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The Ubyssey Mar 8, 1966

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Array TM UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 57
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 1966
CA4-39U
norm  betts photo
CHANCELLOR CANDIDATE ENEMOTO
. . first we'll have my sign repainted
Enomoto calls for end
to governors secrecy
Br CAROL WILSON
Student candidate for chancellor, Randy Enomoto, called
Monday for out - of - camera
board of governors meetings,
undergraduate election of
chancellor and larger government grants to UBC.
"The secrecy of the board
of governor meetings must be
changed," Enomoto told The
Ubyssey.
"If something of vital interest to the students was kept
from them, and I were chancellor, I would break the secrecy and disclose the contents
of the meeting.
"I % would do the same thing
for the faculty."
Enomoto said the faculty
and students of UBC should
elect the chancellor because
they are more affected toy the
outcome than are the graduates.
"The system now is similar
to an absentee landlord — we
have an absentee electorate,"
he said.
"People who have been absent from UBC for years elect
the chancellor.
"The chancellor is just a
'figurehead position' used by
the university for prestige and
influence to attract funds,"
Enomoto said.
"I think the board of governors is too locked into the
institution to see the moral
dimension of the university's
finances."
He cited the $8 million grant
to the university by H. R. MacMillan in the fall of 1965 as an
example of "blood money."
"The university should not
have to rely on the 'conscience
money' tQ.exist; it should come
from the government," he said.
"If Newfoundland, our poorest province can afford free
tuition, B.C., the richest province should at least be able to
do better that it is now," he
said.
Enomoto was born in Brae-
lorn in 1944. His family was
one of the many Japanese families which were evacuated
from the coast by the federal
government during the war.
He went to grade eight in a
Cariboo school and attended
Sir Winston Churchill and Mo-
Gee high schools in Vancouver.
He graduated from UBC
with a B.A. in 1965, and is cur
rently working on his master's
degree in English.
At UBC he is currently program co-ordinator for the Academic Activities Committee.
He was on the committee for
the Academic Symposium at
Parksville this year, and the
ad hoc committee of the march
of concern.
He has been chairman of the
education conference, Education and Beyond in 1966, and
the writers club of 1964-65.
Last August he was a delegate to the Canadian Union of
Students Seminar in Fred-
ricton, New Brunswick.
AMS plans
$2 student
fee increase
CHANCELLOR  RACE   ONE-SIDED
Buchanan wont campaign
The campaign for the UBC
chancellorship will be a onesided affair, candidate John
Buchanan told The Ubyssey
Monday.
Buchanan, who returned
from a Mexican vacation during the weekend, said his plans
haven't changed following the
unexpected nomination of grad
student Randy Enomoto last
week.
Enomoto plans an active'
campaign — the first ever in
a contest for chancellor.
"I don't think an election for
this type of position demands
an extensive campaign." Buchanan said.*
He said he doesn't regard the
campaign as a political election
in the sense that he would need
a platform and campaign.
"This  is   the  naming   of   an
individual for a position" said
Buchanan.
"I presume my credentials
will go forward with the ballots. I will rest on the results
of the ballot.
"I was approached by a
group of alumni to let my
name stand for chancellor. After a great deal of consideration, I agreed.
"I am prepared to carry out
my duties to the best of my
ability if I am elected," Buchanan said.
He said he would not put
forth a program to the board
of governors or senate if he
were elected.
"Although I would be a
member of the board of governors and the senate, and I
have been in the past, I think
it would be inappropriate to
offer a program at this time,"
he said.
"I will just play a part in
the board of governors and
senate."
Buchanan received his B.A.
from UBC in 1917.
He is a former member of
the board of governors and a
past president of the alumni
association. He was a member
of the senate from 1951 to 1957.
He is a former chairman of
the board of directors of the
alumni of UBC development
fund.
Buchanan received the Great
Trekker award in 1951 for outstanding service to UBC.
He was an executive of B.C.
Packers in 1964 and is now a
director of the company.
By DOUG HALVERSON
UBC students may face a fee increase next year that no
amount of protest to the acLministration can fix.
AMS council was asked Monday night to up the AMS fee
by $2. This will mean students
will have to pay $31 in student
fees in 1966-67.
The proposal to increase fees
was made in a brief to council
by AMS t r e a s u rer and
treasurer-elect Mike Sommers
and Lome Hudson.
As council bogged down in
a marathon meeting Monday
they did not discuss the proposal. A_VES president Byron
Hender said at 12:30 a.m. today
he would call an emergency
meeting sometime this week to
discuss the proposal
The proposal said that out
of the total $29 fee now being
levied, only $8 was left for
Undergraduate Societies, Clubs,
Intramurals, Administrative and General Expenses and
Campus Activities and Events.
The bulk of the $29 is spent
on the SUB ($15) and Men's
and Women's Athletics ($5).
"It should also be noted that
the sum of $14 actually available for the society's present
program has not increased in
the past twelve years and a review of the student activity
fee across Canada suggests that
neither the present nor the proposed fee are unreasonable
bearing in mind that the society is presently embarked on
a major building project and
sponsors of the largest student
programs on the continent" the
proposal stated.
!«$.v... • »_i>:
SOMMERS
. necessary?
AMS cash
gives lift
to CUSO
The AMS council unanimously approved a motion Monday
night to give the Canadian University Services Overseas $875
to put it on a firm financial
footing.
The committee requires $850
for stationery, telephone, and
advertising.
CUSO will donate $250 for
the services of a secretary from
International House.
Earlier this year, the AMS
gave CUSO a grant of $225,
making a supplementary grant
of $875 necessary.
"Every year since CUSO
commenced operations at UBC
it has been forced to incur a
loss," said AMS treasurer Mike
Sommers in a brief presented
to council.
The brief "stated that "by
juggling various accounts in
International House, by making
use of other budgets, and by
talking International House into accepting a large portion of
deficit, CUSO had managed to
retain the false impression of
maintaining a state of liquidity
throughout the years."
Sommers said that since
CUSO was not organized until
1961, it has been last in line
for getting AMS grants.
MED  HASSLE
OVER AMS FEES
See Page 5 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 8,  1966
OVER
the HILL
... and around
the  bend
By BERT HILL
Does Simon Fraser really
exist ?
I have been told there is
something out there on Burnaby Mountain but I always
assumed civilization ended at
Boundary Road.
Of course, I have met people who claimed they live in
Burnaby and some who claimed they lived in New Westminster.
Everybody knows Vancouver has a population of about
800,000 and B.C. has two million, so there is a lot of people
left over even if you cram
a few thousand on Vancouver
Island.
I know there is an island
because I have been there. I
didn't meet Bennett, but I
know he exists.
And I know there is a Phil
Gaglardi because he has
black-topped a lot of this
place.
He must exist because two
pictures of him appeared in
four pages of copy in Thursday's Wayfarer.
And the fact that his
nephew put together those
four pages of religious material must mean he exists, right?
Now that we have taken
care of the island we have to
consider the interior.
Everybody knows there is
a big booming town up north
called Prince George which
is supposed to contain a lot of
wild people.
And there are lots of other
places like Kelowna and Vernon and lots of UBC students
come from there.
But that must take care of
the rest of the 1.2 million
people who aren't in Vancouver.
Anybody else lives in North
or West Vancouver or other
exotic centres like Horseshoe
Bay or Squamish.
But still Simon Fraser ? I
doubt it. Of course there was
the   pictures   of   it   in   The
:UbySsey some time ago. And
■everybody  knows  TheUbys-
*'sey>doesn't lie;
• -i-iit we don't know about
the photo staff of The Ubyssey. The head> guy is Norm
Betts, who walks around in
big boots like a farmer would
wear .
And farmers wear boots to
shovel manure. There could
be a connection.
Now what about those
people who claim they go to
Simon Fraser ?
To them, to their way of
thinking, Simon Fraser probably exists.
It's an hallucination. They
have been taking LSD. In
true life they all work for
The Vancouver Times.
So I have disproved another
fallacy that has haunted the
existence of many people and
made their lives less enjoyable.
We at The Ubyssey are always glad to help.
In the future we will examine other popular fallacies
like Malcolm MacGregor,
Jack Wasserman, fees, sex,
Motherhood and maybe even
Roger McAfee.
FOR LISTENERS  ONLY
Campus key club
gives away gifts
The "mystery" of UBC's key club has been cleared up.
       It's part of a UBC radio promotional campaign.
betts foto
CO-ED YUKS it up at Saturday dance in armory, oblivious to fact frosh lost $300
on the gig.
Lolita  makes  it
at  Simon  Fraser
Humbert Humbert isn't the
only man with a Lolita —
Simon Fraser's got one too.
^Lolita Wilson, dean of Mo-
anen anti associate professor
of psychology at Simon Fraser, has been appointed acting dean of student affairs.
"UBC radio is the key to a
club — a club of great listening," Radsoc sales executive
Ken Grant said Monday.
Radsoc members will be in
the residence cafeterias Tuesday night to distribute numbered key club stickers for lucky
number contests.
"Before we can even think
of applying for an FM license
we have to increase our audience," said Radsoc president
Paul Thiele.
Most of Radsoc's income
comes from advertising.
Five hundred dollars in
prizes will toe offered as an incentive for residents to listen
to Radsoc at 65 on the radio
dial.
Dinner and theatre passes
for two will be given away as
well as merchandise vouchers.
The grand prize of the contest will be awarded to the
winner of the "in 25 words or
less why I listen to UBC Radio"
contest.
The winner will receive a
$100 gift voucher to be used
with any major airline.
THE SECRET IS OUT I
THE  KEY CLUB
IS HERE!
UBC  Radio-65   on  Your
Residence  Dial
presents
THE KEY TO GOOD LISTENING
AND PRIZES
From now till March 31st, you can win $2,000 in prizes.
All you have to do is to listen to your campus radio station
on our loudspeakers or your radio in Lower Mall, Totem,
Acadia and Fort Camp.
UBC RADIO FLIGHT OF FANCY
CONTEST
You can win a voucher of $100 to be used on any
CPA flight to the destination of your choice. Simply write
on a post card or letter in 25 words or less "Why I like
to listen to UBC radio." The most original entry will be
selected March 31st.
SMOKE SIGNAL CONTEST
Don't throw away empty cigarette packs. Bring down
any two package fronts, print your name and address on
the back, and you can win valuable prizes, such as:
cigarettes, dinners, merchandise.
KEY CLUB CONTEST
You will receive a Key Club membership card which
has your lucky number on it. Put it on your radio, or
display it in a prominent place, then listen to UBC radio
for your number.
For this year
the COMPANY OF YOUNG CANADIANS
is operating a domestic service only
overseas volunteer service is to be handled by
CUSO
for overseas service apply UBC - CIJSO president's ,.
^commto^ ^*
APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED UNTIL THE END OF APRIL
FRIDAY, MARCH  11
IN THE ARMOURIES
A
Come and hear the BANDITS from
Seattle sing their recent hit
"UTTLE SALLY WALKER"
DANCE?
I
T
S Tuesday,  March  8,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
— dermis gans photo
TAKING  ADVANTAGE  of   Friday's  good  weather, students beat food services monopoly
by pitching picnic in shade of library lawn cedars. They didn't repeat it Monday.
Christian Action message
set to John Birch melody
Canada's answer to the
John Birch society will be
presented by special events
Wednesday noon in Brock
lounge.
For absolutely nothing students can hear Eric Butler,
representative for the Christian Action Movement, speak
on why Rhodesia should
maintain   White   Supremacy
and    why    the    Americans
should remain in Viet Nam.
Butler who is the National
Director of the Australian
League of Rights is a journalist and speaker presently
touring Canada.
This is the second time he
has spoken at UBC and according   to   Special   Events,
Libraries open lafe hours,
more helpers still needed
More than half the student assistants required to keep
the main and; Sedgewick. libraries open late during exams
have been found.
"The main library will be open until midnight from
Monday to Thursday, although it looks as though we may
not be open late on Friday," Basil Stuart-Stubbs, head
librarian said Monday.
The Sedgewick library will be open until 2 a.m. Monday and Tuesday Ture Erickson, Sedgewick librarian said.
Lower Mall men plan
frosh rehabilitation
By BILL GRAF
A lower mall men's residence has come up with a proposal to rehabilitate the faltering frosh undergraduate society.
~ In a letter to AMS President
Byron Hender, Robson House
has offered to buy FUS.
"We will assume its debts
and conduct its affairs in a
manner beneficial to the interests of the frosh multitudes,"
the letter read.
Robson House chairman Reg
Handford told The Ubyssey the
proposal was a serious one.
"Control of FUS would provide Robson house with a seat
on the AMS council."
"Our financial position is
much better than FUS's Hand-
ford said. "Our bank balance
is some $210, theirs is about
$180."
Asked why Robson house
wanted FUS, Handford indicated the letter's final paragraph:
"We feel It may be a good
investment, if properly handled."
BYRON HENDER
. . . offer to sell
he was not well received the
first  time.
Special Events Chairman
Dave Lui said that at Fred-
ericton in New Brunswick,
the Lord Mayor walked out
of the meeting and that Butler has often been refused
a hall for his speeches.
Special events co-chairman
Brian Plummer said that the
Christian Action Movement
is a front for the Canadian
Intelligence Service, the
Canadian equivalent of the
John Birch Society.
When asked if Lui was
against any racial or religious group Plummer replied
"They're against everything
but are so hard up for members they will take anybody."
Plummer said that Butler
believes in the "communist
conspiracy."
The Canadian Intelligence
Service publishes a pamphlet
each month and Butler has
written articles for them on
his recent trip to Rhodesia.
On his first tour to UBC
Butler wore a Beatle wig
thinking it would make him
"in" with the students, said
Plummer.
The  campus Club  Credit-
tiste is planning a stunt to
mark the occasion.
UK students
fight loans
LONDON, England (CUP)—
British students are fighting
the introduction of a loans system similar to the Canada Student Loans plan, which would
replace the present British
system of grants.
In the current year, 98 per
cent of British students received a living allowance of
about $300. It is estimated that
this grant would have to be
raised to $450 by 1970 because
of rising costs.
Support for the students'
stand has been received from
the National Union of Teachers, the Association of Scientific Workers and the Association of University Teachers.
INTO THE RED
Clashing events
sink on weekend
A hopping campus weekend jumped two of the bigger
events into the red Saturday
San Francisco jazzman Paul
Winter's show in the auditorium and a frosh-sponsOred
armory dance both lost money.
They were competing with
the Fort Camp women's dorm
formal, a pre-medicine society
dance, a Phrateres formal and
three fraterity dances.
Special events, sponsoring
Winter, lost nearly $1,000 and
frosh were set back $300.
Co-chairmen for special
events, Dave Lui and Brian
Plummer said it was the AMS
co-ordinator's fault that they
lost money because there were
too   many conflicting  events.
BOOKING EVENTS
"The duties of the co-ordinator include the booking of all
AMS functions and events, and
we had Winter booked last
summer," Plummer said.
"Events such as this must be
planned far in advance to work
in with the tours these artists
make."
"We have had difficulty
working with the co-ordinator
this year," said Lui.
Co-ordinator Graeme Vance
said it was not his fault.
"The residences, with the exception of Lower Mall, refuses
to co-operate and inform me of
their plans," he said.
EXAMS TOO CLOSE
"This is a bad time of year,"
said Vance, "and these people
know they are taking a risk.
Exams are too close."
A    dance    in    the    armory
should not be held on the same
night as an event in the auditorium the special events reps
said.
Vance said special events is
always complaining, "especially when it loses a lot of
money."
Lui said they were forced
to have Winter last weekend
and that they don't normally
hold events of this kind on a
Saturday.
NOT FAIR TO CANCEL
The frosh dance was held
Saturday as the final event of
frosh week, featuring the
Shantelles and Don and the
Good Times from Seattle.
Vance said that he did not feel
it was fair to cancel it because
of Winter.
"These things happen all the
time and I doubt if the people
attending the frosh dance
would have considered hearing Winter and vice versa."
Vance said special events
has a budget of $6,000 per year
to take care of such losses.
UBC  forfeits
Southam  trohpy
The Ubyssey today forfeited the Southam trophy to
The Peak, Simon Fraser student newspaper.
"The Peak is so obviously
superior we could no longer
hold the trophy," sobbed
Ubyssey editor Tom Way-
man.
NOTICE
OF REFERENDUM
This Thursday, March  10, a referendum will be held on
the'following motion, put to Student's Council;
Whereas the third and fourth year medical students
because of their off-campus location are unable to
benefit from the vast majority of the activities of the
Alma Mater Society though they are paying full
A.M.S. fees, and
Whereas the Board of Governors of the University
and Students' Council of the Alma Mater Society
find the following to be a satisfactory relief of this
situation;
Be it resolved that commencing with the 1966-67
academic year the third and fourth year medical
students be exempted from the A.M.S. fee.
YES
NO
Polling stations will be located as follows: North and
South Brock, Buchanan #1 and $2, Bus Stop, Education .Library, Wesbrook, VGH, Angus Bldg., and
Shaughnessy Hospital.
These polls will operate from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Residence voting will be held between 5:00 and 7:00
p.m. on March 9. mnrsstf
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
jrear by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office. CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, MARCH 8,   1966
"The responsibility ot the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,  1966
Open library
Cheers for a concerned librarian.
Mr. Basil Stuart-Stubbs' announcement last Wednesday that main stacks would be open to midnight from
March 21 to April 22 deserves real applause.
As he himself termed it, this is a minimal arrangement, with student assistants instead of permanent staff
present, and with the midnight closing instead of Simon
Fraser's 2 a.m.
But what Mr. Stuart-Stubbs' action represents is a
willingness to accede to a reasonable student request.
Somehow or other within his budget, he found the
money to keep the stacks open for hard-pressed essay
writers and last-minute crammers. And both groups —
which include most students — will be grateful.
Mr. Stuart-Stubbs' action represents another case
where something termed "impossible" before, suddenly
became a reality when approached with a positive spirit.
And he didn't fall into that deceptive logic which
insists on demonstrated support before any action is
taken, even though by all arguments that action can
only be considered beneficial.
By his actions we have avoided the unpleasantness
of Calgary's study-in, or the inconvenience of a campaign
by students to raise money to keep their library open.
Mr. Stuart-Stubbs has recommended a late operating
library for all next year.
We think this is a good idea, not only because a
university library intrinsically should, be open for long
evening hours and not only because then the exam-time
rush would not be accommodated by only emergency
arrangements but also because—since Mr. Stuart-Stubbs'
demonstrated willingness to listen to reasonable studen^
requests — we would be in favor of just about anything
he recommended.
IN  THE EAR
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Wayfarer not an AMS publication?
Editor,   The   Ubyssey,  Sir:
We object — we object to
the inclusion of a blattantly
evangelical publication in a
supposedly non-denominational newspaper.
If this publication, the Wayfarer, was paid for by the Full
Gospellers then its status as
an advertisement should be
clarified.
If, and we hope this is not
the case. The Wayfarer was
subsidized by general student
subscription, a serious injustice has been done.
Regardless of the puerile
content and invidious implications inherent in the Wayfarer the real objection must
lie in the fact that this is a
non-religious institution. The
personal religious convictions
of a small minority group,
sincere though they may be,
have no place in a publication
sanctioned by the Alma Mater
Society.
Unless we are prepared to
throw the publication and distribution facilities of our
newspaper open to all religious groups the student body
ought not to be subjected to
a mass of religious drivel.
We  have  no   quarrel with
faith or, indeed, with Christian
witness, but we do object to
the use of a general student
service to publicize a particular shade of religious opinion.
G. BISHOP
D. TINGEY
G. THOHP
Ed. note: The Wayfarer,
as its masthead clearly stated,
was "published by the Associated Full Gospel Students".
It appeared inside The
Ubyssey — as did the Edussy
(published by the education
undergraduate society), the
Moobyssey (agriculture), the
Oddyssey (frosh), and others
—as a means of simplifying
its on-campus distribution.
This  is   a  convenience we
offer AMS organizations publishing four-page newspapers
intended for campus-wide distribution.
Its insertion in no way suggests material in it is "sanctioned by the AMS", any
more than an Eaton's furniture sale insert in a downtown paper is "sanctioned" by
the publishers of that downtown paper.
•      •      •
'EMOTIONAL OUTBURST'
Editor,   The  Ubyssey,  Sir:
Re: "Canadians don't seem
to care" of February 25.
It is unfortunate that a foreign student has expressed' in
such emotional terms what I
suggest only a minority feel
so strongly about. Each foreign student at this university
usually tries to fulfill his position as ambassador despite social differences.
Some slip-up as they fail to
realize that quite a few people, including the foreign students, believe their own country to foe the centre of the
world, atad use their own
ethical-social values to judge
but in this case, condemn, the
country in which they are
guests.
Issue can be taken with the
author on several points. He
claims that he receives rude
replies when he attempts to
have an objective discussion.
Is his letter an example of
his objectivity?
Also, he damns the Canadian drinking laws, residence
rules, social freedom and fear
of the police—oh, really?
A foreign student is usually
here on a government grant of
some kind which covers his
fees, or if a student enters
this country voluntarily he
does so at his own risk for he
enters the Canadian socioeconomic sphere.
I fail to see how Canadians
can take to heart that series
of emotional outburst but I
■*<£«,:
am sure they will take note
of some constructive criticism.
BRUCE M. WATSON
•      •      •
FROG KICKS
Editor,   The   Ubyssey,  Sir:
I would like to express my
opinion of some of the members in the play-parliament
on this campus.
In reference to the article
in The Ubyssey, Tuesday,
March 1, 1966, page 3, titled
"Play parliament sets probe."
The lines I am concerned
with are: "Some of the
speeches were partly in
French tout were hooted down
by the coalition members with
shouts of 'Speak Canada's
language — speak English.' "
As a French -Canadian, I
am insulted by the actions of
these incompetent members.
This insult cannot go unchallenged. Canada's national
language is tooth French and
English.
No wonder there is an attitude of some French-Canadians to have the province
of Quebec separate from Canada. How long can any man
take insults ?
The prejudice actions of
these children in the important position they hold in the
in the parliament here is a
sampling of the attitude that
some Canadians(?) have for
us iFrench-Canadians.
Children learn their ways
from adults. If children behave this way, how do the
adults behave ?
If Quebec ever separates, it
will be a sad story for the rest
of Canada. Even a sadder one
than now.
Wine and tea cannot be unified together to make a good
drink. But one can drink tooth
to satisfy the thirst.
Let's follow the treaty of
1763.
A   SEPARATIST  ON
CAMPUS.
BY IAN CAMERON
lan's back!—in trouble again
EDITOR: Tern Wayman
 :    Ron Riter
Associate George Reamsbottom
City Al Donald
Photo   Norm Boris
Sports Ed Clark
Ass't News   Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City Danny Stoffman
Page Friday John Kelsey
Managing Ian Cameron
Features   Mike Bolton
CUP         Don Hull
Between interruptions from The
Peek, intrepid reporters showed
the SFA crowd how to put out a
real newspaper. Lome Mallin edited copy. City desk corrected his
mistakes while Anne Balf trotted
in sans story and Ann Bishop
coordinated. Bert and Marilyn Hill
were here. Calor and Rosemary
got out of residence to come. From
the international types we had a
TJkranian deskman and a Lebanese
debator. I wish Shore and Birney
were back.
Someone is withholding the city
desk press pass. Bring it back or
there will be unpleasant consequences  (threat).
■■MB
For those of you who have
missed my smiling face for the
past week (regardless of your
feeling about it) a word of explanation.
I have been out student
teaching, and
neither I nor
the school system will ever
be the same.
But more of
that later.
At the moment, I would
like to tell Cameron
you all about knitting. On
Sunday I was over at the girl
friend's house when on the
TV screen appeared a man in
a home for the mentally unbalanced, and he was knitting.
The GF turned to me and
said, "How would you like to
learn to knit?"
"Right." I said. "Where's
the needles and ,the wool?"
"You're not serious about
this, are you?"
"You bet your booties I am.
When do we start?"
Finally   I   persuaded  her I
was serious. She got the stuff,
and we got started.
"First you take the wool
and wrap it around the needle
and then you take this needle
through here and bring the
wool around the end and then
bring the point of the first
needle through here and wrap
it around here.
"God,"  said I.  "Gimmie".
Forty seconds later I handed it back, looking like a topo-
logists nightmare. Thirty seconds later I got it back again,
all smoothed out. Twenty seconds later, just as I was getting the swing of things, she
gasped, "You've dropped a
stitch."
"When?" I asked, crawling
on the floor.
I handed it back. She finished the end of the row."
"Now," she said, "We'll teach
you how to knit."
"What  was   I  just doing?"
"You were casting on."
"Oh."
Knitting is just like casting
on,    but    involves    one    less
movement. I started to get the
hang of it. Pleased, I finished
the row and started on a new
one. I was almost finished
when she looked over.
"How many stitches did you
start with?"
"I dunno. Does it matter?"
"Let's see that for a minute.
Hmm. You started with 20,
and your last two rows had
thirty-two apiece. I wonder
how you did that?"
"I don't care. Gimmie."
She showed me how to decrease the number of stitches
on each row, which I forthwith did. This made the two
long rows look suspiciously
like a cancerous growth on
the side of the piece.
I became so interested in
this phenomena that I lost
track of what I was doing.
My trained fingers sped
nimbly on, and the next time
I looked I had an even longer
protuberance, about 40 stitches longer, to be exact.
I quickly utilized my new
found knowledge to diminish
the number of stitches before she could see me, but I
forgot that it is necessary to
spread this proceedure out
over several rows, with the
result that this bulge ended
abruptly in the original
twenty stitches, and looked as
though it would drop off if
jarred.
The GF turned, and burst
into laughter.
When she stopped laughing
she informed me what I did
wrong. When I stopped laughing I stabbed her with a
needle.
Then we got on to pearling.
(Or is that purling?) Anyway,
this caused even more trauma.
By this time there were
holes in the thing that you
could put a finger through,
and other places with big
knots and lumps, like some
strange new leprosy.
Next week, I'm going to
finish it, and then I'll have
the only baby, blue gear-shift
knob cover in captivity.
Now THAT'S camp! Tuesday, March  8,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
REFERENDUM
'Students gone
let fees go
-so
A referendum Thursday will
decide whether third and
fourth year medical students
should pay AMS fees of $29
a year.
Here Con Michas, president
of medicine, gives the "yea"
side of the referendum, which
because of the official wording means he is against his
students having to pay.
The principal reason that
this medical school is asking
the student body to vote "yes"
in this referendum is that
these third and fourth year
med students are away from
campus 100 per cent of the
time. Their lectures and
clinics are conducted at city
hospitals.
They are therefore unable
to take advantage of the vast
majority of AMS and campus
activities. They cannot make
use of any of the student
building facilities nor can
they take part in any athletics
campus clubs, noon hour
events, and so on.
In the past 12 years that
the med students have
been graduating from this university, the question of payment of the AMS fee by students of the two senior years
has been raised virtually
every year. Then in the fall of
1961   a   referendum   granted
the graduate students after
their first year exemption
(from the AMS fee on the
grounds that they had their
own graduate student centre.
In some ways the cause of
the third and fourth year medical students is even more
just. Not only do they have
to make do with their own
facilities but in addition they
are geographically totally unable to make use of other facilities available to all other
campus students including
graduate   students.
Accordingly this year the
medical undergraduate society
approached the AMS council
requesting it to hold a referendum to exempt the third
and fourth year medical students from payment of the
AMS fee.
The council approved the
request by a large majority.
Opposing votes were cast
chiefly by the AMS executive
who feared that other undergraduate societies whose students spent some time off
campus might wish for special
fee considerations resulting in
fragmentation of the AMS
structure.
There is no reason why this
should be the case.
The third and fourth year
medical students differ from
Dissent: Med students
get lots for their cash
CON MICHAS
. . . yea
all other' UBC students, even
those who do spend some time
off campus, in that for two
solid years they are entirely
removed from the campus.
It is true that when the
Health Service Centre is completed the third year students
will return to campus although
the fourth year ones will not.
In the interim this referendum asks the student body to
exempt the third and fourth
year medical students from
contributing to a fund from
which they can derive virtually no benefit.
•      •      •
THIS FACULTY MAKES
A STRONG PLEA TO ALL
STUDENTS TO PLEASE
VOTE SYMPATHETICALLY
ON THIS REFERENDUM
MARCH 10.
Moneymen Mike Sommers
and Lome Hudson, AMS treasurer and treasurer-elect respectively, here present the
"nay" point of view in Thursday's referendum.
The forthcoming referendum which requests that AMS
fees for students in third and
fourth year medicine be eliminated merits careful consideration by the entire student
body.
Although these students are
physically removed from campus, they have virtually the
same opportunity as any other
students to avail themselves
of the majority of AMS activities.
A few of these benefits are
— The Ubyssey (this alone,
amounted to $1.30 per student
this year), grants to buy furniture for their lounge area
(over $330.00 in the last two
years), and travel and conference grants (they have been
granted two this year). The
resources of the AMS office
are fully available to them —
this includes student cards,
off-campus housing, and the
charter flight.
While undergraduate soci-
of less than 50 cents per student this year, the medical undergraduate society received
over $3.00 per student. In
other words, in direct money
grants, the medical students
have received a per capita
grant far in excess of any
other undergraduate society.
The medical students contend that they should not contribute toward the cost of the
sudent union building because
they will gain no benefit from
it. However, the same reasoning can be applied to all students presently on campus. In
addition, the completion of the
Medical Complex (in close
proximity to the SUB) in
196B-69 will once again find
the third year students on
campus. They will be able to
make full use of the building
for their activities at that
time.
The executive of the medical undergraduate society has
acknowledged that all medical
students derive some benefit
from membership in the AMS.
Even though this is the case,
one-half of them wish to entirely withdraw their financial support of the Society.
At the same time, they wish
to maintain their voice in the
affairs of the Society by retaining their seat on council.
For these reasons, we urge
you to vote "NO" on the referendum of March  10.
A Foreigner Is a Friend
YOU Have Not Met
Be  a   Host  to  a   New  Foreign  Student
and   Prepare  for  Your  Own  Travels  Abroad
JOIN THE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE RECEPTION PROGRAM
Rhodesian Newcomer, Judy Males: "I was very happy to get Margaret's and
Susan's letters and relieved that I would know someone, at least by letter,
when I arrived in Vancouver. My family felt easier about my leaving too.
Margaret told be about the University and campus. Susan wrote about the
differences between Vancouver and Salisbury. It was wonderful to celebrate
Thanksgiving and New Year Canadian style with Margaret's family.
Canadian, Margaret Hosgood: "Having a Rhodesian friend has made the crisis
there much more real. It is possible to strike up a casual acquaintance with
students from other countries on campus but this program gives Canadian
students a chance to really know a student from another country by becoming actively involved in helping someone, like Judy get settled."
Rhodesian Fellow-Countryman, Susan Adams: "I felt there would be reciprocal
pleasure in showing a fellow Rhodesian the U.B.C. campus and city of
Vancouver. I thought it would be interesting to know another person from
Rhodesia, learn her impressions of U.B.C, and hear news from my former
home. My own experience when I first arrived in Canada was helpful in
advising Judy.
300 New Foreign Students from over SO Countries arrive Sept.
BE A FRIEND   ——   Contact International House TODAY Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 8,  1966
CAULIFLOWER EAR
BY AL  CHRISTIE
Rivals beyond the hills
Last week this column announced that UBC was making
a big mistake in rejoining the
WCIAA. At that time I was
asked for  comments.
Well, it turns out, as usual,
that there are two sides to
every story. Let's look at the
values we will receive when
we join.
First of all our competition
will be in a league with a
visible championship, Canadian
at that. Both fans and players
will get to know the opposition
and consequently an inter-
school rivalry will result.
Competition will be close to
being on a par with us as far
as skill goes.
If you remember Ken Neilson, formerly of the University of Saskatchewan, had a
seven-foot FRESHMAN take
UBC into overtime before the
basketball 'Birds finally won
the  league  championship.
The recent track championships in Winnipeg show that
Canada is competitive in that
field, as it has indesputably
shown our hockey teams.
There is much to be said too,
for the Canadian game of football. By its very formation of
only three downs and an extra
backfielder (this year with new
blocking privileges) the game
is much more spectacular than
the average American game
which uses the percentage play
to death.
This does not for one minute
advocate the complete withdrawal from our American alliances.
We managed to schedule
some pretty fair competition
while we were in the Western
Conference.
For example do you remember the game three years ago
when UBC rented Empire
Stadium  to  host a  top   notch
£/6a*t^j£f&c
OIAMOND      PI I N • •
SONNIT ....   FROM $100
Flit BANKS
599  Seymour  -  Brentwood
and Park Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
American football team.
Odds are fifteen to one that
you don't because UBC fans
were conspicuous by their absence. UBC fans due to their
spectator apathy don't deserve
any better than the WCIAA.
Well,  what do  you think?
Passing flashes. Those are
those two yellow and purple
stripes running beside the bent
football camp. Life is not all a
bowl of roses: It has stars and
bells too.
(jetting Ktlamed?
Yours for the asking . . . Our free "Take
Home" invitation album. Phone or call in
to our store today.
Another Feature: only the finest papers
and the very latest styles, all thermo-
graved in just 12 days.
™ CARD SHOP
Comer Robson and Burrard MO 44011
Treasures from
The Art Gallery of
Toronto
Through March 27
31 important paintings by
Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Hals,
Reynolds .Canaletto, Monet,
Renoir, Degas, Picasso and
others.
at
The Vancouver Art
Gallery
open Tue.-Sal. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Fri. 7 p.m.-lO p.m., 2 p.m.-
5 p.m.
CUS FLIGHT to EUROPE
$822
Leaves Winnipeg June 3
Returns from London....Sept. 4
Applications at C.U.S. Office
B.E. 558
Better worlds don't just happen.
They're made.
rbtter worlds. The kind
1 we've come to know.
'The kind it takes hard
rwork to make. The kind
"some people in this country may
never experience.They're the kind of worlds
that are made. They don't just happen.
HV
anyone h7i<»
enough to
cares
help.
That's why The Company of Young
ne company   Canadians was formed. They are joining
,;2*„5i";   other Canadians doing what they can to
a h,<ie, *orid.   make that better world. You can have that
same opportunity..
The Government of Canada has announced to Parliament its intention of
introducing legislation giving formal approval to the name and structure of The
Company of Young Canadians.
You can start by working right here
in Canada. It's work that's not easily
accomplished. The steps are slow and
faltering. The goal sometimes will seem
impossible to reach. But it's there, and
the effort is worth every scrap of energy
available to achieve it for Canada.
Good old prosperous Canada. How
would you feel if you were hearing about
the "good times" and that "things have
never been better" and you're wondering
what you're going to eat? Or what your
kids are going to wear? Or what will keep
the place you live in warm this winter?
How would you feel?
It's this kind of thing that we're working to alleviate. It's this kind of thing that
makes you realize that being in The Company of Young Canadians is no two year
fling with a picnic hamper and a few relief
items. It's 730 days of someone else's life.
It's tough. You'll face problems you've
never faced before. There's absolutely no
money in it for you. You'll make maybe
a couple of dollars a day and survive if
all goes well. You might end up some
place near the Arctic Circle, in one of the
bigger Canadian cities, or in some other
area where there is a strong need for help.
But no matter wherever you are you
will learn about yourself and from the
people about you.
What kind of person do you have to
be to join The Company of Young Canadians? You have to be young. Not so
much young physically, but young in
spirit and attitude. You have to have initiative. You have to be dedicated to a
purpose. Most of all, you have to care.
You also have to qualify. You must be
over 18 years of age and be willing to give
two years of your life with a minimum
of financial return. You might be a carpenter, a secretary, a teacher, a mason, a
nurse, a plumber, a doctor, a gymnastic
instructor, or anyone who can work well
with people.
You invest your service
for a couple of dollars
a day.
There's a simple way to find out more
about The Company of Young Canadians.
Write to us and we'll send you our booklets and brochures. Then you spend some
time thinking it over. And when you do,
remember, better worlds don't just happen, they're made. By you.
Further information can be obtained
from The Company of Young Canadians
P.O. Box 1520Ottawa, 4, orany local office of the National Employment Service.
The biggest achievement
is the one
your heart knows.
THE COMPANY OF YOUNG CANADIANS
Better worlds don't just happen. They're made. Tuesday,  March  8,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
KEPT ON DEFENSIVE
Reps blank rugby Birds
By  DOUG  MOSER
Brian Wightman's rugby
Thunderbirds were given their
first goose egg of the season
Saturday.
Birds were blanked 12-0 by
Vancouver Reps at Brockton
Oval in the first round of the
McKechnie Cup series.
*      *      *
The loss eliminated UBC
from further play in the four-
team competition.
The experienced Rep side
dominated nearly all phases otf
play. Their forwards and backs
kept the Birds continually on
the defensive.
Only good tackling and
strong cover defense kept the
BRIAN WIGHTMAN
... a goose egg
JVs sweep Canada
hoop title tourney
VICTORIA — UBC Jayvees won the Canadian Junior
Men's Basketball Championships here Friday.
Norm   Watt's   Jayvees    de
Soccer Birds
manage a tie
in PCL play
Joe Johnson's soccer Birds
lost another point Saturday in
their drive for a playoff position in the Pacific Coast
League.
Birds tied last-place St. Andrews 1-1 at Varsity Stadium,
leaving them in third place
with a one-point edge over
Burnaby Villa which has two
games in hand.
UBC dominated the game but
had to rely on a second-half
goal by Dick Mosher to gain
the tie.
Andrews' goal came on a deflection from a corner kick in
the first half.
The ball rebounded off
center-half John Haar over the
head of UBC's onrushing goal-
- keeper $ke SchlejEfler.
"> TJB'C plays fcurnaby Saturday at 2 p.m. at Callister Park
in a must game.
Tomahawks lost the second leg
of the Seggie Cup to Burnaby
3-2.
Palmer can't
come to U BC
One of the world's greatest
golfers turned down an invitation to come to UBC.
Arnold Palmer could not accept an invitation to play in
the Thomson Golf Classic because of business committments
and tour pressure.
He told The Ubyssey in a
telephone interview from Palm
Springs that even though the
UBC course is to his liking,
previous engagements prevent
his participation.
The Classic sponsored by the
Big Block Club, begins March
18, the day when Palmer is
playing a tournament in Japan.
Tickets are available for
$1.25 from Ian Muter or Steve
Spencer.
Norm Watt's
feated Victoria Chinooks 58-
48 in the final game to go unbeaten through the seven-team
tournament.
Lanky Sam Vandermuelen,
also known around the high
jump pits, led the Jayvees with
18 points; four more than Dave
Rice, a husky UBC guard.
UBC's Vandermuelen and;
Ken Kern were named on the
National All-Star team.
Vandermuelen led Jayvee
scorers all year while Kern,
h a m p er e d with injuries
throughout the season with leg
and rib injuries, gained his all
star berth despite a severe
ankle sprain suffered in Tuesday's victory over Calgary.
Reps from scoring more.
The concensus was the Birds
played very well against much
superior opposition.
Scrum-half Stu Soofield and
winger Gary Rowles played
outstandingly
Center Bill Black broke
through the Rep defence on
several occasions, but didn't
have enough support from the
rest of his backs to push over
a score.
• •      •
Even though well-beaten by
the Reps, the Birds are showing good form for their upcoming World Cup games with the
University of California March
17-19 at Varsity Stadium.
In an earlier game at Wolfson Field, Tomahawks were
defeated 8-6 by the surprisingly strong Barbarians II.
• •      •
Tomahawks led for most of
the game, but appeared to tire
towards the end and allowed
the Barbarians to score two unanswered tries.
The forwards flayed a very
strong game. Ian Donald rambled for '60 yards to set up one
of the Tomahawks scores.
Bonspiel results
Here are the winners of the
32 rink intercollegiate curling
bonspiel held at the Winter
Sports Centre during the weekend:
"A" event: John Munro (UBC),
Rick Pugh (SFA), Wayne Carson
(Victoria),   Dave   Etmanski   (UBC).
"B" event: Jack Arnet (UHC),
Ron Adie (UBC), Mike Gurvin
(SFA), John Errington (Victoria).
"C" event: I_en Wejr (SFA), Miko
Swanton (SFA), Bob Robinson
(SFA),  Carl  Rosbergr  (Victoria).
SOCIAL
WORKmSm
%' »;_> -    Interviewer from the "British Columbia -.^ss>._■.
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
will be pleased to interview persons with a Bachelor of
Arts Degree or graduates of the School of Social Work
for permanent positions in the  Department.
Interviews Will Be Held In Student Services Building
Thursday, March 10,
and Friday, March 11
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Appointments can be made by calling in person or
phoning 228-3811
SALARY SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE APRIL 1,  1966:
M.S.W.     $490.00 to $590.00
B.S.W.         470.00 to    550.00
B.A.        389.00 to    450.00
All usual Civil Service benefits
Further information from
Training Division
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
800 Cassiar Street
Vancouver 6, B.C.
Telephone:    CYpress 9-9131
Spring  Formal Specials
Complete Outfit
Tuxedos Colored Tails
$6.50 Jackets $8.50
$7.50
£. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 Howe (Downstairs)       MU 3-2457
SPECIAL
EVENTS
presents
ERIC BUTLER
RIGHT WING SPEAKER and JOURNALIST
Speaking on "Why White Rhodesia is Right and Why
the Americans Should Stay in Vietnam."
Tomorrow (Wed.)     —     12:30    —    Brock    —    Free
COMING  FRIDAY .
The Foerstrovo Trio
direct from behind the Iron Curtain. Czechoslovakia's
finest string trio.
Fri., March 11 — Freddy Wood Theatre — Noon — 50c
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Students Court: Constitutional Hearing
The court will hold a hearing on Tuesday, March 8th,
12:30 p.m. in the TV Room, (2nd floor) Brock Hall,
to enquire into the validty of the Law Students
Association, election held Feib. 25, 1966.
All those interested in making representation to the
court must notify the Clerk of the Court of their intention to do so by 4:00 p.m. Monday, March 7. The
hearing is open and all students are invited to attend.
Apply Box 126, Brock Hall.
Canadian  Union of Students:
Applications open for S.I.S.A. Deadline is Wednesday,
March 9. Apply to CUjS., Box 153.
Assistant Co-ordinator:
Applications are now beiilg accepted "for the. position
of Ass'tr Coordinator. Applicants should apply in
writing to the Co-ordinator-Elect, AJV1.S. Office, Brock
Hall. All applications must be accompanied by an
elegibility form. Applications will close on March 24,
1966.
Brock Management Committee:
Applications are now being accepted1 for positions on
the Brock Management Committee. They should be
sent to the Co-ordinator-Elect, A.M.S. Office, Brock
Hall. Applications must be submitted by March 24,
1966.
Chairmen  Needed:
Applications are now being received for chairmanship
of the following committees:
Student Union Building Chairman
Open House Chairman
Ubyssey Editor
Totem Editor
All  applications  shall  be  in   writing and shall  be
addressed   to   the   Secretary   (Box 54).   Eligibiltiy   forms
must be submitted with applications. Eligibility forms are
available  in the Secretary's office (S. Brock).
Applications must be submitted by 4:00 p.m.
Friday, March 11, 1966.
W.A.A. Managerial  Positions:
Applications are now being accepted for managerial
positions for all W.A.A. teams. Applications should be
submitted to the President of Women's Athletics c/o
Women's Gym. Page 8
THE      UBYS5EY
Tuesday, March  8,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Breath tests discussed
Panel discussion noon Wednesday in Law South. Compulsory Breathlyzer Tests — What
Price Civil Rights? Panelists:
Roert Malkin, Sydney Simons,
and A. Hooper.
VIETNAM  COMMITTEE
Dr. Willmott speaks Wednesday noon in Bu. 104.
NEWMAN CENTRE
S p r in g general meeting
Thursday 12:40 p.m. Newman
Lounge St. Mark's. Nominations for next year's executive.
EL CIRCULO
Spanish-speaking day in IH.
Coffee available.
ED. US
Hogarth Puppets noon Thursday in Ed.  100.
Lecture on history, use and
demonstration of puppetry.
PRE-MED SOC
Seminar — Women irt Medicine at 7:30 p.m. at IH. All
girls welcome.
IL CAFFE
Italian Day Wednesday at IH.
Some of the best arias of Italian operas noon. Tickets for
Italian dinner to be held in IH
March  12th are available.
PRE-MED
Dr. Szasz will give a lecture
and slides in Wes. 201 at noon
Wtdnesday.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Meeting noon today in Bu.
204. Dr. Hayes on orthodontics.
ONTOLOGICAL
Heaven, purgatory and hell
Ron Polack will give his views
of these states Wednesday noon
in Bu. 221.
CHORAL SOC
Recording (for   radio   broadcast Wednesday at 6 p.m. Bu.
104.
PRE-LAW
General meeting: election to
be held today at noon Bu. 221.
ALPHA OMEGA SOC
General meeting Thursday
Grad Studies Centre at 7:30
p.m.
ED.  US
Dean Scarfe speaks Ed. 100
noon today.
ROMANCE STUDIES
Dr. Peter Nurse of the University of Kent, Canterbury,
speaks Wednesday noon on Mo-
RESERET CLUB
Man's Search For Happiness
— film shown in the Mormon
Pavilion at the New York's
World Fair will be shown Wednesday in Bu. 202. Discussion
following.
BAY
THE  HIGH BRIGHT SUN
Dick Bogarde
Susan Strasberg
Plus
CAT BALLOU
Lee Marvin, J. Fonda
STUDENTS 75c
DELTA
MARCH 11 & 12
BLACK SPURS
plus
A WEEKEND WITH LULU
Leslie Phillips
Robert Monkhouse
VCF
The men's chorus of Berkeley Baptist Divinity School will
sing in Brock at noon.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Baron Monchuasen Thursday noon and 8 p.m. Members
25 cents. Others 50 cents. Bu.
106.
• •      •
BLACK AND BLUE REVIEW
Meeting Wednesday noon in
Hebb 12 for all those interested
in working on The Review.
First and second year students
particularly needed.
• •      •
STUDENT COURT
A hearing will be held in
Brock T.V. room at noon today
to determine the validity of
the Law Students Assn. election. Open to all.
DEBATING UNION
"UBC's Chancellor Should
Be a Student" Gamma Phi
Beta vs Acadia Camp, Bu. 220
noon  today.
• •      •
WUS
Exchange students discuss
college life in Germany, Japan
and U.S.S.R. Wednesday noon
Bu. 203.
• •      •
ED. US
Folksinging Ed. 100 noon today. 10 cents.
• •      •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets for Jose
Molina Bailes Espanoles Spanish dancers appearing tonight at Queen Elizabeth Theatre at BE. 255 for 75 cents.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send lo Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
SEX—LOST, GOLD RING IN apparatus Gym (Feb. 23), initials
(A.O), sentimental value. Reward
ffered.     Phone   FA   5-7861
FOUND—BLUE AND GOLD WA-
terman's fountain pen. Pick up_ at
Publications  Office   in   Brock.	
FOUND—SCHAEFFER RETRACT-
able pencil. Phone John, HE
4-4673 till 8:00 p.m. and leave tele-
phone  number.
WOULD ANYONE HAVING
found my poetry and physics 100
texts at last Thursday ni£_it
Chemistry 102 lab., please contact
Paul at 266-8621. $5.00 reward offered.
LOST ON LOWER FLOOR BUQH-
anan, lady's dark-framed glasses.
Phone   Diane,   224-5780.
HELP — LOST: ENGLISH 440
notes. If found please telephone
738-0974.  Urgent need  of  them.
Greetings
12
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CINDY, YOU
are unrestricted now. Uninhibited
next.     PP.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Motorbike & Scooter Insurance,
also from $17.00 up. Ted Elliott,
224-6707.
STUDENT MEDICALLY UNABLE
to attend classes needs notes for
month of March in English 100,
History 202, Psychology 100, Sociology  200.   Phone   228-8593.
NEWMAN CENTRE SPRING
general ' meeting Thurs., March
10th, 12:40 p.m. Nominations "for
next year's executive. Newman
Lounge,   St.  Mark's  College.
KOOTENAYITES, COME OUT TO
cheer for the Castlegar boys,
Trail girls, Cranbrook girls in the
B.C. High School Basketball finals.
MENNONITFJ STUDENTS: INVIT-
ed to meet with Howard Snider,
IT. of A. First session Fri., 12:30,
Ed. 200. Second session Fri., 8:00,
Ed 200. For further particulars,
Phone   224-1729.
WINTER KEPT US WARM, NOMI-
nated for Cannes Festival: p"re-
sented March 9,   10, 11 and 12. "
Transportation
14
CARPOOL OR RIDERS. W. VAN.,
near Ambleside. Arrive by 8:30,
leave 5,   M-F.    926-2293 after 6.'
RIDE WANTED FROM 41ST AND
Knight for 8:30 Mon.-Fri. Phpne
325-9650   after  6   p.m.
Wanted
15
WANTED ADDITIONAL CREW —
For 28^-ft. cruising-racing sloop
for 1966 sailing season and swift-
sure. Must be dependable, keen,
experienced. Phone Vern Ruskin,
day, 5682-3808 Loc. 57: evenings
and weekends, WA  2-0406.
WILLIAMS: A LITTLE TREAS-
ure of Modern Poetry. Phone
Welch,   224-9953   between   6-7.    '
Travel Opportunities
16
POST EXAM TOUR TO MEXICO,
$295 via CPA. For inform, phone
Steve Hunter, AM. 1-8656 after 6
p.m. Reservations. Deadline March
11th.
WANTED: ONE GIRL TO TOUR
Europe with two others in rented
car,  May-August.    Phone 921-9065.
Automobile! For Sale
21
BLOOD RED 1952 MARK VII
Jaguar Twin S.U. Carbs, 3.5 litre,
overhead cams, walnut leather
interior.     RE   3-8765,   Robert.
'55 AUSTIN, GOOD CONDITION,
good tires. Needs minor motor
work, $100 or highest offer. Must
be  sold   this  week.     CR  8-8763.
•58 VOLKSWAGEN, GOOD CONDI-
tion.     Phone   Mike,  FA 7-4026.
1955 PLYMOUTH HARDTOP. OR-
iginal owner.    266-6206.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
4$
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Gran-
ville,  263-4530. .
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING
thesis, essays, etc., on new IBM
Executive typewriter, phone 263-
4023.
DEEP COVE STUDENTS—TYPING
done, my home, experienced. Seasonable rates.    Call 929-3181.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SUMMER TRAINEE DIRECTOR OF
Recreations — Applicant must be
in the Faculty of Physical Education & Recreation. To organize
and direct the summer recreation
program of swimming, playgrounds
and activity centre, commencing
May 1, 1966. Starting salary $400
month plus car alee.
Send applications to Director of
Recreations, Municipal Hall, 610
Duncan   St.,   Powell   River,   B.C.
HEAD LIFE GUARD to supervise,
direct and train a staff of five life
guards and assist with the summer aquatic program. Qualifications expected. Instructor's award
in swimming & life saving. Salary $400 month, plus car allowance
and extra instructional income
opportunity. Send applications' to
Director of Recreations, Municipal
Hall, 610 Duncan St., Powell River
B.C.
RELIABLE BABY SITTER WANT-
ed, Friday 4-10, Saturday, 4-7, 50
cents  hr.     263-4328.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
SPECIAL TRADE: FREE ROOM
(furnished, near Gates, private
bath, entrance, kitchen), in exchange for tuition in French.
Avail. April 30. Male only. Phone
224-6857.
Miscellanous For Sale
71
ARLBERG SKIS, 215 cm., BOOTS
size 9%, and poles for sale. Phone
Frank  Harris,   224-0349.
Room fc Board
12
ROOM AND BOARD — D.U. FRA-
ternity House. Excellent food. Call
Al Dahlo CA  4-5852  or CA  4-9.41.
MOVE ON CAMPUS FOR EXAMS!
Room and board available in Fraternity House. Phone 224-9986 between  5:00  p.m.-6:30  p.m.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
GIRL (22) TO SHARE PART
furn. 2 BR apt. with same. c/d_ 58
Kits.      Close   to    everything.      RE
8-8707.
Houses and Apis.—Other
Cities 87
ROSEDALE .ONTARIO — FAMILY
of 4 with furnished coach house
(3 air cond. BR's, 2% baths, LR,
DR, garage), wishes to trade for
similar accommodation July-Aug.
with responsible individual in Van.
For further information call Van.
682-6331.
SUB
REPORTS
WHY
THIS
AD?
Students not capable
Theatre good example
Many students have
asked why the SUB committee has been taking out
these ads. They cost
money — money which
could well be spent in the
building, money which
could toe used to supply
furniture for half a dozen
offices in the new project.
The answer to that question is quite simple. We
have toeen unable to get
information into The Ubyssey concerning progress
on this project. When the
information does get in it
is almost always oversimplified to such an extent that the issue 'being
explained is distorted out_
of all perspective.
STUDENTS NOT
CAPABLE
Many of the aspects of
this building are very
complex, and the editor of
The Ubyssey has said on
many occasions that the
students are not capable
of understanding a complex; issue unless it is put
in its simplest form. Also
he has stated that the full
presentation of such issues
requires too much space.
The committee has maintained that students are
able to undestand complex
issues if they are explained accurately and fully.
Another factor complicates the issues. The editor of The Ubyssey has on
many occasions stated his
opposition to this project.
He therefore uses the entire newspaper in an effort to make it appear as
if the project has been ill-
planned and is being poorly conducted, at the present time.
His own reporters have
on at least one occasion
apologized to the chairman of the committee for
the quotations he has admitted have been "manufactured". In all fairness
to the reporter it should
be pointed out that these
quotations were "manufactured' after the reporter had completed and
turned the story in to the
editor.
The report stated bluntly that he was told there
was nothing wrong with
"manufactured" quotations because that was "in
essence" what was said any
ways. Besides, he was told
everyone knows students
officials are always claiming they are being misquoted so no one will believe them anyway!
That is the reason that
this committee has refused
to comment to Ubyssey reporters further on issues
raised by the Ubyssey.
The committee would
rather say nothing, than
have what it did say distorted and confused.
THEATRE GOOD
EXAMPLE
The prime example to
this type of coverage involves the theatre planned for the new building.
This theatre was never intended to be used for full
scale theatrical productions. It was intended to
be use d for noon-hour
speakers and, films. However, as early as eight
months ago, the committee heard rumors that the
university was planning
to tear down the auditorium sooner than expected
so it began to investigate
the possibility of including
a minimum production
program in the theatre
until a second, larger
theatre was built.
The committee is trying
to assure all groups that
they will have the facilities their program needs,
and it is therefore considering expanding this
theatre.
All these facts are
known to the editor of this
paper but he refuses to
include them in his story.
He implies that the theatre was ill-planned. This is
just not the case.
Other instances of this
type of journalism could
be recorded but it would
take this entire page to
even get started.
When reading the stories concerning SUB in The
'Ubyssey, one always re-
mlemibers the editor of this
paper sitting behind his
desk in the office answering a first-term, complaint
that no information on
SHJB was getting into the
paper.
The person complaining
was told that SUB was
only a bureaucratic project.
"What we need are issues, martyr's," the editor
said, "and we'll get them
even if we have to make
them ourselves!"
Questions answered Friday. Send them
to A.M.S. Office or S.U.B. Office.

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