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The Ubyssey Oct 17, 1967

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Array CLANSMEN TROMP  OVER  BIRDS, 32-13
By MIKE FITZGERALD
Ubyssey Sports Writer
The first round of a new inter-collegiate rivalry
was fought at Empire Stadium Monday night.
About 15,000 fans watched Simon Fraser University Clansmen destroy the UBC Thunderbirds
to win the Gordon Shrum trophy.
Interrupted by minor skirmishes and 45 penalties, the game, billed as the most exciting college
contest in this area in years, hardly lived up to its
expectations.
mm^■m***r*   «_ A battle—yes, but exciting—no.
Wr^~^Am hH The Birds started out well, run-
^____M_B__. _,, ning the ball to the SFU 26 yard-
line. But quarterback Kent Yaniw's
second pass was intercepted, and
the drive was quickly snuffed out.
The Clan took over, with
quarterback Wayne Holm taking
the ball on an end run to the UBC
15.
Then, in three quick bursts up
the middle, the Clan gained their
first touchdown, scored by Holm.
John Steele kicked the extra point.
The Birds again tried a running game, but simply
could not penetrate Clansmen territory on end runs.
Two crossbuck runs by Paul Danyliu moved the ball
to the SFU 21 and a first down.
But a penalty and a-loss left them back on the
38. Then Yaniw attempting to hit Ron Ritchie with a
GNUP
pass, threw it into the arms of defensive back Don
Andrews and a second drive was ended.
Useless penalties cost UBC the ball this time and
SFU did not waste the opportunity. A Holm to Grant
Kaulback pass made it first and 10 on the UBC 11
yard line.
SFU's helmsmen tossed the ball to Warkentin
in the end zone and made it 20 to 0. And before you
could bink your eye, the SFU machine scored again
— one-man team Holm running eight yards around
end, making it 26-0.
Luckily a physical discussion between the two
colleges and half-time stopped their drive.
A few plays after the riot, UBC quarterback Kent
Yaniw was ejected from the game for arguing too
strenuously about a UBC penalty.
As second half rolled around, so did UBC, and
they started to move.
After the redshirts casually scored to make 32-0
on a (guess who?) Holm to John Senst pass, Thunderbird halfback John Wilson took a handoff from substitute quarterback Gordon Hardy and ran off-tackle
from the eight yardline to finally put UBC on the
scoreboard. Their convert was blocked.
But the play of the game had to be Ron Ritchie's
punt return as he ran 60 yards for a second major
to make it 32-13, and that's the way it ended.
UBC seemed to save everything for the fourth
quarter, but it didn't really matter. Simon Fraser's
momentum could not be stopped, even though the
second half was long and dull.
The players talked about it all week, and were
quite   determined   to   prove   themselves   against   a
worthy opponent. It did no good.
Round One is over.
"What can I say?" said UBC football coach Frank
Gnup after his club's loss.
"We just didn't have the football players to compete with the Simon Fraser crew. They were better
than us from the opening kickoff," Gnup added.
"There was on turning point in the game."
On the opposite side of the field, SFU coach
Lome Davies said, "The boys did it" when asked
by a Simon Fraser fan how he had engineered the
victory.
"I think the interception by Jim Jardine was the
big play of the game," said Davies. "From that point
on control of the ball shifted from them to us and
we kept it for the rest of the game.
"We'll look forward to playing them again next
year," added the victorious coach.
Denny Boyd, Vancouver Sun sports columnist
said after the game, "I can think of no good reason
for continuing this game next year."
"I think it was lousy football and the behavior
of both student bodies was juvenile," added Boyd.
The game was marred by a riot which threatened
to end the contest before it was half over.
Some UBC engineers, who had come to the
game with the express purpose of causing a disturbance had their dream come true.
It took the police riot squad ten minutes to calm
thines down.
VANCOUVER, B.C., *TUESbAY; "OCTOBER 17,  1967
Vol. XLIX, No. 12
224-3916
— derreck webb phele
ALTHOUGH SUFFERING from a twisted knee,   UBC  fullback   Dave   Corcoran   makes   a   vain
attempt to dodge SFU   left halfback.  Bill   Robinson. Robinson led the singing of "Amen" in
the SFU dressing room after the 32-13 beating the Clansmen handed the Birds.
Shaun cans
NLF visitors
By HEW GWYNNE
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan confirmed
Monday he did not inform UBC students that a North Vietnamese
student delegation was available to speak at UBC.
Sullivan received a letter from CUS dated Sept. 25, asking
that he contact them if UBC was interested in hearing the students, members of the National Liberation Front.
Special Events chairman Jerry Cannon said
■''.''''^■^^ Monday that while he and four other students
^HHH^^ wrote, phoned and telegramed Canadian Union
^■p^^^li of Students headquarters at Ottawa seeking
]^T    . I     information, Sullivan kept quiet.
Last Friday Sullivan was asked if he knew
anything about the NLF delegation. Sullivan
produced the letter from CUS.
C^^mmmw "It>s a matter of Sullivan not dealing with
.^BEST^ his bureaucracy," Cannon said. He said Sullivan
^■^a*™****   attended a national CUS seminar last week at
SULLIVAN      which the matter was widely discussed.
Sullivan said Monday that after receiving the letter he
contacted Jim McLean, student president of the University of
Victoria.
McLean told Sullivan he would contact CUS about the delegation. Sullivan said he decided to wait for the CUS reaction
to MacLean's request.
McLean received no confirmation from CUS that the delegation could appear at Victoria, Sullivan said. Therefore he did
nothing more about the matter.
Last week Sullivan received a letter dated Oct. 11 in which
Daphne Kelgard, CUS associate secretary and ex-UBC student,
told him the delegation would not have enough time to visit
UBC after all, following a confusion of schedules.
Miss Kelgard, however, said she is attempting to verify
that a different NLF group may be coming in November.
VOTE TOMORROW
UBC students vote Wednesday to elect four of nine student
candidates to seats on the university senate. Here's where:
Buchanan, south and north Brock, the auditorium cafe,
college library, gymnasium, Wesbrook, the music, education,
home economics, MacMillan, engineering and Henry Angtp
buildings, and the Ponderosa cafe. j
Graduate students vote at the bus stop cafe, the HennlM*
and bio-science -buildings, tho main library and the grad studmS'
centre, although undergraduates may vote at any ot the rim
Voting will also be held ia gesidenta today from 5 sua. it
t p.m. '        .i-/ ■ , Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  October  17,  1967
Lawyers are gutless wonders,
Webster says during debate
Lawyers are gutless wonders, says newsman
Jack Webster.
Speaking at a debate in Brock Monday noon,
Webster blasted lawyers "who defend policies
but won't do anything until they see if you have
money in your pocket."
Three hundred students cheered and hissed
as Aid. Harry Rankin and Civil Liberties Association representative William Deverell also
attacked the law's control over civil liberties.
Main topics in the debate, sponsored by the
Lutheran student movement, were the justice
of proposed national fingerprinting and electronic bugging.
Deverell attacked recent proposals of a national police chiefs' convention.
"If  all  their   proposals   were   implemented,
Attend meeting,
Persky tells arts
Arts president Stan Persky has sounded the trumpet for arts students to attend
the Alma Mater Society meeting tonight.
At tonight's meeting in Brock council
chambers, the $478,000 AMS budget receives second reading and possible final
approval as well.
The budget includes no provision for
arts, although the arts council asked for
$5,000 last June.
At a protest meeting Friday, students
rejected AMS treasurer Dave Hoye's offer
of $2,000 to arts if the budget was passed
and arts then applied to the budget committee.
Persky, however, said Monday he
thought the offer was a good idea despite
its defeat.
Arts students at the meeting instead
called for a renewal of the original arts
demand of $5,000, without strings attached.
Meanwhile John Churchland, arts I, is
collecting names of those willing to withold
their AMS fee of $29 at the time of the
second term fee payment.
over half the population of Canada would be in
jail," Deverell said.
He criticized Vancouver police chief Ralph
Booth's proposal that every person be fingerprinted. "I want no big brother watching me."
'•Of course we must surrender some civil liberties for
the good of society," Webster
said.
Innocent persons should
have nothing to fear from universal fingerprinting, he added.
Replied Rankin: "You say
we have nothing to fear but
fear itself, but who has nothing
WEBSTER to fear."
Rankin decried city council's handling of
the suspension of the Georgia Straight newspaper's business licence.
"We took over the supreme court judge's
function," Rankin said.
He called the cast against Georgia Straight
an example of hypocricy.
"It is nothing to our credit when chief constables make policy on civil rights and lawyers
stand by and watch."
Webster called attorney-general Robert Bonner the worst B.C. ever had .
"Bonner and his colleagues are the people
we must prod," he said.
Rankin and Webster agreed that the present
method of appointing judges should be changed.
"Throw out Social Cerdit and begin all over
again," Webster suggested.
Arts I organizes
for internal liason
Internal organization may be on the way for
arts I.
At an informal meeting Friday, students
agreed on a tentative arts council structure, with
an unofficial leader and no bars oh membership.
"Faculty felt a council could act as liaison
between student sections," said a spokesman.
He said lack of communication and lack of
funds prompted the move.
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BOOK STORE Tuesday, October 17,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Windsor union
stays in CUS
WINDSOR (CUP) — Windsor students voted to stay in the
Canadian Union of Students Friday.
After two recounts of ballots CUS won by a slim 24-vote
margin. Out of a total enrolment of 3,000—1,128 students voted.
The first ballot count showed a nine-vote majority against
CUS membership; the second count was in favor of CUS by
seven and the third ballot boosted the CUS majority to 24.
In Ottawa Monday, CUS president Hugh Armstrong expressed pleasure at the results of the vote.
He said now is the time for Windsor students to begin work
on their six-point education program. This was passed by the
Windsor U council prior to the referendum.
Sides in the battle crystalized around two figures over
the past two weeks.
External affairs vice-president Bob Somers led the anti-CUS
forces.
Kevin Parks, responsible for CUS to council, led the forces
in support of the union.
V
— kurt hilger photo
"I BRING YOU the word and the branch of peace," says Brother Decus, who will soon be
appearing on campus, as the first stop in his cross-Canada tour for peace. Decus, an
ordained Aquarian minister, was hounded out of the U.S. when he attempted to march
from  Seattle  to Washington.
SPECIAL MEETING
FOR ALL
CLERICAL EMPLOYEES
EMPLOYED BY UBC
will be held at
ALMA HALL
BROADWAY and ALMA
WEDS., OCTOBER 18-8 P.M.
-    COME ONE, COME ALL!    -
This meeting is sponsored by the University of British
Columbia Employees Union, Local 116, which represents more than 800 employees of the U.B.C. The 1
topic under discussion will be trade union organization
for white collar workers. There will be a question
and answer period.
President
R. BLACK
Treasurer
A. ELLIOTT
ACADEMICS . . .
Woes mar Malcolm's war
Little Malcolm and his Struggle against the Eunuchs
turned out to be more of a struggle with fire engines
during its first performance.
Charles Lawther, the student who plays Wick in the
Freddy Wood production, was smashing up a framed
picture at the very end of act one, when he caught his
wrist on a staple and put a two-inch gash in it.
Within two minutes, the UBC fire department was
there, sirens wailing. A truck carrying three concerned
firemen sped him to hospital to have the wrist treated.
"The show is especially good for anarchists and
sadists," Lawther said. "For the latter category, we also
beat up a girl onstage."
"They are now using glued frames for the picture I
smash," he added happily.
This was not the first time he has encountered difficulties. He cut his wrist during the summer while putting
on a show at the Okanagan Arts Festival.
. . . MOST IMPORTANT
How the senate functions
By BO HANSEN
The senate is concerned with debating and
approving or disapproving academic matters in
the administration of the university.
It can consider and revise courses of study,
and approve the establishment of new faculties,
departments or courses of instruction.
The senate also makes regulations for the
management of the library, awards, scholarships
and grants degrees.
Decisions of the senate involving money must
be approved by the board of governors because
only the board can appropriate funds.
Basically, the senate provides a forum on
academic matters within the university community.
Meetings take place five times during the
year and last four to five hours each. The next
plenary meeting is Oct. 25th. Meetings are restricted to members of the senate and observers
from the information services office.
Most of senate's work is delegated to committees. There are several standing committees,
such as those on curriculum and the library, as
well as ad hoc committees. Deans have committees of their faculties for senate business.
Most senators are members of one or more
committee.
Committees report their conclusion on any
given question back to the plenary senate meeting, where their recommendations are debated.
A week before a senate meeting, each senator
receives a docket of information on what has
transpired in committee meetings between plenary senate meetings.
Committee recommendations are generally
approved.
The senate membership list is headed by the
chancellor (John Buchanan), the president
(acting president Dean Walter Gage), who chairs
senate meetings, and the registrar <J. E. Parnall),
who becomes senate secretary.
The dean and one elected member of each
faculty total another 24 senators.
The provincial government appoints four.
Fifteen more are elected by convocation and four
will be elected by students Wednesday. A number equal to these three categories (23) are
elected by a joint meeting of the faculties.
Also on senate are the librarian and representatives of the theological colleges (three)
and the alumni asociation (three).
Senators, except for student senators, hold
office for three years. Student senators will be
elected for two year terms, though this year
only the graduate studies senator and the general student body candidate with the most votes
will get two year terms. The other two students
will sit on senate for one year. Their positions
will come up for re-election next year with a
two-year term for the winners.
A sample measure coming before senate will
first be presented to the secretary by the interested group. The measure will then be debated in senate, or sent to a committee for investigation. The committee reports back to senate
with recommendations.
In considering any measure, senate is concerned with maintaining academic standards and
examining how changes will affect the present
administrative structure and academic program
of the university.
For instance, suppose the senate has debated
the academic aspect of a proposed measure and
has given its approval. The measure will then
go to the board of governors, who decide
whether funds are available for the proposal,
and in fact, whether it will be carried out.
If the board defeats the proposal, the senate
can renew its recomendation or vote to deplore
the 'board's decision, but there its powers end.
If the proposal is approved by the board, the
decision is released by the UBC information
office.
Elections for the four student senator positions wil be held Wednesday, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. TMWSStJ
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
thos6 of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242; editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loe.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-524.
OCTOBER 17, 1967
r^A^vZ^
Slaves & senators
You'd think we were black people in Selma or
South Africa. They treat us like niggers.
They've got their own cans — no students allowed.
They eat in the posh Faculty Club — while we line
up for slop in Ruth Blair's plantation kitchens.
They tell us what to do with our minds — and whip
us into shape with exams and marks.
Now they've given us four seats on a senate which
has more than 80 members.
This is reminiscent of the way a southern plantation
owner used to delegate a little authority to an experienced slave.
This slave was raised above his fellows because he
had proved himself "responsible" — that is, because
he accepted the values of his master which characterized
him as inferior. Such slaves became known as Uncle
Toms.
We suspect — sadly — that it is an Uncle Tom
kind of "responsibility" on which some of our senate
candidates have based their election platforms.
These Uncle Toms are easy to identify — they're
the ones who keep yapping about responsibility — as
if this was a magic word to make all us lesser niggers
jump into the right boxes when we vote Wednesday.
To the Uncle Tom candidates responsibility means
knowing your place and acting with suitable meekness.
It means agreeing with the master even when you know
he's acting against your people's interests. All for the
sake of good public relations.
UBC students do not need Uncle Toms representing
them on the senate. Uncle Tom senators would be worse
than no student senators at all.
We need instead senators who will speak up strongly
in senate deliberations — as equals — in the interests of
the 18,000 students they represent.
It's time we stopped acting like slaves.
Who will speak?
Dentists have a pressure group in Ottawa.
Labor has a pressure group in Ottawa.
Picklemakers have a pressure group in Ottawa.
So do students.
Students' own pressure group is called the Canadian  Union  of Students.
One of its chief functions is putting pressure on
government to take into consideration student interests
and needs. This function is especially important in times
of major financial decisions — such as the present
deliberations over the Carter commission report.
That any group must — out of sheer self-interest
— maintain a pressure group in the nation's capital
should be obvious. But it's not obvious to the campus
minority presently trying to break UBC students' ties
with the national union.
These people apparently would find it preferable
if there existed no federal student loans or if tuition
fees weren't deductible from summer earnings. For it
must be remembered that these federal measures in
the student interest were brought about by CUS lobbying in Ottawa.
If the small influence on government students now
enjoy is not to be destroyed it is imperative that we
maintain our representation in Ottawa.
Even groups as powerful as business, labor, and
farmers find it necessary to maintain pressure organizations.
Students — a much less powerful interest group —
can hardly afford not to do the same.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing  Murray McMillan
Photo     Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports  Mike Jessen
Wire   Charlotte Haire
Page Friday   Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lee
In dithyrambic, almost mnemonic
coruscation, the flibberttigibbets
osculated to incalescent gemnation.
As some gormandized, others, with
apocryphal pleonasm, imprecated
decoctions. Oh Christ, mumbled Irving Fetish over the phone to
Argentina. Prime Minister Bennett
is   a  eunuch,   repeated   Little  Mal
colm. Nuts, replied Ann Arky.
Slamping their hoofs in unison were
Norman Gidney, Steve Jackson,
Jane Kennon, Alexandra Volkoff.
Paul Knox and Hew Gwynne, as
Irene Wasilewski, Judy Young,
Denis Newman, Mark DeCoursey,
Richard Baer and Ted Syperek
wrote what was print to fit. Brutus
Hansen, his red toga snapping in
the breeze, made cutting comments.
Meanwhile, with the roar of the
cowed echoing in their ears, the entire photo department was crushed
at the football game by screaming
Franz. But no one shed a tier for
George Hollo, Lawrence Woodd,
Derrek Webb, Bob Brown or Powell
Hargrave,  let alone Chris Blake.
Mike Fitzgerald was pressed in
the press jock cubicle, while Pio
T'ran was relieved, in a jocular
way. Come, all ye editors today to
pose  for  press  pictures.
"The whole  business  bothers  me.   Next thing,  they'll
be wanting representation!"
A clear choice
in senate race
By MIKE BOLTON
Bolton is a third-year law
student. He writes a weekly
column for the Vancouver
Province.
On Wednesday, 18,000 students can cast ballots to fill
the four new student positions
on the university senate.
Competitors include Arnold
Abramson, law 3, Brian Wallace, law 3, Gabor Mate, arts
4, Kirsten Emmott, science 4,
Ray Larson, arts 4, Hugh Maddin, commerce 3 and Ken Hal-
latt, commerce 4.
Abramson and Wallace have
done most of the talking about
responsibility. In the same
breath they talk of a creative
approach to the senate positions and of the need for harmonious communication between student and other senators. These ends seem a bit
incompatible.
On closer inspection the
seeming incompatibility manifests itself as a very milquetoast-like sense of responsibility.
Wallace has suggested he
views the task of student senator as a public relations undertaking. If he was serious he
must certainly lack political
acumen.
To articulate effectively student interests — the abolition
of examinations, increased academic freedom and the need
for much more student participation in academic policy decisions—student senators must
be an abrasive, dissenting
force.
RESPONSIBLE ?
Abramson has forthrightly
promised he will not upset the
senate applecart.
He   will   be   responsible   in
seeking a unified public image
for   the   university   administrators.
Who is he being responsible
to? If he really seeks a student voice in academic policymaking, why is he afraid to
foment friction between student senators and businessmen
senators?
Either of these candidates
probaibly would be very pleasant senators who would articulate, a friendly feckless brand
of student demands. Senate secrecy would be assured.
Three other candidates are
more positive.
Mate, a widely-known campus activist, says creation of
four student seats was a token
gesture to quiet student demands for a voice in academic
decisions.
He's in good company. Past
UBC president John MacDonald said  the same thing.
SECRETS
Mate promises he'll be responsible to the students who
elect him, but not to the other
senators. Senate secrets, he
says, will be the property of all
students. Miss Emmott agrees.
Standing between the forceful stand of Miss Emmott and
Mate and the mellow position
of the law-commerce faction,
is Ray Larsen.
Larsen is appalled by the
lack of student influence on
academic policy, and while he
isn't bent on decrying tokenism, he is prepared to ensure
his student seat becomes a
viable force in senate discussions.
The alternatives in Wednesday's election aren't really
vague.
It is a choice between keeping students out of academic
decision-making or ensuring
that students will have at least
an embryonic voice.
And the only candidates
clearly aligning themselves
with student interests are Emmott, Mate and Larsen.
GUERRILLA
GOVERNMENT
By STAN PERSKY
This is a call to arms, I
guess. I urge all arts students
come to the Alma Mater Society meeting a 7 p.m. in
Brock council chambers.
This is a grim request, I
realise. But tonight, the AMS
is planning to pass the so-
called student budget, in which
no provision for arts has been
made.
On Friday, about 300 students, acting as an arts council, held a meeting in the new
John Stuart Mill lounge (formerly Buchanan lounge). The
arts council decided what to
do about the fact that AMS is
planning to give arts nothing,
despite the fact arts students
put up $150,000 of the student
budget.
ALTERNATIVES
Here are some of the alternatives we came up with:
(a) In a conversation with
Dave Hoye last week he offered what I'd call an under-the-
table deal or a way of bypassing the present bureaucratic
mess. He said we could make
an application to his finance
committee, after the budget
was passed and that we might
expect as much as $2,000, with
$1,300 taken off to cover the
anti-calendar bill, leaving us
with about $700.
Arts council voted overwhelmingly against accepting
this proposal. Most people felt
Hoye's proposition was unfair
and unethical.
(b) The council voted that
we reiterate our demand for
fulfillment of our basic request of $5,000. Council members said they would come to
the AMS meeting to visibly
demonstrate their displeasure.
CIVIL COURT
(c) Anticipating that our efforts to move the reactionary
AMS might prove fruitless, arts
council decided to look into
the possibility of getting an injunction against the AMS from
a civil court.
(d) A series of proposals was
discussed, ranging from "tearing AMS down" to "a gentle- ^
manly split with central student government." Students
considered all kinds of petitions, committees and fee-
withholding plans.
(e) Another suggestion was
to continue raising money on
a voluntary basis.
(f) And finally, a suggestion
to do nothing. Forget AMS.
Just work on our local-level
community.
All of the above is a straight
factual    report   —   dull    but
necessary.
SICK OF AMS
What is clear is that arts
students are sick of AMS.
They're tired of fighting an
obstacle course of petty offic-
ialdum.
It's important to realize that
if arts were merely fighting
central student government
and doing nothing else, they
would be irrelevant also. But
they're not. Most of the arts
council energies are going into
projects in the local area.
The out-of-date central student government just can't understand that a government's
function may be as simple as
providing conditions for people
to talk, become friends and
wake up. Tuesday, October  17,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
^        \
FREDERIC WOOD STUDIO
Canadian Premiere of a New British Comedy
LITTLE MALCOLM
AND HIS STRUGGLE AGAINST THE EUNUCHS
by David Halliwell
October 12-21    —    8:30 p.m.
STUDENTS: 75c ADULTS: $1.50
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre
Room 207 or 228-2678
— kurt hilger photo
TONY AND LELA Calaman don't have the necessary middle class standards to adopt children through the Children's Aid Society. Tony, his wife and his son Mortecae, 2, came to
Stan Persky and the arts council Friday for help when all other bureaucratic alternatives
were exhausted.
Non
says
conformist
Children's
cant adopt
Aid Society
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Two California "flower children" who want to raise an
interracial family here have
charged the Children's Aid Society with treating children like
a commodity.
Tony and Lela Calaman, who
came to Canada from Berkeley
in July, said they tried for three
months to adopt a child through
the CAS.
"The beautiful simple adoption statute is circumvented by
the adoption agency. They are
dooming children to a life of
institutions," Calaman said in
an interview with The Ubyssey.
"They're treating children as
a commodity", Mrs. Calaman
said.
Calaman said there are 7000
children in foster homes in B.C.,
but the CAS turns down 90 per
cent of all parents who apply
to adopt.
"Only those people who have
or show white middle class
mentality are allowed to care
for foster children, or allowed
to adopt a baby," he said.
He claims the blame lies with
11 social workers in the
adoptive wing of CAS.
The social worker is under
no stress to adopt out the chil
dren under their care, he said.
"They deny 90 per cent of all
parents who apply to adopt.
"But if you reek white middle class they'll waive some of
the unwritten requirements,''
said Mrs. Calaman.
"It helps if you're sterile,
Protestant and have been married for five years.
"But they won't buy altruism
as a reason for wanting to adopt
a Negro baby.
"The social workers say you
hate your own race. They're all
Freudian."
"I went to the CAS office
here five times trying to find
out where social workers get
the power to give and take
away babies," said Calaman.
"The fifth time I went (Oct.
2) they called the police."
He said he hopes to circumvent the CAS and allow parents
to adopt babies without going
through the adoption wing and
waiting up to two years.
To do this Calaman formed
the Freedom for Adoptive Parents association.
Through the FAC, prospective parents would get in touch
with an unwed mother, see a
lawyer and appear in Supreme
Court to legally adopt the
child, he said.
Calaman, a former boxer and
soldier in the Marine Corps, has
applied for Canadian citizenship.
NOTICE TO '68 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Location - Oct. 16-30
Huts by Brock
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard
736-0261
aMU-iiM
RENTAL & SALES
2,500   GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE FROM
Full Dress (Tails)
Morning Coats
Directors'  Coats
White and Coloured Coats
Shirts and  Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623 Howe 688-2481
Illusionist
—andre kole
-thursday nite
-auditorium
St. Anselm's W.A. Annual
THRIFT   SALE
Saturday, Oct. 21st
12 noon to 3 p.m.
at
UNIVERSITY  HILL UNITED
CHURCH
5375 University Blvd.
fashion at
your door!
Leather  and   wool   jackets,
coats,   vests,   shirts,   slacks.
Suede   suifSj   ties,  purses.
Cow,  sheep,  wolf  skin  vests.
Wedding   dresses,   dresses.
Blou'ses,   bathing    suits   and
jumping   suits.
All  garments  tailored for
self measurements.
MEHMET'S TAILORS
540 Granville St. - 684-0811
In Arnold & Quigley's Shop
STUDENT SENATORS ELECTION
LOCATION OF POLLS
Today:  11:30 - 3:30 — Brock South
Education
5:00 - 7:30 — Residences
Grad Student Centre
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 18—10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Bio Science
Brock North
Brock South
Buchanan
Bus Stop
Cafeteria
Coll. Library
Education
Engineering
Grad. Stud. Ctre.
Henry Angus
Home Economics
Wesbrook
Library (Main)
MacMillan Bldg.
Music
Physics (Henning)
Ponderosa
War Mem. Gym
Polls lor Grad. Student Seat on Senate
Bio Science   —   Bus Stop   —   Library
Grad. Student Centre    —    Physics
JEUNESSE MUSICALES
PRESENTS THE
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
CHAMBER PLAYERS!
A VERY SPECIAL "SPECIAL EVENT"!
A  YOUTHFUL  MUSICAL  HAPPENING!
NOON TODAY!
AUDITORIUM
35c! Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October  17,  1967
Whigs study LSD,
UBC student Liberals have called for a federal study of
LSD and marijuana.
President Kent Pearson, arts 3, said the idea is included
in a club policy letter to national headquarters in Ottawa.
There the Canadian University Liberal Federation will
prepare a policy presentation to the federal cabinet.
In their letter, UBC Liberals included proposals for adoption of a guaranteed minimum income and the establishment
of a federal education ministry. Another point is that the
monarchy at present inhibits development of a Canadian identity.
The bill of rights should be incorporated into the constitution and be binding on federal and provincial governments,
the students say.
— kurt hilger photo
ON A CLEAR DAY, take a look around you and you'll see
where you are — on a motorcycle on the terrace of Brock
Hall ? From whence they came nobody knows, nor whence
they  went.
'Drug laws
should be
changed'
By ALEX VOLKOFF
AMS president Shaun
Sullivan has opposed the
law against marijuana.
"The law must be
changed and as quickly as
possible," he said.
"As far as I know, there
has been no scientific proof
that marijuana is dangerous. It's less harmful than
cigarettes or alcohol, Misinformation has led to condemnation."
Sullivan was commenting on the news that the
University of Victoria may
become a centre for marijuana research. This became a possibility when
UVic student council supported the structure of an
independent research body
at the campus to study the
uses of marijuana.
"Experimentation could
be done on a campus, but
it must be a government-
sponsored project Sullivan
said. "A university is not
recognized with enough
respect to change a law."
Arts president Stan Persky said the law against
marijuana is a farce. It's
just used as an attack on
young people.
"If anything like this
comes to UBC, and I hope
it does, students could volunteer for the experiments."
Careen Opportunities
Employment and career opportunities in widely diversified fields
are offered by Cominco Ltd. to engineering and science graduates
and post-graduates, and to graduating technologists.
The main functions in which these opportunities are available include research, development, geology, mining, ore dressing,
design and construction, production and technical services.
Cominco is a Canadian company engaged in mining, refining, the
production of chemical fertilizers and other diversified activities.
Its operations and interests extend across Canada, into the United
States and other countries. Progressive and expanding, Cominco
needs progressively-minded men who seek a challenging, satisfying and rewarding future.
Starting salaries are in line with the national level and opportunities
for advancement are excellent.
Plan Now to Meet with our Interviewers When They Visit Your
Campus
Tcominco
Don't miss the
International
FAIR
ON CAMPUS
NOVEMBER 3 & 4
.
ANDRE
KOLE
—illusionist
—thursday   nite
—auditorium
GIGANTIC
POST GAME SOUL SPECTACULAR
2 GREAT BANDS
ROSALIND KEENE & THE APOLLOS
BILLY DIXON & THE ACCENTS
AND THE GO-GO GIRLS
Only $1.50 • Field House * Friday * 8:30 p.m.
PAPERBACKS
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 88 - October 12, 1967
Abnormal  Psychology.   Hamilton    Penguin.   (Psychology)     1.85
Air   War-Vietnam.    Harvey.   Bantam.         .75
American  Novel Through  Henry  James.  Holman.
Appleton  Century  Crofts.   (Lit.) _..      1.60
Basic Laws of Arithmetic. Furth. Univ. of California. (Mathematics)   2.65
Behind  the  Lines  Hanoi.   Salisbury.  Bantam.       .95
Bertrand Russell Dictionary of Mind Matter & Morals   Denonn.
Citadel.   (Phil.) ..__   0.50
Broken Wings. Gibran. Citadel. (Philosophy)   2.00
Canadian Short Stories. Weaver. Oxford. (Canadian Fiction)   1.95
Catalina.  Maugham.  Penguin.   (Fiction)   1.25
Chinese & Japanese Art. Buhot. Anchor. (Art)              2.25
Christmas Holiday. Maugham. Penguin. (Fiction)   1.25
City in the World Economy. Clarke. Pelican. (Economics) .  1.35
Descartes-Collection of Critical Essays. Doney. Anchor.  (Philosophy)  1.65
Discovery of Time. Toulmin & Goodfield. Pelican. (Science)     1.85
ESP.   Glasser.   Essandess. '(Psychology)   1.25
Education in the Modern World. Vaizey. McGraw Hill. (Education)  3.25
Egypt &  the  Sudan.  Collins  &  Tignor.  Spectrum.  (History)   2.25
Formation of the American Republic 1776-1790. McDonald. Pelican.
(U.S.   History) .             . _  ym6S
French Canadians 1759-1966. Nish. Copp Clark. (Canadian History) __ (2.25
Games People Play. Berne.  Dell. (Psychology)       1.25
Here Comes Tomorrow. Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones. (Fiction)  2.25
Hitler's   Social  Revolution.   Schoenbaum.   Anchor.   (History)       1.65
Hormones in  Human. Reproduction. Corner. Atheneum.  (Biology)  2.00
Image of Childhood. Coveney. Peregrine. (Literature)   3.50
Intelligence & Ability. Wiseman. Penguin. (Psychology)        1.85
Kant Collection of Critical Essays. Wolff. Anchor. (Philosophy)   L 1.65
King-Byng Affair 1926. Graham. Copp Clark. (Canadian History)  2.25
LSD: Consciousness Expanding Drug. Solomon. Berkley. (Psychology)       .95
Land & Life. Sauer. Univ. of California. '(Geography)    2.65
Language of Life. Beadle. Anchor. (Biology)       1.65
Liang  Ch'l-ch'ao and the Mind of Modern  China. Levenson.
Univ.  of  California.  (History)     1.60
Magician.   Maugham.   Penguin.   (Fiction)          .85
Marx in the Mid Twentieth Century. Petrovic. Anchor. (Philosophy)  1.45
Mechanical Bride. McLuhan. Beacon Press. (Sociology)  3.80
Opinions & Perspectives from the New York Times Book Review.
Brown.   Peregrine.   (Literature)     J.95
Panic i:j Needle Park. Mills. Signet. '(Fiction)         .75
Penguin Atlas of Ancient History. McEvedy. Penguin. (Geography)  3.50
Phenomenolgy.  Kockelmans.  Anchor.   (Philosophy)     2.25
Poetry of W.B. Yeats. MacNeice. Faber. (Poetry)  2.95
Pre-Classical from Crete to Archaic Greece. Boardman. Pelican. (Art) __ 2.95
Principles of Chemical Equilibrium. Denbigh.
Cambridge  Univ.  Press (Chemistry)    4.50
Promise of America. Blum. Pelican. ^History)    1.65
Quotation Dictionary. Myman. Collier MacMillan. dictionaries)  2.45
Racism or Responsible  Government.  Nish.   Copp.   Clark.
(Canadian   History)    2J25
Romanticism & Revolt-Europe 1815-1848. Talmon. Thames & Hudson __ 3.95
Ruskin   Today.   Clark.   Peregrine.   (Literature)  2.95
Secrets of the Heart. Gibran. Citadel. (Philosophy)  2.00
Six Day War. Churchill. Heinemann. (History)           .95
Songs of Forest & River Folk. Glass & Singer. Grosset & Dunlap. (Music) 2.50
Songs of Hill & Mountain Folk. Grass & Singer.
Grosset  &   Dunlap.   (Music)   2.50
Songs of Town & City Folk. Glass & Singer. Groi.et & Dunlap. (Music) 12.50
Spiritual Sayings of Kahlil Gibran. Gibran. Citadel. (Philosophy)  2.00
Structure of Life.  Clowes.  Pelican. (Biology)    2.50
Study of Total Societies. Klausner. Anchor. (Sociology)  1.45
Symphony — 2 volumes. Simpson.  Pelican. (Music)  each 1.85
Theatre. Maugham. Penguin. (Fiction)        1.25
Then & Now. Maugham. Penguin. (Fiction)  1.25
This Germany The Story Since the Third Reich. Leonhardt. Pelican.
(History)       _    2.50
Three Cities. Asch. Bantam, (translations)        1.45
Tit-Coq. Gelinas. Clark Iwrin. (Canadian Fiction)  1.65
UFO:  Top Secret. Young. Essandess. (Fiction)       1.25
United Empire Loyalists. Upton. Copp Clark. (Canadian History)  2.25
War Crimes in Vietnam. Russell. Monthly Review Press.       .95
Water & Marsh Birds of the World. Austin. Golden Press. {Zoology) ._ 3.25
Waves &  Messages. Pierce.  Anchor.   (Physics)     1.45
Young Offender. West. Pelican. (Psychology)   1.35
UBC BOOKSTORE Tuesday, October  17,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
W
!§&&$#
Even freak goals count—
UBC loses in soccer clash
The UBC soccer Thunder-
b_rds lost a 3-2 game to Burnaby Villa on Saturday when a
clearing punt by UBC goalie
Bruce Ballam rebounded into
the net off a Villa forward.
If the Birds had won the
game they would have moved
into first place in the seven-
team Pacific Coast Soccer
League.
Instead there are now five
teams tied for first, although
not all have played the same
number of games.
One third of the 3,200 seats
in the new Thunderbird Stadium were filled for Saturday's
game.
There are no breaks in sight
in what coach Joe Johnson calls
"the most competitive league in
years."
As an example he gave the
following series: UBC beat Vic-
JV football tallies
lesson in severity
__ The UBC Junior Varsity
football squad is probably the
fastest improving team on
campus these days.
Although the Jayvees lost to
the Skagit Chargers on Saturday, the 8-2 score was a fantastic improvement on earlier
scores of 62-0, 26-0, and 20-0.
"Our defense played a great
game," said coach Nestor Kor-
J chinsky. "And even the offense
is  starting  to show  a bit  of
life."
The Chargers scored first on
a safety and later on an end
run from the 25-yard line.
The Jayvees got their points
on a safety also, nabbing the
quarterback in the end zone.
"You feel they're just ready
to burst," Korchinsky added,
"but the inspiration just
doesn't come."
"But you better believe we'll
be ready Oct. 21."
The Jayvees take on Brandon
College of Manitoba then, and
if the score keeps going the
way it has, look for a win.
toria, Victoria beat Villa and
now Villa beats UBC.
All the teams in the league
are well seasoned and Villa,
which finished second to last
last season, is getting more than
a little help from five semi-professional British players killing
time before forming the nucleus of the Vancouver Royal
Canadians team next year.
Johnson had planned a new
attack to use against Villa. The
attack should've worked, as
shown by at least three missed
goals.
Johnson to 1 a m e s weakness
around their own goal as one of
the factors leading to defeat.
The Birds came from behind
twice to tie the score with fine
goals by Ash Valdai and Jim
Briggs.
The end came fast and unexpectedly as Ballam tried to get
rid of the ball by punting it
down the field. The ball ricocheted off a Villa player's foot
over a surprised Ballam's head
and just dribbled over the goal
line before anybody could get
to it.
Next game for the Birds will
be this Sunday at 2 p.m. at Callister Park where they meet
Columbus.
Johnson would like some extra support to offset the 2,000
fans Columbus seems to carry
around with them.
UBC hosts gymnasts
Spectators at a recent National Basketball Association
game on campus were impressed by the international calibre
of the half-time display by UBC gymnasts.
Coached by
Bruno Klaus,
a former U.S.
national team
member, the
UBC team has
a full schedule of competitions     this
spring. KLAUS
Two of the
gymnasts who performed are
members of Canada's national
team. Leslie Bird competed
internationally in 1966 at the
North American and world
championships, and Bill Mackie was a member of the 1967
Pan-American team.
Both are slated to compete
in the 1968 American Championships to be held in the War
Memorial Gym this spring.
This meet will include gymnasts from the United States,
Mexico and Cuba.
In the past Canada's gymnasts have been drawn to the
U.S. for competition. With
Klaus, however, UBC is expected to develop as a center
for Canadian collegiate gymnastics.
Last year's team was western Canada's best and formed
part of the Canadian collegiate
championship team.
'We didn't play as a team/
says rugger coach Spence
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds are a team of 15 individuals and if they would play as a team they would be
able to win a game.
So says Donn Spence, coach
of the rugby Birds.
"We played badly," commented Spence about the Birds'
16-0 loss to Rowing Club I on
Saturday.
Women fare well
The Thunderette tennis and golf teams fared well in the
Western Intercollegiate Athletic Association championships held
in Edmonton on Saturday.
In tennis, UBC team members Stephanie Green, Janice
Tindle and Barb Johnston, went undefeated in their singles and
doubles matches.
Their 10 points outs of a possible 10 made them the intercollegiate champs.
In golf, Marilyn Palmer, with rounds of 77 and 81, was
awarded the trophy for being the outstanding individual.
Other team members, Ashley Allen and Heather Munroe
helped bring the team to a second-place finish.
"We lacked cohesion and
didn't play as a team."
Spence is
hoping things
improve soon.
He has tough
workouts m m
workouts
scheduled all
this week.
On   Oct.   21
the  Birds will
SPENCE play  Meralo
mas, the second place finishers
in the Vancouver Rugby Union
League of last year. They are
touted to be the toughest fifteen
in the league this year.
In other weekend rugby
action, the UBC Braves 'beat
Richmond 14-8, the Totems lost
16-14 to Rowing Club II and the
Tomahawks lost 6-3 to Brentwood College.
UBC sailing team masters waves,
trounces ail southern competition
The UBC sailing team won the second annual Douglas Cup
Regatta at Long Beach Yacht Club Sunday.
UBC competed with five other teams, University of Southern
California, Tulane of New Orleans, California State College at
Long Beach, Stanford University, and University of Southern
California at Santa Barbara.
The UBC crew lost only to Long Beach and ended up tied
with USC. Having beaten them previously, however, UBC won
the Cup.
The races were competed for in "Columbia 28's", fibreglass
racing yachts with light displacement.
Skipper of the UBC crew of Huntey Gordon, Peter Wood,
Maynard Marceau, and Rob Black was Donald Martin. UBC
faculty adviser was Dr. E. G. Fiedler.
The event was part of the California International Sea
Festival and races were over two days.
SS
wi
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
JAPANESE
NOH THEATRE
Lecture Demonstration by Major Mulholland
THURSDAY, OCT.  19   —   12:30 P.M.
FRIDAY,        OCT. 20   —   12:30 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
It
kS
EHI6H SGHIISRI
ink siuonwin
Thinking of returning to the U.K. ? You'll get good
straight talk about scientific opportunities from the
team of ICI scientists visiting your campus shortly.
They'll tell you about jobs available now, where they
are, how much they pay, what the housing situation
is. If you've only just arrived, you can still talk prospects with them.
ICI's recruiting team
will visit your campus on  OCT. 25, 26
Contact them through     Mr. J. C. Craik
Office of Student Services
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers and
umbrellas.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10%  discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October  17,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Chamber group
performs today
Jeunesse Musicales presents
the Vancouver Symphony
Chamber Orchestra, today,
noon, auditorium. Admission,
35 cents.
ARTS GOVERNMENT
An evening of fun and games
at the AMS meeting Tuesday,
7 p.m., Brock council chambers. Arts students urged to
come and protest against the
AMS budget.
PRE MED SOC
Dr. D. H. Williams discusses
the function of the department
of continuing medical education, Wednesday, noon, Wes.
201.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP
Tour   of  the   acquisition   library Wednesday noon.  Meet
in foyer of reserve library at
12:30.
ONTOLOGY
Ron Polack discusses What's
Your Value, Wednesday, noon,
Bu. 223.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Check point meeting for
Totem Rally, Wednesday, 7
p.m., Brock council chambers.
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
General meeting Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 214.
PHYSSOC
Feynmans film series, film
one: the law of gravitation, today, noon, Hebb theatre. Series continues every Tuesday.
LIBERAL CLUB
Federal     cabinet     minister
Jean   Chretein   speaks   today,
noon, Brock lounge.
DEBATING UNION
Forum debate: resolved that
socialism is the scourge of the
twentieth century, today, noon,
Bu. 217.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
General    meeting   today,
noon, Bu. 216.
SCIENCE US
Science general meeting,
Thursday, noon, Henn. 200.
Election of first-year council.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
See    clubhouse    Wednesday
for time and place of women's
get together.
IL CAFFE
Wednesday is Italian day at
IH. Slides of Pompei, Paestrum
and  Ercolano  will be  shown
beginning at 12:30.
CIASP
General meeting for all applicants Wednesday, noon, Bu.
122.
GTU
Philosopher     Melchard     T.
Reiveille speaks tonight, 7:30,
Robson 307.
CHORAL SOC
Rehearsal     Wednesday,      6
p.m., Bu.   104.  New members
welcome.
SCM
Panel discussion on Missionary Go Home, with Bill Willmott, Rev. Norman MacKenzie,
Kathie Finley and Eric Low,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 104.
AAC
Karl Burau discusses UBC—
place   of  sweet  hallucination,
Wednesday, noon, Bu.  192.
UN CLUB
Prof.    Ronimois   and   Prof.
Zacher  debate  the  merits   of
the   Bolsheviks   vs.   the   UN,
noon, today, Brock lounge."
SAILING CLUB
General meeting noon, today,
Bu. 106. Slides of the Tranpac
race will be shown.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
Lunch, noon, today at Figi
house. /All members urged to
attend; Bring money.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, today, IH 402.
Film.
MUS
General    business    meeting,
noon, today, in Brock council
chambers.
AQUA SOC
Students listed for second
course appear in clubroom
sometime Tues. or Wed.
HERE
THURS DAY
ANDRE KOLE
Illusionist
Experimental College
MR. FRED STOCKHOLDER
Imperialism in Literature
THURSDAY, OCT. 19th - BU 226
12:30 -  2:30
READINGS
CONRAD — Heart of Darkness
LENIN — Imperialism
SCHUMPETER - Imperialism
MR. KARL BURAU
What is Wrong With Canada
and The True Human Nature
THURS., OCT. 19th - BU 202
1:30 ■ 3:30
N.D.P.
CHARLES TAYLOR
McGILL LECTURER
PRESENTS SOME INSIGHTS  INTO
FECIAL
VENTS
THE
FRENCH - QUEBEC
QUESTION
10 cents
FRIDAY NOON BROCK LOUNGE
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
UNDERGROUND ROCK BANDS ARE
where it's at. For your next dance
Phone  Magic  Theatre.   685-1711.
COUNTRY   JOE   IS   BACK
at the Retinal Circus with the Painted   Ship  and  Papa  Bear's   Medicine
Show,  October 20 - 21, $2.50.
GIGANTIC POST GAME SOUL SPEC-
tacular featuring 2 Great Bands
only $1.50. Rosalind Keene & The
Apollos plus Billy Dixon & The
Accents.   Field   House,   8:30   p.m.
DANCE TO THE BETTER HALF
Friday, Oct. 20 at the Hallmark
Hall.   $1.50  per person.
Greetings
12
COFFEE   HOUR   TODAY,   3:00   P.M.
at   I.   House.   Everyone   welcome....
Lost & Found
13
REWARD. BI-FOCAL GLASSES IN
brown pigskin case. Lost Registration week on Campus. Gratitude.
Don,   2741523.
LOST—SILVER RING WITH BLUE
stone in men's washroom, main
Lib. or Bu., inscription Templeton.
Finder   please   phone   Glen   2543845.
COUNTRY JOE HAS BEEN FOUND!
Retinal Circus has Joe, the Painted
Ship and Papa Bear's Medicine
Show,  October 20  -  21,  $2.50.	
WOULD THE PERSON WHO Mistakenly picked up a dark brown
Suede Coat on Serenade Night at
the Psi U House please return it
to the Publications Office or phone
738-1775.
CELL PHSIOLOGY 330 NOTEBOOK
lost Oct. 12, Buchanan 203, reward.
Phone   John   526-7595.
LOST, THURS., 12-1 P.M., IN OR
around Library, black Ladies' Kid
Glove, size 8. Finder please phone
Renata,   731-9381.
Automobiles For Sale (Cont'd)
1959 PORSCHE 1600, SILVER COUPE
healthy condition, 2250 Wesbrook,
224-9662.
'62 FALCON 2 DOOR 45,000 MILES,
new valve job & battery, radio
excellent  tires.   $800.  —  738-0292.
1965 SPRITE. TOP CONDITION.
Complete service record. Never
raced. Has UBC Staff Sticker. 321-
2482 after 6.
1954 PLYMOUTH 4 - DR. 6 - CYL.
automatic in showroom condition,
$550. Also 1954 Dodge 2-dr. 6-cyl.
standard in good running order,
$125.   224-4231.
56 BEAUMONT 396 CU. IN. 4 SP.
Tach. Mags. Offers. Phone 738-7462
after  5  p.m.
FOR  SALE
'62   Corvair—Radio—New   Front  Tires
Good   Condition
Private 266-4941
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles  - Cars
Generators  -  Utility Units
New   and Used
SPORT CARS
N Motors T
O S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 888-1284
GOING TO EUROPE — 1967 YAMA-
ha 60 cc, almost new, perfect
shape. Phone 738-4504. 	
1967 SUZUKI 250 cc. HUSTLER. 2000
miles, only six weeks old. A-l condition.   Carrier.   Phone   266-8031.
SUZUKI 80S TOP CONDITION.
Leaving town, must sell. $190. Helmet included. See it o ncampus Call:
Carol 228-3320 afternoons, mornings,
weekends   684-3724.
FOUND SILVER    RING    WITH
unique Emotionless   Face   on   front.
Phone Peter,   number  five,   AM   1-
8737.
Rides & Car Pools
14
BSA — 1963, GOOD CONDITION,
rebuilt engine, transmission, etc.
Must sacrifice. Phone 738-5390
evenings.	
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-6129.
"GOOD    EXPERIENCED   TYPIST"
available   for   home   typing.
Please call 277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Male or Female
53
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE
tutors required. Fourth year or
graduate,    736-6923,    4:30-6:30   p.m.,
except  Tuesday.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY — The
Ubyssey requires a copy runner to
transport material to printers. Car
essential. Apply Murray McMillan,
Managing Editor, The Ubyssey,
Brock Hall.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
GUITAR
Teachers   who   care   —   all   styles   —
Bill   Lewis   Music,   3645   W.   Broadway,   738-0033.
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
Maths.  Tutors, 4th year or graduates,
GRADES   7  to  13
736-6923 — 4:30  -  7:30  P.M.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYLINa
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4574 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block   from   gates.
1964   HONDA   CB   160.   VERY   GOOD
condition.  $325 or best offer.  Phone
224-9953   and  ask   for   Alan.
GIRL WANTS RIDE TO 19th & OAK
M, W, F or all nights after 7:15.
Phone 874-0645.
Special Notices
 15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURE
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   298-5966.
GSA WILL HOLD ITS GENERAL
meeting for fall on Thursday, October 26, 1967, at 12:45 p.m., in the
Lower Lounge of the Graduate Student Centre. Plans for Centre expansion and consequent fee increase
will be discussed.
COUNTRY JOE RETURNS
to the Retinal Circus with the Painted   Ship  and  Papa   Bear's  Medicine
Show,   October   20   -   21,   $2.50.
HOW TO VOTE FOR SENA.TE —
mark three "X's" out of seven
choices   —   Hallat   solicits   one   'X'.
SKITS, SINGING, BANJO — PICKIN'
Guitar Playin*. It's all at Talent
Night, Friday 20 Newman Centre,
8:00 p.m. Free Coffee.  Dance after.
HALLAT . . . REMINDS RESI-
dents . . . Senate advance poll tonight . . . Vote Responsibiy to insure greater student participation
in   administration   for   the   future.
Travel Opportunities
     16
TORONTO CHRISTMAS CHARTER
Limited capacity on modern Turbojet at inexpensive Student Rate.
Information 224-9841 or 731-5429, 4-
6 p.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED:     USED     MICROSCOPE.
Phone 733-6296.
Miscellaneous
32
WHOLESALE  PRICES TO ALL UBC
students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE,   3235  West  Broadway,  Tel.
732-6811.
STATIONERY - ART SUPPLIES -
Gift & Party Shop. See Walter's
Stationery, 2910 W. Broadway. Ph.
733-4516.
% PRICE. Luxury Full-length white
Leather Coat. Good Condition. Size
10   $60.   Call   688-4157  or  688-9994.
PHILIPS CONTINENTAL 150 (EL
3302) Tape Recorder, $75.00. Phone
926-3304.
RCA VICTOR AUTOMATIC PORT-
able stereo, detachable speakers, 4
speeds, 4 separate controls, automatic shut-off $50. Phone 874-4096
evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
WANTED — WILLING HELPERS
male or female, to work on Treasure   Van.   Phone   Bev.,   261-5491.
DEAR CAT, I'M BALLOU WITH-
out you. Meet me in Aud., Oct. 26.
Signed,   Lee  Marvin.	
THE SCANDALOUS COUNTRY JOE
returns to the Retinal Circus with
the Painted Ship and Papa Bear's
Medicine Show, October 20 - 21,
$2.50.	
LOOKING
For clean, used, guaranteed appliances.
Also   complete   repair   service  for all
makes and  models.
McIVER Appliances Ltd.
3215  W  Broadway—738-7181
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931.
GOLF CLUBS 1964 WILSON STAFF
2-9 Irons Ex. cond. $175. Phone Ross
266-6503.   After   6.	
OLYMPIA PORTABLE TYPEWRI-
ter, manual, small type, zippered
carrying case, like new. $55. 874-
4096 evenings.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
GRAD STUDENT WANTS GIRL TO
share furnished apartment near
4th and Alma. Transportation available. Contact Anne, 228-3856 or
922-1085.	
ROOMS ON CAMPUS CLOSE TO
meal services, 2250 Wesbrook Cres.,
224-9662.
MALE STUDENT, SINGLE ROOM,
kit. priv., use frig, bath. Main
floor.   Non-smoker,   $40.   733-8778.
ROOM FOR RENT, FOR MALE
students, near Alma St. Phone
738-4792,   ask for  Mrs.  Wang.
PHI KAPPA SIGMA DOUBLE ROOM
available after 15 October, Phone
228-8476   evenings.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS,
5745 Agronomy Road, Ph. 224-9667
after six. 	
DISAPPOINTED WITH YOUR
Pledges? We buy, sell and trade.
Contact Jim. Psi U House after 5:00
p.m.
WANTED — A CHANCE TO RE-
sponsibly represent the majority
of UBC students on the Senate . . .
Ken   Hallat,   Commerce  III.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1965 TR 4-A RED, TOP CONDITION.
Never raced. $1900.00 or i>est offer.
Phone after 6 p.m. 263-8227,  Frank.
WILL ALL ALPHA DEDTS PLEASE
return dirty Rush Manuals to Dan
Mclntyre at the A.D. House before
Spring Rush.
ARE YOU GETTING ANY? COME
to the Witches Brew at the Hallmark Hall Oct. 20. The Better Half
 $1.50   per   person.	
ELECTIONS FOR        SENATE    —
Undergrads. Let's    have    a    large
turnout .  .  . Vote Responsibility —
Vote  Hallat.
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON FRA-
ternity is now inviting inquiries for
accommodation in their new $155,-
000 36-man house on Agronomy
Road. The house will be officially
opened Jan. 1, 1968, but room and
possibly board will be offered in
early November. The house will feature the best living! facilities at
UBC for residence rates. For further information and opening dates
please write: H. Harrison, No. 6,
3851 West 4th Ave.
NEAR UBC. TWO MALE STUDENTS
to share very large nice room.
Good   meals,   table   tennis.   738-2305.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE FLAT
with young couple. $60 per month.
681-2679,   West   End.

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