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The Ubyssey Nov 10, 1966

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Array Vol. XLVIII, No. 24
THE UBYSSE
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1966
VC backers
mess up
discussion
By DAVE CURSONS
Wednesday's "bitch - in on
Vietnam turned out to be just
that.
The Vietnam Committee was
bitching because hardly anyone
showed up at the meeting.
The speakers were bitching
because only half of their number appeared at the rostrum.
The audience was bitching
because they were disappointed
with the calibre of discussion.
And finally, twenty science-
men were bitching because they
had no one to whom they could
■ show their pretty posters, made
up just for the bitch-in.
Slogans such as "Bomb the
Cong", "The Dove of Peace is
a Commie Chicken", "War with
China Now," and "Napalm
Burns Good like an Incendiary
Bomb should," were hoisted
above the host of 50 that dotted
UBC auditorium.
"Clearly the anti-war movement is still active," said independent speaker Bob Cruise, a
law student.
The sciencemen cheered the
sale of Canadian arms to the
U.S. and when New Democratic
Youth speaker Colin Gableman
suggested Canada should say
something about the use of her
weapons against the Viet Cong
a scienceman at the back of the
hall burped loudly.
Despite constant heckling the
speakers finished their talks
and the meeting closed without
incident.
—kort hilger photo
ACRES AND ACRES of empty seats greeted 'bitcher' Bob
Cruise at Wedesday's Viet Nam bitch-in. Only 50 people
turned up to hear pinkos air their views on the subject.
RYERSONIANS PACIFIED
Editors return to jobs
TORONTO (CUP) — Students and administration representatives of Ryerson Polytechnical Institute worked out a
partial agreement Tuesday to
end the two-day walkout by
18 student editors of the Daily
Ryersonian.
A new publishing board suggested by Ryerson's director of
student affairs will give the
paper's student editor final say
in all editorial disputes.
Three students and three
faculty  members  will  form  a
final court of appeal. The student editor, as a board member, will have an extra vote
in the case of a tie.
Representatives from both
sides welcomed the proposal,
approved Tuesday night in a
vote taken among second-year
journalism students.
The walkout was sparked by
the announcement Sunday
night by Ryerson's principal, F.
C. Jorgenson, that in future,
Lloyd Lockhart, the paper's
professional   managing   editor,
Geology profs head south,
leave students on rocks
Geology students will look at rocks on their own
next weeks—the profs are heading south.
Most geology classes are cancelled for next week
as the profs emigrate to San Francisco for the Geological
Survey of America Conference.
Science dean V. Okulitch said geology professors
and some grad students leave Friday for the conference
starting Sunday, Nov. 13, and will return at the end of
next week.
Presenting papers at the conference will be Dr. W.
R. Danner, Dr. R. E. Garrison, and Dr. G. E. Rouse.
These classes will be cancelled: Geology 204, 210,
307, 306, 401, and 412.
would review all copy before
publication.
When the system had been
tried before, Lockhart had censored some material, staff members claimed. In one article the
word "horseshit" was removed
and a few sentences altered.
E. U. Schrader, communications department head at Ryerson, said the move was prompted by comments from two members of the institute's board of
governors.
Schrader said the unfavorable comments prompted him
and Jorgenson to agree the
paper had to improve if grants
were to continue coming from
the board.
Ryersonian editor - in - chief
Len Coates charged the institute put clamps on the paper
to prevent the Ryersonian from
"embarrasing" Ontario education minister William Davis.
Coates said the board of governors acted following prolonged Ryersonian criticism of the
controversial Ontario government student awards scheme.
Jorgenson denied Davis had
any connection with the board's
decision to make Schrader pub-
(To Page 2)
SEE: RYERSON
1%
Shorta
may close
doors—Mac
By ROD WILCZAK
UBC president John Macdonald warned Thursday Canadian universities may have to close their doors to many
eligible students in the next ten years.
Macdonald was commenting
on a report released this week
by the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada.
The report predicted enrolment in Canadian universities
will double by 1976 to 553,000.
Present enrolment is 206,000.
. Macdonald was asked in an
interview whether he thought
the universities could accommodate 553,000 students by
1976.
"They are certainly not going to do this unless there is
a substantial infusion of
money over and above what
there is now," he said.
"The greatest problem of
all, of course, is the lack of
teachers. You can put the
buildings up in two or three
years, but where are we going
to find the teachers?
"This is why I have always
encouraged the development
of the graduate schools at
UBC."
The Sheffield report written by AUCC research director Edward Sheffield, predicted a growth in graduate student enrolment of only two
per cent over the next five
years.
Only 12.3 per cent of the
college age population of Canada go to university as compared to 39.5 per cent in the
U.S.
Macdonald sees a direct correlation between this discrepancy and the difference in employment patterns of the two
countries.
"Only a quarter of Canada's
JOHN MacDONALD
... warning
labor force is employed in skilled occupations, compared
with one-half in the U.S.," he
said.
Part-time students make up
a third of the present university enrolment. The Sheffield
report says by 1971 there will
be as many part-time students
as there are full-time students
now.
Macdonald said the Board
of Governors has not yet appointed a committee to find
his   successor.
The Ubyssey asked him if
he has decided yet what he
will do after June 30 when his
resignation takes effect.
"I've had several offers,
but I'm still thinking," was
the reply.
Bar beagles cop
law library books
Future members of the B.C.
bar have stolen more than 500
volumes from UBC's law library since 1964.
A recent inventory of the library revealed the losses.
The greatest loss occurred in
the reserve section, where -100
books have disappeared.
. In his inventory report, librarian Tom Shorthouse said:
"In actual numbers they far
exceed the losses from the reserve room in the main library,
where the ratio of users to
books is much higher than in
law."
Included among the books
stolen was Kenny's Outlines of
Criminal Law, which explicitly
describes expensive penalties
for theft.
Reference Librarian Mrs.
Donna MacKenzie said: "The
value of the books is impossible
to assess — some of the books
are out of print, and there is
no way of determining what
the second - hand replacement
cost would be."
In his report, Shorthouse
added: "more stringent measures should be imposed to prevent continued pilfering."
PETERSON
ON EDUCATION
(SEE PAGE 20) Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November  10,  1966
'Students deserve say
in residence planning'
Students should have a big
say in how their residences are
built an expert in community
planning said Wednesday.
Professor Gerhard Rosen-
burg, senior lecturer at Auckland University, said students
should think of their own de
signs, and submit plans to the
architect.
"Any architect would be
more than happy to receive student suggestions," he said.
"Students are an underprivileged group," he said. "They
can smash  windows but they
RYERSON EDITORS
(From Page 1)
lisher of the Ryersonian and
give professional managing editor Lockhart final say in 'matters of taste' concerning the
paper.
"There is definitely no censorship, and student editorial
opinion has not been nor is now
in question," said Jorgenson.
"We are concerned with putting out a professional paper.
Lockhart's purpose is to advise
reporters and help improve
stories, not censor the paper,'
he said.
"If they want a better paper
they should improve teaching
methods so journalism students
can distinguish fact from fan-
stories, not censor the paper,"
he said.
The only point of disagreement remaining is makeup of
the masthead for the next term
and the method of selecting
new editing staff, the University of Toronto Varsity reported
Tuesday night.
Flans to launch a new stu-
Council hits
McGill Daily
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill University's student council dealt twin blows last week
to its campus newspaper, The
Daily.
After a heated debate the
council rejected the Daily's
annual statement of policy and
empowered its executive applications committee to appoint the paper's managing
board, subject to council ratification, in the future.
Under the latter ruling, a
committee will choose the
paper's managing board and
submit it to council for approval.
Christmas
Shopping Yet?
- THE
SPANISH
HOUSE
4456 West 10th Av«nu«
and see the one of a kind
unique gift items handmade and imported from
Spain at most reasonable
prices.
"A Corner of Spain
2™ UockTfro^UBC'
Open Friday till 9 p.m.
CA 8-8822
dent newspaper called the Bolt
have been shelved for the time
being. Ryerson students' council earlier this week demanded
the return of funds channelled
into the Daily Ryersonian by
the board of governors.
CUS president Doug Ward
supported the council's position.
"If we wish to maintain the
prestige our student press has
in the orld student movement
it is up to all of us to fight
encroachments on principle
wherever they occur," he said.
can't have a constructive say
in the structure of their environment."
Rosenburg also suggested
that UBC foreign students build
their own residences.
"There are enough foreign
students here," he said, "for
each nationality to establish an
independent residence, as has
■been done at the Sonbonne."
And he says university residence should be located within
the city limits.
"Students live like monks,
segregated from the rest of
society."
"Education does not come so
much from the university, as
from student contacts with one
another."
Blue Collision
METROPOLIS (UNS) — A
flying red and blue object today collided with an Air Pango
Pango jet cruiser. There were
no casualties, but a large city
newspaper reported one of its
reporters missing.
[/info
RESTAURANT
and
Dining Room
4544 W. 10th Ave.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
• Full Dining
Facilities
• Take
Home
Service
Student assembly meets
this weekend to organize
The B.C. Assembly of Students holds its organizational conference this weekend at Simon Fraser Academy.
BCAS is unique in Canada, representing students
from all institutes of post-secondary education in the
province.
Students from high schools, universities, technical
institutes, vocational schools, and nursing schools will
all attend the conference.
The assembly will draw up a constitution for the
organization, and elect the executive.
TEXACO  EXPLORATION  COMPANY
CALGARY - ALBERTA
REPRESENTATIVES FROM ONE OF CANADA'S
LEADING OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCING COMPANIES WELL BE ON CAMPUS
TO INTERVIEW STUDENTS IN THE FOLLOWING
COURSES
NOVEMBER 17 and 18, 1966
REGULAR EMPLOYMENT:
GRADUATES, POST-GRADUATES, PETROLEUM
ENGINEERING — ALL BRANCHES OF ENGINEERING. GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION — ALL
BRANCHES OF ENGINEERING, GEOPHYSICS,
AND MATHEMATICS. GEOLOGICAL EXPLORATION — GEOLOGY, GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING, LAND ACQUISITION & NEGOTIATION
— LAW, COMMERCE, BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT:
YEAR PRIOR TO GRADUATION—GEOLOGICAL
EXPLORATION — GEOLOGY, GEOLOGICAL
ENGINEERING.
FOR   FURTHER   INFORMATION    AND    APPOINTMENT
PLEASE   CONTACT   THE  PLACEMENT OFFICE
Graduating Engineers
in the Mechanical, Engineering Physics
and Metallurgical options:
You will find challenging engineering work,
recognition, and above average advancement
opportunities with United Aircraft of Canada
Limited.
For over 35 years, United Aircraft of Canada
Limited has played a key role in the growth and
development of the Canadian commercial aviation industry. As a member of the United Aircraft Corporation, it manufactures, sells and
services in Canada the products of United's
Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, Sikorsky Aircraft,
Hamilton Standard and Norden Electronics
divisions.
In 1957, the Company formed the nucleus of a
design and development organization which
has since expanded into a 400-man engineering
force. Among this group's many accomplishments are the preliminary design of the Pratt &
Whitney Aircraft 3000-lb. thrust JT12 (J60)
engine. They have also developed the now mass-
produced PT6 (T74) free turbine engine for
aircraft applications and its ground-based counterpart—the ST6, used in CN's new Turbotrain
for example, as well as in oil well equipment,
turbine-powered boats and other industrial
applications.
This engineering team is now embarked on what
will be a world first... the design and develop
ment of the gas turbine power plants and propulsion machinery for four new Canadian
destroyers. These will be the first destroyers in
the world to be exclusively powered by engines
of this type.
United Aircraft of Canada now employs approximately 5200 in its manufacturing, overhaul, supply, research and development operations. In addition, the Company's long-term
plans and its pre-eminence in the gas turbine
field have created exceptional opportunities
which will prove to be well worth the detailed
consideration of graduating engineers. For
further information, please contact your Placement Office.
Our recruiting team
will be on compus Nov 17 & 18
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AT
United
Aircraft
OF CANADA LIMITED Thursday, November 10, 196$
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
—dennis gans photo
ENDLESS IT ALL SEEMS - the books, people, and work -
but it's midterm and essay time, and the library was never
so full. Last lectures this term are Dec. 9.
LIKE ELECTIONS
Library makes queries
By KRIS EMMOTT
Remember Friday, November 19th.
That's the day you'll fill in
a questionnaire about your
use of UBC's libraries.
Forms will be available in
the libraries and at stations
around the campus and in
dorms.
Students are asked to answer questions regarding use
of library facilities and to cri
ticize     library     policies    and
study conditions.
"The survey will be conducted just like an AMS election,
with tables and questionnaires
at the usual polling stations
around the campus," head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs
told a library committee meeting Tuesday.
"The election-type method
of getting mass results is an
unprecedented step for a college    library,"    Stuart-Stubbs
Student expelled
for housing grog
By RON SIMMER
Housing czar Malcolm McGregor has expelled a first
year arts student from university residences because of a
Totem Park drinking party Friday night.
Tim Boyes, 18, met with Mc-
said.
The survey will be one of
the largest of its kind ever
undertaken. Results will be
computerized and used in
formulating long-range library
policies.
Ture Erickson, Sedgewick
librarian, told the committee
Sedgewick's circulation for
October was double last
year's.
"We circulated over 42,000
books, as against last October's
20,000," he said.
The rise has placed a severe
strain on Sedgewick staff.
In other business, Stuart-
Stubbs announced reserve
books will be due at 1:30 p.m.
after January 4.
"This way we can get returns catalogued and back on
the shelves in time for those
who leave campus early to
get them," he said.
Reserve books are now due
at 3 p.m.
Gregor and Salish house don
Ron Kidd Wednesday morning
and was told that since he
started the party in his room
he was responsible for the ensuing melee.
"Eight of us were having a
quiet gab-fest in my room
with two cases of beer when
other Totem people with non-
student friends from Vancouver drifted in with a lot more
booze," he said.
The Don was quite right in
breaking up the party, he said.
The door was scratched and
some of the furniture was
slightly damaged, "and I got
sick all over the place," he
admitted.
McGregor told him that he
didn't like the liquor ruling
but it was his job to administer it, and if he found out the
names of the other students
at the party he would expel
them also, Boyes said.
Frederic Wood Theatre...:
THE MOST EXCITING PLAY EVER SEEN ON CAMPUS
The Persecution and Assassination
of Marat as Performed by the Inmates
of the Asylum at Charenton Under
the Direction of the Marquis de Sade
By Peter Weiss
Directed by John Brockington
November 18~~26,-*S:30 p.m.
Special Student Performances: Monday, Nov. 21 — 7.30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 24, 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets are Available for All Performances.
Due to the elaborate production student tickets for this play only will be $1.00
BOX OFFICE: RM. 207 FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Than has been a tremendous advance interest in  this play. You are advised to get your tickets early.
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l#F VSYSStV
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and. Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the Uni*sr*ity^ of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the" university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific StudenK-TPress. Authorised
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence  and  editorial writing.
NOVEMBER  10,   1966
A reporter's lite is not easy; trying to
make exciting news out ot ordinary people
like us, Robin.
Batman, Nov. 7, 1966
Peace
Remembrance day, 1966.
For those who died, a fervent but forlorn wish that
the honor list which records their names may grow no
longer.
Bogwaders
The rains came, and as we eruditely predicted a
month ago, Marine Drive is a soupy, boggy sea in which
somebody's car will soon drown.
The goddam muck track over which 3,000 oars pass
each way every day is an absolute disgrace,, an outrage,
and an insult to the commuters of UBC.
The reason for this outrage, we suspect, was the
Canadian Open golf tourney, and the shortage of parking
space near Shaughnessy golf course. For parking, the
provincial highways people and the City of Vancouver
left the road unfinished for term opening. Now, inclement weather, as they would say, makes completion
both difficult and expensive.
So we're blowing our editorial cool over those two
miles of muck.
We're blowing at the government which gets things
done partly (and how albout the Sixteenth Avenue extension which was to be completed this year and isn't even
started), and we're blowing at students who happily
drive over that muck with no visible sign of outrage.
What the hell, Phil, is it nothing to you?
Ma wuz right
Never trust a city-slicker, Mother always used to
say, and make the lawyer keep his 'hands on the table.
For if you don't, she said in her country way, he'll
snitch the antimacassar from behind your head while
smugly probating Pa's will.
We usually don't listen to Mother, but now we know
we should.
Those paragons of law and order in UBC's law
school have pinched mote than 500 valuable law books
in the last two years—a much higher pilfer rate than
in the main library, where one might expect rampant
thievery from us lowly peasants.
But then, lawyers are taught to qualmlessly defend
either side of any argument, regardless of truth and
irrespective of their own integrity.
A brilliant young barrister caught in the filch would
probably argue that he can make great contributions
to the study of law by owning the book.
And the law would be denied his contribution if the
book stays in the library where it can be read by all
those other idiots who won't make the bar anyway.
it oriqiflal.
flLODi^ws
£&*0*T*Sf>.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
« ''<„«
;<<;«-'-,      -^o^-n^
7 become daring
Editor, The Ubyssey:
So ... I am poor ... So
they tell me to get a job. I
do. I work for a few years
but I haven't got the magic
degree.  I remain poor.
I become daring. I come to
UBC. I get a loan for first
term fees but the machine
makes it out in two payments
(one now, one January.) I
am still poor. So I spend the
first payment on rent and
books. Then I can't get
get another loan.
So I work after classes
27 V6 hours per week. I pay
rent. I get letters. They say
send money. Got yer fees!
I think about it at work; I
give a guy a wrong order.
"Stupid," he says, "I'll report yah to the supervisor!"
. . . he's a university student.
He's talking about frats
and drinking and screwing
so I guess he is a real collegiate type.
Anyway . . . this job at the
bus stop only allows me to
remain at a consistent level
of poverty.
But then I read about this
guy named Wayne Wiebe. He
really cheers me up, see,
'cause he said that some students favor tuition fees. He
must really know a lot of
neat stuff to say that. Gosh.
I wish I could appreciate
smart stuff like that.
Anyway, I guess I'll never
get a chance to learn. I have
been notified to drop out of
university   on   the   15th   of
November for not paying
fees.
SISYPHUS
'Unwarranted'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to register my disapproval of your editorial
(and anti-editorial) following D r. Macdonald's announcement of his resignation.
I feel it was entirely unwarranted and very disrespectful especially considering what he has done for
UBC and the province of
B.C.
It is very unfortunate and
somewhat alarming that the
general political attitude of
the paper in the past months
has swung so far left.
A  Canadian   Student
Trictionless  hips'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Kathy Harkness, in Tuesday's Ubyssey, calculates that
if a 140 lb. student walks to
and from C-lot each day, he
will walk  128 miles a year.
She then multiplies this distance, in feet, by 140 lbs. to
calculate the work done, and
arrives at a figure of 94,617,-
600 foot-pounds.
Anyone who passed high
school physics should see that
the   figure   is  incorrect,   be
cause   one   does   not   walk
against one's own weight, but
at right angles to it. That is,
weight is a vertical force and
does not affect horizontal motion.
Take   comfort,    Kathy!   If
your hips move without friction, you will do no work at
all when walking from C-lot.
KELLY   KLINE
Ap. Sc. 11
Tree final years
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The McGill Daily often
contains news items from
British Columbia universities. A recent one concerned
a   demand by  B.C.   students
To Page 5
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing    _     Richard Blair
News   Carol Wilson
City            ._   _   ..    Danny Stoffman
Photo ... Powell Hargrave
Page Friday ._._ Claudia Gwinn
Focus Rosemary Hyman
Sports     Sue Gramby
Ass't News        Pat Hrushowy
Ass't City    Tom Morris
CUP Bert Hill
Debating Dave Cursona was
bitched-ln. Boni Lee floated over
her typewriter in the lotus position. Bo Hansen, Murray McMillan, John Appleby, Ron Simmer,
Norman Gidney, Kris Emmott,
Pat Lidkea, Rod Wilczak, M&ry
Ussner, Charlotte Haire, and Rick
Fetish reported.
Swarms of camera clutchers included Derrek Webb, Kurt Hilger, Don Kydd, Chris Blake, John
Tilley, and Al Harvey.
Party Thursday. Come down to
find out where. Thursday, November 10, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS
Of radicals, China, vin
for free first-year tuition.
Presumably this would later
be extended to free tuition
in the second and subsequent
years.
I should like to propose
starting at the opposite end,
giving free tuition for the
final year or two years. A
free first year would encourage those who want a year
at college just to have a good
time.
On the other hand, the
prospect of free tuition at a
later stage should encourage freshmen to work hard
enough to succeed in their
first year, and the taxpayer's
money would not be wasted
on playboys.
NORMAN THYER
Montreal
Tew radicals push'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
What are we here for —
an education or a lesson in
how to undermine authority?
We as individuals can take
an active part in shaping our
future and that of our government, but it is not the responsibility of the student
council to turn the university into a pressure group.
Tom Morris (Ubyssey —
Nov. 8th) has the right idea
— there are hundreds of us
who are sick of being run by
left-wing, left-out agitators.
It is time we realize that so
called 'student opinion' is
only the thinking of three or
four student radicals who are
able to push around a weak
and mentally impoverished
council executive.
Student council has become
a haven for student radicalism.
GEOFFREY   FLACK
UBC Conservatives
'Amid the bombast'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We were present at the Friday night and Saturday afternoon sessions of the China
teach-in last weekend. Amid
the bombast, specious reasoning, sophistry and veiled and
outright slander employed in
particular toy David Crook and
on occasion by several other
members of the two panels,
we were immensely impressed by the sound logic, sincerity and intellectual integrity of Dr. Rene Goldman
of the dept. of Asian Studies.
Not once did Goldman
swerve in his attempt to present an objective analysis of
the Chinese cultural revolution and its historical roots.
Not once, despite the harrass-
ments, loaded questions, and
embarrassing rudeness of the
other panel members, did he
retaliate to their attempts to
discredit the legitimacy of his
presentation or the personal
motives behind his viewpoint.
Not once did he emulate several of his fellow panelists in
altering a question from a
member of the audience in
order to avoid a possible refutation of a prior statement.
The China teach-in taught
us an excellent lesson in wariness of intellectual stuntmen
and logical magicians who
transform opposition to their
faulty reasoning into the discrediting of their opponents.
It also taught us honest
admiration for a man who
does not consider abandoning
the ideals of true intellectual
inquiry in the face of dema-
goguery and the prostitution
of logic. Thank you, Dr. Goldman.
RAYMOND and JEANNE
WALKER
Wayne Knights
'Apathy appalls
Editor, The Ubyssey:
During a recent visit to
Simon Fraser Academy I was
appalled at the general state
of apathy the students apparently show towards the
maintenance of their campus.
What drew my attention
most was the condition of the
coffee shop and cafeteria —
the floors were literally a sea
of trash left by neglected or
disinterested students, obviously too lazy to walk a few
steps to a garbage container.
This amounts to desecration of
a toeautiful building for which
the students should show regard.
SFA, being a showplace, is
frequented by tourists and
should therefore make some
attempt to impress upon the
students that they must no
longer act like teeny-boppers
and must try to act like mature adults, if they wish to
have the distinction of being
recognized as university students.
A disgusted observer
No  vintners,  we
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In reference to Friday's
story on page three about the
alleged victory of the pubsters in the boat race, I hope
that you are not inferring
that Andres crackling rose is
a Canadian champagne.
It is not a champagne and
was never meant to be.
If you are confused I suggest you try Andres Richelieu deluxe champagne.
E.  J.   MERRELL
Arts 4
'Relaxation
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We, the undersigned, have
read the current petition asking for the elimination of the
restrictions on women students in residences. We agree
that a change in these regulations is long overdue.
Unfortunately, the petition
is poorly worded and ambiguous; therefore useless. It asks
for a change that parents of
first year women especially
won't accept. Parents fear
undesirable occurrences will
be caused by a sudden conferral of freedom.
We suggest a retention, or
perhaps a relaxation, of restrictions for first year women rather than complete elimination of restrictions for all
women. This is fairer to the
parents and probably better
for the women.
BILL   PATTINSON
ERIK   BRYNJOLFSON
RICK  YOKOME
LARRY WILSON
DON MacLELLAN
JOHN  MORTON
P. B. MORAN
Why should they?'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re The Ubyssey of Sebt.
29, 1966.
Aren't you defeating your
purpose by asking the residents of Point Grey to open
their homes to students and
asking the city council for a
three-year relaxation on zoning when this sort of thing
goes on? (meaning the sex
referred to in the said issue
of The Ubyssey).
I don't think the people in
that area are that crazy, and
why should they be?
DISGUSTED?
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'TJojua.  Shop-' Page 6
THE      1TB Y S S EY
Thursday, November 10,  1966
Seduction okay
with UBC profs
UBC  professors  are  not  concerned
of a 300-year-old seduction poem.
The poem, To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell,
caused a flurry of controversy at the University of
North Carolina recently.
Essays written on the poem
by a first year class were considered "vulgar and embarrassing" by many students,
and parents' concern resulted
in transfer of the professor.
Geoffrey Durrant, head of
UBC's English Department,
expressed surprise at the
story.
"We assume that a university is a place where professors can make free decisions
on anything in the syllabus,"
he  said.
"This tells more about the
University of North Carolina
than it does about the poem,"
he added.
Andrew Busza, UBC assistant professor of English, said
it was a good poem.
"Such controversy is ridiculous," he said. "It shows these
people's basic lack of sense of
humour, and the double standard of American life."
George Garnett, UBC English instructor, said he had
never encountered this type of
controversy at university.
"This poem is taught at the
second-year level, but none of
my students have expressed
that much terror of sex "
Birds meet Villa
The UBC Soccer Birds play
Burnaby Villa Friday. Game
time is 2:00 p.m. at Callister
Park.
QUAKER MEETING FOR WORSHIP
SUNDAYS  11  A.M.
FRIENDS' HOUSE, 535 W. 10th AVE.
Visitors Welcome
about  the  effects
Potty group
to educate
fag smokers
A group formed to educate
pot smokers will hold its organizational meeting in a
Tenth avenue coffeehouse Friday.
The group, as yet unnamed,
announced the organizational
meeting in a press release
Wednesday.
The gathering will be at
the Advance Mattress Coffeehouse, Tenth and Alma, Friday night at 6:30.
Gathering and distributing
of information on the legal
and moral aspects of marijuana smoking and taking
LSD, and helping those arrested on drug offences, are
the prime obpectives of the
association.
The group called on all students to attend a B.C. Civil
Liberties Association discussion on Drugs and the Law, tonight at 8:15 in the B.C. Hydro
auditorium.
The release added, "Don't
be paranoid, be careful."
Library  stacks
remember holiday
The main library will be
open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
on Remembrance Day.
Sedgewick and Woodward
libraries will open from 8
to midnight.
The law library opens
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.,
Mathematics library from
8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., and the
Social Work library from 8
a.m. to 10 p.m.
This weekend don't be left out . . . join the "in crowd"
Dance to Terry and The Viscounts
featuring the dynamic Bud Currie
Friday and Saturday  Night at the
EMBASSY    BALLROOM
1024  Davie
Dancing   from   10:00   until   1:00  a.m.
"The   Place   With   the   Dancing   Lights"
Admission   only   $1.50
FEDERAL CABINET MINISTER
John Turner speaks on the
changing Canadian political
scene at noon today in Bu.
104.
Coming . . . Sunday, November 13
AN  ALL NASHVILLE SHOW
STARRING
ROT   ORBISON
THE CANDY MEN - THE NEW BEATS
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE - 6:30 and 9:00 p.m.
TICKETS AT: VANCOUVER CENTRE, MU 3-325S - ALL EATON'S STORES ,',■"-
(CHARG-* THEM) - TOWN AND COUNTRY HOME FURNISHINGS IN M-'l
RICHMOND AND KERRISDALE. ■-«*-*
Fifty years ago we only made 'aeroplanes',
(See what's happening now!)
Boeing-Vertol Helicopter
if
Boeing 737 Twinjel
NASA Saturn V
Engineers & Scientists:
Campus Interviews, Thursday and Friday, November 17 and 18
In 1916 The Boeing Company's career
was launched on the wings of a small seaplane. Its top speed was 75 mph.
Now, half a century later, we can help
you launch your career in the dynamic environment of jet airplanes, spacecraft, missiles, rockets, helicopters, or even seacraft.
Pick your spot in applied research, design, test, manufacturing, service or facilities engineering, or computer technology. You can become part of a Boeing
program-in-being, at the leading edge of
aerospace technology. Or you might want
to get in on the ground floor of a pioneering new project.
You'll work in small groups where
initiative and ability get maximum exposure. And if you desire an advanced
degree and qualify, Boeing will help you
financially with its Graduate Study Program at leading universities and colleges
near company facilities.
Often it will be sheer hard work. Bi
we think you'll want it that way whe
you're helping to create something uniqu
—while building a solid career. Visit you
college placement office and schedule a
interview with our representative. Boein
is an equal opportunity employer.
Divisions: Commercial Airplane   •    Missile
Information Systems    •    Space   •    Superson
Transport  •   Vertol  •   Wichita  • Also, Boeir
Scientific Research Laboratories Thursday, November 10, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
LIKE CHRIST, MAN
'Meditation stalls death
By BONI LEE
Indian spiritual leader Maharish Mahesh Yogi has long
brown hair, a white robe, a
string of white sparklers and
a physical resemblance to
Christ.
An overflow audience of
900 students Wednesday packed Brock Hall to hear him discuss transcendental meditation.
"Life will cease to be a
struggle. All the problems of
life will dissolve," he promised.
Maharish said worries are a
weakness of the mind.
• Transcendental meditation
is a conscious exploitation of
the depths of the mind," he
said.
"It deepens and expands the
conscious capacity and fulfills
the full potentiality of the
mind."
And even more.
Maharish said the human
mind can obtain clairvoyance
and extra-sensory perception.
One can predict an event and
even attempt to change it.
"There are no limitations of
past, present and future," he
said.
He said transcendental meditation can prevent people
from getting old.
Design  contest
deadline  today
Deadline for the Open
House symbol design contest has been extended until
today.
Dr. Lionel Thomas of the
fine arts department heads
a committee to select a design to be constructed on
main mall during next
year's Open House.
Winning entry will receive $25, runner-up $10.
AGO GO
at
the
Swig.
presenting
EL RAU'S MOJO
and   the
A GO GO GIRLS
DANCING   9   to   3 THURSDAY
FRIDAY   and   SATURDAY
Ample Parking
821   RIVER  RD.,   RICHMOND
Special  Student rate with
AMS  Cards Friday
Reservations,   CR   8-2624
The body runs down because it is constantly working.
"With transcendental meditation it is possible to give
perfect rest to the body. The
aging process becomes restricted," he said.
"It is possible to avert
death. Is is possible to live
eternally," he declared.
(Maharish was later asked
how old he was. He declined
to answer because: "I am a
monk, and a monk is not supposed to talk about his personal life.")
Maharish said in transcendental meditation, one goes
deeper into thought, not think
ing out.
He said: "As the mind goes
deeper and deeper, the strings
of the nervous system and
mind  are closely correlated."
Maharesh was asked about
his resemblance to Christ.
"I don't hold to be Christ.
If people love me, I welcome
it," he said.
Maharish does not impart
technical information concerning his method of meditation
at public lectures.
"It is a private, personal
matter. It must be learned
by every individual."
Individuals interested can
be taught for a fee of $15.
SUDDENLY YOU'RE THE
CENTRE OF ATTENTION IN
Glenayr
uienayr     -        m   ^_
SWEATERS,
SKIRTS, SLIMS
Picture yourself in this
medium weight "Fair
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colours to enhance the
rest of this delightful
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of the warm new shades
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partner—a fully-lined
matching 100% pure
wool skirt, woven from
superfine English
Botany. It's d ry -
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to perfectly match all
Kitten Botany pure wool
sweaters. At all fine
shops everywhere.
it is not a genuine KITTEN.
THE BRITISH AMERICAN OIL COMPANY LIMITED
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
British American  Oil  Representatives will  be available on  November   14,   15
and 16 to discuss career opportunities for the following disciplines:
• ENGINEERING
• GEOLOGY
• GEOPHYSICS
• COMMERCE
• HONOURS ARTS
• HONOURS CHEMISTRY
• HONOURS MATHS and PHYSICS
• BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
• MBA's
• COMPUTER SCIENCE
Students interested in interviewing us are requested to contact their placement
office.
The   modern  way  to   see  is   with
Contact Lenses
Have   them   expertly   fitted   at   a
reasonable price by
LAWRENCE CALVERT
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705 Birks Bldg.
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AN ANNOUNCEMENT OF SPECIAL INTEREST
/* OR SEVERAL years now, the Garnelene (Terylene and
Wool) suit has been the measure of quality in Canada.
Its remarkable shape-retention . . . durable performance
and distinguished appearance have set it in a class
apart.
FOR FALL we have a new version of Garnelene-satin
smooth to the touch. The colorings are deep, rich and
masculine — featuring Sapphire Blue, Antique Jade,
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/.HE SUITS, of course, are styled expressly for Clinton's
by Progress Brand Clothes, one of Canada's great names
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elene suits are now on display. Ready-to-wear $99.50.
Tailored-to-measure somewhat higher.
Clothing for Compos and Dress-up Occasions
742 Granville St. MU 1-5635 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November  10,   1966
SUB MOVES  AHEAD
Game ends stadium use
For those who like football   their   place   in   the   building,
games in UBC's comfortable
old stadium, Saturday is your
last chance.
UBC Thunderbirds tangle
with the Manitoba Bisons at
the stadium in the season's last
game at 2 p.m. The stadium
will be torn down in February to make way for a new
student  union  building.
AMS treasurer Lome Hudson said Wednesday the final
plans for the student union
building are to go to the Board
of Governors on Nov. 22.
Building consultant Porter
Butts is making his final review of the plans now and
SUB architect Ken Snyder of
Winnipeg will be in Vancouver next Monday for a week
prior to the presentation of
the plans to the board.
"Everybody's satisfied with
even Radsoc," said Hudson.
Cost estimates for the structure and a proposed brief to
the provincial government outlining the AMS request for
low-cost financing will be released to individual members
of the board Nov. 14 or 15.
"As far as the work on the
building is concerned, SUB is
a big iceberg," Hudson said.
"We have had about 50 professional people working on
the plans for 18 months."
The plans will go to tender
as soon as board approval is
received.
The approval is conditional
on the clearance of the project from various agencies on
the campus.
People such as food services
functionaries and fire marshals must be satisfied the
building conforms to the neces
sary    specifications   in   areas
that concern them.
If no problems develop, construction will begin in February.
But for those who love the
old stadium with heartfelt intensity, — it will not be torn
down until then since the interior is still being used for
wrestling instruction.
Minister  finds
debating  shield
Found: Wesbrook debating shield, last seen in 1914.
The shield, given for debating in the colleges that
surrounded Vancouver in
the years before World War
One, was found Tuesday by
Anglican College principal
John Blewett in the college's attic.
The Huberman Educational Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL   COLLEGE
"Knowledge  and  success  through  learning   power"
Director: M. HUBERMAN, B.A., LL.B.. B.C.I.C.
3601  West 16th Ave.
228-8028 - 263-4808
Lionel Conacher (Honors Bus. Admin. '60) is a successful London Life sales representative.
Lionel K. Conacher* counsels '67 grads:
it
Why I chose a marketing career with London Life"
"In my field of work, there is unlimited scope for
graduates who seek freedom to decide their own
fiiture along with an opportunity to develop their
own potential.
"London Life gives you three major assists in
establishing your career in marketing:
"First, a solid three months of specialized training
at the head office, with emphasis on marketing
among executives and professional men, in business
insurance, estate planning, taxation and group insurance. And this is only the beginning of your training,
"Second, an attractive starting salary that helps
you become established. Also, there are plenty
of opportunities for graduates to move into key
marketing management areas.
"Finally, you are backed by the company with more
insurance in force on the lives of Canadians than
any other. A company whose annual sales are
unexcelled in the Canadian market."
Graduate Opportunities
London Life requires graduates with bachelors or
masters degrees in commerce, arts, and business
administration, to develop the fast-growing market
of life insurance throughout Canada.
Successful candidates will enter the marketing
branch for specialized training in group sales and
ordinary life sales to professional people and businessmen. Beginning with three months of initial
training at its head office in London, Ontario, the
company's 18-month training and development
program for university graduates continues under
expert supervision in your home area (or another
location of your choice), with continued short
courses in London.
An attractive salary is provided during the training
period and can be supplemented by sales commission. In addition, you enjoy individual freedom to
develop your own skills, knowledge and income at
the pace you choose to set. There are no limitations
to opportunities in fife insurance marketing.
A London Life representative will be interviewing
at your college placement office on the date below.
If you are interested in learning more about a marketing career with London Life, arrange for an
appointment through your placement officer.
*At the University of Western Ontario, Lionel
Conacher was well known as a fullback on the
champion University Mustangs of 1957 and 1959.
He was graduated in 1960, joined London Life,
and became a group insurance supervisor in
Montreal. In 1963 he transferred to the company's Ordinary Branch in Toronto, where he has
successfully established a business clientele.
A representative will be interviewing at this campus on November 15
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office: London, Canada
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INVESTIGATE A
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Our current expansion plans
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S90j§a\[ jo SAiaiA ^iia-uno jb p-rei[ surep Moqs p.qsiiij\[ r
pi
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
*        <    ;*
,. ™ * - mimmMmmm.'m\i: ~, «s»
NOV. 10, 1966
ON THE COVER: Collage
by Gordon Fidler. SF
Mime appears in the
Auditorium at 12:30 and
8.30 today.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants:  judy bing
sue richter
fly
The Jefferson Airplane
made the scheduled landing at The Queenie,
Thursday night. It's the
second round trip for The
Airplane. (They appeared
in Brock last year.) But
their landing flaps were
lowered well in advance
this time and the actual
set down was smoother
and without the jagged
sound effects.
The female vocal lead
is as mellow as before
and with the new cooperation of accompaniment
and vocalists they have
become a group.
The echo from "My
Best Friend" and "I Want
To Love Somebody" is
success.
Tom Northcott's trio
unfortunately lacks the
expression and audience
contact even though they
do have a good sound. But
judging from the applause
the audience (without
looking that is) was mainly comprised of the supercool hippy set. Not even
the visual girations of colors incited any response.
Sandwiched between
the two was The Muddy
Waters blues band which
explained the presence of
the odd fur stole.
With a curious mixture
of blues and semi-rock the
Waters group were at
least aible to nod a few
heads to the rhythm.
Other than that the only
sentiment vocalized was a
low groan when Muddy
began a song he said he
wrote in 1947.
And the C-fun-ny man
wasn't funny.
pf 2 wo
Racists cramp campus
By RICHARD DALY
University College in Salisbury, the
only multi-racial soil in Rhodesia, has
obviously became a thorn in the government's side during the past year.
Student discontent, brewing for the
past two years, came to a head in July
when Mr. Dumaney, an avowed Cape-
Richard Daly, is a history and economics student at Trinity College, Oxford, England. Daly spent several years
studying at UBC.
town racist, was invited as guest of
honor at the Salisbury convocation
ceremonies. Considering this a serious
breach of academic freedom a sizable
group of students held a protest demonstration during the ceremonies.
Protocol being seriously upset the
police were called to the scene. The
ceremonies ended with many youths
'behind bars.
Thirty students were suspended.
Many ignored the order. In the following days and weeks, these students
went into hiding, often in their lecturers' houses.
The day after graduation those suspected of planning and leading the demonstration, and generally inciting innocent students to rebellion — nine
lecturers and nine students, Africans,
Indians, and Europeans — were packed off to Gonakudzingwa retention
camp.
The Smith regime continues to accuse
a number of U.C. lecturers of seeding
young minds with sedition. They have,
until recently, accused, arrested, and
retained without trial any voices of
protest in the colony. The new Law and
Order Maintenance Act allows the
policy to make indiscriminate arrests
without regard to the due course of
law.
But student ferment continues. Obviously preventative detention had not
been effective.
In August, John Conradie, a young
outspoken history lecturer, was arrested at Salisbury's airport just before he
was to leave for a family wedding in
South Africa.
Charged with the aiding of rebels
(the police maintain Conradie was
storing Russian hand-grenades in his
flat) Conradie will stand trial for his
life early in November.
In Rhodesia's state of political disease
defense lawyers are not available. The
last defender of political prisoners, Leo
Baron, is inexplicably in jail.
Though it is unlikely Smith wants
to create an academic-political martyrdom, especially with a white man, John
Conradie is in serious trouble. More
recently further numbers of campus
leaders have been detained or forced
to flee the colony.
Consciousness of the Rhodesian problems have reached England. The Rolls-
Royce club members sport bumper
stickers which support Smith's regime.
The National Union of Students has
asked Prime Minister Wilson to plead
for grants to students dispossessed by
the Smith regime.
Students at London School of Economics are also taking action on the
Rhodesia affair. Dr. Walter Adams,
principal of U.C. Rhodesia, has been
appointed director of the L.S.E. and
the students promise strong action unless Adams explains his failure to protest intimidations and searchings of
staff and students by Smith's regime
since U.D.I.
One student told me, "Since L.S.E.
is also a multi-racial school we find it
extremely inappropriate that Adams be
appointed director. And some of the
teaching staff agree with us."
The situation in Rhodesia is illustration that the academic's luxury of
moral inaction has ended. Scholastic
freedom in future will have to ibe maintained or regained iby active and cooperative awareness and participation
by students and teachers of all universities.
In the case at hand, funds are being
solicited from university people all
over the world to send defense lawyers
for Conradie and the others who have
been arrested in the interim.
One prime example of academic
morality and injustice is the officials'
refusal to allow the soliciting of funds
anywhere within University College
London.
By not registering our protest in this
matter we, the western world's academic communities, are giving the
silent nod to fascistic injustices, in
Rhodesia, South Africa, Viet Nam,
Mississippi . . .
Godard fairytales go pop
By NELSON MILLAR
"poor little boy lost
he takes himself so seriously"
—Bob Dylan, Vision of Johanna
In Jean Luc Godard's pop
fairy tale Alpha ville, in-
dividual conscience that
needs love, fears death and
clings to the past, conquers a
computerized and conformist
society which imposes logic
and implants total conscious
surrender to the present.
But neither conquest nor
individualism is where it's
at.
Entertaining sight and
sound motifs make the battle between the technological
and the human seem worthwhile; however they take
second place to the dialogue.
Godard takes words too seriously.
Eddie Constantine has the
Bogart-like face and manner
appropriate for a pop knight
in shining white armor. Anna
Karina's face and movements
are viably sensitive and
beautiful, just right for a
pop version of Sleeping
Beauty.
Go flip out on
a. sight and sound
b. Constantine and Karina
Juliet died victim of a myth
MYSTIC Maharishi Mahesh
meditates during his appearance in Brock yesterday.
By NANCY CORBETT
Monday afternoon, police found the body
of UBC student Juliet Du Bray in her room.
An investigation is underway.
There is only a small group of students
at this university who are not receiving
support from their parents. The great majority of young people in this position just
simply do not come. It is too hard.
Sometimes an individual from a poor
home takes seriously what he hears about
higher education. Juliet did.
You say, there are scholarships available.
Juliet was a good student, tout the scholarships are for the brilliant. They don't go
very far for the students who are merely
good.
There are bursaries, yes. The average
maximum is $100 a year.
But there are loans, you say.
Juliet came from a family to whom debt
was a frightening thing, with no way out.
She worried about assuming debt. Finally
she applied for a the loan. $1,000. After
books and fees, $400.
That's $50 a month for each month of the
school year.
To   manage,   Juliet   held   part-time   jobs,
often two at a time. She worked as a waitress, a ticket-seller at a moviehouse, in the
library, in food services, as a baby-sitter.
Her studies suffered, and she worried
about them. She worked often, a twenty-
hour day.
She was exhausted. Her marks went down.
She grew more and more despondent.
But she always believed that what she
was doing was the only way to escape the
fate of her family. She could not face the
idea of giving up what she was struggling
so hard to attain.
But it is impossible to manage for months
and months without proper sleep, proper
meals, relaxation and entertainment.
Luxury for Juliet was having a few extra
hours to study. But she didn't have many of
those hours, and her marks kept slipping.
She grew increasingly frustrated and depressed.
You may laugh, or consider her stupid
for not giving up. But she believed what
people like you say about higher education.
Three days ago Juliet died.
Our society, talking about university,
didn't mean her. She should have known
better than to try.
-'";K
Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 10, 1966 <!tt"f':
Mime wars on audience
PF's Gabor Mate talks
with Peter Cohen, member
of the controversial St-_.
Francisco Mime Troupe, appearing today in the Auditorium.
pf: What is it that bugs
you about middle class America?
Cohen: Middle class everywhere . . . The attitude that
prescribes a correct way of
doing things, that says there
is a RIGHT way to live, a
RIGHT way of doing things,
a RIGHT way to operate
your business — that attitude which makes life dull,
anti-reality, and  anti-art.
pf: Where do you see this
attitude?
C: Most of American society is permeated by it.
American society is so rational, everything made to
order, streets. intersecting
exactly    at    right    angles,
houses geometrically progressed — this is why the
absolute beauty given to insanity, why "that's crazy"
or its's insane" are words
of praise. This love o f
insanity is just a reaction
against that cold rationality,
that jig-saw puzzle attitude
towards life, and it celebrates eccentricity, spon-
tanaiety, and beauty—all of
which scare the middle
class.
pf:  Is that what you do?
C: Yes, one of the purposes of this theatre is to
bust them in half. Our kind
of theatre is outrageous, it
outrages their notions of propriety and decency. It's a
guerrilla theatre — we are
at war with them.
pf: Do you pose any
threat to the middle class
that they recognize? They
notice the kind of guerrilla
warfare the Viet Cong is
waging, do they notice you?
C: They must notice us,
because they try to stop our
show. The people we are
fighting,  or the  enemy we
roughly call the Establishment, are not stupid. They
are smart, and they are as
intuitive as we are — they
just operate on different
premises. They have very
good antennae which tell
them when they are being
attacked, and the extent of
the danger. They obviously
sense something in our
whole stance which they
consider dangerous, so they
pass directives to the University of California saying
these kids are not to be allowed on campus.
pf: What political criticisms do you make of your
society?
C: It is difficult to say.
America is really a kind of
consciousness, and the consciousness is an empire consciousness, and this consciousness is reflected in the
politics. I mean, what the
hell are the politics of America? It's a government by
the rich, for the rich. Look
at the irony of millionaire
Sargent Shriver running the
poverty program, and then
immediately cutting the
funds of every program that
begins to threaten his status
as a rich man.
pf: Will there be any attempt to censor acts like
yours, or even to ban them,
now that Reagan is elected?
C: Absolutely. There is
amendment out now, the so-
called Clean Amendment,
Proposition 16, which would
empower any private citizen
to force a policeman or a
public prosecutor to prosecute anything that he considers obscene. It is really a
vicious amendment, and I
am sure things will get
tougher for us.
pf: How will you,react?
Will this force you to
change?
C: Not essentially. We
have a whole idea about
guerilla theater worked out
which is modelled after a
guerilla band. You are at
war, you have to be light
and agile, you have to be
incredibly flexible and imaginative, and you have to
draw your support from the
people. So we put on free
plays outdoors in the parks
of San Francisco and make
collections after them; we
improvise forums that are
free-wheeling, that give us
the greatest room to present
the ideas we want to talk
about.
pf: How do you, as artists,
>i ?.■ .fv;--"    ^,'« &' ■; -.. ---
relate your ideas to society?
C: I think that any artist
has a choice whether or not
to toe concerned with the
ideas that are central to
his day, and if you don't
concern yourself with those
ideas, I think you are copping out. I think aesthetics
is an appendage today, unfortunately. We study the
Greeks, or Michealangelo's
David, but bombs still drop,
the war still goes on, and
people still die. Now, all art
teaches you something about
your senses — painting
teaches you about sight,
symphony about hearing —
but it should do more than
that. Art should not be separated from the times it exists in. I think the time we
live in has incredible creative potential, but you have
to deal with it, and face the
risks of dealing with it.
pf: Aren't you working
backwards then, trying to
change the art, and through
the art change society, when
in fact it is society which
produces the art to begin
with?
C: That's the old chicken
and the egg question. We
are not really trying to
change the art, we are just
looking for forms which are
adaptable to what we are
trying to do. The minstrel
show was a traditional
American form but it was
loose enough to admit current material, to admit ad
lib. Audiences want to participate, they don't want to
sit back and look at things
through a picture frame, or
look at a statue on a pedestal. They want to become
involved, and our theater
involves them. It involves
them in the scene they live
in   the   street,   it   involves
them with contemporary vocabulary, and it involves
them through the structure
which is loose and open, and
which they have to fill in.
pf: What exactly do you
want your audience to get
involved in, in the larger
sense?
C: The show really says
it. We purposely put ourselves outside the society,
outside the position where
we can be compromised. We
don't own anything, so we
have nothing that can be
taken away, and we don't
make compromises. You can
take a play like Marat/
Sade, which was written by
Peter Weiss, a socialist, and
yet there is nothing in the
play that prevents David
Merrick, an arch-capitalist,
from presenting it on Broadway. It is this dichotomy
and compromise that we are
trying to overcome, the
dichotomy by which a man
can employ two hundred
Negroes and Puerto Ricans
in his factory at sub-standard wages, and then go
home and read humanist
literature. I am certainly
trying to destroy such contradictions in my life, and
make other people own up
to them as well. The show
is accused of obscenity a
lot because there are four
letter words in it, but really
all we are doing is holding
up the mirror. And if you
don't like what you see, you
don't try to clean up the
mirror.
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Thursday, November 10, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
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Plod onward blasted student
By MIKE COLEMAN
Joe Students on this campus plod stoically on, their
collective eyes rivetted on
The Degree to the exclusion
of all student involvement
other than Friday beering
and Saturday wenching.
And maybe they're the
smart ones.
Throughout the country,
attempts at progressive initiative through the Canadian
Union of Students is bringing increasing resignations
and withdrawals by the moss-
backs who masquerade as
student leaders.
The radicals reply by continually railing against the
bureaucracy, by castigating
anyone associated with a
moderate (translate as representative) attitude.
Joe Student's views are
never solicited. Service
station leaders no more stand
for the Canadian student attitude than do extremist banshees of the New Left. The
bitter, bloody battle storming
around the bastions of student government is a pointless exercise in the pursuit of
some mythically Machiavellian power for it is not relevant to the ideals and needs
of the student.
Some specific examples
should suffice to show my
point. Anyone attending an
academic symposium on this
campus is immediately suspect as subversive by a large
part of the AMS Establishment.
Ridiculous? No more so than
the automatic anathema of
the  progressives,  which  ac-
jf 4©i||
crue to anyone trying to reform the AMS from within:
for the radicals are just as
much a suspicious clique, as
the old guard.
Students' Council claims
legitimacy through the electoral machinery (although
many council members were
elected by less than 200 voters).
Radicals claim legitimacy
through a monopoly on activism (though this is seldom
more than criticism) and intellectuality (though this seldom includes open - minded-
ness on issues).
Joe Student's views are an
amalgam of the two. He
thinks most student government types are pompous, but
recognizes they're trying to
do a difficult job; he agrees
with most of the radicals'
aims, but disagrees with
them in method and extent of
furthering their cause.
Joe Student gets wrapped
up in his own world of
studies and relaxation, both
in reasonable measure.
And the meaningless battle
as to his 'representation'
swirls by unnoticed; a battle
superbly described by the
phrase "full of sound and
fury, signifying nothing".
Apple sorting reviewer
does Talon injustice
Editor, Page Friday:
Massimo Verdicchio's review of Talon was inadequate.
Instead of giving a sense
of what the magazine contained he told us about the
difficulty he faced reviewing
"amateur" poets. One is hard
put to know what amateur
means — bad poets, novice
poets, poets who don't accept
money?
And the difficulty itself is
silly, because he imagines
that his task as a reviewer is
to simply blame or praise, as
if he was sorting apples.
He then makes a distinction between poems and non-
poems which is nonsensical; it tells us nothing about
Talon and nothing about
critical theory.
I felt that he had his eye
on himself as a reviewer,
rather  than  on  the  poems.
Since he probably reads and
enjoys poetry the review no
doubt doesn't do him justice,
let alone Talon.
Worst of all the criterion
he uses in praising one poem
is that "it makes one think."
That might suffice for a
crossword puzzle, or a good
math question, but it is pretty thin as a test of poetry.
I would guess that if pressed he would say that think
means just about everything
one does, or undergoes, when
reading poetry, which would
ibe better, but not much, for
he would then be saying,
"this poem makes me do
what a good poem makes one
do."
The reviews of the art
show and movie in the same
issue were much better.
ROGER SEAMON
Dept. of English
z«.
Page  12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November  10,   1966 Peril yellow not Yankee
By K. H.  CHRISTIE
I have noted with growing puzzlement the one-sided policy of your editorial
staff and columnists regarding the armed American
presence in Viet Nam.
This war has been called
immoral and the allied leaders have been tagged warmongers interfering in a
purely internal Vietnamese
conflict.
I find myself unable to
agree with those who feel
that the Vietnamese War is
now being fought because
of American "imperialism".
Whatever the original reasons for either side entering
the conflict, it has become
the major ideological front
of the Cold War.
I feel that the American
presence is indeed justified
by the fact of Communist
Chinese aggression.
Immediately opponents to
this statement will, I'm sure
jump forward and ask for
proof of Chinese troops in
Vietnam.
And I will have to reply
that, except for a few "advisors", there is no real
evidence of an active Chinese military force.
But by so answering I do
not withdraw my charge of
China's aggression, this
would be underestimating
the intellect and cunning of
the Communist leaders of
that nation.
Mao tse Tung, Lin Pao,
and others have stated many
times their ambition for
world revolution but this
does not necessarily mean
that Chinese troops have to
enter a war.
•        •       •
Their stated policy is to
send highly trained propagandists into developing nations and foment trouble in
the rural areas by gaining
ardent converts, by bribing
officials, and by occasionally murdering a local chief-
tan who has opposed them.
Once the rural areas have
toeen more or less peacefully
won over by false hopes,
the people are trained and
aroused sufficiently to attack cities in many cases
with Chinese supplied arms.
The disorganized and
sometimes corrupt city leaders are easily overcome.
Then the locals set up a
People's Republic, under the
fatherly eye of Papa Mao
and a satellite is obtained
without the shedding of
Chinese blood.
•        •        •
However the Communist
plan is taken even one step
further.
The continents of Asia,
Africa, and South America
are considered as rural
areas that can be more or
less easily taken.
The continents of Europe,
North America, and Australia are the cities. Remember what follows? Couldn't
happen, you say? And yet
this is the Communist Chinese policy.
There are practically no
dissenters, for the mass of
people have only a vague
idea of "American imperialism".
Many actually believe in
the revolution, and party
leaders who differ have
been purged only a short
time ago.
But last week, columnist
Mate asked how Ho Chi-
Minh could accept America's word of honor in order
to  reach  a  settlement.
He can, Mr. Mate, because you and I, and many
more like us in the States
can force our leaders to keep
their word by public protests, by letters to the editor,
by getting up on a soap-box,
and by many other methods.
Instead of the question
proposed by Mr. Mate, we
should ponder the other side
of the coin—why should we
trust Ho's word?
Though the Soviets can
now be taken with a large
measure of good faith, Asian
Communism has not yet developed to that extent.
Their rulers are not governed by the opinion of
their people because dissenters are not allowed and
therefore government policy
and public opinion have become one and the same.
Let us suppose that the
Americans do withdraw.
Many people in the West
would applaud, many would
condemn.
'But not so in the emerging nations of Africa and
Asia.
These countries are in a
balance which could very
easily tip. Despite recent
Communist failures, Western and Chinese are even
and an American withdrawal
could not be rationalized in
many of the developing
states.
It would seem as if the
United States had been militarily defeated and it
would become very fashionable to ride upon the tail of
the Chinese comet.
Thus I feel it is imperative for the South Vietnamese, the Americans, and
their various allies to remain in this war.
•        •        •
In the meantime Americans must realize that no
military victory alone will
ever assure a lasting peace
and that with Western aid
in the background, the Vietnamese must be allowed to
develop their own systems
of democratic government
and industry.
For even the Soviet Union has changed with time
and, let's face it, so have
we, with both sides taking
some of the good from the
other.
Eventually, I'm sure that
the Communism is Asia will
modify also.
But this development will
take a far slower course
and, in fact, may never develop at all if we allow the
People's Republic to spread
revolutionary ideas and
arms at an unchecked rate.
UNTIL SATURDAY,  NOVEMBER  19th
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The Fascinating Sound of
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DECEMBER 19 THRU NEW YEAR'S EVE
FRAN DOWIE'S
KLONDIKE KAPERS
THE CAVE
Graduate Student News
1. ATTRACTIVE G.S.A. CHRISTMAS CARDS will be
on sale at 12 cards for $1.00 next week in the G.S.A.
office.
PLEASE NOTE that Club Nights are now being held
on Friday nights rather than Saturday.
CURLING — SOCIAL EVENING:
Time: Friday. November 18th. 8:15 to 10:15 lo 1: a.m.
Place: Thunderbird Winter Sports Arena and G.S.C.
Cost: Curling and Social $1.25. Social only 50c. Refreshments will be served in the centre after the
curling in addition to the regular club night. Tickets
are on sale in the Centre.
Thursday, November 10, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
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Page   13 .*<*... v>-i4i\ftXfr&e&&£: »iM*SiiM\»1'r».'»^ -
—•*.-
.jtfWMEtL
Crap grabs trap
By  STEPHEN  SCOBIE
Perhaps the chief merit of
The Trap is that it will show
Rita Tushingham fans all
over the world how beautiful B.C. is. Unfortunately,
as the man said who reviewed Lady Chatterley's Lover
for a gamekeeping journal,
one has to wade through a
good deal of extraneous
matter.
This consists of what purports to be a plot, centering
on a French-Canadian trapper with a nice line in ballads, and a psychosomatic-
ally mute girl, with a supporting cast of Indians,
wolves, and sundry other
flora and fauna.
The climax comes at a
somewhat rudimentary leg
amputation, when Oliver
Reed says, "Scalpel, nurse"
and Miss Tushingham
obliges with  an  axe.
Perhaps the primitive nature of the plot and dialogue
is intended to reflect the
primitive life of the country, but more probably it's
just bad writing.
■,\i*--.
On its own level, it is
fairly good hokum, and enjoyable enough for the romantic at heart.
It's also a good movie for
nervous - girlfriend - clutching.
Robert Krasker's color
photography does full justice to the magnificent landscapes; but the few back-
cloths and dollops of studio
snow stick out rather badly.
Miss Tushingham, with
only her eyes to rely on,
relies on them. Oliver Reed
is good in a part which requires almost as much suffering as the average Brando
film.
Sidney Hayers' direction
is adequate, and even manages in one sequence (the
wolf hunt) to generate a
quite respectable amount of
excitement — apart from
the fact that one of the
wolves can be observed
standing aside wagging his
tail.
The Trap is showing at
the Dunbar, where it succeeds Born   Free.
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Page   14
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November   10,   1966 Under new management
By FRANK CABELL
So God is dead; then I am
damned.
The Pearly Gates have just
been  slammed
right in my face! and in
their place
There's  nothing  left but
outer space.
'Tis trickery, if you ask me;
For I've spent years
expectantly
of small space in heavenly
grace —
But now the Boss has closed
the place?
Things sure have gone from
bad  to  worse
when the maker  of the
Universe,
Without real cause against
His Laws,
Just ups and leaves us with
our flaws.
It must be rumor and not
true.
If so, we should spread one,
too.
Let's all decide to publish
wide;
'The devil committed
suicide!'
Too many sayings
mar poet's wit
By ROY   STARRS
On the cover of Ralph
Gustafson's new collection
of poetry, Sift in an Hourglass, his publishers inform
us that he is an eminent
compiler  of anthologies.
There can be no doubt of
this, for his own poetry too
often reads like an anthology of notable sayings. He
paraphrases everyone from
Robert Frost to Jesus Christ
(his two favorite people)
with the same objectives but
somehow never with the
same effects.
Only when the anthologist
gives way to the poet does
Gustafson    emerge    in    his
own right, a man of wry
and exquisite wit.
In "Dirge for a Penny
Whistle" he is whimsical
and mock incredulous re-
gardiag their successive
deaths: "Only Pound to go?
. . . This is grave business."
And ribs them mercilessly:
"MacNeice! Better take out
a policy . . . I'll beat you
to  it:  Williams."
If the poet weren't quite
such an eminent anthologist,
we might have enjoyed this
humor  in  a  purer form.
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Thursday, November 10, 1966
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them. You can get full details from
MR. J. CAMERON CRAIK
at the University Placement Office
• AGRICULTURE • FORESTRY •  BIOLOGY • BACTERIOLOGY   • BOTANY • ENTOMOLGY
• MICROBIOLOGY • PHARMACOLOGY • PHYSIOLOGY • VETERINARIAN   SERVICE
• CHEMISTRY ^BIOCHEMISTRY • FOOD CHEMISTRY • ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
• PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY • WILDLIFE • ZOOLOGY
we want
engineers
especially
impatient,
ambitious,
resourceful
ones
If you're an engineer who's raring to tackle a tough, practical project
in a dynamic industry . . . we'd better get together. At Columbia Cellulose,
graduate engineers are assigned to planned programmes with important,
specific objectives. Your efforts in design, process development, construction or research, right from the start, can bear heavily on our continued
development. The pulp and paper industry is a business on the go,
growing at a fantastic rate, devouring established methods of technology
almost daily. Our future success will be largely determined by people like
yourself — engineers determined to develop new and better ways of doing
a hundred jobs in the manufacturing process. Maybe you'd like to play
a part in changing our industry, and possibly the idea of living in British
Columbia appeals to you. If so, come and talk with us when we visit
your university on November 21 to 25.
Your employment office can arrange an appointment. Why not set a
time today?
e.
OLUMBIA
e.
ELLULOSE
HEAD OFFICE: 1111 WEST HASTINGS STREET, VANCOUVER 1, BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISIONS: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT . PRINCE RUPERT PULP DIVISION . TWINRIVER TIMBER LIMITED
CELGAR PULP DIVISION . CELGAR LUMBER DIVISION . CELGAR WOODS DIVISION • CALUM LUMBER LIMITED
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15 3fi.-1^
I APPEAL TO YOU, citizens of America, as a person
concerned with liberty and social justice. Many of
you will feel that your country has served these Ideals
and, indeed, the United States possesses a revolutionary tradition which, in its origins, was true to the
struggle for human liberty and for social equality. It
is this tradition which has been traduced by the few
who rule the U.S. today. Many of you may not be fully
aware of the extent to which your country is controlled
by industrialists who depend for their power partly
upon great economic holdings in all parts of the
world. The U.S. today controls over 60% of the world's
natural resources, although it contains only 6% of the
world's population. The minerals and produce of vast
areas of the planet are possessed by a handful of men.
I ask you to consider the words of your own leaders,
who sometimes reveal the exploitation they have practiced.
The New York Times of Feb. 12, 1950, said: "Indochina is a prize worth a large gamble. In the North are
exportable tin, tungsten, manganese, coal, lumber and
rice; rubber, tea, pepper and hides. Even before World
War II Indo-China yielded dividends estimated at $300
million per year."
One year later, an adviser to the U.S. State Department said the following: "We have only partially exploited Southeast Asia's resources. Nevertheless, Southeast Asia supplied 90% of the world's crude rubber,
60% of its tin and 80% of its copra and coconut oil.
It has sizable quantities of sugar, tea, coffee, tobacco,
sisal, fruits, spices, natural resins and gums, petroleum, iron, oil and bauxite."
This makes clear that the war in Vietnam is a war
like that waged by the Germans in Eastern Europe.
It is a war designed to protect the continued control
over the wealth of the region by American capitalists.
When we consider that the fantastic sums of money
spent on armament are awarded in contracts to the
industries on whose boards of directors sit the generals
who demand the weapons, we can see that the military
and large industry have formed an interlocking alliance for their own profit.
THE TRUTH IS THAT the Vietnamese popular resistance is just like the American revolutionary resistance
to the British, who controlled the economic and political
life of the American colonies In the 18th Century. Vietnamese resistance Is like the resistance of the French
Maquis, the Yugoslav partisans and the guerrillas of
Norway and Denmark to the Nazi occupation. That ls
why a small peasant people Is able to hold down a vast
army of the most powerful Industrial nation on earth.
I appeal to you to consider what has been done to
the people of Vietnam by the U.S. government. Can you,
In your hearts, justify the use of poison chemicals and
gas, the saturation bombing of the entire country with
jelly-gasoline and phosphorus? Although the American
press lies about this, the documentary evidence concerning the nature of these gases and chemicals Is
overwhelming. They are poisonous and they are fatal.
Napalm and phosphorus burn until the victim is reduced to a bubbling mass. The U.S. has also used
weapons like the Lazy Dog, which is a bomb containing 10,000 slivers of razor-sharp steel. The razor darts
slice to ribbons the villagers upon whom these weapons
of sheer evil are constantly used. In one province of
North Vietnam, the most densely populated, 100 million silvers of razor sharp steel have fallen in a period
of 13 months.
It Is even more revealing and terrible that more
Vietnamese died during the reign of Diem, from 1954
to I960, than since 1960, when the Vietnamese partisans took up armed resistance to the American occupation in the South. What the papers have called the
"Vietcong" is, in fact, a broad alliance, like the popular fronts of Europe, including all political views
ranging from Catholics to Communists. The National
Liberation Front has the most ardent support of the
people and only the willfully blind will fall to see
this. Do you know that 8 million Vietnamese were
placed in internment camps under conditions of forced
labor, with barbed wire and armed patrols? Do you
know that this was done on the direction of the U.S.
government, and that torture and brutal murder were a
continuous feature of life In these camps? Are you
aware that the gases and chemicals which have been
used for five years in Vietnam blind, paralyze, asphixi-
ate, cause convulsions and result in unbearable death?
Try to imagine what it would mean if any enemy were
bombing the U.S. and occupied lt for 12 years. How
would you feel If a foreign power had saturated New
York, Chicago, Los Angeles, St. Louis, San Francisco
and Miami with jelly-gasoline, phosphorous and Lazy
Dogs? What would you do If an ocupylng army used
these toxic gases and chemicals In every town and
hamlet they entered? Can you really think that the
American people would welcome so savage an aggressor? The fact is that everywhere in the world people
have come to see the men who control the U.S. government as brutal bullies, acting In their own economic
Interests and exterminating any people foolhardy
enough to struggle against this naked exploitation and
aggression.
WHEN THE U.S. BEGAN its war against the Vietnamese, after having paid for all of the French war
against the same people, the VS. Defense Department
owned property valued at $160 billion. This value has
since doubled. The U.S. Defense Department is the
world's largest organization, owning 32 million acres
In the U.S. and millions more in foreign countries.
BERTRAM RUSSELL'S STATEMENT ON
THE WAR IN VIETNAM AND THE WAR
CRIMES TRIBUNAL
(A   Private    Advertisement)
At a time when so many of my associates
are fortified with that indifference so falsely
called philosophical, it becomes necessary to ignite for them a solitary candle in the form of this
advertisement rather than curse them. Mes amis
Canadiens que faites-vous pour votre deliverance?
-COSMOPOLITES EIMI.
B.Sc.  (U.B.C.)  '66
Military assets
In the U.S. are three times as great as the combined
assets of UJ3. Steel, Metropolitan Life Insurance, American Telephone & Telegraph, General Motors and
Standard Oil. The Defense Department employs three
times the number of people working In all these great
world corporations. The billions of dollars in military
contracts are provided by the Pentagon and fulfilled
by large industry. By 1960, $21 billion were spent on
military goods. Of this colossal sum, $7% billion were
divided amongst ten corporations and five corporations
received nearly $1 billion each.
I ask you to consider carefully that In the executive
offices of these same corporations there are 1,400 army
officers,' including 261 generals and officers of flag
rank. General Dynamics has 187 officers, 27 generals
and admirals and the former Secretary of the Army on
its payroll. This Is a ruling caste, which stays In
"power no matter who Is elected to nominal public office, and every President finds himself obliged to serve
the interests of this all-powerful group. Thus, American democracy has been emptied of life and meaning
because the people cannot remove the real men who
rule them.
It is this concentration of power which makes it
necessary for the Pentagon and big industry to continue the arms race for its own sake. The sub-contracts
they award to smaller Industries and war contractors
Involve every American city, and thus affect the Jobs
of millions of people. Four million work for the Defense Department. Its payroll is $12 billion, twice that
of the U.S. automobile industry. A further 4 million
work directly in arms Industries. In many cities military production accounts for as much as 80% of all
manufacturing jobs. Over 50% of the gross national
product of the U.S. is devoted to military spending.
This vast military system covers the world with over
3,000 military bases,
YET, DESPITE the immense wealth of the U.S., despite the fact that w'Sh only 6% of the world's people,
approaching two-thirds of the world's resources are In
its possession, despite the control over the world'* oil,
cobalt, tungsten, Iron ore, rubber and other vital resources, despite the vast billions of profits that are
gained by a few American corporations at the cost of
mass starvation among the peoples of the world, despite all of this, 66 million Americans live at poverty
level. The cities of America are covered in slums. The
poor carry the burden of taxation and the fighting of
colonial and aggressive wars. I am asking all of you
to make an intellectual connection between events
which occur daily around you, to try to see clearly the
system which has taken control of the U.S. and perverted its institutional life Into a grotesque arsenal for
a world empire. It is the vast military machine, the
great industrial combines and their intelligence agencies which are regarded by the people of three whole
continents as their main, enemy In life and the source
of their misery and hunger. If we examine the governments which depend-for their existence upon American military force, we shall always find regimes which
support the rich, the landlords and the big capitalists.
This is true in Brazil, in Peru, in Venezuela, in Thailand, in South Korea, in Japan. It Is true the world
over.
The result of this is that In order to suppress a national revolution, such as the great historic uprisings
of the Vietnamese people, the U.S. Is obliged to behave
as the Japanese behaved in Southeast Asia. This is
literally true. The concentration camps to which I
have referred and which held nearly 60% of the rural
population of South Vietnam, were scenes of torture,
massacre and mass burial. The special experimental
weapons, like the gas and chemicals and jelly-gaso-
Hne, are as horrible as anything used by the Nazis during the Second World War. It is true that the Nazis
systematically exterminated the Jews and the U.S. has
not yet done anything comparable In Vietnam. With
the exception of the extermination of the Jews, however, everything that the Germans did in Eastern
.Europe has been repeated toy the U.S. in Vietnam on
a scale which is larger and with an efficiency which
is more terrible and more complete.
In violation of solemn international agreements
signed by American presidents and ratified by the
American Congress, this Johnson governmemVhas committed war crimes, crimes against humanity and crimes
against the peace. It has committed these crimes because the Johnson government exists to preserve the
economic exploitation and the military domination of
subject peoples by UJ3. industrial magnates and their
military arm.
The Central Intelligence Agency, which
has a budget IS times larger than all the diplomatic
activity of the U.S., Is Involved in the assassination of
heads of state, and plots against Independent governments. This sinister activity is designed to destroy the
leadership and the organization of peoples who are
Struggling to free themselves from the stranglehold of
American economic and political domination:
I HAVE CALLED on intellectuals and eminent Independent men and women from efl parts of the world
to join In an International War Cflmes Tribunal which
will hear evidence concerning the crimes of the U.S.
government In Vietnam. You will remember that Germans were considered guilty If they acquiesced In and
accepted the crimes of their government. Nobody considered it a sufficient excuse for Germans to say that
they knew about the gas chambers and the concentration camps, the torture and the mutilation,
but were unable to stop it. I appeal to you as a human
being to human beings. Remember your humanity and
your own self-respect. The war against the people of
Vietnam is barbaric. It is an aggressive war of conquest. During the American War of Independence, no
one had to tell the Americans the purpose of their
struggle or conscript them against their will. Nor was
it necessary for American soldiers to go 10,000 miles
to another country. In the American revolutionary war
against foreign troops Americans fought In fields and
forests although they were in rags and the occupying
army was the strongest of the day. Americans fought
the occupier, although they were hungry and poor, and
they fought them house by house.
In that war of liberation, the American revolutionaries were called terrorists and the colonial power was
the one labeling them rebels and rabble. American national heroes responded with words such as Nathan
Hale's and Patrick Henry's. The sentiment, "Give me
liberty or give me death," inspired their struggle. Just
as it inspires the Vietnamese resistance to U.S. aggression and occupation. The Nathan Hales and Patrick
Henrys of Vietnam are not the U.S. army. Those who
display heroism, love of country and that deep belief
In freedom and Justice which inspired the American
people in 1776 are today the people of Vietnam, fighting under the revolutionary leadership of their National Liberation Front.
It is Americans who have been killing Vietnamese,' attacking villages, occupying cities, using gas
and chemicals, bombing their schools and hospitals—
So It' Is that the real struggle for freedom and democracy is inside the U.S. itself, against the usurpers of
American society. I have no doubt that the American
people would respond just as the Vietnamese have responded if the U.S. were invaded and subjected to the
atrocities and tortures which the U.S. army and government have Inflicted on the Vietnamese. The American protest movement, which has Inspired people all
over the world, is the only true spokesman for American concern for individual liberty and social justice.
The battlefront for freedom is In Washington, in the
struggle against the war criminals—Johnson, Rusk
and McNamara—who have degraded the U.S. and its
citizens. Indeed, they have stolen the U.S. from its
people and made the name of a great country stink in
the nostrils of people the world over.
This Is the harsh truth, and It is a truth which-Is
affecting the dally lives of Americans irrevocably and
increasingly. There is no looking the other way. There
is no pretending that the war crimes are not occurring,
that the gas and chemicals do not exist, that the torture and napalm have not been used, that the Vietnamese have not been slaughtered by American soldiers and American bombs. There Is no dignity without the courage to examine this evil and oppose it.
MY APPEAL TO AMERICANS is made with full
awareness that the rulers of the U.S. have spared no
device in propaganda to hide from the American people
the ugly face of their rulers and the truth about their
behavior. Abraham Lincoln gave expression to the hope
that a people, once aroused, can be deceived no longer.
The international War Crimes Tribunal Is itself an appeal to the conscience of the American people, our allies in a common cause.
The War Crimes Tribunal is under urgent preparation now. I am approaching eminent jurists, literary
figures and men of public affairs in Africa, Asia, Latin.
America and the U.S. itself. Vietnamese victims of this
war will give evidence. Full scientific data concerning
the chemicals used, their properties and their effects
win be documented. Eyewitnesses will describe what
they have seen and scientists will be invited to examine
the exhibits in the possession of the tribunal. The proceedings will be tape recorded and the full evidence
will be published. There will be documentary film material concerning the witnesses and their evidence. We
aim to provide the most exhaustive portrayal of what
has happened to the people of Vietnam. We intend that
the peoples of the world shall be aroused as never before, the better to prevent the repetition of this tragedy elsewhere. Just as in the case of Spain, Vietnam
is a barbarous rehearsal. It is our intention that
neither the bona fides nor the authenticity of this tribunal will be susceptible to challenge from those who
have so much to hide. President Johnson, Dean Rusk,
Robert McNamara, Henry Cabot Lodge, Gen. Westmoreland and their fellow criminals will be brought
before a wider justice than they recognize and a more
profound condemnation than they are equipped to
understand.
Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 10,   1966 Thursday, November 10, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page   17
COUNCIL   JOLLIES
BY KRIS EMMOTT
Gavel grinds for order
"Order! Order! I will have order in this
chamber!"
Who's speaking? Is it Sitting Bull at the
war council, Eric Newell at the EUS meeting, Henry VIII at the Star Chambers?
Nope. It's Peter Braund, alias Gavel Peter,
desperately pouring oil on troubled waters
at the AMS council meeting.
Alas, Gavel Peter is not possessed of a
booming voice nor a vinegary countenance
like some councillors and is unable to terrify
his band of nitpickers into silence. He has
to use a gavel.
When he doesn't have a gavel, he improvises. Somebody stole his ivory-handled gavel
two weeks ago. So last Monday he used a
screwdriver.
A couple of weeks ago council had to approve some minutes of the University Clubs
Committee executive. Some sharp eye noted
that UCC had received constitutions from
the Kootenay Men's Club and the Student
Zionist Society.
The same sharpie claimed the Kootenay
Men's  Club is inactive, or undesirable, or
something like that, and did UCC have the
power to receive consitutions? So council
hemmed and hawed and decided not to approve the clubs.
Now last Monday council received some
UCC financial documents to approve. Neither
of the above clubs appears to have a UCC
grant this year.
On Oct. 26 and Nov. 2 UCC revoked the
constitutions of nine inactive clubs, including two groups with the fascinating names
of Young Bourgeois Artists and Authors'
Association, and Subud. The two clubs mentioned previously were not among the nine,
so if you're a Student Zionist, you seem to
be without money or legality.
Charlie Boylan wondered how come UCC
granted $27 to the Blue Guard, a new club
which has no constitution yet.
Council bickered about that for awhile,
and then Boylan objected to the sums given
to political clubs, and council bickered about
that.
Anyway, minutes are just one of the many,
many minutes that council finds to fuss over.
No wonder Gavel Peter gavels.
Would
you
like to
join us?
We're Canada's largest manufacturer of telecommunication
equipment and cables, both power and communications.
Sales in 1965 exceeded $350,000,000—an increase of 44% in
four years.
Our plants are located at Montreal, Lachine, Ottawa, Belleville,
Toronto and London, and our sales and distribution houses stretch
from coast to coast.
Our International Operations Division is developing world-wide
markets.
We do our own research and development in the largest and most
modern laboratory in Canada—more than 800 people work in R. & D.
Of our 22,000 employees, over 1,700 are university
graduates: they comprise more than 60% of middle management
and more than 90% of top management.
Although more than half the 1967 grads we hire will be for
technical assignments, the balance will be from a wide range of
non-technical degrees and disciplines.
Our starting salaries are substantial. Your performance will
be evaluated at regular intervals and increases will be based
on these evaluations.
To encourage your professional growth we have liberal tuition
refund plans, scholarships and bursaries for our employees.
We provide excellent employee protection in the form of sickness
benefits, life insurance, company-subsidized medical plans and
non-contributory pensions.
If you'd like to work for an all-Canadian Company that is a
leader in its field and is daily breaking ground with new and
exciting projects, ask your Placement Officer for an appointment
with our recruiters.
They'll be on campus shortly.
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Page  18
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November  10,   1966
MERELY  TOOLS'
Idiot computors
cause no threat
Contrary to popular belief the large-scale computer is
not a giant brain but a 'giant idiot savant' that does only
what it is told, according to electrical engineering associate
professor A. C. Soudack.
He said humans need have
no fear of these idiots taking
over the world. They are
merely tools of man used to
widen his scope in his quest
for higher knowledge.
Soudack is presently attending the Fall Joint Computer
Conference in San Francisco,
sponsored by the American
Federation of Information Processing Societies.
He will chair a session dealing with hybrid computers
and non-deterministic problems.
"Hybrid computers are revolutionary systems where random variables and inputs are
able to be measured, thus
throwing light on an area In
the dark until recently," said
Soudack.
"Hybrid computers are the
product of a marriage between
digital computers and analog
computers."
"Digital computers are used
in data reduction and analysis
while analog computers are
used  scientifically..
"Hybrid computers combine
the properties of digital and
analog computers, the end result being accuracy involving
scientific study."
Attending the meeting will
be representatives from every
scientific field, including medicine, and representatives from
major commercial and industrial concerns.
Attack on principal ends
in reformatory for youth
KINGSTON (CUP)—Four of five youths who attacked
Queen's University principal, Dr. J. A. Corry, have been
sentenced to terms ranging from 12 months to two years.
Additional charges of under-age drinking and possess-
of liquor out of residence drew 30 day concurrent sentences for the four.
The youths, convicted of assault causing bodily harm
to the Queen's principal, will spend their terms in the
Ontario reformatory.
Corry suffered a severe beating and kicking in the
Oct. 3 incident in which $30 was taken.
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No malarkey
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The facts are these:
Polymer Corporation Limited is looking for University
graduates and post-graduates (see below) who are
interested in careers that are challenging and adventuresome.
Polymer produces the largest range of synthetic rubbers
in the world. Polymer also produces a wide range of latices
and plastics and is constantly exploring new and
better uses for its products in industry and by consumers.
Polymer, a completely Canadian company, markets its
POLYSAR* brand products in over 70 countries. There
are very real opportunities in our foreign operations
as well as in Sarnia.
When you work at Polymer you keep good company.
Dedicated men and women
who are recognized experts
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you, giving you that
spark which makes a job
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At Polymer you learn
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your education in a variety
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Polymer Corporation provides excellent salaries,
benefits and orientation programs.
Don't wait to see what the future holds in store for you;
build a secure one of your own. A Polymer representative
will be visiting your campus soon. Find out how you can
begin a rewarding career with Polymer Corporation Limited
by having a chat with him when he visits your campus on
November 21, 22, 23.
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Camp-us Tories will battle Dief
By DON SELLAR
OTTAWA (CUP) — When the national Progressive Conservative convention opens here Monday, Tory
chief John Diefenbaker will again join
battle with his greatest critics.
Among those who would topple The
Man from Prince Albert is the face of
youth, typified by Michael Vineberg.
Vineberg, 22, is national president
of the Progressive Conservative Student Federation, representing some
2,5O0i student Tories in 53 campus
clubs across the country.
FULL SUPPORT
Silent ever since the unsuccessful
attempt to banish Mr. Diefenbaker
from the corridors of power two years
ago, Vineberg has finally pledged his
full support— and that of his federation—against the Diefenbaker legend.
"A leader can't toe a leader forever,"
he said during a recent visit to Ottawa. "Mr. Diefenbaker was valid in
ligi57 — but he isn't today. What we
have to decide is whether he is relevant to the present day."
In threatening Mr. Diefenibaker's
position atop the Tory totempole,
Vineberg now speaks with what he
calls "virtually unanimous" support
from student Conservative associations across Canada.
LEADERSHIP ISSUE
A referendum conducted recently
among student Tories urged the
party's national federation to become
involved in the leadership issue, to
support Dalton Camp's campaign
against Mr. Diefenibaker's leadership
and to lobby for a leadership conven-
DALTON CAMP
JOHN DIEFENBAKER
. the adversaries
tion before  another federal  election
is called.
"What this country needs is a new
generation of leadership," Vineberg
says. "It's not so much their age as it
is their outlook ..."
SCANDAL MONGERING
The POSF leader, who spends his
time these days finishing off a
master's degree in political science at
McGill University, studying first-year
law at the same institution and barnstorming around the country for the
POSF, says student discontent with
"scandal-mongering and constant use
of invective in the House" is growing
into a concerted drive for a leadership convention in 1967.
"At   a   leadership   convention,    I
would doubt that many students
would support Mr. Diefenbaker."
The dark-haired Montrealer has
some evidence to indicate that student
Tories are ready to do something
about the current Parliamentary
situation.
Students at Waterloo Lutheran University recently voted 49 per cent
Conservative in a Model Parliament
election there, with Liberals and New
Democrats mustering only 28 and 23
per cent of the popular vote respectively. This represented a 12 per cent
gain for the Conservatives over last
year's performance, Vineberg says,
being careful to note the Waterloo
election was fought on a pro-Camp
platform.
But what will happen when about
100 student Tories, with only 65 votes
•u-t of 1,150 distributed among convention delegates, attempt to stage
their own revolution in the party?
What will they concentrate their energies on in addition to an attack on
the Old Guard.
Vineberg is looking for internal
party reform in long-range planning
areas, for one thing.
INTERNAL REFORM
"We feel that a caucus deals with
only what you're going to say in the
House next week. Right now, there
is no coherent Conservative statement
on many important issues," he says.
"There is no long-range planning
going on right now." With this in
mind, the PCSF will try to lobby for
establishment of a policy commission
in the party.
There is one place where student
Tories won't be treading: education.
Although he predicts one or two "unofficial" education resolutions will be
introduced, Vineberg explains "there
just wasn't enough time" to prepare
any PCSF legislation on the subject.
NOTHING FREE
"Frankly, I personally don't really
know what to say aibout education. I
don't understand all the economic
arguments (in favor of free education)," Vineberg says.
While he favors more support to
post-graduate education in Canada,
Vineberg suggests he is not a willing
supporter of educare: "Nothing should
be free," he says.
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CAREERS IN RESEARCH         *
DEVELOPMENT, AND            f||
INSTRUMENTATION
for graduates in
Departments  of  the   Federal   Government
carry out some of Canada's most extensive
research  programs. These programs need
PHYSICAL AND
science graduates capable of  performing
INORGANIC
high quality pure or applied research, de
CHEMISTRY
velopment, or instrumentation.  Graduates
are   required   at   all   degree   levels;   and.
/MATHEMATICS
because   the  work   covers   most   branches
of   science,   opportunities   exist   in   almost
PHYSICS
all  specialties.  In  the  physical and  earth
sciences, for example, there are openings
GEOPHYSICS
for graduates in the areas listed  at  left.
GEOLOGY
Research scientists representing a  number
of government departments will hold inter
MINING
views on your campus on
NOVEMBER 21, 22 and 23, 1966
METALLURGY
They will  be acquainted  with  the whole
MINERALOGY
range of openings for science  graduates.
If   your  career   interests   are   in   research.
OCEANOGRAPHY
development, or instrumentation, they will
be pleased  to discuss these opportunities
ELECTRONICS
with you.
ASTRONOMY
An interview appointment can be arranged
by contacting.
PHYSICAL
GEOGRAPHY
MR. J. CAMERON CRAIK
at your University Placement Cjffice.
Thursday, November 10, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Paq<
e  19 ■FOCUS'
DON'T   MISS
•1199
"Thou Shalt Not Kill
BANNED IN MOST OF EUROPE. A STORY ABOUT
CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS
Two Shows Only —
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13 - 3:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
Dunbar Theatre  —   Dunbar at 30th   —  75c for Students
VANCOUVER'S
OLDEST
BUSINESS
HAS  YOUNG  CUSTOMERS!
WHY?
Since 1886 - 80 years - GRASSIE JEWELLERS have
served their patrons well with quality jewellery —
courteous service and reasonable prices. Our young
customers appreciate all these things but also demand contemporary merchandise as modern as
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years. Come in and see us.
566 SEYMOUR . . . 685-2271
TECHNICAL GRADUATES
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
WITH ALCHEM
Technical selling offers a challenging opportunity to
grow with a growing company. Your technical background may well be the kind of experience that will
open the door to ai* exceptional growth opportunity
with ALCHEM.
Selling Alchem's industrial chemicals is challenging,
rewarding and satisfying. You represent an outstanding line of products that solve specialized processing
problems in the steel, paper, petroleum, mining and
many other industries. As a trained Alchem expert,
you follow a very successful and highly respected
policy of customer assistance and service. You are
backed iby a large staff of Alchem technical and research specialists. Also by the staffs of affiliated companies, Nalco Chemical in U.S.A. and C-I-L in Canada.
If you have a degree, some chemistry, and a real
desire for a career in sound, technical, professional
level selling, ask your placement officer for Alchem
brochure,
"You Stand Out With Alchem
or send resume to:
ALCHEM LTD.,
c/o DR. JOHN W. RYZNAR.
BURLINGTON, ONTARIO.
PETERSON, politico
By TOM MORRIS
Leslie Peterson is minister of education
and labor or, depending on the sign on the
office door, he is minister of labor and education.
Peterson is above all a politician.
Suave and clean-cut, he epitomizes the new
breed of sophisticates in politics—contrasted
with his gregarious, be-knighted boss, Bennett,
or the highway-hannibal, P. A. Gaglardi.
Show and noise isn't for Peterson, but the
party line is.   A new approach; an old policy;
The approach is a cool, unemotional presentation of the facts the way Peterson sees
them.
There is a willingness to admit that his
ideas are not perfect even if they have pretences to that.
Follows party
And Peterson follows the party line, regardless of any personal scruples that may exist.
There is little distinction between Peterson
and the party.
"There has been a veritable explosion in
regional colleges and universities in this province," he claims.
"Our immediate concern is to provide an
education to all those who want an education
in this province. It is expected that in the
next seven year period, two additional public
universities will come into being."
Until then B.C. has three public universities.
Under the public school act, Peterson has
little responsibility in the sphere of post-
secondary education. He can't determine
course content, senate appointments, or student
activities.
But he does control money for post-secondary education.   He is the education gift-horse.
"My responsibilities at the university level
do not go far beyond the provision and equitable distribution of grants. I take a liberal-
view of these responsibilities."
Although education is constitutionally a provincial matter, the federal government has
recently supported, to a greater extent, financing in this area.
Between provincial and federal allocations,
education continues to survive.   But the federal
government is becoming stingy.
In the last federal-provincial conference,
the central government gave less to universities and vocational and technical schools than
was originally asked for by the provinces.
Peterson was disappointed.
"We went to Ottawa expecting additional
assistance for university education. They were
prepared to offer more in the way of tax
transfers but this was tied into withdrawing
allocations to existing plans for technical and
vocational education."
"I would prefer to see larger grants from
the federal government either direct to the
universities or to the provincial government."
"I would also like to see more alloted to
capital and operating expenditures to help
with the necessary buildings."
But if the central government won't cooperate, why doesn't the provincial government spend more to compensate?
The minister is no fool, least of all, a political fool. He is quick to remind that education
occupies top priority in the provincial .budget.
"Highways use to be the largest spending
department of government. We must keep in
mind the other competing claims on the public
purse."
"But at present, I feel education should
and does occupy top priority in the provincial
budget. The education budget is now the largest in the province not only in dollars but
also in proportion to expenditures in other
departments."
No student denied
The 1966-7 provincial budget is $659,782,-
000. The total education budget was $205,-
000,000 or 31 per cent. The total social welfare
budget was $216,987,000 or 33 per cent of the
total budget.
Peterson echoes Social Credit policy when
he claims that no student should be denied a
post-secondary education purely due to financial reasons.
He says students have to depend on three
sources   of  student  aid:  bursaries,   loans  and
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571 GRANVILLE  (at Dunsmuir)
Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
MU 2-4846
Thursday, November 10,  1966 FOCUS
discusses government, education
scholarships. All these, he claims are either
based on need or merit.
"I prefer the approach of student assistance
in this stage of our development rather than
the abolition of fees."
But student assistance in its present form
may not be doing the job.
There are the students from the interior
of the province, who pay costs of transportation and room and board.
Some students live with social barriers between them and higher education. Will monetary assistance encourage them?
Equalization grants
Peterson refers to "the stage of our development"  and  social barriers  remain.
But he does recognize the problem of nonlocal students.
"The principle of equalization grants is desirable to aid these students who are compelled
to take up residence at distant locations.
"We have been meeting with the federal
government and hoping they would integrate
their scheme of grants with our equalization
plans. This program has been postponed by
the federal government."
If he feels short-changed financially, he
does see a bright future in the academic sphere.
"We have had a complete reorganization on
the public school level in academic programs.
The first graduates will leave this system in
the summer of 1967."
It wasn't many years ago that a student had
two choices when he graduated from high-
school. He either began working or went to
university.
Peterson is proud of "new flexibility" in
the educational system:
"The changes that have been made at the
secondary level and post-secondary level in
regards to more and smaller universities and
technical schools have increased flexibility in
our system."
More flexibility
Then he retreats: "At least there is more
flexibility now than there was a few years
ago."
He says that all students should be able to
continue up the educational ladder as far as it
will carry them. He also has a role for each
participating group on that ladder.
"If our educational system is to be effective,
LESLIE PETERSON
I think that at all levels we have to involve
all segments of our society."
But it is one thing to talk about involvement but another thing to talk about the means
by which this should be achieved.
Students and faculty want a larger role.
Governors and senators are clinging tightly
to their prestige position.
The picture appears simple to Peterson.
"If you are operating at the public school
level, then the teachers are your employees
and the children are the product you are
turning out. I think the same would apply
at the university level."
Nevertheless, the minister insists that there
has to be total involvement 'by the university
community, in order to obtain varied views and
have two-way communication
system.
"Decisions that are made
must receive the support of
the entire community which
would include students."
"The university is a large
business and therefore I think
you need a board of governors. Their responsibility lies
in business and they have to
be the most competent men
you have.
"This is not a full-time occupation with them and therefore they must rely on advice
from the president and other
university officials.
"In turn they must be a
liaison between these officials
and the public."
On students
Peterson doesn't say very
much about students. During
the past election, student
pressure to make education
an issue was ignored by the
education minister.
"Students are generally
restless whether they are at
university or at any other institution. As long as this unrest is channeled in a positive
way I don't worry about it."
But he admits that the con-
contrary is also true.
"On the other hand, if it's channeled in a
completely negative way, we are in for trouble.
For example, I think Berkeley could never
serve a useful purpose."
"Young people are by nature uneasy and
restless. We rely on that youth and vigor in
times of war but in times of peace there doesn't
seem to be the opportunity to channel and
utilize these qualities."
The labor force and labor problems continue to grow. Larger unions, more strikes,
and higher prices.
Two large jobs taken on by one man.
"I think the integration of the two departments is valuable," Peterson says.
"When I was just education minister, I was
spending a great deal of my time arguing with
the other department. I can only argue with
myself  now."
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE  BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL
ST. ANSELMS'
(United)
(Anglican)
8:00 and  9:30 a.m.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Holy Communion
"Getting Lost"
11:00 Martins
"The Bones of Joseph"
7:00 p.m.    TALK BACK    St. Anselm's
"D. H. LAWRENCE - Retort to Jesus"
HAROLD MacKAY                                             JIM McKIBBON
We Need Foresters
Our woods divisions are rapidly expanding and we
require energetic foresters to assist in Northern and
Interior operations. If you are interested in assuming
individual responsibility and accepting professional
challenges, make an appointment now to see our
representatives who will be on campus November
24 and 25.
a
OLUMBIA
<___
ELLULOSE
1111 WEST HASTINGS STREET, VANCOUVER 1, B.C.
SPECIAL
"A Minstrel Show"
Today
- 2 Shows -
12:30 and 8:00 p.m.
Both ,'n The Auditorium.
TICKETS
For  12:1)0 pert, at  door    7.1c.
tor N p.m.  pert', advance at   AMS.
Van.   Ticket   Centre,   or   at    door
SI.2.) students. .S2.00 others.
EVENTS
"•lUfe^
TROUPE
A   MINSTREL   SHOW
the  skin  of the
to   liberate
common human
t s  tree  territory on  a  stage,
_nd  we employ guerilla  tactics
o   defend
Thursday, November 10, 1966
that's   a   shock.
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  21 Page 22
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 10,  1966
College bowl cuts Birds
—best of western teams
The UBC Thunderbird's
final football game this season
has turned out to be just a lot
of bull.
Earlier it had appeared that
a win over University of Manitoba Bisons Saturday at Varsity stadium would make UBC
the logical choice from the
West to play in the Canadian
College Bowl game.
But the national selection
committee has now decided to
ignore the West altogether.
Teams from Ontario and the
Maritimes, to be selected after
games this weekend, will play
in the Bowl game.
Bird's head coach Frank
Gnup referred to the decision
Top runners here
for cross country
A record entry has been set
for the Pacific Northwest
crosscountry championships.
Over 300 competitors from
B.C. and the U.S.A. will take
part in the meet which starts
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at UBC.
One of the highlights of this
19th annual competition will
be the appearance of Doris
Brown, world record holder
of the women's indoor mile.
She will be representing the
Seattle Falcon Track Club.
Another first is the women's
open event, UBC track and
field coach, Lionel Pugh, expects this to be the premier
race of the day. It has attract
ed nine teams.
For the first time, Simon
Fraser Academy is participating. It is entering a junior
men's  team.
Thirty high school teams
are entered.
Pugh said the junior and
freshman section is the one to
watch. The Seattle Pacific
club will be defending its
title, won last year.
The club will be competing
against the B.C. junior champions, as well as the Vancouver Olympic club. The latter,
Pugh said, has remarkable
strength and should easily defend its senior section title.
as "immature" saying "the
selection committee should
have waited until next week
when the college schedule was
completed.
Maritime college football is
a step below the West. This is
a decision made by a few pen
pushers who know little about
Canadian College football."
This will be the last game
under Varsity colors for at
least nine graduating Birds.
All-star tackle and co-captain
George Brajcich, a five year
veteran, is among those graduating.
Others are Ron Kincade,
Bob Sweet, Bruce Abo, Glen
Brandt, Lance Fletcher, Eric
Savics, Ben Stapleton, Dick
Gibbons and co-captain Mike
Rohan.
JUDO
M
W - F — 4:30 p.m. — Mem. Gym. — App. Room
Expert   Instruction   Available   Free.
You Provide Jacket — That's All.
Faculty  Welcome  —  Grads,   too
School of PE & REC,
Voluntary Rec. Program
Phone 228-2401
Vancouver Peace Action League
REMEMBRANCE  DAY ACTIVITIES
Friday, Nov. 11, 11:30 a.m.: Wreath laying at the
Cenotaph in Victory Square. March to Granville and
Georgia. Silent vigil for peace there lasting one
half hour.
Sunday, Nov. 13, 3 and 8 p.m.: Powerful anti-war
film, Thou Shalt Not Kill at Dunbar Theatre. English
subtitles. Students 75c, others $1.25.
EVERYONE       WELCOME
Is Prayer Obsolete?
Learn how prayer can be scientifically
applied to any situation . . .
Come and hear a lecture on
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
by
LENORE D. HANKS
of Portland, Ore.
Monday, Nov. 14 - Noon - Angus 212
Sponsored by U.B.C. Christian Science Organization
* civil
* electricaj
* mechanical
* industrial
* chemical
* metallurgical
* mining
* engineering
physics
ENGINEERS
An   engineer's   career   in  the   GOVERNMENT   OF   CANADA
features . . .
Planned Career
jPromotion Based on Merit
Competitive Salaries
Training
Modern Equipment
Technically Trained Support Staff
*  Broad Scope and Challenge for
Professional Development
INTERVIEWS
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
NOVEMBER NOVEMBER NOVEMBER
16 17 18
You are invited to meet Mr. C. E. Lowthian, P. Eng., APPLIED SCIENCES STAFFING
PROGRAM on the above dates. Arrange your appointment today through the
Placement Office. Thursday, November 10, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 23
ANNUAL JUDO  TOURNEY
Here's a few good belts
—derrek Webb photo
IT'S A LONG WAY DOWN for this beginning judo competitor as a senior opponent flips him with a well-executed
shoulder throw. But ifs all part of tournament preparation.
An eighth degree black belt
heads the list of visitors to the
fifth annual UBC judo tournament.
Masao Ichinouye of Yoko-
suka, Japan, is the top instructor for the U.S. Navy in
Japan. He has just completed
an instructional tour of the
U.S. and Mexico.
The tournament takes place
Saturday at the War Memorial
Gym.
Doug Rogers will also appear. He is an Olympic silver
medalist, Canadian heavyweight champion and third-
ranked world heavyweight.
Another contestant is Hank
Mukai, an ex-Canadian middleweight champion.
Also competing is the ex-
Japanese high school champion, "Taki" Uryu.
Yoshi Okita will represent
UBC as last year's grand
champion and runner-up to
Rogers at Steveston.
UBC has a strong black belt
division with Okita, Al Stewart, and Bruce Harwood.
When questioned as to the
colored belt chances of the
UBC club instructor Harwood
had this to say:
"We have a couple of very
strong competitors in Paul
Musgrove, current Vancouver
Island grand champion, and
Doug Franco."
The juniors fight in three
divisions starting at 1:00 p.m.
The seniors follow at 2:30
p.m. Eliminations will take
place all afternoon with the
finals and black belts at 7:30
p.m.
Totems and Tomahawks
out to scalp U of A braves
A combined Totem-Tomahawk rugby side will play
the Braves Thursday noon at Wolfson Field.
The Totems, 4-0, and the Braves, 3-1, are leading
the newly-formed B.C. Junior Collegiate Rugby League
after the first half of the schedule.
The combined UBC side will also play the University of Alberta Saturday afternoon at Wolfson.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
HIGH SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
1967 CANADIAN  UNION  OF
STUDENT NATIONAL SEMINAR
CO-ORDINATOR:
Applications are now being received for the Co-ordinator of the 1967 Canadian Union of Students National
Seminar to be co-hosted .by the Universities of British
Columbia and Simon (Fraser in August-September,
1967. Please state interest, experience, faculty and
year. Further inquiries and applications should be
directed to Miss Daphne Kelgard, Chairman, Canadian
Union of Students Committee, Box 153, Brock Hall.
STUDENT ADMINISTRATION
ADVISORY COMMITTEES:
Applications are now toeing received to select students
to sit on joint student-Administration advisory committees concerned with:
1. Food Services
2. Traffic and Parking
3. The Bookstore
4. Student Residences
Applications in writing stating interest, experience,
faculty and year should be submitted to the A.M.S.
Secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall.
THE
PRINT CENTRE
2760 West Broadway
Vancouver- B.C.
GRAPHICS - REPRODUCTIONS
PRINTS and POSTERS
ONLY $1.98
Student  Discount on
Art Supplies
Open  Tues..Sat.  9.30-5.30
Friday to 9 p.m.
A Career
in
Iron Ore!
IRON ORE COMPANY OF CANADA
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QUEBEC NORTH SHORE AND LABRADOR RAILWAY
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► GEOLOGY
^ MINING ENGINEERING
^ GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
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PERSONNEL. DEPARTMENT,
■ RON ORE COMPANY OF CANADA,
SEPT-ILES, P. a.
Our representatives will be pleased to meet with you when they visit your campus on
November 14 and 15 Page 24
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November  10,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Mimes crow in shows
SPECIAL EVENTS
Special events presents the
innocuous San Francisco Mime
Troupe in two outrageous
performances of Jim Crow
A Go Go, 12:30 and 8 p.m.
Tickets for 12:30 show are 75
cents at the door. Evening
tickets at the door or AMS
office. Students $1.25, others
$2.
PHYSOC
Grad talk today at 1:30 on
nuclear physics, lab tour will
follow.
EUS
Girls are invited to a free
mixer noon today in Brock.
DEBATING UNION
McGoun cup debate today at
noon in Ang. 110. Resolved
that a two-nation policy leads
to no nation. UBC verses U of
Vic.
LIBERAL CLUB
Cabinet minister John Turner speaks today at noon in
Bu. 104.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Josh   McDowell  speaks   on
Resurrection: Fact or Fallacy,
tonight at 9:01 in Lower Mall
common lounge.
DUBOIS COMMITTEE
Melchard   Riville    discusses
the concept seven, tonight at
6:30 in Robson 325.
VOLUNTEER SERVICE
Those who have been placed
in volunteer service and who
have not contacted their agencies or volunteer bureau
please do so immediately.
Phone 731-6919.
SCM
Meeting Monday at noon in
BE 350.
SCM
Fireside   discussion   tonight.
Rev. Jim McKibbon speaks on
his   Selma   experiences.   4739
Chancellor.
UN CLUB
General meeting, Tuesday
Nov. 15 in IH upper lounge.
LSM
Dr. John Conway continues
his  discussion  of  the  church
in   Nazi   Germany   today   at
noon in Bu. 217.
GEOPHYSICS
Department of Geophysics
seminar:   G.   Atkinson   speaks
on   A   Theory   of Polar  Sub-
storms  in   Henn.   301,   Thursday. Nov. 17 at 3:30 p.m.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
The field trip to Jericho
leaves the northeast wing of
Buchanan at 1 p.m.
SLAVONIC  CIRCLE
Meeting   today   at   noon  in
IH 400.
COTC
UBC   Pipeband:   full   dress
parade Friday 10 a.m. at the
armory.
LSM
Dr. Pat Taylor discusses the
ethics of controlled  heredity,
Monday at noon in Bu. 104.
LIBERAL  CLUB
Coffee   party  for  the  Hon.
John Turner today at 1:30 in
Mildred Brock.
NDP
.   Professor   Bosher   discusses
French   socialism   Monday   at
noon in Bu. 104.
ED ACT
Folksingers and speeches by
Patrolmen
hide cars
on campus
Have you lost a small Sunbeam sedan within the last 22
months or so?
If so, it may be one of three
cars presently held by the traffic patrol in a compound behind the parking office.
There are also two trailers
parked in the lot. One is a
good U-haul type, the other a
dilapidated wreck.
Of the three cars, a black
Hillman has been abandoned
by a building and grounds
caretaker. The second, a '57
Buick is waiting for its out-of-
town owner to claim it.
What's left is a Sunbeam
sedan, licence number 238-737
(1965 plate) which nobody will
talk about. Parking officials
won't say where it came from
or what will happen to it.
It remains the mystery car
of Wesbrook crescent.
EYE-CATCHING
EYE WEAR
New glasses will enable
you to see better, but if
you want to look your best
tco, see our wide selection
o.1 fashionable frames. We
have a style that will suit
you perfectly.
HoJ^QptuxA
seven
locations
in Greater
Vancouver
1701  W. Broadway
731-3021
Hycroft   Med.   Bldg.
3195 Granville
733-8772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
Charlie    Boylan     and     Fred
Spencer, today at noon in Ed.
lounge.
UN CLUB
Dr. Belshwa discusses technical assistance, a field for student action, today at noon in
IH upper lounge.
ARCHAEOLOGY  CLUB
Meeting  today   at noon   in
Bu. 204, slides will be shown.
GIRLS ICE HOCKEY
Practice today at 11:30 a.m.
in the arena.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Meeting Monday at noon in
Bu. 203.
w
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15, 1967
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS —
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.*
2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
9:30 p.m.**
5:00 p.m.**
9:30 p.m.
2:45 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
7:30
3:00
7:30
12:45
7:30
'Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons —   Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings     —   Students .50     Adults .75
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST AROUND MED. BLDG.
heavy silver ring (gift). Finder
please phone 261-2796.	
LOST: SMALL GREEK LETTER
pin in Brock or Buchanan. Finder
please  phone   Debbie   266-2608.
LOST: PAPERBACK ED. VIKING
portable Coleridge in B u s t o p
Cafe last week. Phone 733-3757
p.m.
FOUND: PERSON WHO HELPED
me start my yellow Ford station
wagon left a set of keys. Claim
at AMS Office.
FOUND: HIGH SCHOOL CLASS
ring, 1962 initials BVC. Apply
Publications   Office.
LOST: TUES. ON THE GYM.
Football Field, a green and white
agate ring with gold flurentine
finish. Reward offered. Vince,
RE  8-0493.
FOUND: KEY CASE NEAR BROCK
on Friday. Licence 454077, Jack,
RE   3-8756.
THANK YOU TO THE OWNER
of Plymouth Fury who gave us a
ride from Cornwall on Tuesday
morning for returning purse left
in car.
Greetings
12
Coming Dances
12A
GIRLS   FREE!
All   girls   are   invited   to   meet   the
Engineers    at     the     Brock     Hall
Mixer, noon today.	
HERE'S THE BIG DANCE NEWS
for next weekend! Two great
bands — the Nightrains and the
Stags—on Sat., Nov. 19. Watch
for details  early   next  week.
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quaillfy for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted  Elliott,   224-6707.
DON'T MISS "THOU SHALT NOT
Kill"—banned in most of Europe.
Story about conscientious objector.
Two showings ONLY on Sun. Nov.
13—3:00 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dunbar
Theatre—West 30th. $.75 students.
SKIERS SPECIAL RATES.
Double Rooms. Phone 492-2969.
Write Braemore Lodge. Reservations 2402 South Main St., Penticton.
MIKE  C.   FOR  MR.   CHOKE.
Transportation
14
GOING SOUTH AT XMAS WE
need a ride as far as you are
going and farther. Phone Joe:
224-9064 or Ed 224-9049.  Will pay.
Travel Opportunities
16
ANYONE WISHING RETURN
ticket on AMS charter flight. Returning Aug. 25 from London.
Contact Joy,  AM 1-2718.
AUTOMOTIVE   8t MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
I960 CONSUL DELUXE FOR SALE,
green and white. New seat cover,
fine good tyres, $300. 736-0859 af-
ter 6 p.m.	
'53 CHEV. '54 REBUILT MOTOR,
75 miles, 6 tires w.w., radio. Must
be seen to be depreciated. $245,
733-3426 after 5.
19 5 8 PLYMOUTH EXCELLENT
transportation. New brakes. Must
sell. View at 2408 Pearkes Rd.
Acadia.
Automobiles  (Cont'd.)
1966    CHEV.,    NICE    BODY,    STD.
$300.  Phone 731-8497 after 6.
HAVE HER TOPLESS OR DOUBLE
topped. Born 59 Disc Wheeled
Healy 3000 HP. HT. MG OD 298-
5063.
STEAL! 1961 ALPINE, TOP CON-
dition, $800, or best offer. Will
trade   for   Volks.   Phone   435-9139.
1959 RAPIER — MAKE AN OFFER.
Phone  733-5776  after 6 p.m.
TEST DRIVE REBUILT "57 CHEV,
6-auto., 5,000 mi. Then buy motor
and   trans.   327-4874.
1960 CHEV. 6-CYL. STD. 4-DR,
w.w., good tires. City tested, $700.
Phone 327-6632.
TODAY ONLY: I WILL OFFER
my 1964 Triumph for only $999.
Reconditioned motor, new tires,
radio. Ph.  224-6857.
Accessories & Repairs
22
IMPORTED CAR PARTS! SPORTS
car accessories! Metric tools! Get
them  all  at:
OVERSEAS    AUTO    PARTS
12th   &   Alma 736-9804
(10%    Student   Discount)
Motorcycles
27
66% SUZUKI 25*, X-6. Leaving
country. Must be seen. Call Barry,
321-8142.
FOR SALE 1964 HONDA 56CC $130.
($20) Helmet included. Perfect
cond.   879-4807  after 6 p.m.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
SAVE ON TAILORED TO MEA-
sure salts (men or women). By
expert tailor — hand cut, hand
sewn, hand pressed. Choose from
600 most-wanted shades and patterns. Phone 738-7487 and plan to
be measured now so you look
better on Christmas. 2 pee. suits
49.75, pants 14.75', sports jackets
35.00, top coats 57.75. All tailored
to measure. Guaranteed all wool
cloths. Pure Irish linen. Wrinkle
resistant.
Scandals
39A
HEY SAMPSON COME IN AND
and see Del-Eila at the Campus
Barber Shop, 153 Brock Hall Ext.
BEWARE NOVEMBER THE 12th?
Stroozun from Fort — will swim!
Happy   birthday,   Sue   Strawson!!
TRY      ONE OF     MY     FIFTEEN
bands    for any   engagement   you
may   have. Contact   Ken,   253-2505
after 6.
JIM CHRISTOPHER, COMM. II.
speaks: "Today I am 21," Brock
Thurs.   noon.
Typing
43
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS    LIMITED
70th   &  Granville   Street        263-4530
TYPING —. THESIS, ESSAYS,
notes; please phone 277-8487 after
6:00 p.m.
TYPING IN OWN HOME. 725
West 20th, North Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone 988-3852.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST LOOK-
ing for home work. Please call
277-5640.
WILL DO   TYPING  —  MY   HOME
255-5541.
ESSAY AND THESIS — REASON-
able rates.  Call Joan 228-8384.
MANUSCRIPTS, THESES, ESSAYS
accurately typed. Phone 224-5046
after  6  p.m.
TYPIST   FOR  CONVENIENCE   AT
733-6345. Reasonable and accurate.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
NEED AN OLDER STUDENT TO
drive car from Vancouver to San
Diego. Leave Dec. 28. Arrive San
Diego Dec. 31. Phone 263-4103
after 6 p.m.	
WANTED — DELIVERY BOYS
with own car, $1.10 per hr. plus
20c per delivery. Late evening
work. CA 4-0833 — 4423 West 10th.
Music
63
INSTRUCTION  —  SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
PRIVATE LESSONS, COACHING
for exams, English, German,
French Translations, 731-8783 —
1265 W.   10th Avenue.
ENGLISH, FRENCH HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. 736-6923. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish,
German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
Instruction Wanted
66
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available. Now. Limited
Number. Buy now, only 75 cents
from Publications Office, Brock
Hall,   or  the Bookstore.
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications office in Brock.
BOOKS FOR SALE. ENGLISH 420,
429, 440 texts and paperbacks.
Phone  Bernle 266-8702.
BRAND NEW LEAD GUITAR, $100.
4 pick-ups, tremelo, phono adapter, case, strap, cord. Phone Ed,
Bowes,   224-9065   or   228-8415.
RENTALS  & REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
61
ACCOMMODATION    FOR    TWO.
For Information phone FA 1-9978.
SLEEPING ROOM FOR SENIOR
male student. Private entrance,
shower. Light cooking facilities.
Close to gates $50.00 per month.
CA 8-8814.
SLEEPING ROOM, MALE STU-
dent $35.00 per mo. or weekly
3555 — W. 5th Ave., Van. Ph. 733-
2795.  Eve.   6 to  9 p.m.	
WARM, BRIGHT ROOM FOR
quiet female student, $38.00 per
month.   224-6471.	
MALE STUDENT ONLY. TOTAL-
ly quiet and private room near
Gates. Bathroom and study facilities, phone, breakfast, $45. Phone
731-4437   after   6.	
SINGLE ROOM. PRIVATE EN-
trance and bathroom. Vicinity
South Granville, $40.00 per month.
Phone   733-2068.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
ROOM-MATE WANTED, MALE TO
share modern, furnished, Kits,
view ' apartment. Quiet, close to
U.B.C, reasonable rent. Phone
733-2267,  evenings.	
MODERN      FULLY      FURNISHED
trailer    for   two    girls    or    married
couple. Area of Cambie and  S.W.
Marine.   Phone 224-9139.
Unfurn. Houses    8-Apts.        84
Halls For Rent
85

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