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The Ubyssey Jan 7, 1982

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Array •  I
'Deficit
not answer'
By BRIAN JONES
In an unprecedented move the provincial government recently gave B.C.
universities permission to go into debt in order to buy out the contracts of
tenured faculty.
At the same time, the government also refused UBC's request for a $7.2
million grant to defray unbudgeted salary increases for this year's faculty.
"The treasury board has agreed to allow universities to borrow money to
facilitate the early retirement of tenured professors," faculty association
press officer Andrew Brockett said Wednesday.
"The universities act does not allow universities to go into debt, unless
they have the approval of the ministers of finance and universities. They
seem to have given their approval for universities to incur a deficit for the
purpose of facilitating early retirement," Brockett added.
But the intent of the motion isn't entirely clear, according to faculty association president Charles Culling.
"If tenured professors want to retire voluntarily, it would be worthwhile.
I don't approve of the move if retirement is forced. The two (voluntary vs.
forced retirement) shouldn't be confused," said Culling.
UBC administration president Doug Kenny was also unsure of the proposal's intention. "We don't yet have the details of the proposals," he
said.
But if it is intended to help solve the financial crisis facing universities it
would only add to the problem, Kenny added. "It's not really saving
money. It (going into debt) is not a solution, it's just compounding the universities' problem," he said. "My main concern is how the universities
would pay back the principle and the interest. I don't see that as a solution
to anything if that's what the proposal is."
What is important, given today's interest rates, is whether the university
is expected to borrow the money from the government or on the open
market, Kenny said.
The government has also announced that it will not provide universities
with special grants to meet their estimated budget shortages.
According to education minister Pat McGeer the condition of B.C.'s
economy does not allow extra spending this year.
A committee chaired by vice-president Michael Shaw is currently examining possible ways of meeting the expected budget shortfall.
TAU talks
break down
By GLEN SANFORD
The Teaching Assistants Union
meets today to vote on possible job
action following another
breakdown in contract negotiations
with the administration.
"If the union rejects the latest offer, we could be taking job action as
early as next week," union president Jonathon Katz said Wednesday.
The two sides have met through
months of bitter negotiations, but
union security and wage settlements
remain unresolved. The last
meeting took place Monday, and
ended when the administration
angrily walked off the bargaining
table.
"(Employee relations director
Robert) Grant threw a tantrum and
stormed out. It was rather childish,
actually," Katz said. "It's clear to
me they're not interested in coming
to a settlement. They intend to
frustrate and break down the
union."
Grant said Wednesday he left the
meeting because he was frustrated
with changes on the union
negotiating team.
"There are times when you just
close your books and leave because
there's nothing more to be said,"
Grant said. "After four months of
listening to their 'holier than thou'
rhetoric, I didn't want to put up
with it any more."
Grant claimed that when the
union switched members of the
negotiating team, points which had
already been discussed came up
again.
But Katz said the members of the
negotiating team represented the
union's demands, and said the administration was not willing to give
a fair hearing to union representatives.
"The whole time they've been
very condescending, and have
treated us with contempt at the
negotiating table," Katz said.
"When Grant left, he said he was
going  away  to   forget  about  the
teaching assistants."
Both sides expect that mediator
Richard Longpre will book out
shortly, and the teaching assistants
will be in a legal position to strike 72
hours afterwards.
The mediator was appointed by
the provincial ministry of labor in
early December after teaching
assitants voted yes in a strike vote.
The ministry appointed the
mediator because it considered TAs
perform an essential service.
Union spokesperson Keith
Baldrey said Wednesday the
mediator had been appointed to
prevent any strike action during
Christmas exams. He said the
ministry never made clear what part
of the TAs jobs it considered an
essential service.
Baldrey added that the mediator
had been completely ineffectual
because the university refused to
change its bargaining position.
Grant said he agreed with the
union's assessment. "We didn't
want a mediator in the first place
because we had gone as far as we
were willing to go."
The two outstanding issues are
union security and wages.
On union security the union
wants all TAs to automatically
become union members, if they
haven't opted out within one
month. The administration wants
to provide TAs with an option form
to be filled out during registration
week, offering them the choice to
join the union or not.
The union has agreed to accept
the administration's wage offer if
teaching assistants are given a tuition waiver or rebate equal to the
fee for six units of undergraduate
courses or the employee's total tuition fee, whichever is less.
The union meets at noon hour today in the Grad Centre ballroom to
discuss the current university offer
and possible job action.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 33
Vancouver, B.C. Thursday, January 7,1982
228-2301
— Craig yuill photo
WELL, THEY tore down the walls but we still have the roof of our solar house, mind you, I've always wondered
how this thing's supposed to work in snow." Couple ponders plight of being left out in the cold, without a ray of
hope. "There's snow business like snow business," a retiring administrator who had been in charge of building
student igloos out of yellow snow said before flying to ice follies in Kingston. Meanwhile, American paratroopers,
led by commander Frost T. Thesnowman received an icy reception on their botched second attempt on Iran.
Houses destroyed despite use
While students are attempting to
cope with a housing crisis, UBC's
former housing director Mike Davis
authorized the destruction of two
solar houses early last month.
And architect Charles Haynes,
who designed the two houses, said
in a December interview that the
demolition was part of the university's overall plan to clear the area
and put in high cost housing.
"Had they (the houses) remained
they would have demonstrated the
viability of low cost, solar
housing," said Haynes. And
Acadia Camp resident's association
president Gail Bexton said Wednesday she hated to see the houses
destroyed because they had great
potential for use.
"It's just a complete loss. It was
the politics that got in there and we
would have liked to have had them
developed," said Bexton. "Unfortunately, the houses were left too
long."
She added the houses were
neglected and fell into disrepair
when the project was phased out
which made them a hazard to
children playing in the area. Acting
housing director Mary Flores
agreed the houses were dangerous.
"They were horrid and they were
far from completion. They were a
danger to the community," said
Flores who denied the demolition
was part of a plan to rebuild high
cost housing in the area.
"Haynes has a personal stake in
those houses. It's not true it was
part of a plan to replace it with high
rent housing," said Flores. But she
added: "I agree it does seem strange
to see houses being torn down right
now."
The total estimated cost to
renovate the two houses, according
to a Physical Plant assessment cited
by Flores, was $90,000.
But Haynes disagreed and said
the whole point of the houses was to
use novice builders for low cost
housing. Bexton said the university
currently plans to redevelop Acadia
camp housing and adds the contentious issue will be the number of
units made available to students.
While the university planning
committee examining housing alternatives has guaranteed 100 subsidized units for students, Bexton said
the rent there would have to increase.
Students nixed in housing hiring
No students are involved in the
selection of a new campus housing
director to replace recently resigned
Mike Davis, Alma Mater Society
external affairs coordinator James
Hollis said Wednesday.
"If we had a student in the selection process, maybe we could get
someone half human," said Hollis.
"I guess the administration is looking for another Mike Davis clone."
Davis, who resigned last November, disregarded the needs of
students while serving as housing
director, charged Hollis. "Somebody who has the students best interests in mind would be a refreshing change," he said.
AMS president Marlea Haugen
agreed with Hollis. "I think it's
time that the university took a long
hard look at housing," said Haugen. "I thought that Mike Davis
had absolutely no concept of student needs."
Representatives  of the  campus
residences were also upset with the
performance of Davis as housing
director. "I wish he had been a little
closer to the students," said Heather McBurney, president of the
Gage Towers residence association.
"I think there was a real gap between students and the housing director," she added.
McBurney is also concerned over
the process that is being used to
select  the  new  housing director.
See page 2: NO Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 7, 1982
No input
From page 1
Since it is a staff appointment, there
will be no student input until after
the candidate has been chosen, she
said.
But acting vice-provost and registrar Ken Young said student input
would be encouraged. "We're certainly interested in what the students want," said Young. He added
that Davis did an "adequate" job
and was successful in many areas.
Davis was at one time president
of the Vancouver Centre Liberal
Association and is now working as
a contractor for the Canadian
Mortgage Housing Corporation in
Kingston, Ontario.
In early 1979, student council
called for Davis' resignation for his
lack of student input on the housing
budget, trying to confuse students
on the decision and formulating an
irrational housing policy.
U.B.C. Thunderbirds
Varsity Sports
HOCKEY WEATHER IS HERE! Get in the WINTER SPIRIT! Join the action
at the Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre and cheer for your UBC Thunderbird Hockey in their games with the U. of Calgary Dinosaurs.
SAT. AFTERNOON 2 P.M.
SUN. AFTERNOON 2:00 P.M.
Dress warmly and anti-freeze is available at Winter Sport Centre Lounge if
you want to stay WARM!
Cheer on the Varsity Basketball Team
FRI. NIGHT vs SASKATCHEWAN HUSKIES 8:30 P.M.
SAT. NIGHT vs SASKATCHEWAN HUSKIES 8:30 P.M.
War Memorial Gym
Gorilla
wrestling
Yes, it's a very popular sport
in the small emerging
African nation of Hcywhats-
happeninman? But you won't
find it at P. J. Burger & Sons.
Nope. Just 15 incredible
burgers; huge salads; chicken
and other great stuff.
Open 7 days a week from
11:30 a.m. till really late.
Furs optional.
SUB FILMS presents
K3b?*s5-%itayi*kto*MMS«'ir   '   : S^..-                                             ' ^4£*te**--tt£*4fl
t************************************^t*B  V;  .':  ^                           '^^^^^^^^^^^^1
AIRED STATES
ALTERED SWES' william hurt ■ blair brown
BOB BALABAN • CHARI FS HAID
Thursday & Sunday 7:00
Friday & Saturday 7:00 & 9:30
$1.00 SUB Auditorium
INTERESTED IN
MANAGEMENT
CONSULTING
Arthur Andersen & Co.
Arthur Andersen & Co. is seeking 1982
graduates preferably with backgrounds
in commerce, science or engineering,
for the management consulting division
of the Vancouver office. Our consulting
division deals mainly in management information systems for both large and
small businesses. Submit an original or
photocopy of your personal resume
(UCPA form is suitable) by January 15,
1982 to the Canada Employment Centre
on Campus, Brock Hall.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You
will be contacted around the end of January regarding interviews. Additional
information is available at the U.B.C.
Canada Employment Office.
.Arthur
Andersen
<&£(>
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Vancouver • Calgary • Winnipeg • Toronto • Ottawa • Montreal
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
for AAtS.
Executive Positions
President
Vice-President
Director of Finance
Director of Administration
Coordinator of External Affairs
Close of Nominations:
3:30 pm, Friday January 8
Nomination forms can be obtained from the A.M.S
Executive Secretary, SUB 238
Submit Nominations to the A.M.S. Vice-President, SUB 252 Thursday, January 7, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Referendum fever hitsAMS
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
The student council chambers
were barraged with referendum
fever Wednesday night.
Council members passed a motion approving a referendum to
renovate the SUB conversation
lounge and unfinished basement,
slated for the last week in January.
Council also agreed to an emergency meeting to discuss The Ubyssey's autonomy proposal next Tuesday night in the newspaper office.
Students will be asked to approve
a $10 levy to finance the SUB reno-
Candidates hide
from stake
Student council executive elections are nearing but according to
the student administrative commission secretary, a low voter turnout
is expected because most students
have nothing at stake.
And according to election's commissioner Alexis Cherkezoff, few
students have come forward to fill
the positions for president, vice
president, finance and administration directors and external affairs
co-ordinator.
Nominations for the Jan. 25 to 29
elections close at 3:30 p.m. on Friday and Cherkezoff said she expects
candidates to wait until the last
minute before submitting their
names.
PIRG hopeful
Despite narrow defeat last year,
B.C. Public Interest Research
Group organizers are confident
they will win a January referendum
approving campus funding.
PIRG organizer Clark Roberts
said Wednesday 750 student
signatures have been collected so
far calling for a referendum allowing UBC students to carry out
research projects.
Three projects currently planned
for PIRG are:
• investigation of a liquid natural
gas plant under construction in Port
Coquitlam
• analysis of Vancouver's housing
problem focusing on tenant's rights
• the adequacy of daycare facilities and direct action plans if
the study reveals that this need is
currently neglected by local governments.
vations totalling $345,000 over two
years. AMS vice-president Pat
Chow said her SUB renovations
committee actively sought input
from students and undergraduate
societies on the proposals.
The motion specified "there exists a need for more usable space in
SUB and there is support for the
listening lounge and basement proposals as outlined from a cross-section of the student population."
But graduate student representative Robert Cameron objected to
the proposal and said it involved
too high a cost over a short period
of time.
"As far as the traditional fees go
at UBC, they've always been paid
off over a period of time. We've always looked at capital costs and
evaluated what it's worth and calculated the fees proportionally,"
said Cameron.
He added if the student council
wants to continue with building expansions, a permanent building
fund should be considered. "People are trying to estimate building
fees as a way of life; for perpetuity.
If we want to establish perpetual
capital fees, that's what we should
be saying to the students."
Cameron said he also objected
because there was little debate on
the proposal. Last year a SUB
building referendum asking
students to continue a $15 building
lew failed.
Council also voted overwhelmingly to endorse an autonomous
Ubyssey Publications Society. The
motion recognized a free press as
desirable in any democratic society
and that student council could be
seen to have a direct conflict of in
terest in dealing with Ubyssey affairs.
A petition with more than 570
student signatures asking for a referendum was presented to Chow.
The emergency meeting will deal
with an appropriate referendum
date.
But some council members raised
concerns about the exact wording
of the petition. Student board of
governors representative Chris
Niwinski said before the referendum went to the students the wording should be examined by the AMS
lawyer.
DEMONSTRATORS OCCUPIED Ubyssey office yesterday to protest
last month's news feature on Ku Klux Klan. Ubyssey was accused of approaching KKK and providing platform for fascists. ProtestDrs claimed
Ubyssey had neglected to fulfill its responsibility to students of UBC, protestors demanded that Ubyssey retract article and refrain from writing
— craig yuill photo
about such groups in future. Staff listened to grievances for half hour, but
time constraints negated further discussion as staff had paper to put out.
Demonstration was organized by Trotskyist League, although not all 13
protestors were members.
Political unknowns vie for senate
By CRAIG BROOKS
Political unknowns and acclamations are in the majority in this
year's elections for student positions on the university senate and
board of governors.
Ten of 12 student positions
representing individual faculties
were filled by acclamation when
nominations closed Dec. 23.
Students in the faculties of grad
studies and science will be the only
students to go to the polls later this
month to elect a student senator for
their faculty, while all UBC
students will select five at-large
senators from a field of six.
The six candidates vying for the
at-large positions are Wilf Ratz-
bury, grad studies. Michael
Shepard,   science   3;   Rob   Sum-
merbell, arts 3; Mark Thompson,
arts 3; and Stephen Henderson, arts
4. Henderson, currently a member
of student council and senate, said
Wednesday he may pull out of the
race to prevent the necessity of
holding an election.
Ken Freeman and David Kirshner
are running for grad studies
senator, while Horatio de la Cueva
will take on William Mislosevic for
science senator.
All candidates running for senate
positions, with the exception of
Henderson, have never sat on
senate or student council before.
Engineering undergraduate society president Lance Balcom and
physical  education   undergraduate
society president Kerry Armstrong
are trying for their first term on the
UBC board of governors, the financial decision-making body of the
university.
Also running for the two board
positions are Frances Janes, applied
science 3; and Ron Krause,
medicine 2.
Krause tried unsuccessfully two
years ago for a senate position,
while  this   is   Janes'   first   try.
Chris Fulker, arts 3, who tried
unsuccessfully for the board of
governors two times, AMS executive three times, and senate three
times, withdrew his candidacy for
board Monday, citing a "lack of
time."
CUP favors analysis
— craig yuill photo
STUDENT-TOYOTA GFV-666- consoled by fellow car-ing engines of academic propulsion after seeing Xmas
exam results. "It's a gas," Toyota was heard to remark, "Oil I wheely wanted was a high grade." Profs called
Toyota "shiftless" and "dents" and it was said to be "lacking drive" and exercising "too much poetic license,
which should be curbed." But Toyota said, "Wheel, that's life in the fast lane."
Immediate national news without
analysis is no longer a priority
among members of Canadian
University Press.
Delegates to the 44th annual
CUP conference, held in Bolton,
Ontario, decided to cancel the telex
(wire) service which transmits news
across the country. Instead,
delegates reinstated the vice president's position, giving CUP a
feature writer to increase national
coverage analysis.
CUP is a co-operative organization of student newpapers from
post-secondary institutions across
Canada which provides news and
other services to its members and
strives to improve and strengthen
the calibre of Canadian student
journalism.
The Ubyssey had five representatives at the conference and the
Alma Mater Society chose: its direc
tor of administration, Terry Cox, to
act as an observer.
Cox was impressed by the conference, he told student council at
its meeting Tuesday, and said he intends to present a full report of his
experiences in two weeks.
Julie Wheelwright of The
Ubyssey was elected CUP president. Ontario's Rick Jenson was
elected vice president/features
writer, and Jim McElgun, who
currently runs the CUP Winnipeg
bureau, was elected national bureau
chief. All offices become effective
in April.
Cox told council he had found
that The Ubyssey is one of the finest
student newspapers in the country.
"It's very well respected by other
newspapers in the country for its
quality and it's respected in the
organization for its leadership," he
said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 7, 1982
Act now to change AMS
If you talk to people who have
dealt with the Alma Mater Society
for the past few years, most of them
will tell you that this year's is the
worst in a long time.
That's saying a lot, because in recent years the AMS has gotten a
reputation as an unresponsive, secretive organization, to put it mildly. Last year's SUB expansion referendum fiasco and this year's SUB
bookings mixup are two examples
of the way the AMS rides roughshod over the wishes of the student
body.
You may remember the article in
a November Ubyssey about how the
week of Nov. 23-27 was going to be
a week of protest at all post-secondary institutions in B.C. All but
UBC, of course.
These people are not only screwing us, but they are giving the university a bad reputation among the
student population of the rest of the
province, presenting the image that
the "fat cats" of UBC are not interested in stopping government cutbacks or fee hikes.
This is only the latest example of
the unresponsiveness of the present
AMS. It seems that most of the people in the AMS don't want to rock
the boat.
Many people have spoken to me
about the idea of running a slate of
progressive people who are concerned enough about the quality of
education at this university to speak
up and make a little noise, and not
go licking the boots of the administration or of government officials.
It could be done by forming a coalition of interested groups who are
fed up with the way the affairs of
this university are being run, and
want to effect a real change for the
better.
The turnout at AMS elections is
something like 10 percent, so if we
could mobilize our constituencies,
we could put progressive people in
there who would be responsive to
student needs.
We must act now to form the
foundations for a coalition of concerned, progressive students who
will act positively for constructive
change, and who will give the AMS
back to the students.
Lawrence Kootnikoff
president, UBC NDP dub
'SAE undemocratic'
It is necessary to clarify some
points raised in an article in The
Ubyssey, Nov. 27 where the petition
to oppose the fee hike was discussed.
I have been a member of Students
for an Accessible Education
(S.A.E.) since its inception and attended every meeting as a member
of the steering committee. At a
publicly-called meeting on Thursday, Nov. 12, I presented a draft
petition as a suggested beginning of
Oppose the Klan. . .
In general, I think The Ubyssey is
an excellent paper which plays an
important role on campus.
I think, however, that you showed bad judgment in agreeing to run
an annotated interview with Ku
Klux Klan leader Alex McQuirter
(Nov. 27, 1981).
The racists and neo-Nazis who
run the Klan are eager for publicity
of any kind. Even bad publicity,
such as an account of their criminal
activities, is welcome to them, as it
serves to reinforce their image as a
powerful and fearsome force. After
all, it is no accident that they have
chosen to identify themselves with
the Klan, with its long history of intimidation and violence. To allow
McQuirter to ramble on about his
group's size and activities at UBC
without any attempt to evaluate the
truth or the motive of his claims is
to play into his hands.
I am not suggesting you, or any
of us, ignore the Klan. But we
should use our publications to report on or to oppose them, not to
provide them a platform (no matter
how weak a platform we think it is).
Mark Golden
department of classics
. . .and not Soroka
The Ubyssey of Nov. 27 was a
real disappointment. Interviewing
the head of the KKK and giving him
the chance to utter some monstrous
lies assists the Klan to gain an aura
of "respectability."
On the same page you ran a big
"expose" of Al Soroka and the
People's Front. I don't agree with
everything Soroka has to say, but I
know that he is opposed to the
KKK. He should be praised for his
opposition to the Klan, not attacked.
The petition against the fee increase is just fine, and it's wrong to
oppose it because a member of
CPC(M-L) drafted it. The Ubyssey
should print that petition and let the
students judge if it's a correct petition or not.
Tim Louis
law 2
a campaign to fight fee increases.
The statement was discussed and
accepted with minor amendments
and it was agreed that I would be
responsible for this part of S.A.E.'s
activities. There was no
misrepresentation of any sort in
saying this petition was sponsored
by S.A.E. and at no time was a
separate group set up as some people have tried to claim.
Shortly after the petition appeared, S.A.E. stopped having
regular publicly-announced
meetings and a few individuals
around S.A.E. raised the issue of
my support for CPC (M-L) as
justification for an attempt to prevent me from participating in this
student-financed group and to
disassociate itself from a petition
which was adopted according to the
established practices of S.A.E. and
which has since been enthusiastically signed by well over 300 students
with barely any work having been
done yet.
These people must explain their
underhanded and undemocratic
methods which result in dividing
students when unity to defend our
interests is so necessary and in suppressing student initiative when
students desire to act on this issue is
so high. They must explain why
they raise my political connections
as the problem when the problem is
the fact that the administration is
getting ready to make us, the
students, pay for a funding shortage we are in no way responsible
for.
Incidentally, I would also like to
suggest that the staff members of
The Ubyssey reread the libel laws.
In B.C., calling a person a liar is
considered a serious breach of journalistic ethics and those responsible
are held accountable.
Garnet Colly,
unclassified 5.
Solar homes burned
In a classic example of complete contempt for the university community,
UBC's administration has bulldozed through one of its pet projects, and
bulldozed down the Acadia Camp solar houses.
Realizing that the topic was considered important and debatable to
many people at UBC, the administration pretended all semester it had put
plans to rip down the solar houses on the back burner. Then, lo and
behold, classes close, The Ubyssey stops printing, and the houses disappear.
It's almost as if they didn't want students to participate in the decision.
Or even know about it.
We're also faced with another amazing spectacle. Not only did the administration act in secret, the person responsible for the decision has
disappeared as thoroughly as the houses.
Smashing the solar houses was no doubt former housing director Mike
Davis' last major decision. He announced his resignation shortly before the
end of the term, and now guess where he is. Kingston. He works for
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. (We won't mention his close
ties with the Vancouver-Centre Liberals, or speculate on the fate of the
solar houses in Kingston.)
It is incredible that Davis would make such a decision and then leave
before facing the music. But it is typical of the way UBC's administration
operates.
Why were the solar houses torn down? The administration claims they
were not structurally sound and not economically feasible to reconstruct.
Even the architect of the houses offered to make them completely liveable
at low-low prices.
Whey were the solar houses really torn down? The administration didn't
want them there. They were one more obstacle in the administration's
great plans for a brand new high-density housing development.
With the solar houses gone, all the administration has to do is wait for
the Acadia Camp huts to rot out of existence. And that may not take long
because the administration refuses to repair or renovate any of these low-
cost family housing units.
One final note to Mike Davis: Thanks for resigning. Hopefully your
replacement won't decide that the administration knows what's best for
students.
THE UBYSSEY
January 7, 1982
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
It was a busy day in Ubyssey land. Protests appeared with the frequency of snow flakes,
much to Anne Marie Fleming's disgust. Sean Lafleur was confused, and Craig Yuill tripped
over his feet while toeing the political line. Glen Sanford, Julie Wheelwright and Marie
Hyphen Leiren Hyphen Young preached the eastern orthodox practice, only to be countered
by lotus eaters Verne McDonald and Kevin McGee. Craig Brooks cowered in a corner, Chris
Wong whined, both to Brian Jones' disgust. Nancy Campbell abstained. Many thanks, hugs,
kisses and back rubs to all loyal and wonderful staffers who helped with the petitions.
Rationalism rules
Jonathan Mills (Dec. 4) does not
like my letter of Nov. 19 on the evolution-creation controversy. That's
his prerogative, but I wish he'd at
least criticize what I said, rather
than try to set up a Straw Man.
Out-of-context quotes and pejorative adjectives accomplish nothing. My views stand, and I ask interested readers to look at what I
wrote before they are convinced by
someone who accuses me of being
ignorant of the true nature of the
scientific endeavor, then cites Baconian induction as representative
of the correct methodology. I also
suggest a reading of John Collier's
excellent letter (Dec. 4).
As I said before, rationalism only
works if everyone plays by the
rules; if Mills takes such pleasure in
the mystery of empirical science and
reality I don't think we have anything to discuss.
Richard O'Grady
grad studies zoology
So does 2nd Law
I hope you are not averse to
printing correspondence from
somebody off campus but I feel I
must comment on the recent letter
to The Ubyssey that wheeled out
that old Creationist warhorse, the
second law of thermodynamics.
In this context and in a nutshell
the law states that any physico-
chemical system will, in the absence
of an external influence, go from a
state of order to disorder.
Life, the Christian fundamentalists correctly and perennially point
out, is a system moving in a direction opposite to that dictated by the
second law. Ipso facto there is an
external influence and god is justified. Such twisted logic does not
stand up to scrutiny.
If the sun were to fail us tomorrow, life would soon toe the line of
the second law. Try throwing a few
blankets over a greenhouse if you
wish to test this experimentally.
What are Creationist friends are inadvertently advocating is sun worship, a religion that has a longer history than Christianity I might add. I
would hate to see sun worship elbowing its way into our science
classrooms but these days anything
seems possible.
One other thing that puzzles me
about the concept of entities creating entities. Does God believe in a
god and if not does that make him
an atheist?
Derrick R. Ewid
Harwood St., Vancouver Thursday, January 7, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
in mivuiiin}iuijww^uw^^iijuBuiitiiiii^iiiii.nam'*jji|iip!Hiyjpkj<mw—
Letters
No more Socred illogic on education funding
The Ubyssey's coverage of the
proposed changes to the Established Programs Financing arrangements is mislea#ng. In fact you
seem to be playing a Socred tune, a
surprising precedent.
The potential implications of the
changes were exaggerated in a recent issue, and the identity of the
true villains of the piece have been
confused. The Socreds will be the
only ones to blame for any decrease
in funding. Any other interpretation cannot have addressed the
facts.
The EPF over the past decade has
consisted of the federal government
paying the piper for a tune called by
the provinces in the areas of health
care and education. While the provinces have been jealously guarding
their exclusive jurisdictions in these
areas, the level of the federal government's financial contribution
has been escalating, essentially
without control. This problem has
contributed a great deal to the size
of the federal deficit, since contractual obligations have been safe
from austerity measures. The Socreds meanwhile have been sanctimoniously pointing to their
(fraudulently)   balanced   budget.
This is hogwash of course. They've
just been getting someone else to
foot the bill.
Under the new system, the federal government has reduced its direct contributions to both education and health care by some $5.7
billion over five years. Instead, the
federal government has proposed a
reduction of its tax rates, so that the
provinces can increase their rates in
order to make up for some of the
lost transfer payments.
If the provinces maintain the existing overall level of taxation, the
shortfall over all 10 provinces for
the next five years, in both of these
areas, will be $1.9 billion. Are we
really to believe Mr. Curtis (as The
Ubyssey has) when he claims that
the net result to B.C. is a loss of $91
million next year, and $600 million
over five years, all to come out of
education? Of course not. His figures actually refer to the loss of direct payments. What about the vacated tax points? Not a word.
What's going on here? The answer seems clear. Mr. Curtis wants
to cut education funding, but he
doesn't want to accept the blame.
These developments have provided
him   with   a   convenient   Liberal
Use brains in B-lot
Last May I acquired my 1976
Mini, a long awaited arrival. I rejoiced at the thought of giving up
the "plight of the urban
commuter" - never again would I
stand on a hot bus, driven by an obnoxious creep, next to some social
deviant who hadn't bathed in years.
I was fully prepared to cope with
Vancouver's suspect drivers, and
the march of the lemmings in from
B-lot each morning. I can cope
quite well with those things. It's inconsiderate drivers in the parking
lots that get me.
Today (Nov. 27), I strolled out to
B-lot, at about 1 p.m. My Mini was
parked on the final row of the first
lot, the one adjacent to Macleod,
and the engineering buildings. At
8:05 this morning, 1 would my way
into what I thought was the last
spot at the end of the "cul-de-sac".
Obviously, I was mistaken.
Well, this hosehead (thanks Bob
and Doug) decided there was more
room. In fact, just enough room for
his/her gold VW Bug (GCX 536 -
consider yourself publicly
humiliated) This ignorant soul
parked his vehicle on the embankment, giving me about four inches
on  the  driver's   side.   I   can   see
him/her/it now - "Gee, just enough
room on the passenger side to get
in. Tee hee." Bozo. Mini's, or at
least mine, can't be unlocked from
the passenger side on the outside!!!!
Well, after some rather loud
obscenities, a very nice fellow gave
me some of his time and helped me
push my car out of the space.
Without his help, I might have succumbed to tire slashing.
This particular bozo is not alone.
Equally annoying are those who
figure they can take two parking
spaces. It bothers me (and other
small car drivers) to see a boat of an
automobile smack dab in the middle of two spaces, with four feet on
either side - not quite enough room
for a Honda, Mini, et al. (Mr. Blue
Firebird driver - consider yourself
publicly humiliated).
We won't ding your doors, or
squeeze you in, if you just use your
brains (you are university students,
after all) and be a little more considerate. And then we may all live
happily ever after. Or until exams.
Which ever comes first.
Mary Henricksen
commerce
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scapegoat. Well, we won't let him
get away with it. If the Socred government plans to divert those new
tax revenues to other fields of expenditure, then we've got them to
blame.
Finally, we ask why cuts are necessary at al!? As we've argued, any
cuts in education which may result
from the new budget are a fraction
of those quoted by Mr. Curtis as a
scare tactic. But a more fundamental issue underlies all ol" this.
For several years the federal gov
ernment has been running a budgetary deficit on behalf of the provinces. What they're saying now is
that if the provinces want a certain
level of services, they can run the
deficit on their own budgets. This is
only as it should be: the political decisions should be made at the level
of constitutional responsibility. So
if the Socreds have some religious
belief that budget deficits are proscribed, then they'll have to explicitly justify to us what spending priorities aire held to be higher than education (megaprojects perhapis?).
And if they truly want to invest in
a high technology future for the
province, then a budget deficit for
educational purposes may be justified as an investment. The main
thing is that these issues be debated
openly and above board, without
hiding behind illogical excuses. It's
about time that the Socreds treated
the issue of financing for education
in an honest manner.
David Moloney
Andre Ploudre
grad studies economics
Remarks sincere not sarcastic
I was incorrectly quoted in the
Ubyssey article titled Baricing no
answer — Kenny (Nov. 24, 1981 on
page 1).
The two statements attributed to
me were not only out of context,
but incorrectly interpreted in your
report. My remarks at the faculty of
science meeting were offered in
complete sincerity, and were incorrectly reported in your article as
having been "sarcastically suggested."
I have accepted (by telephone)
the editor's apology for the editorial misinterpretation of the reporter's story. For the record, 1 will try
to explain my remarks here. There
are three points.
(1) The university requires a long
term strategy for financial support,
in order to maintain its tradition of
excellence, independence and service. This is especially true in times
of relatively high inflation, when it
is difficult for governments to resist
the temptation to use the inflation
rate in two ways: (a) to selectively
underfund public institutions, and
(b) to effectively increase income
taxes (since increasing wages automatically move into higher percentage tax brackets, while decreasing
in real purchasing power). Thus,
governments can manipulate the
distribution of capital, "invisibly"
through inaction.
(2) For the following reasons, not
many strategies are available: (a)
The university is prohibited from
operating in debt; (b) UBC is very
dependent on government's yearly
appropriation of operating funds;
(c) A policy of raising tuition to
cover underfunding would not only
be unfair (because UBC would become inaccessible to the vast majority of the residents of B.C.), but
also would encourage future under-
funding by government.
(3) Thus, in case of a serious cutback in real operating funds, the
university should certainly ask the
government to reconsider its decision on funding. However, if no
Redistribute
The Ubyssey
Perhaps The Ubyssey's distribution staff could deposit their piles
of papers in safer locations. On
more than one occasion I've seen
someone stumble over a stack of
newsprint which was left in the centre of a main foyer. By creating an
obstacle course for the visually impaired, you are showing little consideration for a valuable portion of
our student population.
Also, it seems to me that you
guys have twice as many copies
printed as are needed. Cut down
circulation and save a tree. My
wooden friends and I thank you.
Rick Cheyne
computer science
further funds are forthcoming, the
university should consider closing
early in that year, perhaps offering
instructions only from September
to May. In this way underfunding
could be made much more "visible" to the public, and the university could take a definite stand
against deterioration in the quality
of the vital services it provides.
Roy Douglas
mathematics dept.
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@QEH@ Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 7, 1982
I
Tween Classes
TODAY
AMNESTY UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Regietration  for  winter  ctaeeea,   noon,   SUB
foyer.
CAMPU8 CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Challenge for 1962, noon, Hebb 12.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Regular meeting, regional representative will be
present, noon, SUB 212a.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
EISA
Ice skating party, 7 p.m., Thunderbird skating
rink.
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
GAY AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 207/209.
GRADUATE REPRESENTATIVE ASSEMBLY
Meeting, grad centre committee room.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Welcome beck meeting, all new members most
welcome, noon, St. Mark's College. Meet at
12:25 at Speakeasy if escort is necessary.
UBYSSEY
Full production day, noon onwards, SUB 241k.
All staff and new recruits welcomed with open
amis.
FRIDAY
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for women's bowling league,
men's volleyball league, basketball league,
hockey league, and ivy leegue, 1:30 p.m., War
Memorial gym 203.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Short meeting for ski trip on Jan. 16. Registration and deposit required. First come, first served, noon, SUB 117.
MUSLIM STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Muslim Juma (Friday prayers), all Muslims are
requested to attend, noon, International House
lower lounge.
SATURDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Sports night, 7:30 p.m., Osborne gyms.
THEATRE ASSOCIATION
Party for anyone who loves drama, lots of food,
wear your favorite mask or hat, $1 for non-members, 8 p.m., Dorothy Somerset stage (back of
Freddy Wood theatre).
SUNDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
John Woodend will be at Gate 4 with his guitar,
2-5 p.m.. Gate 4 in International House.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Recital of music for flute and piano, 8 p.m., Vancouver Unitarian church (49th and Oak). Paul
Douglas and Harold Brown perform in aid of The
Coalition for World Disarmament, $5 ($3 for students and pensioners).
MONDAY
WESTERN CANADA
WILDERNESS COMMITTEE
The South Moresby: The Canadian Galapagos, 8
p.m., Robson Square theatre. $2 admission.
CONTEMPORARY ART SOCIETY
OF VANCOUVER
Lynda  Benglis,   noted American  sculptor,  will
discuss her studio work, 8 p.m,, Vancouver art
gallery.
UBC GRITS (LIBERALS!
John Roberts, minister of environment and Liberal party leadership hopeful (when Trudeau resigns in 1990), noon, SUB 212. Acid rain and
other concerns may be discussed.
TUESDAY
FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT
FACULTY LECTURE SERIES
George Knox on New Ideas about Piazzetta,
noon, Lassere 104.
| Hot Plashes |
Roberts
fo ramble
Come one, come all, here's your
chance to see an endangered
species in B.C., a federal Liberal,
John Roberts, the minister of environment and reported P.M.
hopeful is coming to UBC this Monday as a guest of the UBC Liberal
Club. Think of the possibilities. All
you always wanted to know about
acid rain and oil pipelines, this
here's the fella to set your mind at
ease. No quips about yellow snow,
please. Remember, that's at noon
Monday in SUB 212.
Drama daze
Don't Bogart that joint, my
friend. The Theatre Association is
throwing a bash for all of you
drama lovers out there, the only
stipulation being that non-members
in attendance fork over the pittance
of $1. Lots of food, wear your
favorite mask or hat, and be classy.
Festivities kick off this Saturday at 8
p.m. at the Dorothy Somerset
Stage (love that name) in back of
Freddy Wood Theatre.
Challenging
This is going to be a shorty. The
Campus Crusade for Christ will be
having a meeting today at noon in
Hebb 12. The topic is "challenge for
1982."
HANDEL SOCIETY
New members, preferably tenors and sopranos
welcome. Previous experience is essential.
Phone Gisela Woldenga at 939-6367 for more in-.
formation.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Organizational meeting for spring rides, noon.
Bio Sci 4449.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
General meeting, all new members welcome,
noon, IRC 1.
WEDNESDAY
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for women's hockey league and
men's totem tennis tournament round II, 1:30
p.m.. War Memorial gym 203.
Attention! Yes, we know this Is the first issue of 1982 and not all Ubyssey staffers have recovered from New Year's yet. but something important has come up. All Ubyssey staffers are cordially ordered to turn
up at Glen's place on Saturday. Jan. 9 at 1:30 p.m. tu maka crucial decisions on autonomy and other areas of tha newspaper. Ba there, or never
show your face in the office again.
IMPORTANT
TAU Special Meeting
Today — 12:30
Grad Centre Ballroom
• Results of Mediation
• Job Action
• Election Notice
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1982-83
These positions are open only to full-time registered U.B.C. students. Successful applicants
will be required to live in the residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions
are available at the Ponderosa Housing Office
and at the Front Desk of each residence area:
Totem Park, Place Vanier, and W.H. Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January
4th to January 15th, 1982 at the Front Desks
of the Residences, or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for
SENIOR RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1982-83
Walter Gage Residence, Place Vanier Residence,
Totem Park Residence
The ideal applicants for these positions will be students who are in their final
undergraduate year, are unclassified, or are graduate students and who have
substantial experience living and working in residence. These positions will
be attractive to those who have skills and interests in working in an extensively people oriented field. Major responsibilities include the following:
(a) Supervising the residence's Advisors;
(b) Being the contact person between the Department and the Residence
Association;
(c) Ensuring that proper standards of behaviour are maintained.
Those interested in applying for one of these positions should submit a
resume and letter explaining their reasons for being interested in the position
to Dima Utgoff, Coordinator of Residence Student Affairs, at the Ponderosa
Housing Office (mailing address: 2071 West Mall, University Campus, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Y9 on or before Wednesday, January 13, 1982). Please
phone Dima at 228-5778 for further information about these positions.
BALLET-U.B.C.-JAZZ
WINTER
SESSION "82"
Jan. 11 - March 21
Registration — Today — Tomorrow
12:30-1:30 p.m.
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PROF. ACTRESS offering acting course
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Damn damn dam \ THE DINER]
By CHRIS FULKER
Today's environmentalist is in a
tight squeeze when confronted with
the choice of providing the basic
necessities of living for an increasing population or of providing for a
safe and clean environment for the
future. Often these two are in direct
conflict.
The Site C dam on the Peace
River is a fine example. The environmentalists up there, though
their cause is just, make a farce of
their campaign by basing their opposition to the dam on the following line — ". . .we don't believe
that Hydro's forecasts of energy
needs are accurate," i.e. this dam is
not necessary. This is a cop-out if
there ever was one — energy demand in B.C. is always going to
grow and don't let anyone tell you
differently. Why don't the environmentalists come right out and
say, "the damage to the environment that will be caused by this dam
will be too great (bearing in mind
that we North Americans are
unbelievably wasteful of energy
already)"?
I'll tell you why you don't hear
this most obvious line of reasoning
— it's because the majority of people in B.C. are not in the slightest
perspectives
interested in the environment. As in
1984 they are proles — even most of
the supposedly-educated at the
university. The only things they
care about are "what's on TV
tonight?", the price of beer, who's
going out with who, and the price
of gasoline. They are short-sighted
in that they cannot see beyond their
own wallet . . . their main aim in life
is to ensure that they maintain, no
IMPROVE their standard of living
and damn anything like the environment that gets in the way.
Why do some proles wind up at
university? Not because they like
what they are doing or want an
education in that field, but simply
to get a job. I was stunned on Sunday night to find nearly every room
in the Henry Angus building full of
Commerce students studying. These
people and others like them in the
world are not interested in education (or even in Commerce often!).
. . the reason they are at UBC is to
get the S15 per hour wage, the
stereo, the Trans-Am, the Hawaiian
vacation,   etc.,   etc.
These are the people the environmentalists are fighting against.
Try telling them that we need less
electricity. The reaction of one of
Hydro's spokesmen on TV was
typical . . . pointing to the stores
downtown in Fort St. John, the cars
on the streets, and other evidence of
consumerism, he said something to
the effect that "these people must
realize that all this was built on
energy consumption and now they
want to tell us that turning on the
lights is dangerous." Don't laugh.
People will believe that sort of
stuff.
Why not come right out and say
that damage to the environment is
irreparable and that jobs, money
and electricity are of less than no
importance by comparison? They
simply cannot be "afforded".
I'll tell you why environmentalists don't say this. Ever heard of
the Chamber of Commerce syndrome? No? It's a term used to
describe the passion in our society
for continuous growth, for MORE
cars, MORE housing, MORE
daycare, MORE profit, MORE
cash flow. All of you out there,
remember, you're only on this
planet to consume, and it's the job
of business to supply your needs.
The entire economy is supposedly
based on growth. Just talk to B.C.'s
architects, engineers, construction
companies, developers and the like.
Peace River farmland is of no im
portance ... it is only looked at in
terms of dollars .
Goddamnit, you idiots, it's
priceless. The C of C syndrome
demands that everything be
measured in terms of dollars, but
dollars can't replace land or fresh
water. The environmentalists are a
part of this syndrome . . . they're
mixed up. They look at the growing
social needs of the province, and as
I mentioned earlier, they look at the
growing energy needs of the province, but THEY TOO will degrade
the environment eventually when
the need becomes great enough.
When the stereo won't work any
more, or when the lights start to
dim, I'll bet my bottom dollar that
even the most ardent environmentalist will turn over. The typical environmentalist tends to separate
social needs such as the "housing
crisis", "halfway houses", daycare
centres, etc., from other types of
building such as stores and offices.
Yet even rather strong environmentalists will tear up parkland to build
housing if its the right kind of housing (i.e. low-income housing) . . .
remember how the Blue Heron
Housing Co-Op tried to tell us that
their development on the UE;.L
would "blend in harmony with the
environment", etc.? Environmentalists have got to learn to respect
the earth and stop treating it as
sacred until some human need
(whatever need) has to be filled.
The C of C syndrome requires
that we try to increase the supply of
a commodity (i.e. energy or housing) rather than work on controlling
the demand for the same. If they
really want to do battle with this
philosophy, environmentalists have
got to do four things:
• be ruthless in controlling land
use and in controlling the runaway
construction epidemic;
• persuade or force people to
accept a short-term drop in their
standard-of-living in order to arrive
at a long-term gain;
• put absolute limits on the importation of food, gasoline, etc., into B.C.;
• install a moratorium on further energy production and
resource sell-outs within B.C.
Unless these things are done, and
done more of less completely, I
hold little hope for the long-term
future of B.C. I was surprised to
learn the other day that I have an ally in Bob Hunter of Greenpeace; we
both want an Independent B.C.
(Vancouver Sun, Oct. 13, p A3).
Perhaps now you can see why.
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7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. '
Closed Sundays (t Public Holidays \
4556 W. 10th Ave. - 224 1912 j
—rrrr—j
LSAT
GMAT
MCAT
INTENSIVE
REVIEW
SEMINARS
Vw.ihY, t, .i ■.-... h . .t tin- l.SAI. CA'.-VI
.iii.l M( Al
• -00 p.i^u i . ip\ni;hli'J i nrrk ul in
• 70 p.i.:c Vidth Primer (.till I.' t. . tl
I.^Al &c l.;MAI'rL-i;i-cr.int)
• v|VM.lli:o.l  llMllllhT-
• r.ii.iunui   rqv.it th.-nmrv.- I
«ii.iJu-v ih.mrviK i-
YVln nnriiivni.. , .ill .uni l.iul .
U'lH .III R'.llK X' the pR'p.ir.UhH
ki'up fhuiklilu. \ nil'II u,ul .ui'UIkI
Perspectives is a column of opinion, wit and comment open to all
members of the UBC community.
Chris Fulker, arts 3, is renowned
for his opinions and is not running
for board of governors for a
change. All submissions must be
typed, triple-spaced, on a 70
character line.
National Testing Centre Inc.
HO-1 IS: MimhinJSr.
V.iiKiina-r. B.C. VY.B JTJ
or t-all:
(604) 6Kl)-W0
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THE FIREBUGS
by
Max Frisch
Directed by Leon Pownall
JANUARY 15-23
(Previews -- Jan. 13th and 14th)
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4.00
Box Office * Frederic Wood Theatre * Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL THEATRE
CONCORDIA   &
UNIVERSITY  •&
Concordia University Graduate Fellowships
Master's level $6500 Doctoral level $7500
David J. Azrieli Graduate Fellowship $8000
application deadline:February 1, 1982
announcement of winners: April 1, 1982
commencement of tenure: September 1982 or
January 1983
For details and application forms, contact the Graduate Awards
Officer, S-305, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W.,
Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8. Tel.: (514) 879-7317
put you in the picture
The picture isn't complete without you. Why?
Because qualified people like you, with the
capacity to grow and develop, are the future of
Co-op.
Federated Co-operatives Limited and the more
than 400 consumer-owned retail co-operatives
in Western Canada are looking for intelligent,
responsible individuals with the capacity to accept challenges and adapt to the rapidly
changing demands of today's and tomorrow's
world.
The Co-operative Retailing System can offer
you not only challenge, but planned programs
of training and personal development that can
help you perform your job better, while preparing you for steady career advancement.
CO-OP
Federated
Co-operatives
Limited
Throughout Co-op's retail system there are
jobs that require special training, skills and attitudes — retail management of food, hardware, dry goods, petroleum, crop supplies,
feed and building materials. There are
wholesale management opportunities in
distribution, marketing, accounting, finance
and personnel. Manufacturing and refining offer exciting potential, as do the ever-
expanding areas of advertising and consumer
counselling.
What does Co-op require of you? Ambition of
course — the desire to succeed plus the
perseverance to make your ambition into
realities. But above all, the spirit of cooperation. You see. Co-op is people, first and
foremost -- people working together, striving
together to achieve common goals.
Why not discuss your future plans with us?
Moving into the Co-op picture could be the
wisest move you'll ever makel
Recruiting on campus Wednesday,
Feb. 10,1982. Please contact the Canada Employment Centre on Campus
for details. Page 8
THE   UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 7, 1982
Mon-C
red
it Cour
ses Instructional Spo
Second Term
rts Pn
Dgram
Registration for all classes will take place
during regular office hours at the Intramural and Recreational Sports Office, Room
203, War Memorial Gym, Monday, January 4 - Friday, January 15, 1982 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Course
Max.
Code
Course
Section Day(s)
Time
Place
Cost
Date(s)
Number
100
Fitness Division
111
Yoga (Hatha)
01
Tues./Thurs.
4:30- 6:30 p.m.
War Mem. Gym
Room 211/213
$15.00
Jan. 19-April 1
40
112
Yoga (Hatha)
02
Mon./Wed.
5:30- 7:30 p.m.
War Mem. Gym
Room 211/213
15.00
Jan. 18-Mar. 31
40
121
Recreational Running
01
Mon./Wed./Fri
12:30-  1:30 p.m.
War Mem. Gym
5.00
Mar. 1-Mar. 19
25
122
Explore UBC Trails
(Intermediate Runner)
02
Tues./Thurs.
12:30- 2:30 p.m.
War Mem. Gym.
5.00
Mar. 2-Apr. 1
25
131
Strength & Circuit
Training
01
Mon./Wed.
4:30- 5:30 p.m.
Universal Weight Rm.
War Mem. Gym
5.00
Jan. 18-Feb. 10
20
132
Strength & Circuit
02
Tues./Thurs.
4:30- 5:30 p.m.
Universal Weight Rm.
5.00
Jan. 19-Feb. 11
20
141
Strength & Circuit
01
Mon./Wed.
4:30- 5:30 p.m.
Universal Weight Rm.
Training
War Mem. Gym
5.00
Mar. 1-Mar. 24
20
142
Strength & Circuit
02
Tues./Thurs.
4:30- 5:30 p .m.
Universal Weight Rm.
Training
War Mem. Gym
5.00
Mar. 2-Mar. 25
20
151
Rhythm Fit (Beg.)
01
Mon./Wed.
12:30-  1:30 p.m.
Gym B West—Osborne
Tues. /Fri.
4:30- 5:30 p.m.
Gym B—Osborne
15.00
Jan. 18-Apr. 2
70
152
Rhythm Fit (Advanced)
02
Mon./Tues./Th
jrs. 7:30- 8:30 a.m.
Gym B West—Osborne
Friday
7:30- 8:30 a.m.
Gym E—Osborne
15.00
Jan. 18-Apr. 2
70
153
Rhythm Fit (Drop-in)
Sunday
11:30 a.m.-12:30 noon
Gym B—Osborne
1.00
per session
Jan. 24-Apr. 4
154
Rhythm Fit (Drop-in)
Sunday
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
Gym B—Osborne
1.00
per session
Jan. 24-Apr. 4
200
COMBAT SPORTS SECTION
211
Fencing
01
Mon. /Fri.
9:30-10:30 p.m.
Gym E Osborne Ctre.
10.00
Jan. 18-Feb. 26
16
221
Karate (UBC Karate Club)
01
Tues./Thurs.
7:30- 9:00 p.m.
Gym E Osborne Ctre.
10.00
Jan. 19-Apr. 1
30
Women's Self Defense
01
Tues.
7:00- 8:00 p.m.
Gym E Osborne Ctre.
5.00
Jan. 19-Mar. 30
40
300
OUTDOOR PURSUITS SECTION
321
Power Skating
(Learn to skate)
01
Mon./Wed.
10:30-11:30 a.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
Hockey Players Ice
Rink
10.00
Jan. 18-Mar. 31
30
322
Power Skating
(Hockey Players)
02
Mon./Wed.
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
Hockey Players Ice
Rink
10.00
Jan. 18-Mar. 31
30
331
Mountain Climbing
01
Thurs.
12:30-2:30 p.m.
Osborne Ctre.—Rm.
203A
10.00
Mar. 4-Mar. 25
15
400
TEAM SPORTS SECTION
411
Power Volleyball
(Indiv. & Beginner)
01
Tues./Thurs.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
5.00
Jan. 19-Feb. 18
40
412
Power Volleyball
(Inter. Level for
Teams & Indiv.)
02
Tues./Thurs.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
5.00
Jan. 19-Feb. 18
40
421
Basketball
(Beg. to Inter. Level
For Teams or Indiv.
01
Mon./Wed.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
5.00
Jan. 18-Feb. 17
45
500
RACQUET SPORTS SECTION
511
Tennis (Beginner)
01
Mon./Wed.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Armouries
10.00
Jan. 18-Feb. 17
24
512
Tennis (Beginner)
02
Tues. /Fri.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
Armouries
10.00
Jan. 19-Feb. 19
24
513
Tennis (Beginner)
03
Wed.
3:30- 4:30 p.m.
Armouries
10.00
Jan. 20-Mar. 24
24
514
Tennis (Beginner)
04
Monday
8:30-10:30 p.m.
Armouries
10.00
Feb. 22-Mar. 22
24
515
Tennis (Beginner)
05
Tues./Fri.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
Armouries
10.00
Feb. 23-Mar. 26
24
521
Tennis (Inter.)
06
Tues. /Fri.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Armouries
10.00
Jan. 19-Feb. 19
16
522
Tennis (Inter.)
07
Saturday
8:30- 9:30 a.m.
Armouries
10.00
Jan. 23-Mar. 27
16
523
Tennis (Inter.)
08
Mon./Wed.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Armouries
10.00
Feb. 22-Mar. 24
16
524
Tennis (Inter.)
09
Tues./Fri.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Armouries
10.00
Feb. 23-Mar. 26
16
531
Tennis (Advanced)
10
Monday
8:30-10:30 p.m.
Armouries
10.00
Jan. 18-Feb. 15
12
532
Tennis (Advanced)
11
Monday
8:30- 9:30 a.m.
Armouries
10.00
Jan. 18-Mar. 22
12
533
Tennis (Advanced)
12
Sunday
(4 classes only)
9:30-11:30 a.m.
Armouries
5.00
Feb. 21-Mar. 14
12
541
Badminton (Beg.)
01
Mon./Wed.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
10.00
Jan. 18-Feb. 17
20
542
Badminton (Beg.)
02
Tues./Thurs.
9:30-10:30 p.m.
Gym A—Osborne Ctre.
10.00
Jan. 19-Feb. 18
20
543
Badminton (Inter.)
03
Mon./Wed.
1:30- 2:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
10.00
Feb. 22-Mar. 24
20
544
Badminton (Inter.)
04
Tues./Thurs.
9:30-10:30 p.m.
Gym A—Osborne Ctre.
10.00
Feb. 23-Mar. 25
20
551
Squash (Beginner)
01
Mon./Thurs.
4:15-5:00 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
20.00
Jan. 18-Feb. 18
8
552
Squash (Inter.)
02
Mon./Thurs.
4:15- 5:00 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
20.00
Feb. 22-Mar. 25
8
561
Racquetball (Beg.)
01
Tues./Thurs.
4:15- 5:00 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
20.00
Jan. 19-Feb. 18
8
562
Racquetball (Inter.)
02
Tues./Thurs.
4:15- 5:00 p.m.
Winter Sports Ctre.
20.00
Feb. 23-Mar. 25
8
600
DANCE SECTION
611
Modern (Beginner)
01
Tues.
1:30 3:30 p.m.
Armouries Rm 208
15.00
Jan. 19-Mar. 23
25
612
Modern (Beginner)
02
Thurs.
1:30- 3:30 p.m.
Armouries Rm. 208
15.00
Jan. 21-Mar. 25
25
613
Modern (Inter.)
03
Monday
5:00- 7:00 p.m.
Armouries Rm. 208
15.00
Jan. 18-Mar. 22
25
614
Modern (Inter.)
04
Wed.
5:30- 7:30 p.m.
Armouries Rm. 208
15.00
Jan. 20-Mar. 24
25
621
Jazz (Beginner)
01
Mon./Wed.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Gym A—Osborne
15.00
Jan. 18-Mar. 24
50
622
Jazz (Intermediate)
02
Tues./Thurs.
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Gym B—West Osborne
Ctre.
15.00
Jan. 19-Mar. 25
50

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