earnings
expectations for women amounted
to a "reverse discrimination"
because women are able to earn a.
same minimum wage as men.
ministration to locate the centre
outside the campus core.
The centre's planning coordinating committee recommended in March that the board of
governors have Brock Hall
renovated to house the data
processing centre.
The recommendation followed
protests by some students and
faculty, members against the
committee's original proposal to
put the building in SUB green
space south of Brock.
A main contention of the
protestors was that the SUB site
contravened a contract between
the administration and the AMS.
The contract provides that no
structure may be built if it is
planned fof SUB property, if .it
obstructs major traffic routes to
and from SUB or if it clashes with
SUB's architectural design.
"If it weren't for the SUB
agreement the protest would have
been somewhat less effective,"
van der Kamp said.
"But the administration were the
ones that really stopped the Brock
thing," he added.
After the planning co-ordinating
committee recommended
renovation of Brock to house the
centre, then-administration
president Walter Gage objected to
the Brock site proposal and ordered the president's ad hoc space
review committee to study the
proposal.
The three-member committee
recommended against the Brock
site for two reasons, committee
member James Kennedy said
Monday.
Not only would the centre
displace services which could not
readily be accommodated
elsewhere on campus, but the
building        doesn't require
renovating to continue its current
operation, Kennedy said.
Physical plant's planning
committee was then instructed to
study alternative campus sites for
the centre.
Eight sites, all but one south of
University Boulevard, were
studied, and the committee
recommended the C-lot site.
si .^m^m ^ ^S^^^S^-
—manse savaria photo
THEY START THE DREARY TREK, winding around, walking patiently to where they pay homage to U.S.
publishing houses. If they don't pay now, they'll pay later, when the bibles are not to be found and they
need them to earn credit to escape his grip.
AAAS decides Pit rates Wed.
McCorkle sings goodbye
After a year of raging controversy in the music department,
controversial head Donald McCorkle has resigned.
McCorkle, who was attacked
throughout the 1973-74 academic
year by faculty and students
protesting his autocratic manner
of running the department, took a
four-month leave of absence last
September.
The purpose of the leave was to
relieve tension in the department
which at one point threatened to
spill over into the courts over
alleged remarks made by McCorkle in a memo to faculty.
Administration president Doug
Kenny said Monday McCorkle
submitted his resignation to the
board of governors in the summer
and it was accepted. McCorkle will
continue to teach in the department.
"He said he wished to devote full
time to his own personal
scholarship," Kenny said.
Accusations of "aloof" and
"arrogant" were commonly used
in the department to describe
McCorkle's administration. While
some professors thought at the
time that he had initiated some
valuable programs and had
developed a good grad program,
his manner in running the
department was brought into
serious question.
George Austin, then chairman of
the music undergraduate society's
aims, policies and grievances
committee, issued an ultimatum to
McCorkle in March 1974 to either
publicly apologize for remarks
made about him in a faculty memo
or back them up in court. No court
action was ever taken.
After his leave was announced,
McCorkle told The Ubyssey he was
on a contract to write a book.
"I will be back," he told a
reporter at the time.
Pit beer prices and employee
wages for the coming year will be
set by the Alma Mater Society's
finance committee this Wednesday.
Pit manager Dave Foster said
Monday he has been directed by
the AMS administration to
maintain higher prices and wages
until Wednesday's open meeting.
During the summer, prices in the
Pit are usually increased to offset a
decrease in business. In addition,
students are employed for the
summer in the Pit at slightly
higher wages.
At the beginning of this summer
the price of draught beer increased
to $2.10 a jug from $1.80, with
bottled beer going to 60 cents from
45. Because of beer distributors'
labor problem, bottled beer is
currently not available in the Pit.
Earlier the AMS finance committee voted to cut back Pit and
information booth salaries to their
pre-summer low of $2.50 an hour,
an unpopular move which prompted 15 of those affected to attend
last Wednesday's AMS council
meeting.
Although the matter was never
fully discussed at council, the
finance committee apparently
thought the price of beer could be
lowered by cutting employee
salaries.
One of the students speaking for
the group protesting the cutbacks
said continuity and good spirit are
an important part of working in the
Pit. He said the chances of staff
theft increases when people are
working for a "starvation wage."
"You'll have a lot of people
quitting and there could be some
Kenny plans UBC forum
Administration president Doug
Kenny is planning a series of
meetings, seminars,and forums
"to help inform the university
community and the public of the
aims, problems and aspirations of
UBC."
In an Aug. 29 open letter to the
university and the community,
Kenny said he and other administration members will discuss
the basic purposes of UBC, its
relation to society and its internal
function and organization during a
series of public seminars to be
called The University Today.
Kenny also said a semi-annual
Open Forum will be instituted at
UBC with the first forum slated for
late fall and another for the spring.
". . .The general public will be
invited and offered the opportunity
both to learn more about the
university and to raise questions of
concern," he said in the letter.
He added that beginning this fall
"I and others from the president's
office  will  begin  meeting  on  a
continuing basis with a variety of
small, informal groups of faculty,
students, staff and members of the
public."
"These gatherings will be informal so that we begin to get to
know each other better and so that
the people from these different
groups will have the opportunity to
express their ideas and concerns
freely," Kenny added in his letter.
Kenny said details of the
seminars and meetings will be
announced in the near future.
inadvertent sabotage. There are
some people who just might do
this.
- "If council is having problems
with money, look at AMS efficiency
to cut back — not in the most
vulnerable spot."
All motions passed by the
finance committee must be ratified
by council. However the motion on
the Pit was tabled until Wednesday's meeting when AMS
treasurer Dave Theessen said the
issue would be fully discussed with
affected staff present.
Asked Monday if the Pit made a
profit during the summer, Foster
said: "Business was better than
expected — enough to keep it
open."
Employee wages before the
summer were at the minimum of
$2.50 per hour. That wage was
boosted to a minimum of $3.25 in
the summer rising, in some cases,
to a high of $3.75.
Foster cited the higher wages
and increased cost of beer as two of
the many reasons for the Pit's
higher prices.
Theessen said, "We (the AMS)
feel a moral obligation to hire part-
time student workers at union
levels . . . unfortunately we cannot
do it immediately because of
budgetary constraints."
He said he hoped higher wages
would have a few indirect benefits
such as better work performance,
more accourilability by the staff
and lower turnover among employees. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1975
Learn, involve, organize
So you've made it to UBC.
Registration week is over, you're getting settled into
courses, last week's hectic pace has slowed to a dull roar
and . . .
Hold it! Don't be too impressed yet. The fun has just
begun.
To those of you who are here for the first time, welcome
to the factory known as the University of B.C., Inc. Its
purpose is to manufacture education by taking your tuition
fees, putting you through "the system" then spitting you
out, assembly-line style.
Traditionally, The Ubyssey takes the opportunity at this
time and in this space to offer sage wisdom about the campus
and how to get along. This year is no exception.
No matter how streamlined and organized things appear,
the system always breaks down and it could catch you in the
middle. (Just ask one of the 1,000 or so students who didn't
get authorization to register forms.)
You will soon learn that everything you read in the
administration calendar and in that little lifesaver's booklet
aren't as peachy-keen as they are made out to be.
Three things to remember: understand the system and it
won't beat you; become involved in anything outside of your
classes and organize with other students to change what you
don't like.
First the system.
It looks in the beginning like they just ddn't want you
here. Forms for this, permission for that, lines for something
else. If you keep hearing "Go away, go away" blowing in the
wind, you're probably not alone.
Experience has shown that the system can bend to you
rather than vice versa.
For example, no section of a course is full if you go
directly to the prof and demand to be let in. It's your right,
be pushy.
If you have problems go to the top. Don't waste time
yapping with middlemen. Those at the top are there because
they know how to get things done.
• If you're poor, borrow. Anyone, especially chartered
banks, love to dish out money to students at low interest. If
you're'lucky, the government will throw in some extra for*
free.
You'll soon realize there are two groups at UBC —them
and us. Them, the administration, have power and money to
do anything. Us, the students, have little say.
It doesn't have to be a bitter confrontation — some
administration people are very nice and can help you.
But administrators have certain interests and students have
certain interests. Unfortunately, they don't always coincide.
Therefore, take an interest in the admin — find out who's in
it, what it's doing and why.
Don't buy books from the bookstore without checking
second hand markets first. A second hand book is cheaper,
the pages are softer and the notes crammed into the margins
can sometimes reveal the subject to you.
Rarely, if ever, are deadlines real. No matter how hard a
prof insists that marks will be taken off for late papers it
seldom happens. A good sob story goes a long way.
Parking tickets at UBC are silly. There's no way in the
world a ticket from a quasi-cop means anything more than
another peace of garbage. Ignore all tickets. Nothing can be
done to you.
I WANT 4 CAUD  M«
A   SICK fWEMP... Wf'i
SICK OF «E6k iDMTIC*',
Sic*. OC   F6C5, HCK.
OF «&D TAPS. HCK or
Library people are always nice. The only thing that
cramps their style is jerks who rip off books.
Death to book thieves.
If you take books out legally, return them on time. You're
only hurting a fellow student by keeping them late.
The Alma Mater Society is the student-run organization
that represents you to the outside world. Learn what they
do, meet your faculty rep and if you don't like something,
bitch. That's your money they're throwing around.
Next comes involvement.
Involvement can mean becoming part of the system
mentioned above. Many faculties have room for students on
decision-making committees. Senate is full of student places.
Even the board of governors has two students on it.
Join something. Join anything to take your mind off
classes. Ballroom dancing appeal to you? Kung Fu? Bridge?
Checkers? Somewhere on this campus there's someone to
play with.
Like criticizing but not participating? Join The Ubyssey
and become a student journalist. (Applications, SUB 241 K.
No idiots, please.)
Clubs day is coming up soon. Sign up for something and
save your soul.
Third is change.
Nobody at UBC would try to tell you everything's great
here. There is room for change. There's a need for change.
Students as individuals have power directly proportional
to the amount of guts they have. But as a group, well that's a
different matter.
A few examples.
Several years ago music students vocally denounced their
department head as an autocrat. They created such a stink
that Donald McCorkle took a year's leave of absence to save
face.
This summer, he resigned. One point.
When Rec UBC was first formed, it was unpopular.
Students dumped on it and argued against it with no success.
Some gave in and joined. Others continued the protest.
Now we learn that the board of governors has abolished
the Rec UBC fee starting next year. Two points.
Last year, the administration wanted to put a data
processing centre on the green grass adjacent to SUB. The
centre was needed but not there. Students caused a fuss,
hung posters and mouthed off.
That centre is now being built in C-lot. Three points.
A recent example of group action came last Wednesday at
the AMS students' council meeting. Finance committee
wanted to cut Pit employees' hourly salaries from just over
$3 back to the minimum wage.
A group of 15 showed up to protest and the decision was
delayed until Wednesday, but with every sign of a decent
wage for student employees.
Four good examples of what students working together
can do.
But there are things such as housing and financial aid for
students which are inadequate. Organize and protest these
issues. If history is any indication, success is more probable if
you act rather than sit on your ass.
That's it. Wisdom from the mount. Straight off the hip.
While you're here make it count.
And have fun while you're doing it.
Letters to- the editor
welcomed. Drop them in
SUB 241 K.
LJoovy
TH( UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 9, 1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Gary Coull
It was the first day of school and all the kids were there. Art teacher
Miss Savaria handed out shiny new pencils and notebooks to everyone.
History teacher Mr. Sasges caught Doug Rushton chewing gum at the back
of his libel class and tweaked his ear as he sent him out into the hall. Senior
class president Gary Coull squirted all the little kids with his brand new
fountain pen. Mark Buckshon was sick in second period and had to go to
see school nurse Nancy Southam. Matt King, Cedric Tetzel and Carl
Vesterback snickered at him and almost caught hell for it.
Peter Cummings and Marcus Gee fell off their desks after falling asleep
during Uncle Rod Mickleburgh's dissertation on what it was really like to
be alive in the sixties. Ralph Maurer and Kent Spencer had a fight at luncht
time in the empty lot, while first grader Charlie Rendina and Greg Edwards
traded peanut butter sandwiches in the lunchroom. Class bully Chris
Gainor had to stay after school and copy out 50 times, "I must not dip
Daphne Gray-Grant pitails in the ink well ever again." "Copy? Did I hear
someone say copy?" asked copyboy Lesley Krueger. The Ubyssey—
An organization with a history
By MICHAEL SASGES
The Ubyssey, the student newspaper at
UBC, has been called many things since a
tabloid under that name was first published
in October, 1918.
"Biased," "doctrinaire," "left wing,"
"sacrilegious," "scurrilous," "tasteless,"
"the best argument for censorship that
could be produced" and "vile" are a few of
the epithets.
But it has never been called a campus
institution nor have the qualities of an institution ever been publicly attributed to the
paper.
An institution is simply an established
organization with social and political pull.
The Ubyssey is an organization, it is
established and it publishes to influence
politically.
The Ubyssey is an ordered structure of
news departments which publishes a
newspaper from the first week of classes to
the last.
And it is established with a base of beliefs,
traditions and practices that adds up to a
reason for publishing.
Ubyssey staffers have come to believe-
there is a certain illegitimacy to the
university because students and the general
public have little say in its role or functions.
This belief is reflected in the paper.
Believing therefore that the interests of
rulers and ruled often differ, Ubyssey
staffers generally dislike anybody in
positions of relative power, faculty, administration and student council, and feel
free to criticize and judge.
A kind word is seldom seen in The
Ubyssey.
Ubyssey staffers never pretend to reflect
accurately campus opinion. In almost daily
contact with the news-makers, usually
people in power, reporters come to see these
people and the society they represent and
reflect in a different manner than most
students.
Certainly The Ubyssey appears
disorganized at times. The newsroom is
usually a mess. And there is nothing permanent about the paper's existence from
year to year because it must rely on the
Alma Mater Society for part of its
publication budget.
This is the darker side of the institution,
disorderly and unsettled. But the paper has
always come out.
In 1959 during a printers' strike, The
Ubyssey was mimeographed and
distributed. In 1971 when some people opposed to the paper's editorial position during
a bitter AMS election stole 13,000
newspapers, a second edition was on
campus within a few hours.
It is, therefore, a campus institution with
its own practices, traditions and beliefs that
form a base for an established organization.
Certainly many former staffers,
especially those involved until the middle
1960s and known as pubsters for their
membership in the university's publications
board, and perhaps some current staffers,
won't agree that The Ubyssey is and must be
a serious political force on campus, and
influences campus politics because of its
established organization and position as an
institution.
This does not mean The Ubyssey and
Ubyssey staffers haven't taken and learned
much from those less inclined to treat the
paper or the university seriously.
Two of the most obvious traditions that
have come down through six decades of
publication is the disrespect for people in
power and a fierce independence of those
people.
Less obvious and certainly less seriously,
The Ubyssey never loses a boat race, never
misses a publication year without
publishing at least one fake story and a goon
issue and is published in a hole and always
in a hurry.
Ubyssey staffers are usually lousy
students, often future professional reporters
and editors, great party-goers and ferocious
boozers — indeed the walls of the Pit are an
unintentional testimony to the elbows of
three generations of campus reporters and
editors.
The first Ubyssey of Oct. 17, 1918, was a
sickly rag, its deference to people of power
reflected in the front page headline
"FRESHMEN RECEPTION" and the sub
headline " 'Frosh' Have the Privilege of
Shaking Hands with Important Personages."
But the paper quickly found its way and by
the 1922 Great Trek, when students marched
through Vancouver to Point Grey to
illustrate the need for a university campus,
it was promoting a campaign of political
significance.
It began to joust with the administration
and the provincial government and in 1931
the university turned on the paper, expelling
editor Ron Grantham for daring to suggest
how the university should bargain with the
provincial government.
This would not be the last time the
university would interfere in the affairs of
the paper.
In 1951, The Ubyssey was forced to
apologize for saying that the administration
was withholding certain facts about the
university's budget.
And in 1959, the year considered by
current Ubyssey staffers to be the start of
the "modern" era, the faculty council expelled a number of staffers from school for a
goon issue which lampooned Christianity in
general and Easter in particular.
The paper, during these attacks, never
bowed under.
Himie Koshevoy, now writing for the
Province, followed Grantham as editor and
immediately criticized the administration
for its relations with the government and for
expelling Grantham.
In 1955, a cross-Canada survey showed
The Ubyssey had the least faculty control.
The report prompted Rev. E. C. Pappert,
then faculty adviser to the student paper at
Assumption College, Windsor, Ont., to say:
"The Ubyssey is the vilest rag you can
imagine and is the best argument for censorship that could be produced. Thank God,
we're at the bottom."
The Assumption College paper was
considered to be one of the most thoroughly
censored papers.
And in 1960, The Ubyssey published a
short story about a student meeting a
prostitute. All then president Norman
Mackenzie could say was: "In extremely
bad taste."
The reason Grantham and Koshevoy
could stand up to the university has been
attributed to the changes brought about in
the late '20s and early '30s by editors
Maurice Desbrisay and Rod Pilkington.
Desbrisay, one of the first Ubyssey
staffers to work for a commercial daily,
brought back the style of the commercial
press to the newsroom in the Old
Auditorium.
And Pilkington introduced the paper to
pamphleteering.
As the university and paper slid into the
Depression, many of the paper's practices
and traditions of today were formed.
To most Ubyssey staffers, the
appearance of the paper three
times a week is something of a
miracle. But somehow it always
gets done, and the real reason is
that The Ubyssey has been around
for three generations of students.
Sasges, of the latest generation,
was Ubyssey co-editor  in 1973-74.
One pubster remembers fellow staffers
didn't attend lectures, were poor students,
hung around the office most of the time and
began to join the paper to train for jobs on
the commercial press.
"The Depression was still around and only
engineers were getting jobs," he remembers. "There was, however, a better than
average chance of getting employment on
the Vancouver newspapers and the percentage of pubsters graduating into employment probably compared favorably
with the figures for chemistry majors."
In the early 1940s, Pierre Ber(on, The
Ubyssey's most famous alumnus, joined the
paper and immediately began creating the
news — by mugging some Union College
students.
But that was only after he wasn't allowed
to write any stories except for one item on
new books in the library.
Canadians were in a  war-time  mood.
Gordon Shrum and Walter Gage were
commanding university militia programs,
the gun towers below the cliffs were constructed, but Berton concocted a story of
sciencemen inventing a beast which had
stalked the campus and a picture of a
disguised Berton stepping over the main
library was run with the story.
When the boys came marching home, they
turned out to be independent men unwilling
to take crap from anyone. Editors in the late
'40s were much older than usual and
sometimes family men and their expectations of a return on their investment in
years of service was reflected in the paper.
See page 6
FAVORITE UBYSSEY CAN ... a story is born 'V9WV4JT,    **CfSICIIIfcJCI      7/      I 7/ •
Ubyssey feuds with bad hacks
From page 5
In 1950, the first battle between
The Ubyssey and red-jacketed
engineers took place. Ubyssey
editor Jim Banham, now a
university public relations officer,
was kidnapped for refusing to run
the engineers' annual faculty
newspaper.
The conflict has been repeated
ever since. Allan Fotheringham,
now a well-known columnist and
Sun senior editor, was left adrift in
Horseshoe Bay, with no money and
just his underwear, one dark night
in the early '50s.
In the late '60s, Gabor Mate, who
wrote a column of progressive
views which generally differed
from most of the campus, was
kidnapped and injured when he
escaped.
The Ubyssey has generally attacked in the best way it can — by
not giving publicity to the
publicity-hungry   morons   in   the
applied science faculty.
But last year Ubyssey staffers
delivered what one veteran
engineering undergraduate society
executive member considers the
best counterattack engineering
students have experienced.
A number of staffers, in absolute
secrecy, published a fake Red Rag,
the sexist, racist tabloid printed
each year in red ink during
Engineering Week.
The fake paper had the same
layout as the real Red Rag, but had
a left-wing twist not expected of
career-oriented engineers.
The Ubyssey continued to report
and criticize during the '50s and
paid for its ways in 1951. The
campus was growing during these
years, engineers rioted, The
Ubyssey went after fraternities
guilty of discrimination and The
Ubyssey publicized and former
another student trek, this time to
Victoria.
And in 1959 some beatniks on The
Ubyssey lampooned Easter.
By the next year, the paper known
as The Ubyssey had ceased to
exist. It was a bad paper.
But this was to change as Bill
Rayner, now Sun news editor,
began to help the paper publish.
Rayner, on Sun-paid overtime,
brought with him tips and advice
on newspaper practices and in the
process formed a dynasty of
Ubyssey editors and a Sun farm
team.
And in 1961-62, The Ubyssey won
the Canadian University Press
Southam Trophy as best student
newspaper for the first of seven
consecutive years until awards
were abolished.
But Ubyssey staffers were not
content to remain technically
excellent.
Under the prodding of a number
of editors in the mid '60s, staffers
began to question the paper's
approach to journalism and its
political role on campus.
And internally, staff democracy
and collective decision-making
were emphasized as the paper's
policies came to be determined by
the staff, not an editor and an
editorial board.
As the paper began to act
collectively and department
editors were abolished,its pages
reflected a belief in left-wing
reformism, for lack of a better
phrase.
The Ubyssey's policies will
either remain the same this year or
will change — according to the
beliefs of the current staff,
especially those most willing to
sacrifice large doses of their time
and academic career to it.
Regardless of collectivization,
this has always been true.
UNDERCOVER RAG
. ■ ■ Ubyssey trashed
DECORATE WITH PRINTS
Th*
INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER
... a story is where you find it
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
f(Opp. Liquor Storeand Super Valu)]
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes- Gifts, etc.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS"
Henneken Auto
Your Foreign Car Specialist
8914 Oak St. (Oak & Marine)
263-8121
ANCIENT LINOTYPE MACHINE . .. still used to produce Ubyssey
Computer
fucks up
registration
More than 1,000 students did not
. receive authorization to register
forms for the current winter
session.
Associate registrar Kenneth
Young said Monday that instead of
mailing the forms, the registrar's
office sent letters to the students
asking them to pick up their
authorizations in the administration building.
But when students arrived to
pick up the forms, many had to
wait while typists prepared them.
"We're very embarrassed about
the whole thing," Young said.
Young blamed the foul-up on a
new computer, which was installed
in April to process registration
data and forms. He said staff took
more time than anticipated to
learn ta use the computer.
He added that there were more
applications this year than in 1974,
and staff were unable to cope with
the increased volume.
But Young said the registrar's
office has "learned its lesson. Next
year we'll have more staff and the
kinks in the computer system will
be ironed out."
'FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE3
MISALLIANCE
By George Bernard Shaw
SEPTEMBER 12-20
(Previews Sept. 10 & 11)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by John Brockington
Settings by Richard Kent Wilcox
Costumes by David Lovett
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $6.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 10 - 20 MISALLIANCE by Shaw
Oct. 29 - Nov. 8 DOCTOR FAUSTUS by Marlowe
Jan. 14 - 24 SCAPINO by Moliere
March 3 - 13 SPRING'S AWAKENING by Wedekind
BOX OFFICE   •   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   *   ROOM 207
.Sunnnrt Your Campus Theatre Tuesday, September 9, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Housing — 'compromise'
Page 7
By DAPHNE GRAY-GRANT
What do you do if you don't have
a place to live? You compromise.
That seems to be the view of a
random sampling of students
polled Monday afternoon at the off-
campus student housing office,
near the north entrance of SUB.
Brigita Kempe, science 2, lives
in a place most students would
consider almost ideal. Currently,
she shares a home with three other
people. However, she is also
casually looking for somewhere
else to live.
"Everything's perfect", she
says, "but..." The house is a fair
distance from the campus and she
doesn't have a car.
There's also the problem of
people. "I think it might be a bit too
social. I really want to get into
studying this year."
Brian Laing, education 1, has
exactly the opposite problem. "Too
many rules" is the trouble with his
suite.
Right now Laing pays $85 a
month for room and partial board.
During the past week he has been
looking for a place "anywhere in
Vancouver, as long as it's near a
bus route."
He blames the housing problem
on individual homeowners and
feels that they should be more
willing to listen to and respect the
students' point of view.
Distance from campus is a
major problem. Jim Morrison,PE
1, lives in Whonnock, a town between Mission and Haney, and
commutes to UBC every day.
"Sounds outrageous, doesn't it?"
he asks.
Morrison is willing to consider
any type of accommodation
costing $125 a month or less. He
Wage hike causes cut
UBC libraries have decreased
hours and cut back services to
offset wage increases granted last
March to student assistants.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs said Friday that library
hours have been cut 10 per cent to
offset the wage hike.
The students' wages were raised
in March to $4.16 an hour from
$2.50. "I'm not mad," Stubbs said.
"Its good students are getting
more money."
Stubbs said the wage increase
came after the library budget was
submitted. The cutbacks were
necessary, he said, despite the fact
the library was given extra money.
Stubbs refused to disclose the
amount of money granted to the
library after the wage increase.
Student assistants were due to
work 140,386 hours at a cost of
$351,000 under the original budget.
The students' hours have now been
reduced to 115,948, he said.
Other cutbacks include fewer
purchases of new books, a freeze
on hiring of new staff, and
suspension of an on-demand
recording service offered through
Crane library to blind students
attending other B.C. post-
secondary institutions.
In addition, the Medline terminal
at Woodward library will be closed
if other funding is not found. The
terminal is part of a medical information retrieval system
operated by B.C. universities,
colleges and hospitals.
Stubbs said he hopes that full
service will be restored after next
year's budget is approved.
He added that a proposed new
circulation policy for the libraries,
which was announced in June, has
run into opposition.
Under the new policy, fines
would only be charged on books
that have been requested by
another person. Fines of $1 a day
would be charged to a maximum of
$25. X
"I announced it and now there
are objections to it," Stubbs said.
"I'm looking forward to implementing the new policy."
The new policy would also
remove the current distinction
between student and faculty
borrowers. At present, faculty can
take out certain types of books for
longer periods than students.
Because of opposition to the new
policy, Stubbs said he does not
know when it will come into effect.
The policy was formed after a
survey of library users indicated
that most borrowers would like
changes in the circulation policy.
THE "NEW"
PONDEROSA SNACK BAR
ON THE WEST MALL
Now Open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday
CHAR BROILED BURGERS
SHORT ORDERS
SANDWICHES
SNACKS
CURRY OF THE DAY
Bottled beverage available to those 19 years and over
from 12 a.m. to 2 p.m.
C.U.E.
(Continuing University Education)
NEEDS NEW MEMBERS
Are you a mature woman student? If so, join us in the
Mildred Brock Lounge at 12:30 on Wednesday, Sept.
10th to meet your peers.
You Will Be Welcome!
BROCK HALL WOMEN'S LOUNGE
Dean of Women, Dr. Fulton will be there with encouragement
and advice.
agrees there is a housing crisis and
blames in on "people who are too
scared to rent to students."
Brian Anderson, law 1, is not
sure whether there's a housing
crisis. He'sliving in a suite on East
8th for $95 a month.
"I'll pay a little more if I have
to," says Anderson. "I want a
place with a comfortable atmosphere and as close to UBC as
possible."
According to the students interviewed, the basic problem
seems to be getting the right type
of housing. There is housing
available, but often the rent is too
high, the distance too far, or the
terms too strict.
Whose fault is that? The students
believe many people who have
room are simply afraid to rent. Or,
as Margaret Blackwell, education
5, says, "people who are renting
are trying to get every last buck
they can."
,n.
r^--vi^«ads*%-
VL
zipping
around campus?
There's lots to do. Like locating your NN
classes, deciding which profs to avoid,
and checking out the action at the campus
pub. But before you wear yourself out,
drop by your Bank of Montreal nearest the
campus and open an account. We'll
answer any questions you have (like
which account is best for you). As well as
give you a free metric converter — so you
can calculate how many meters-per-
minute you have to dash from the foot
of your bed to your 8 o'clock class.
J^L   The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,  1975
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
mtimtem Contest
WIN A LORNE ATKINSON 10-SPEED BIKE
USE THIS ENTRY FORM!
NAME
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GUESS the amount of money in the \ar
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B.C. HYDRO
COLLECTIONS Tuesday, September 9, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Pool supported
by UBC board
From page 1
Development grant, and $1.25
million through a public campaign.
This campaign would be aimed
primarily at UBC alumni, staff and
faculty members and B.C. corporations, he said.
Adams said 60 per cent of faculty
and staff members surveyed
recently said they would pledge
money for the pool and pay their
pledge over a five-year period.
Student board member Svend
Robinson pointed out to the board
that they had "no idea where the
money was coming from."
He said the decision to build the
pool in stages instead of all at once
"is the only thing that's changed
since the last board meeting (at
which the pool was rejected).
There's no additional funds."
Stage I of the building includes
the basic frame and structure, and
the pool itself. It does not include
electrical and mechanical systems
or pool decking. The pool would not
be usable.
Stage I would take 12-14 months
to build. A contract will probably
be awarded in mid-November and
construction could start before the
Christmas holidays.
Students voted to build the pool
in a 1972 referendum. Projected
cost then was $2.8 million, which
was to be split three ways:
students and administration were
to contribute $925,000 each and the
remaining third was to be obtained
from various government sources.
In the fall of 1974 a number of
studepts voiced opposition to the
pool, either because there were
other building priorities on campus
such as housing, or because inflation had forced the cost of the
pool to a prohibitive level, or both.
The number of students
dissenting was large enough to
force an October referendum on
the question, but a large student
voter turnout decided by 71.4 per
cent to continue paying the $5 pool
fund.
At the time, then-AMS president
Gordon Blankstein said current
interest rates would force students
to pay the $5 fee for 1-6 or 17 years.
By mid 1974, pool cost estimates
had risen to $4 million, and by this
summer had risen to $5.2 million.
On July 4, the board voted
against calling tenders on the pool,
mainly because of the high cost.
But between that meeting and
the Sept. 2 board meeting the
planning co-ordinating committee
trimmed the cost to $4.7 million by
eliminating unnecessary luxuries
and asked the board to build the
pool in stages.
In other business, the campaign
for student participation in faculty
hiring, firing, promotion and
tenure decisions received another
blow when the board voted against
striking a committee to investigate
and make recommendations on the
problem.
Several board members said the
question should be referred to the
board's staff committee.
Svend Robinson, who proposed
the motion, said the matter had
already been referred to the staff
committee twice and both times
was referred back to the board.
Gideon Rosenbluth then
suggested the matter was one the
administration and the faculty
association should discuss, and
Robinson's motion was defeated.
Robinson later suggested an
amendment to the motion to allow
discussion of student representation during talks to establish
collective bargaining procedures
between the Faculty Association
and the administration. The
motion was defeated.
The board also decided the
Faculty Association and the administration should not
discuss the relative importance
of teaching, research and other
factors in hiring, firing, tenure and
promotion decisions; the establishment of hiring and promotion
procedures which would result in
an increase of women in the faculty
and an explicit policy of hiring
qualified Canadians in preference
to non-Canadians.
The board also voted to permit
the Alma Mater Society to charge
law students $2 per year for two
years to pay off the Law Students
Association's accumulated debt of
$3,000.
Two profs
net $5,000
Education professor John
McGechaen and architecture
professor Abraham Rogatnick
have been named UBC's master
teachers for 1975.
McGechaen and Rogatnick, who
will share a $5,000 cash prize, were
chosen by a screening committee
from a record 49 nominees.
The committee, headed by
associate French professor Ruth
White, is composed of students,
faculty and members of the board
of governors and the Alumni
Association.
Committee members chose the
winners after listening to the
nominees lecture. Department
heads or deans are also asked to
evaluate each nominee.
McGechaen, chairman of the
education faculty's English
education department, teaches
methods of English teaching. He
has been a UBC faculty member
since 1956.
Rogatnick, on faculty since 1959,
is currently on leave of absence
serving as interim director of the
Vancouver Art Gallery.
He teaches basic theory of architecture and history of architecture.
The master teacher award was
established in 1969 and since then
has been criticized by both
students and faculty as a tokenistic
institution that tends to obscure the
role teaching plays at UBC.
Welcome Back
We wish you a
successful year
^^JU^bAiM.
YOUR OFFICIAL U.B.C. GRADUATION
PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHERS SINCE 1969
3343 West Broadway                                         732-7446
UBC BOWLING LEAGUE
Organizational Meeting
Wed. Sept. 10—12:30—Buch. 106
Bowling Commences Monday Sept. 15
Sub Lones
NEW BOWLERS WELCOME
We are a   "handicap" league
For Further Information call Walter at 228-8225
Auditions for the
Theatre Department's Production of
DOCTOR FAUSTUS
by Christopher Marlowe
to be presented October 29-November 8
Directed by Donald Soule
will be held on
THURSDAY, September 11 (1230 23o)
FRIDAY, September 12 u:30 5 so)
\in Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building^
(19 Men and 8 Women Required)
Auditions Open To All UBC Students, Faculty and Staff
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Test the new HP-21 today right in our
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Remember. . .
You'll SAVE 10% on calculators at
the bookstore
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE 228-4741
■M Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1975
Kenny buys five veeps
UBC's administrative
bureaucracy has a new look.
Students returned to campus this
fall to find that administration
president Doug Kenny has appointed three new vice-presidents
at $54,800 per year and a number of
other people to senior administrative posts around the
campus.
Under outgoing president Walter
Gage there were two vice-
presidents (then called deputies)
and it was generally agreed that
the administration's power was
fairly centralized.
One of Gage's deputies, William
CONNAGHAN ... non-academic
Armstrong, left UBC last
November to take the newly
created post as chairman of the
Universities Council. That left
Gage and bursar William White to
finish 1974-75 themselves.
Even before Kenny officially
took over July l, the board of
governors approved the appointment of two top-level
assistants for him — Michael
Shaw, agriculture sciences dean,
as vice-president in charge of
university development and UBC
physics professor Erich Vogt, as
vice-president in charge of faculty
and student affairs.
At the same time bursar White
had his title changed from deputy
to vice-president and was retained
with reduced responsibilities
allowing him to devote more time
to the financial affairs of the
university.
To pick up some of White's excess baggage, Kenny called on
Chuck Connaghan, president of
Construction Labor Relations and
a longtime UBC figure, as vice-
president responsible for the administration of UBC's non-
academic sector.
While observers of the UBC
political scene say it's too early to
tell how the new regime will
operate, it is clear that Kenny has
divided up the responsibilities of
the president's office between
more people than his predecessor
did.
Kenny denied in an interview
Monday that the appointments
constituted any radical change in
the structure of the university's
administration. He noted that
Kenneth Hare, who was president
before Gage, had three vice-
presidents—Gage, Armstrong and
White.
However Hare didn't last very
long. Selected out of 60 applicants,
he resigned seven months after
taking office.
Shaw: In charge of university
development, the 51-year-old Shaw
assumes many of the duties which
Armstrong handled under the
Gage regime. He will have overall
responsibility for the planning, coordination and development of
UBC's academic affairs. Kenny
said Shaw will also be involved in
decisions on campus construction
as it pertains directly to adjustments in the university's
academic program.
For a number of years UBC has
had an office of academic planning
headed by Robert Clark which has,
as its title implies, been involved in
the same area with which Shaw
appears to be charged.
Kenny said this particular vice-
president's office and Clark's
office "will have to operate more
dove-tailed than in the past" but he
declined to discuss the situation
more specifically.
Shaw was appointed dean of the
agricultural sciences faculty in
1967. Previously, he taught at the
University of Saskatchewan where
he was a professor and head of the
biology department.
A university press release notes,
among        other        academic
achievements, that Shaw is "a
distinguished research scientist"
and "a specialist in the interactions between fungal
parasites, such as wheat rust, and
their host plants."
Vogt: For the student who has
tried   the   system   to   resolve
especially in the area of student
services.
In addition Vogt is responsible
for faculty affairs, specifically
academic appointments and
granting of promotions and tenure.
Ultimately, the board of governors
confirms appointments on the
recommendation of the administration president. Vogt will
be compiling and analysing
various faculty changes for
Kenny's consideration.
Vogt was appointed physics
professor in 1965. He has been
involved in the creation of the Tri-
University Meson Facility
(TRIUMF) which is doing all
sorts of neat things with atoms at
the south end of campus.
White: Since the formation of the
Universities Council, White, as the
UBC's chief financial officer, has
been bugged with questions about
the universities operation. While
no one disputes the council's right
SHAW ... development boss
to ask, the job of answering
everything plus other responsibilities in the non-academic
sector has kept White busy.
Kenny created Connaghan's post
to   ease   the   burden   on   White.
See page 11: FORMER
VOGT ... student service
problems and been thwarted or
who just wants to start at the top,
Vogt is the man to see. Kenny says
Vogt will be responsible for coordinating the ongoing improvement of student services such
as the bookstore, residences,
student awards, the university
health service and the athletic
department.
During the summer, the 45-year-
old Vogt has been meeting
regularly with student elected
representatives of the Alma Mater
Society on such questions as
housing and student aid. He is one
of the people behind the plan to
house students in a downtown hotel
as one solution to the housing
crisis.
AMS president Jake van der
Kamp said hie has found Vogt to be
"extremely helpful and has given
us a lot of help on housing and other
matters."
Kenny says Vogt can be seen as a
"liaison" between the administration and the students
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
Two workshops based on the premise that an individual can control his
health through regulating diet, exercise and stress response.
FOUR PILLARS OF HEALTH - a 2-day workshop on the basic principles
of preventive medicine. Sessions will include lecture and discussion, aerobic
and movement exercises, and stress-reduction techniques.
September 13 & 14       Fee $75
HUMAN LIFE STYLING - 4Vi days of seminars for professionals and
para-professionals who wish to acquire a basic and simple illness-prevention
approach which can be passed on to those seeking improved health and
well-being.
September 17 - 21      Fee $150
JOHN McCAMY, M.D., who will be leading the seminars, is a physician
who for the past 8 years has been actively involved in developing an
effective system for treating the whole person. He is author of "Human
Life Styling".
For registration and further information, contact:
QOV0
MOUNTAIN
mmwe
Granville Island Park, Vancouver, B.C., V6H 3M5
(604) 684-5355
LECTURE 8 P.M. SEPTEMBER 12th-FEE $3
ROYAL BAN K
THE HELPFUL BANK
• CANADA STUDENT LOANS
• NEW LOANS   • DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS
• TRANSFER ACCOUNTS FOR CONVENIENCE
• SAVINGS WITH CHEQUEING PRIVILEGES
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Charlie Mayne, Manager
Audrey Bud low. Senior Loans Officer
Tina Verveda, Loans Officer
10th at Sasamat
228-1141 rage   11
AUCE closed shop threatened
The UBC administration has
proposed abolishment of a closed
union shop for office and clerical
employees who currently belong to
the Association of University and
College Employees, Local 1.
And AUCE negotiating team
member Suzanne Lester said the
two sides are far apart on several
major issues in contract talks.
AUCE's contract expires Sept. 30
and final negotiations begin
Friday.
"From the union's viewpoint, if
we lose the union shop we will lose
our place as a democratic union
representing our members,"
Lester said Monday.
She refused to disclose the
union's wage demands but said the
two sides are "fairly far apart."
"We are on quite different wave
lengths, but there is room for
movement," she added.
Lester said the university has
also proposed that vacations be
reduced. Under the current contract, workers are entitled to three
Former AMS president
finally hits the big time
From page 10/
Responsibility for physical plant,
purchasing and personnel will be
transferred from White to Connaghan.
White has been a member of the
university administration for 25
years and is responsible for UBC's
multi-million dollar annual budget.
He also acts as secretary to the
board of governors.
Connaghan: A former AMS
president in 1958-59, Connaghan
resigned from his post at the
Construction Labor Relations
Association to take the job as UBC
vice-president in charge of the non-
academic sector. He also resigned
from the UBC board of governors,
a position he was appointed to by
the provincial government, to
accept the new post.
Connaghan's responsibilities
include information services, the
traffic and patrol department,
campus mail plus those departments previously under White
jurisdiction.
Connaghan is known in the
construction industry as a tough
negotiator for the 800 companies he
represented during contract
negotiations with the unions. At
least some segments of the labor
movement voiced their relief that
Connaghan was leaving the industry for UBC. He won't be
starting his new job until Oct. 6, the
bulk of September being taken up
by a trip to Germany where he is
allegedly looking at labor-
management relations.
In 1970 Connaghan was appointed by the provincial government to senate. Two years later
senate elected him as one of its
representatives to the old board of
governors. The government reappointed him to senate in 1974 for
a three-year term.
In late 1974, Connaghan was
appointed to UBC's expanded
board of governors. He was
selected by the provincial
government from a list of
nominees submitted by the UBC
Alumni Association.
The board also approved the
following appointments to various
academic posts around the
university during the summer:
• Walter Hardwick, former
Vancouver alderman and
respected geographer, as director
of continuing education. He has
been given the responsibility of
formulating university-wide
policies on development, administration and funding of continuing education.
• Peter Remnant and John
Stager, assistant grad studies
dean, as associate deans to arts
faculty head Robert Will. Remnant
resigned from his philosophy post
as did Stager from grad studies to
accept the posts. Will replaces
Doug Kenny as the faculty dean.
• Anthony Podlecki, current
head of the classics department at
Pennsylvania State University,
has been appointed to replace longtime. UBC classics head Malcolm
McGregor. Podlecki is an expert in
the field of Greek literary tragedy
and history in the fifth century B.C.
McGregor will continue to teach
this year as a professor in the
classics department.
The board also received the
resignation of Robert Harlow, head
of the creative writing department.
Harlow will continue to teach in the
department.
weeks vacation in their first year
of employment and five weeks
after eight years.
The university has proposed that
first-year employees get two weeks
vacation and that only workers
with 12 years or more seniority get
five weeks vacation, she said.
"That's not the union's purpose
for negotiating," said Lester. "We
won't go backwards."
University labor relations
director John McLean said that
under his proposals all employees
would be required, to pay union
dues but not compelled to join the
union. "This is a common
arrangement in B.C.," he added.
He defended the university's
vacation proposals, saying three
weeks vacation after less than a
year's work "is an unfair
arrangement."
McLean said other campus
unions currently get five weeks
vacation after 12 years and said he
wanted AUCE's contract to
"agree" with the other unions'
contracts.
"The university administration
has never been stubborn or obdurate in negotiations," said
McLean. "We want our employees
to get the best possible contract."
Both Lester and McLean said it
is too early to tell if there will be a
strike but they both said they
hoped a strike can be averted.
A dispute last March between the
university and the Canadian Union
of Public Employees local 116,
which represents service workers
and tradesmen, almost shut down
UBC during final exams.
But CUPE  local  116 president
Ken Andrews said last-minute
negotiations involving provincial
mediator Clark Gilmour averted a
strike. The contract was signed a
month after settlement was
reached March 30.
"The outcome was the best
contract in the last decade on the
campus," said Andrews. "The
union has developed into a united
union."
Under the terms of the present
contract, which expires April 1,
1976, food services workers now
earn a minimum of $5.56 an hour
and tradesmen earn a maximum of
$9.00 per hour.
STUDENT DISCOUNTS
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Texas Instruments, Hewlett Packard,
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE3
MISALLIANCE
By George Bernard Shaw
SEPTEMBER 12-20
(Previews Sept. 10 & 11)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by John Brockington
Settings by Richard Kent Wilcox
Costumes by David Lovett
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $6.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 10 - 20 MISALLIANCE by Shaw
Oct. 29 - Nov. 8 DOCTOR FAUSTUS by Marlowe
Jan. 14-24 SCAPINO by Moliere
March 3 - 13 SPRING'S AWAKENING by Wedekind
BOX OFFICE   •   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   *   ROOM 207
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I.' * % »- *  * •• Shock wave from victory stuns crowd
From page 1
startled faithful at Thunderbird
Stadium Saturday afternoon.
Post-game analysis was slow in
coming as the shock gradually
wore off among the pigskin pundits
attending. But then it came in tides
of superlatives that had been
wasting in cold storage for over
three years while the 'Birds were
wandering in the wastelands.
"Wow!"
"There IS a football team in the
city!"
"Wow!"
'Bird coach Frank Smith was
happy with the win, but remained
cautious, hedging his bets against
any future stinkers.
"We're vastly improved over
last year, of course," he said.
"A lot of the players trained over
the summer, and we did a good job
recruiting. We also have a solid
nucleus of experienced players
returned from last year. We'll
certainly be more competitive this
year than last."
Ample proof of the last remark
was found on display Saturday.
The 'Birds gave up a touchdown on
the opening kickoff return, but
maintained their poise. The
defence shut off the Bison attack
for the rest of the afternoon, and
many a battered Bison was heard
yearning for the good ol' days on
the prairie when they had only
Buffalo Bill to live with.
The UBC offence struck back
quickly, with Shaun McGuiness (a
stout player) collecting a scoring
strike from 'Bird quarterback Dan
Smith.
Gary Metz (love those Metz)
booted the first of his three field
goals and the first quarter ended
with UBC leading 10-7.
The barrage continued unabated
in the second quarter as fleet
flanker Mike Jones corralled
another TD pass from Smith.
"New York" Metz split the
uprights with a second three-
pointer and the cliche-ridden half
drew to a close with the score now
20-7 favouring the Bis . . . er,
'Birds.
The third quarter was boring,
marked only by another field goal
by "Let's Go" Metz.
For the flat Manitoba team, it
was farewell, my lovely. The sands
of time began to run out and the
'Birds continued to pour across the
last white line during the fourth
and final quarter.
Smith barged into the end zone
for another touchdown, and then
back up QB Greg Gardner capped
the glorious afternoon with the
coup de grace, coming off the
bench (in previous year, such a
substitution was the equivalent of
throwing in the towel) and stor
ming over the goal line, falling into
paydirt with the pigskin clutched
firmly in his palms.
Coach Smith was hopeful about
the showing.
"Last year the Bisons beat us 41-
15 and 24-18. We had a great team
effort, and I think it will continue."
Outstanding performances were
turned in by Gord (mightier than
the Sword) Pen, who rushed for 172
yards in 21 carries. (Remember
the years when the entire team
didn't gain that much over the
whole season?) and Dan Smith at
quarterback, who completed 10 of
16 passes for 116 yards, including
two touchdowns. And enough can't
be said for* the defence, which
really had little to do with
Manitoba's only touchdown, and
shut them out the rest of the game.
So the 'Birds find themselves
(for the nonce, at least) in the
heady realm of first place (albeit
shared with Saskatchewan). And
they're averaging 413 yards gained
per game, while limiting their
opponents to 151.
What's going on?
FORMS, FORMS, FORMS
Dental plan costs
could be pain in pocket
By MARCUS GEE
A UBC student has estimated the
student dental plan promised by
Alma Mater Society president
Jake van der Kamp would cost
$424,000 in its first year.
Robert Tsang named this figure
in a feasibility paper recently presented to AMS council. The figure
includes $120,000 for dental
equipment, $80,000 for construction
of a clinic, $104,000 for dentist's
salaries and $120,000 for operating
costs.
Van der Kamp and the other
Student Unity slate members
elected to AMS council last spring
conceived the dental plan as part of
their campaign platform.
"The purpose of the plan is to
make sure people get through
school without their teeth rotting
out of their heads," van der Kamp
said Monday.
"Oneof the more essential things
is to make sure someone helps with
equipment costs," he said.
Tsang's paper suggests the
university pay for equipment and
construction costs and students
pay dental personnel salaries.
Students would thus be required to
pay an annual fee of about $7.50. In
addition to this fee, students would
pay 10 to 20 per cent of the dental
charges at each visit to the clinic.
Van der Kamp said a new
building would have to be built to
house the dental clinic. He said
there is no space for the facility in
existing university buildings.
Tsang estimates it would take
two months for the board of
governors to approve the clinic if
they decide in favor of it and
another three months to receive a
building tender. Thus, he states,
construction would begin in the
summer of 1976 to make the clinic
available for the 1976-1977
academic year.
Simon    Fraser    University's
student society has plans for a
similar clinic at SFU. The SFU
plan would employ six dental
workers whose salaries would be
paid by an annual fee of five
dollars per student.
The AMS plans to circulate a
questionnaire to UBC students next
week to determine whether the
need or desire for a dental plan
exists.
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..xV-^^V-.Vv>/>^if^CVX^v>>>*''.^ Tuesday, September P, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
4     * *?       ' 4
As/an centre still
short $2.3 million
The Asian centre is still $2.3
million short of completion and
fund raisers are asking the federal
cabinet, through senator Ray
Perrault, for $1.5 million.
Head fund raiser Joe Whitehead,
publisher of the Journal of Commerce, said Friday the $1.5 million
is needed to install the pyramid-
shaped centre's lighting and
heating equipment.
The federal external affairs
department rejected an earlier
request for the $1.5 million, he
added.
The federal government last
year gave $400,000 toward the $4.3
million centre. At that time, the
project's estimated cost was $1.6
million.
Whitehead said the increase is
due to rapidly rising construction
costs.
Funding for the centre, which
will house the Asian studies
department and Canada's largest
Asian language library, has been
raised outside the university.
UBC's administration has
contributed only the land upon
which the centre is located. The
building's frame, which housed the
Sanyo pavilion at Expo '70 in
Osaka, Japan, was donated by the
Sanyo Corporation.
The $2 million which has been
College staffs
cut in Ontario
TORONTO (CUP) — Staff
firings have begun as universities
and colleges across Ontario begin
to feel the brunt of the Davis
government's cutbacks.
At McMaster University in
Hamilton a whole department —
systems and methods — has been
eliminated and staff in other
departments will also be
dismissed. University officials
claim that those whose jobs are
eliminated will receive help in
finding new jobs.
However, at Carleton, where
support staff are also being laid
off, such guarantees have so far
proved meaningless. University
procedure calls for formal written
notice several months in advance
and for the university to assist in
finding  alternative  employment.
Despite the procedure some lab
technicians,   one  with   15  years'
raised to date has come from the
federal and provincial governments and from the governments
of other Pacific rim countries,
especially Japan. Whitehead said
fund raisers will attempt to raise
an additional $800,000 from
businessmen.
He said he thinks the centre will
be completed by next May 31 when
the United Nations-sponsored
Habitat '76 conference on human
settlements begins in Vancouver.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — The
destruction of trees near the puce
blorg King's palace produced a
political crisis that rocked this tiny
island kingdom.
King Snake and der Vamp
brushed by reporters saying, "I'm
going to see Lake of the Woods
about this. She'll be heartbroken
about the death of her namesakes
and neighbors."
Meanwhile, Emperor Slug
Benny, whose legions were
reportedly responsible for the
wanton destruction, held court
with the five palace eunuchs.
Palace spokesman Slim Slamen
said, "the super six are planning
for the arrival of a Grownpost
protest pickup truck."
seniority, were verbally informed
of their impending dismissal.
Humber College in Toronto has
already eliminated 25 academic
and non-academic positions and
anticipates the possible
elimination of 25 more.
Layoffs have started at
Algonquin College in Ottawa, St.
Clair College in Windsor, and
George Brown College in Toronto.
There are indications that Queen's
University in Kingston has also
eliminated  some  staff  positions.
Charles Darrow, president of the
Civil Service Association of Ontario, which represents college
staff, has attacked the cutbacks as
"another shortsighted political
ploy by the Davis government in its
attempt to fool the public into
believing that this type of cutback
will actually have an impact on
fighting inflation."
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224-1932 Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1975
Hot flashes
Power in
Portugal
Doing anything Sept. 16?
If not, why not pack the kids
in the station wagon and head on
flown to Seattle — you know, do a
little shopping, have dinner in a
nice family restaurant, and then
about 8 p.m. head down to the
Carpenters Hall at 2512 Second
Avenue to catch Antonio Silva
and JoeJ Gaier give first hand
accounts and opinions of the
political and social changes in
Portugal.
Silva, a member of the
Portuguese army, is a delegate to
the Revolutionary Council of
Workers, Soldiers and Sailors in
that country. Gaiqr, a well-known
socialist, has just returned from an
extended visit to Portugal.
For more information on the
meeting and child care facilities (if
you plan to take the trip without
your kids), phone 733-0288.
Copy
ii
Are you looking for a chance
to earn some booze money and
work for Canada's best newspaper
west of Blanca?
The Ubyssey needs a
copyrunner, who takes our
stories, ads and other assorted
garbage from our office in room
241K, SUB, to College Printers at
Twelfth and Maple.
The copy runs occur twice
each press day. Press days are
Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday each week. We pay $3
for each run, which adds up to
$18 a week.
So if you're interested, drop
over to The Ubyssey office and
apply. You must have a car.
Oman, man
Oman is a tiny (82,000 square
miles) "independent" monarchy
on the rump of Saudi Arabia. Its
total population is considerably
smaller    than    that    of    greater
Vancouver, and their miniscule
per capita income is maintained
by their oil industry.
But naturally 99 per cent of
the people never see any of the oil
money — it all goes to Oman's
Sultan Qabus bin Said, who lives
in opulence in his palace in
Muscat.
Predictably, people over there
are beginning to take things in
their own hands. The Liberation
Support Movement is supporting
them by sponsoring a showing of
The Hour of Liberation Has
Struck, a documentary on 10
years of guerilla warfare in the
country.
It'll be at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre 8 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 15. In addition, Steve
Goldfield, Middle East historian
and past editor of Gulf Solidarity
magazine, will speak to the
audience.
Admission is $1.25 and money
goes to support the struggle.
TUESDAY
DANCE CLUB
Dance classes,  2-3  p.m. and 4-5:30
p.m., SUB ballroom;
Yoga class, 3-4 p.m., SUB ballroom.
WEDNESDAY
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOCIETY
Free   introductory   lectures,   noon,
Bu. 104 and 8 p.m., Bu. 100.
CUE
Meeting     of     women     students
returning     to     campus    after     an
absence,     noon.     Brock     women's
lounge.
AQUASOC
Meeting    for    basic    scuba    course,
noon, SUB 205.
BOWLING LEAGUE
Organizational   meeting,  noon,   Bu.
106.
NEWMAN CLUB
General  meeting,  noon, SUB 105B.
THURSDAY
SLAVONIC STUDIES
Michael Futrell discusses Alexander
Solzhenitsyn's literary
autobiography, noon, Bu. 106.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Club day display, need helpers to
handle display and assist with
demonstration jump, 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. See notice board in SUB 216G.
UBC LIBERALS
Clubs day booth, 10:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m., booth 29, SUB.
CONSERVATIVE MIDDLE CLASS
NEW STUDENTS' CLUB
World free format frisbee
champions to give demonstration
noon, south side of SUB.
FRIDAY
UBC LIBERALS
Party  night,  new and  old  members
welcome,   8   p.m.   -   midnight,   SUB
212.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Steve   Watson   speaks    on   working
'Tween classes
class  political  action  in  Canada,
p.m., 1206 Granville.
MY JUNG KUNG FU CLUB
Demonstration,     noon,
ballroom.
SUB
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••A*
Image Uniforms  !
"Professional Career Apparel"
• LAB COATS   • PANT SUITS
• CLINICAL JACKETS    •
• MENS WEAR
• DRESSES •
smocks      :
Special Student Discount
When Presenting Valid Student I.D. Card
10% OFF UNTIL SEPT. 30, 1975
Fairmont Medical Bldg., 734 W. Broadway, Van.-879-3315
Cariboo Shopping Center, 435 J. North Rd., Coq.-939-4555
:
CHARGEX       Mon., Tues., Wed., Sat.-9:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Thurs. & Fri.-9:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
^ffl^EJJa a
Expense
accounts
sought
WATERLOO (CUP) — A former
Federation of Students president
has suggested that giving student
councillors expense accounts is a
way of getting them more involved
in student politics.
Shane Roberts made the
suggestion following the second
consecutive failure of the Waterloo
council to obtain a meeting
quorum.
Roberts stressed the importance
of making councillors feel they
have an important role to play and
one way of doing this would be to
"give them something to work
with." This could take the form of a
small expense account ranging
between $50 and $100 per year, he
said.
The money could be raised by
"knocking one per cent off each
board's budget" and would then be
made available to the councillors
for use.
- SHIRTS
ATTENTION: Clubs, Grads, Fraternities,
Faculties, Teams,  Residences,
Sororities etc.
CUSTOM CRESTING
OF YOUR DESIGN OR   OURS ON
QUALITY T-SHIRTS
Large selection of white & colored
T-Shirts printed single or multi-colored.
ATHLETIC WEAR £f CREST LTD.
153 W. 7th AVE. 873-1801
Welcome to
ST. ANSELM'S
MD UNIVERSITY HILL CHURCHES
on University Boulevard
Minister: Rev. Luis O. Curran
SUNDAY SERVICES:
8 a.m.        Holy Communion at St. Anselm's
11 a.m.       Worship and Church School at
both churches
All planning, programming and group work are a SHARED
MINISTRY at St. Anselm's Anglican and University Hill United
Churches.
For further information, phone office, 224-7011
MONDAY
MEN'S TENNIS TEAM
Team tryouts, bring your tennis
balls, new members welcome, 4:30
p.m. Last year's A- team, 6 p.m..
Winter Sports Centre tennis courts.
r%i#e^'£ fyi 'Zteatd
FOR NEW & USED
BOOKS
* TEXTBOOKS
* PAPERBACKS
* REVIEW NOTES
* MONARCH   NOTES
* SCHAUMS  OUTLINES
* COLES   NOTES
* LARGEST  SELECTION  OF
REVIEW   NOTES   IN   B.C.
•   WE TRADE USED
POCKETBOOKS
CASH PAID FOR TEXTS, ETC.
U
BETTER BUY
BOOKS
4393 W. 10th AVE. - VANCOUVER, B.C.
224-4144      Open 11 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1*80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., thedaybefore publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
10 —For Sale — Commercial
11 — For Sale — Private
1972 RENAULT SS. Rally prepared.
Modified engine. 30 M.P.G. $1,600.00.
Roger,  985-7018   or  987-5138.
1964 SUNBEAM ALPINE substantially
restored No rust. No bumps. Hardtop.
Soft-top tonneau wires. Will need
engine work shortly $599 OBO —
929-1068.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
25 — Instruction
40 — Messages
50 — Rentals
60 — Rides
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
30 — Jobs
ROOM AND BOARD plus, $75.00 a
month for assistance to faculty family
in preparation of evening meal and
some supervision of children, 9 to 14.
Mostly between 3:15 and 7:00 p.m.
Ten minutes from campus. Non-
smoker. 221-5056.
HOSTESS WANTED for Leisure Club.
Part-time, work days and nights.
Phone  681-9816 for  appointment.
35 - Lost
PAIR DARK RIMMED reading glasses
left in yellow Datsun last Thusday.
Pick up at Creative Writing office.
Brock Hall.
PHOTOGRAPHY
WEDDING - COMMERCIAL
Reasonable Rates
873-5959 after 4 p.m.
80 — Tutoring
85 —Typing
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous luesaay, aepyemoer y,   iy/3
i n c
U   B   T   S   5   t   T
Page 15
SPOR TS
UBC soccer team
still to shape up
By CEDRIC TETZEL
The UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team will start league play this
Wednesday and they still do not
have a team.
Surprisingly the 'Birds' problem
is not due to lack of support. For a
team that attracts a grand total of
about five spectators a game it did
well to draw more than 50 able
bodies to its tryouts.
The task at hand for UBC coach
Joe Johnson is to trim the team
down to 14 for the Wednesday
match against the Eldorado Glens.
Lost to the professional ranks
are veterans Greg Weber, Darryl
Samson and Brian Budd. Also gone
from last year's national champion
team are Phil Sanford, Claudio
Morrelli, Ron Hilder and Ken
Legge.
Because of these losses, UBC will
have to start the year with rookies
making up two-thirds of the team.
Even then, Johnson is not a bit
worried. He thinks the 'Birds will
mean trouble for the other teams in
the league.
The highlight of the season will
be the annual trek down south.
Only this year, apart from going to
Denver, the Thunderbirds will also
drop in at St. Louis and Kansas
City. Therethey will play St. Louis,
regarded as the perennial strength
in the U.S. university soccer scene,
and Rockhurst, the N.C.I.A. soccer
champions.
Next on the agenda will be the
Canada West championships at the
end of October and the national
championships in November. The
'Birds first play the University of
INTO ACTION two students go up for a ball during a volleyball
game. UBC^has wide range of athletic activities, extramural and
intramural, and new players are always welcome.
INTERCOLLEGIATE
FOOTBALL
SATURDAY, SEPT. 13th
U.B.C. "Thunderbirds"
vs
Royal Military College
"Redmen"
Thunderbird Stadium-2 P.M.
U.B.C. Students — Free Admission
 General Admission — $1.00
Victoria Vikings in a home-and-
away series before heading for
Edmonton to play the University of
Alberta and the University of
Saskatchewan.
What this boils down to is a lot of
soccer action for the next few
months, and what coach Johnson
has to do right now is to trim the
squad down to 28 bodies in the next
fortnight or so.
Despite the huge turnout, the
UBC coach still says the teams are
far from being full. He is still
looking at new players and nothing
will be fixed for at least another
week or so, except for the team
that has to play Wednesday night.
These players have to register 24
hours before the game.
So if there are still people around
who like to play soccer and who
think they are good enough for the
'Birds, they should be out in the
soccer pitch in front of the War
Memorial Gym any day this week
at noon.
People who enjoy watching
soccer can still join the fun by
turning up when the Thunderbirds
meet The Eldorado Glens Wednesday night at Capilano Stadium
at 7:30 p.m. for the season opener.
Ubyssey
seeks more
sports staff
All right, you fresh young things
out there in campus land, I am now
giving you the chance of your
lifetime.
I am inviting, or should I say
begging, you to join The Ubyssey
sports staff. So far this year we've
rounded up two whole bodies for
the page. If you like writing, taking
pictures or simply enjoy hanging
around a bunch of swell people,
come over to SUB 241K and enlist.
The paper comes out three times
a week on Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday. Therefore, the staff works
every Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday. Simple isn't it?
For those who are afraid that
working for The Ubyssey would
hurt their studies (yecch), the only
thing I can say is: stop worrying.
These nice little ol' men and
women some call profs like good
writing, which is something we
teach around here.
Apart from writing, taking
pictures and having a decent place
to have lunch, the Ubyssey staff
also have the chance to learn how
to put out a newspaper. Take it
from me: it is challenging, interesting and out of sight.
Experience for writers and
photographers is not essential, and
a photographer doesn't need a
whole mess of equipment.
Many UBC games are played
during the weekends so you must
be prepared for a Saturday afternoon at a sporting event as well
as showing up in the office on press
days.
If John Turner and Malcolm
McGregor can do it, so can you.
Enough of this rah-rah bit, if you
are interested, and who isn't, feel
free to drop in any time.
The only thing is, do it now.
Ole Carl and I need help to keep
you turkeys informed about the
fascinating world of mud and guts.
to is the disappearance of Smith's
seemingly ever-present frown. And
who can blame him for that old
look? The football 'Birds have been
famous only for the incredibly high
scores their opponents have put up
on the old tally sheet.
The story on page one of today's
paper tells the victory in words but
only the two pictures on the left can
relay the true extent of the 'Birds
victory. Witness the elation.
Witness the smile.
Keep it up Frank.
Ubyssey photogs need the
breaks.
SMITH ... before.
UBC Thunderbirds football
coach Frank Smith is still puzzling
over his team's victory over
University of Manitoba Bisons on
Saturday.
But one thing Ubyssey
photographers are looking forward
People who ride bikes are
very quiet, don't mess up
the air. and stay skinnier
and sexier. So ride a
bike. We'll peddle
you a neat one.
-the Peddler.
620 E. Broadway
^874-8611
peddler
bicycle centre
SMITH . . . after.
NEED TO STUDY BOOKS, NOT BIKINIS?
Call UBC TUTORIAL CENTRE
228-4557
Both students and tutors
register for $1
Rates arranged by tutor and
student
A programme of the UBC
Alumni Association in cooperation with Speak-Easy
The
TERM
OPENING
SPECIAL
iltimate
'"Buying
f« Chicken
$1.35 Snack
Only
.99e
TASTE OUR DELICIOUS, TENDER CHICKEN
DURING THIS GREAT START-OF-TERM SPECIAL
EXCLUSIVELY AT ALBERT'S
FREE DELIVERY ON BULK ORDERS
FOR YOUR BANQUET OR PARTY!
Clip This Coupon And Save
s 1.35 Snack For 99c
PRESENT TO
ALBERT'S CHICKEN CHALET
(Next to Peter's Ice Cream)
3 206 W.Broadway Phone 731-8312
Jlf."  .f.rT.i
«f V* V-<W •* *  ***' Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,  1975
DEMONSTRATOR
The P.N.E. is over and now we must sell all the display booth
equipment at reduced prices! Come in and look these demonstrators over . . . and SAVE! Full warranties on all equipment.
RECEIVERS - AMPLIFIERS
;»»v*»>MMt*
MARANTZ MODEL
2270 AM/FM
STEREO RECEIVER
Bose 1801  	
Dynakit ST 120
Dynakit ST 150
Dynakit ST 400
Dynakit Pat 5 ..
Dynakit Pat 4 ..
Fisher 190 ....'.
Harman Kardon
Harman Kardon
Harman Kardon
HARMAN/Kardon
HK 1000 CASSETTE
DECK
LIST
.. 280.00
. . 332.50
. . 740.00
.. 295.00
.. 177.00
.. 369.00
230A 229.
630. 425.
930. 525.
SALE
949.95
199.95
239.95
535.00
210.00
129.95
199.95
95149.95
00339.95
00 419.95
LIST SALE
Marantz 2220  299.95
Marantz 2245  499.95
Marantz 2270  599.95
Marantz 1030 .... 229.95 179.95
Marantz 1060 ....  329.95 259.95
Marantz 500 .... 1,495.95 999.95
Phase Linear 400   799.95 549.95
Pioneer SX 838 ..   639.95 495.95
Pioneer SX 939 ..   739.95 589.95
TAPE DECKS
coo
■ MARANTZ MODEL
^         ' ■ ^^
■      1030 STEREO
I        AMPLIFIER
{■      :■           *           C
V.
LIST
SALE
Yamaha CR 400 .
358.95
295.00
Yamaha CR 600 .
498.95
399.95
Yamaha CR 800 .
598.95
499.95
Yamaha CR 1000
858.95
699.95
Yamaha CA 400 .
298.95
249.95
Yamaha CA 600 .
358.95
295.00
Yamaha CR 800 .
498.95
399.95
Yamaha CA 1000
658.95
539.95
Yamaha CT 600 .
328.95
269.95
Yamaha CT 800 .
428.95
349.95
*#  i*
LIST
SALE
LIST
SALE
CASSETTE
REEL TO REEL
-
Superscope 302A
199.95
Sony TC 377
479.95
399.95
Harman Kardon 1000
425.00
299.95
Tandberg 3300X
499.95
Yamaha TB 700
378.95
298.95
Tandberg 9000X
799.95
Teac 160
269.95
Teac 2300S
749.00
599.95
Telefunken 2100
299.95
199.95
Teac3300S
1,049.00
839.95
Roberts CD 720
269.95
199.95
Teac 4300
998.00
799.95
SonyTC131SD
349.95
289.95
Revox A-77
1,079.00
899.95
Sony TC 134SD
399.95
329.95
Revox A-700
2,149.00 1,799.95
PLUS MORE SONY, TEAC, TANDBERG, TOSHIBA, DUAL, WOLLENSAK, AND OTHERS!
LIST SALE
JBL L-26    216.00 169.95
JBL L-36    273.00 219.95
JBLL-100,    438.00 349.95
JBL L-65    585.00 469.95
JBL L-200    957.00 759.95
Yamaha NS 410 ..   74.95 49.95
Yamaha NS 645 .   168.95 135.00
Yamaha NS 670 .   258.95 209.95
Yamaha NS 690 .   298.95 239.95
PLUS MORE, JBL, ALTEC, DYNACO, YAMAHA, CERWIN-VEGA, MARANTZ, MDS, FAIRFAX, KLH, AND OTHERS!
LIST
SALE
LIST
SALE
Altec 887A	
89.95
E.P.I. 1000
E.P.I. 602 .
E.P.I. 60	
1,350.00
41Q00
849.95
249 95
Altec 891V	
119.95
|     Bose 901 (II) pr.
889.00
749.95
..  99.50
69.95
[      Bose 301 pr	
. 299.00
239.95
Dynaco A-25
. 104.50
69.95
ESS amt 1 	
.. 450.00
299.95
Dynaco A-25XL .
Dynaco A-35
E.P.I. 90	
E.P.I. 201A	
.   134.50
149.50
129.00
335.00
89.95
99.95
89.95
219.95
ESS Tempest 1
ESS Tempest II
JBL L-16	
.  269.95
.. 229.95
186.00
179.95
149.95
119.95
JBL L-16
sound
OUR SALES STAFF WILL
BE HAPPY TO HELP
YOU SELECT THE
BEST SOUND SYSTEM!
THE PLACE TO BUY A MUSIC SYSTEM!     556Seymour
OPEN THURS & FRI
'TIL9P.M.
PERSONAL SHOPING ONLY
682-6144
SONY • TEAC • GARRARD • HARMAN-KARDON • CITATION • FISHER • ROBERTS • ALTEC LANSING   • LENCO • JBL   . SENNHEISER • KOSS •

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