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The Ubyssey Nov 23, 1967

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 Students rally 'round  the  library steps  as speakers   blast  the B.C.   government's  education   policy.
'-B 1
—george   hollo   photo
Vol. XLIX, No. 27 VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY,- NfJVI
23,  1967    <*^§^>48 224-3916
Give learning money
plead rally speakers
— kurt hilger photo
BENNETT IS A FINK,  says  education  action  rally speaker
who   has   his   say   in   the   kick-off   program   to   get   more
money  for   higher  education.   Pat   McGeer,   Dave   Barrett
and Herb Capozzi all had their say.
By MIKE FINLAY
The B.C. government is keeping money from
education for political reasons although it is vitally needed, says Dr. Pat McGeer, Liberal MLA
for Point Grey.
"I'm good and mad at the way the government has treated education," McGeer told 1,000
students at a special education rally in front of
the library Wednesday.
"Education should command the highest priority, but it doesn't, due to the ingrained prejudice
of those in political power."
The rally, sponsored by the education action
committee of the B.C. Assembly of Students,
kicked off a program to get more money for
higher education.
McGeer, a UBC associate professor of phy-
chiatry, said a $110 million government surplus
at the end of last year and $108
million from the Canada Pension Plan put into B.C. Hydro
bonds should be used for education.
Don Munton, committee
chairman and Alma Mater Society first vice-president, outlined the crisis facing higher
education in B.C. to the rally.
"In less than a year fully
qualified high school students McGEER
may be turned away from B.C.'s three universities because of a lack of space," he said.
While Canada's university population is growing rapidly, he said, enrolment cuts may be necessary at all three B.C. universities within the next
year.
Both the Ontario and Alberta governments
pay more than $1,000 more per university student than the B.C. government, he said.
Munton also said the provincial government
stifles the growth of regional colleges by not
alloting them capital for building.
MLA Dave Barrett, (NDP Coquitlam) agreed
with McGeer that the need for more money was
real and immediate.
"Education is the key to the future," Barrett
said. "But in this province, its only a political
priority."
"Students don't threaten the government politically, so their needs are minimized by the government.''
to create new funds for education, he said.
"Students must commit themselves and demand the government publish a list of priorities.
Education seems to be very low on that list."
Socred MLA Herb Capozzi was the last to
speak.
"I am not here to make excuses," he said. "I
don't have to, because I feel education is top
priority in B.C."
Money must be spent on the development of
the province if there are to be jobs for students
when they graduate, he said.
"If you take more money for education,
where is it going to come from? These priorities
are decided by the people and you're going to
have to convince them education is more important than hospitals or housing."
Capozzi criticised McGeer for asking for more
To page 2
SEE: McGEER
Exam   pressures
good for learning
By GLENN BULLARD
Exams are great.
This was the reaction of most students
to UBC's exam system when polled in front
of the library Wednesday.
"They provide a pressure situation,
which is good," said Joy Watson, arts 4.
"We have to live in a pressure environment,
and if we don't face it now, we won't be
able to face it in the future."
Brian Pidcock, eng. 1, said exams teach
you how to work throughout the year. "If
you don't work, you don't pass."
Said Dick Torley, p.e. 2, "You have to
have something to judge how much work
the student is doing, and exams work."
Some students disliked exams.
"They're an unpleasant intrusion into
what can be an enjoyable learning process,"
said Steve Bohnen, arts 2.
Dennis Reade-Slater, comm. 1, thought
exams made students work, but said he
learned more from doing one essay than
from writing 200 exams.
"A perfectly intelligent person can fail
an exam," said Dawn S t e i n e , arts 3,
"Simply because he had two in the morning
and is tired when he writes the third."
"Exams are a myth," added Irving Fetish, grad. studies Swahili. UBC exams begin Dec. Vi. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November 23,   1967
LEADERSHIP  BLAMED
Indian  co-op  attempt wrecked
Uncertain aims and poor leadership have
wrecked an Indian co-op housing attempt, according to Alma Mater Society treasurer Dave
Hoye.
The home for Indian girls was set up as a
joint project in Kitsilano between the AMS and
the Canadian Union of Students.
It closed in May, a year after its opening.
Reasons for its failure were presented in a
brief to student council toy Hoye.
The project was never adequately researched,
he said. Nor were its aims clearly understood
and the implications of the approach taken foreseen.
Using a housemother to manage the home's
McGeer  blasts
FROM PAGE 1
money when the federal government is asking
provinces to cut down on public building.
"I don't really feel sorry for you," he told
the students. "You are very lucky, getting an
education in a beautiful institution like this."
He said B.C. has the highest percentage of
students in post secondary education of any province in Canada.
The provincial government has done nothing
Munton pointed out that many provinces
have a mandatory grade 13 which reduces the
numbers in their universities.
"No student with the proper qualifications
will ever be turned away from an institution of
higher education in B.C." said Capozzi. "I'll write
that down for you, if you like."
An unidentified student copied the statement
down and asked Capozzi to sign it. He refused.
The rally ended with AMS second vice president Kim Campbell urging students to confront
their MLA's with the crisis over the Christmas
holiday.
Those interested in doing this can learn more
about it at a meeting in Brock extension 258
Friday noon.
"But   their
affairs turned the project from a co-op into a
hostel.
"The girls in the home appear to have been
making a genuine effort to form a viable cooperative group throughout this period," Hoye
said.
efforts were toeing frustrated
through inexperience in co-operative living, and an inability
to manage their own affairs,
together with a muddled relationship between the co-op
home, the Board, the CUS committee, and the AMS, which
was the responsible fiscal
^•s agent."
§■■& ^v>  obbbW      It was not clear if the failure
■■■■V      X. .^^^B   stemmed from the  conception
HOYE or from the execution, he said.
The defunct co-op's expenditures for rent and
operating costs totalled nearly $6,000.
Hoye recommended that the $3,600 remaining
in its account be directed to the Nasaika Lodge
Society, which is operating a hostel to provide
Indian girls with temporary accommodation.
Despite the failure of the venture, Hoye said
he thought the idea of co-op residences excellent.
"Students must present intelligent critical appraisals of existing social institutions and attitudes. Through projects such as the co-op home
they can offer challenging innovations, new techniques on approaches in response to perceived
social conditions." No decision on the brief was
made by council.
Britons debate
Oxford and Glasgow Universities will be represented at a Friday noon debate in Brock.
Hannan Rose of Nuffield College, Oxford,
and Colin MacKay" of Glasgow University will
debate with UBC's Betty Hall and George May-
nal on the motion This House Prefers Red Guards
to Apathy.
Students can meet the two members of the
British team after the debate at 1:30 p.m. and
at 4 p.m. in Cecil Green Park.
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THE     U BYSSEY
Page 3
UBYSSEY DISPLEASES AMS
Council criticizes editor
— hurt hilger photo
YOUR  FRIENDLY  Georgia   Straight   representative   is   back
on   campus   peddling    his   wares   to   the   unenlightened.
Back  on   the   streets   with   bright   and   gaudy   colors,   the
Straight offends nothing but the eye.
Women a commodity?
Profs  opinions  differ
By FRED CAWSEY
Society does reduce women to a commodity, says UBC
sociology prof. Lionel Tiger.
In an interview Wednesday Tiger agreed with an article by
Gabor Mate in Tuesday's Ubyssey.
In it, Mate criticizes society's objectification of women as
exemplified by Playboy magazine.
"Although I wouldn't say that Mate is right in his analysis
of the situation, I think his analysis is more correct than the
one given by the Playboy Philosophy," said Tiger.
"I did some research on the London Playboy Club, and I
found it to be a bizarre organization."
Females were merely an exploited commodity in Playboy
clubs, Tiger said.
"In pretending to be a progessive sexual liberator, Playboy
is really being very conventional. They still retain the old
attitude of male dominance over the female."
J. Michael Yates, assistant creative writing prof, and UBC
poet-in-residence, said Mate's argument  is irrelevant.
"Trying to reach the man-in-the-street with this kind of
an argument is useless," he said."
The two faculty members were asked their reactions to
Mate's use of the word "cunt" in the article.
"I think Mate was quite right in using the word, as he was
describing a precise product," said Tiger.
"I find nothing objectionable in that word being used in
the context it is in," Yates said.
"However, I do not like another prase, that precious hole
between her legs, Mate uses to describe a desired product,
said Yates.
"I found it rather revolting and very unpoetic."
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
A special Alma Mater Society meeting late
Tuesday night tabled a motion to suspend Ubyssey editor Danny Stoffman.
The motion, by education representative Bob
Gilchrist, also proposes an extensive investigation of the newspaper's role and acceptance of
the results of the investigation by the editor before his re-instatement.
The motion was tabled to Monday's regular
meeting after an hour of debate. The special meeting was called after an article on Playboy magazine by Gabor Mate appeared in Tuesday's
Ubyssey.
"The Ubyssey neither tries to promote good
will nor advance the cause of higher learning
but has degenerated to a form unbecoming a
publication at UBC," the motion said.
"Mate's article was the #£raw that broke the
camel's back," said engineering president Lynn
Spraggs. "We should strike now, while the iron
is hot."
Mate's article Tuesday includes the words
"cunt" and "arse" in a critical examination of
Playboy magazine.
"The taxpayers are keeping this university
going," Spraggs said. "We're going to have to
put on and show a responsible face. If we can't
clean The Ubyssey up then we can't ask for
money."
"The article could have used some editing,"
said university clubs committee chairman Mike
Coleman. "It showed a juvenile lack of ability
to communicate without resorting to trivia.
"But suspending the editor would be ridiculous."
AMS first vice-president Kim Campbell said
university people weren't offended by the use of
the four-letter words.
Science representative Jim Hughes said The
Ubyssey was reflecting the viewpoint of a very
small minority.
"Undergraduate society events and homecoming were not given sufficient publicity. The
Ubyssey doesn't reflect a true image of the uni-
CIA keeps peace,
drops interviews
'; WASHINGTON   (CUP-CPS)  — In   the
',   interest   of   "maintaining  a  peaceful   aca-
- demic atmosphere," the Central Intelligence
Agency has decided not to recruit on campuses near one of the agency's regional re-    <
cruiting offices.
The   CIA   spokesman   today  confirmed ^
that    college    and    university    placement
bureaus affected are being notified of the
decision, but did not say where the agency's §
recruiting offices are located. He estimated 1
- that there are 10 or 12 of them, however, I
presumably in the major cities. (
The spokesman also noted that in some 1
cases interviews would be conducted in a 1
downtown area of cities that do not have jf
CIA offices. He mentioned Boston as an 1
example, explaining that interviews would
be conducted in the federal building there
rather than on campuses in the area.
The CIA has met with protests, some of
them obstructive and others not, on several
campuses this fall.
versity — it's an unfavorable image in the eyes
of the public," he said.
Miss Campbell said students shouldn't sell
themselves for what they weren't.
"We are both, and should be a hotbed of revolutionary activity and a bastion of conservatism," she said. "The university is a place where
everyone should be free."
Miss Campbell and Coleman both threatened
to resign if the editor was suspended at the meeting.  "
Commerce president Peter Uitdembosch called The Ubyssey an artsy-fartsy paper.
"The Ubyssey goes to innocent people," he
said. They won't be upset by bad words but by
the singleminded point of view expressed in the ,
paper. It has a leftist point of view."
"The Ubyssey, a newspaper supported by the
funds of all the students, is not representative of
what's going on," said grad student president
Bruce Fraser. "But the motion is hysterical and
negative."
"If we feel The Ubyssey is not representative
of campus opinion we should ask what we can do
to help the editorial board make it more representative, not suspend the editor."
Although the meeting started at 10:30 p.m.
so AMS president Shaun Sullivan could be there,
he did not arrive back from a trip to Ottawa in
time to attend.
Ubyssey editor Stoffman Wednesday called
the majority of the undergraduate representatives the "dregs" of the campus.
He said the councillors who urged his firing
were irresponsible.
"There has never been a student council like
this before. Previous councils — even when displeased with the paper — have felt it part of
their responsibility to ensure autonomy of the
press. This one wants to destroy that autonomy."
Be disobedient'
A former UBC student at a protest rally
Wednesday advocated civil disobedience to protest the appearance of Boeing Ltd. recruiters on
campus.
Brian Plummer, a former arts student who
participated in and was jailed after the recent
Pentagon protest in Washington, D.C., urged 75
persons at the rally to more action.
"It's better to have a small crime of civil
disobedience to prevent a larger crime against
humanity," Plummer said.
"To protest is not enough. You have to escalate against the war by passive resistance."
Students should block entrances to any Boeing representative on campus, he said.
"University people talk a lot; talk is cheap.
Take the Dow protest. When Dow and Gage say
the protest went allright, you know it didn't."
Senator Gabor Mate, arts 4, said some action
is necessary.
"We could have very successfully blocked
the Dow sit-in," Mate said.
"There is no use in worrying about alienating
people; if you do things, they will have to relate
to it."
Rallyists defined purposes and forms of protesting because they felt those who attended already knew about Boeing and its relation to the
Vietnamese war.
Arnie Myers, UBC director of information,
who attended the rally, later said action advocated by Mate and Plummer couldn't be tolerated
by the university.
$> iWSTOPEAT/AIGTHE BALLOTS* THATS LWmwX/M/mommjO0/SluP<.WRE NOT F0LL
3§ f*TT0 THE ELECTORAL PROCESS KXJNDE.RED IWjOCJWg OUR WLESlWRE REIfflnwTO"
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fjiHOOLDBE THE SA/1E, mj$OIECTml
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Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
"People who lire in glass houses, shouldn't
throw stones."
— proverto
NOVEMBER 23, 1967
What action?
"We are not anti-government," says one Val Thorn,
member of UBC's education action committee which
hopes to get some action on education out of the Social
Credit government.
It shouldn't be necessary to point out that the Social
Credit government is unsympathetic toward higher education.
The reason, of course, is simple: People with higher
education are unsympathetic toward the Social Credit
government — whose cabinet, by the way, has a lower
percentage of university-educated members than any in
North America.
The Socred government, we suggest to Miss Thom,
is worth being against.
As well as disregarding education, the government
has badly neglected hospitals and social welfare.
The Socreds set their priorities on a basis of what
will bring the most immediate and most tangible economic returns.
This comes down to: "Essondale is good enough for
those loonies and the hell with UBC — let's build more
roads."
We repeat: Premier Cece and club are worth being
against. And we suggest if the action committee wants
action, it better learn who it's enemies are.
Damshur
Ma Murray is a folk hero — and that's fer damshur.
Ma became a folk hero by writing "damshur" in
every other sentence in the Bridge River-Lillooet News.
Most publishers would have a hard time selling their
paper if it had "damshur" in every other sentence, but
there's not much competition — fer damshur — up there
in Bridge River.
The other day Ma lifted her venerable eyes from
the Bridge River scene long enough to toss a few
withering damshurs in the direction of The Ubyssey.
Ma's prose is pretty tough going, but after a few
readings the meaning comes clear — Ma is displeased
with The Ubyssey.
Ma is so displeased that she reaches new heights
of invective, leaving "damshur" far behind. In a burst
of Bridge River-style inspiration, Ma pronounces The
Ubyssey's editor pigeon-brained.
Far be it from us to trade insults with the old hag—
that would be unchivalrous. It would also be avoiding
the issues— if there are any. Furthermore, it would be
tasteless — and The Ubyssey may lack damshurs but
it beats old Ma for taste.
Instead, we'll restrict ourselves to clearing up some
of Ma's misinformation and non-sequiturs:
Ma never offered to write a Ubyssey criticism and
never, as she implies, got turned down.
Ma, while administering her spanking to the "seat
of learning," mentions the millions of dollars poured into
UBC by taxpayers. We don't know what Ma's getting
at, but as usual, it's wrong. The Ubyssey isn't paid for
by public funds. It's supported by voluntary labor, advertising revenue, and student fees in that order.
The Ubyssey should not be "suspended forthwith"—
or even thirdwith—just because Ma doesn't like it fer
damshur. After all, every paper can't be like the Bridge
River-Lillooet News.
It's not unlawful to sell or mail Playboy. The stag
pictures were never tested in court.
There was at least one "constructive" suggstion in
the Nov. 3 issue — that the downtown papers print
columnist Richard Needham as one of them has since
done. Not only is Needham not "burnt-out" but — and
this is fer damshur — he is relevant.
Which Ma ain't.
Moving toward the precipice.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Sir  Mate
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Praise be to Mate the Great!
I am glad that someone has
explained so accurately and
intelligently the double-bind
situation of many girls on
campus. If you develop your
intellect, you are accused of
being a castrating woman, "a
masculine bitch," but if you
do not then you are considered
stupid — like all females.
Hearing a male state the case
for women gives the argument
more authority than when
somebody like me has to explain it, although it is true. At
university girls are involved
in great conflicts as to what
they should be. If a girl really
has a keen interest in learning,
she is always thwarted by a
tyranny of worry about her
looks. She cannot just devote
her time to studying the books
and ideas she loves so much
and wants so much; she must
waste time putting on makeup, setting her hair, deciding
what clothes she will wear; if
she doesn't look after her appearance she is unfeminine
and is denying her true role.
The most frustrating conflict
results when a girl dares to
assert that perhaps she may
want more out of life than
babies and housework, that
perhaps she may want to participate in the world of ideas
as much as her husband. A girl
in this situation can get little
help from adults on this question, either, as adults of both
sexes seem to consider woman
as always being the submissive
female.
But I have digressed. Thanks
again, Mate, for speaking out
for women. Chivalry is not
dead!
KATHRYN KEATE
arts 3
Mate  right
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Gabor Mate' article in Tuesday's paper expresses very
well what many girls know to
be the truth. The equality of
women in our society is a
sham, because in order to exist
we must constantly submit to
the role-playing that Mate describes.
But I wish he hadn't used
those nasty four-letter words.
Not because there is anything
wrong with them or because
they are not fitting with the
meaning of the article, but because there will probably be
some small-minded idiots who
will get hung-up about his use
of these words and miss the
whole point of his excellent
article.
HELEN WITTALL
Vancouver
Mate  bad
Editor, The Ubyssey:
You devote nearly a full-
page spread to the perverted
idiocy of Mr. Gabor Mate. Are
we to assume that you condone
this trash? Perhaps you believe
that a certain degree of sordid-
ness will ensure the distribution of your paper. You disgust me. It seems to me that
the perversion expounded by
Mr. Mate exists merely in his
clouded mind. His four-letter
vocabulary, which he applies
with seeming practice and
ease, would sound natural in
the mouth of a street punk —
not from a student senator.
I am a crusader, Mr. Editor,
but God help us if I stand
alone in my views, (and may
He give you the courage, if
you haven't it, to print these
remarks.)
DAN McKERRACHER
science 1
Congrats, Mate
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I don't uually accept anything Gabor Mate says, but for
once I can wholeheartedly
agree with him. His article on
the "objectification of the female" in the pages of Playboy
and in our entire culture was
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo   Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports   Mike Jessen
Wire   Charlotte Haire
Page Friday   Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni  Lee
Es painano del nosteros, illeo com-
prane <3os perrantonos. Incanto hin-
borman el caledaso, gibbeindo et
martopos desno wanels. "Orran de-
langhs es terranto," spi Ann Arky.
Mai delanerazna por companfor.
Irving Fetish noso palla carrados.
"II manstrosintrepdis for cam-
pusses."    Mike    Finlay    estran    et
a very good expression of what
I, as a mother of a young child,
have been thinking for a long
time. I have shown the article
to several of my friends, and
they also think it is very pertinent. Men sometimes just
don't realize the superior position they occupy in this society, and I don't just mean
economically, politically, and
socially, but I mean psychologically as well. And many women are very conscious and very
resentful of being treated like
objects, and sometimes it is
very degrading. Mr. Mate is to
be congratulated on his perceptive and well-written article.
MRS. JOAN RANDLIS
Wesbrook Hospital
We  bled
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The Canadian Red Cross Society is pleased to recognize
the splendid results achieved
at the UBC fall blood drive of
1967 which the engineering
undergraduate society has so
effectively sponsored. The results will be known to you by
now — over 2,000 attendance.
In the history of our collections at UBC only one fall
blood drive had brought in
more doners, that of 1955 when
2,316 volunteered their blood.
This result of 1967 is in the
measure of the devotion and
hard work of your appointeed
chairman, John Ritchie, and
his faithful helpers, the support of The Ubyssey, and the
enthusiasm of the student
body. We are indeed grateful
and are looking forward to
more and more successful clinics on the campus.
J. P. J. ROUSSEAU
blood donor committee
roboro    felida   monstorls    Phyfatal-
phynx.
Malo frushderca del es patales,
Paul Knox, Steve Jackson, Lin Tse-
Hsu, Alfred Hitchcock, et Mark De-
Coursey alenterde. Glenn Bullard,
itoris, del campange os nostoris fas
nos. Alexandra Volkoff, Godfrey
Golashes, Irene Wasilewski, et Judy
Young fabricando es yanmonpos et
orando. Richard Baer terrlbles koo-
terinso per sauvo. Norman ("Read-
ono") Gidney coponestoal, bellonera.
Frpd Cawsey delestra pal modos des
palricanco.
Delatolos, cadedrees perfeltos
biand matilla, eter Christopher
Blake, Lawrence Woodd, George
Hollo, Bob Brown? et Bernard
Schicklgurger   es   la  darkroom.
Dos les jock shop, manastero Bob
Banno, Pio Uran et Mike Fitzgerald
el morte promptitido. Thursday,  November 23,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS TO   THE EDITOR
Imbeciles
Editor, The Ubyssey:
If the Alma Mater Society is
not going to support the resolutions of he BCAS regarding
freedom of the press, and six
other rights resolutions, I
would like to publicly withdraw my support of the AMS.
I hope one person's opinion
will appease those high school
students who demonstrated
their responsible dissatisfaction with violated student
rights. As future university
students, they must be incredulous that the spokesmen for
he students of UBC chose not
to support them — chose
rather to disapprove!
Is it not also our concern
to fight for freedom of the
press, for better systems of
grading, for less crowded
classrooms and against censorship (shown by high school
principals)? Does not the AMS
itself support a program which
calls for students to pledge to
vote only for those parties
which support higher education?
The members of the BCAS
have my wholehearted support
and sympathy. As for our irresponsible AMS — I am
ashamed to be at a university
where imbeciles have such an
important voice. Simon Fraser
University deserves to attract
the bright young people that
our AMS are alienating.
G. MITCHELL
arts 3
amongst many undergrad leaders concerning The Ubyssey.
This has finally come to the
point where these persons
would like to have the editor
suspended. I do not think that
this is the right time for this
move. I believe that a committee should first be set up in or
out of AMS to examine the
role of The Ubyssey as a
campus paper. Further action
would then depend on the report of this committee. However, up to the present, I have
been thoroughly disappointed
in the reporting of this paper.
1. Constant misquoting.
2. Homecoming: this is a
campus-wide event received
almost nothing in the way of
build-up. There was no mention of the parade, etc. There
was essentially no coverage of
the Queen's crowning.
3. CUS referendum: where
the editor had told Sullivan
that there would be equal coverage of both sides and yet an
article by Peter Uitdenbosch
was not printed. Lynn Spragg's
contribution was put on the
sports   page.
There are several other times
in which I feel The Ubyssey
has failed this campus and the
excuse that people do not contribute articles is not a valid
one.
GENE ZABAWA
agriculure 3
Tolerant'
'Disgust'
Editor. The Ubyssey:
In   recent   week   there   has
been    considerable    disgust
Editor, The Ubyssey:
My views on the protest
against Dow and the protestors
themselves are another issue.
What I am concerned about is
the fact that the loitering
idealists have caused the clos
ure of the student placement
service's reading room (where
the old exams are kept).
My tolerant nature allows
me to withstand their public
antics, but when it interferes
with my private studies at university, I become very annoyed and my limits of boundless
patience are exceeded.
TOM GOVE
comm. 2
BRETT SMAILL
sc. 4
Letters  wrong
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Rick Corbett, in his letter of
Nov. 21, is so naive he makes
babies blush: either that or
he's got rocks in his head and
he is also blind. Johnson is the
Hitler Rick is referring to; or
who does he see in Johnson,
the new God?
Re: Bob Forst's outburst,
what got him? The present
J.S.M. lounge has become what
it is in order to serve most
faithfully the students on this
campus. Here, as in very few
other places on the whole big,
impersonal, concrete mass we
call UBC, one feels at ease,
and encouraged to "communicate" with others. Besides, if
Bob is unhappy with the present situation, why doesn't he
attend the arts meetings and
move to change it? He has as
much right as the "president"
in what happens to the lounge.
David Hobbs, in his letter
to you, does not understand
what the Dow demonstration is
all about. Sure, some other
company can easily take over
providing the USA with necessary stuff, but the picture remains   the   same:    it   still   is
wrong. If Dow's output is so
negligible, all the more reason
to pick on Dow, they can stop
easier and suffer less. Their
decision might sway other
opinions, and one must start
somewhere; what more reasons
do you want? Furthermore,
someone must start accepting
responsibility somewhere or do
what happened in Germany to
the Jews where everybody
was merely "following orders."
GUIDO BOTTO
arts 3
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THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday,  November 23,   1967
ANACHRONISTICALLY
Joey I and still  lives
By JOHN KELSEY
Canadian  University Press
ST. JOHN'S, Nfld. (CUP) — They still have
navy parades in St. John's.
First you hear the drum, then the silver
xylophone, then the bugles start as 400 cadets
and cadettes turn up the Queen's Road hill.
Nobody knew what the navy was celebrating — it was Oct. 1, the 18th anniversary of
the Chinese revolution, but that wasn't it — and
nobody seemed to care. The horde of children
not yet old enough for para-military service
obviously didn't care why they chased the
parade. If it isn't the out-of-step navy youth, it's
the army or the veterans, or somebody, almost
every Sunday.
Then the church bells start
— real, brass bells with monks
on the end of the ropes—from
all directions. Each ring and
each cadet hammers it in: Newfoundland is both a very old
place and Somewhere Else,
not-quite-Canada and no-longer-
England.
Somewhere Else has lots
of rock, scrubby trees, tough
people — and Joey Smallwood KELSEY
owns everything although he's only a provincial
premier. Especially, Joey has a tether on the
souls of the island's half million people.
FATHER JOEY
Newfies always tell you he's the only living
father of confederation, which it true. The legislature has 53 Joeys and three Tories in it.
I first felt the Joey influence when Air Canada's Maritime puddle-jumper landed at St.
John's airport and a bald little shoe salesman
appeared in the first class doorway to beam
at us commoners. I thought it might be Joey,
and people inside the terminal confirmed it —
while the bald man boomed through a bevy
of governmental greeters to a waiting limousine.
Two things to remember while trying to
interview Joey: he delivered Newfoundland unto
confederation in 1949, over the still bleeding
bodies of the colonial gentry, and it's only 1,700
miles to England. In between, the Atlantic roars
in all its cold, wet, foggy and fishy mystique;
and Joey might be on the other side because
he wasn't available that week.
Joey bought the people by bringing money
to Newfoundland, where once existed near-
feudal barter economy. The outporters, the
fisherfolk who live in some thousands of tiny
villages awash along the coast, remember well.
And Joey rules with an iron hand.
In April, 1965, Joey gave Memorial University of Newfoundland freshmen their tuition
fees. Student council president Rex Murphy
noted only 400 people benefitted — you didn't
get fees if you won a scholarship or took educa
tion, because education students already got
government money for part of their university.
Students didn't shout and cheer for Joey,
who insists people shout and cheer.
The next October, Joey didn't ask the administration if he could address a student meeting, he just called one. He announced free
tuition for all, but Murphy had done his work.
No ecstatic cheering.
STUDENT SALARIES
So Joey looked around, those who attended
recall. A grinning cabinet sat behind him on
the platform, watching the amassed students
who watched Joey. Joey shot his wad.
"And furthermore," the legend recalls, "I'm
giving you all student salaries, starting with
fifth year students next fall."
The cabinet's collective jaw dropped, the
students cheered, and today third, fourth and
fifth year MUN studetns get paid to go to school
— $50 a month for St. John's residents, and
$100 for everyone else.
Otherwise the past still grips Newfoundland
education. There are five separate denominational school systems, operated by the United,
Anglican, Catholic and Presbyterian churches
and the Salvation Army.
Thus, an outport of 400 souls often has four
one-room, all-grade schools. Education quality
is so uneven that next year MUN begins a
foundation program for all but first-class high
school students. Foundation year is to give all
entering freshmen a common ground to prepare them for university proper, and some students use it as a junior college year to complete
their high school without attending university.
NEW CAMPUS
At the same time, MUN will split — the
present campus will contain foundation and
first year, and a new campus across the parkway will house upper years and graduate work.
Foundation year is certain to be crowded—
freshmen enrolment dropped this year and the
administration blames salaries. Nobody saves
for university, and everyone's waiting until
salaries include all students. That's in two years,
ii the pattern of dropping salaries down a year
every fall continues.
And the enrolment drop, not so oddly, must
please both Joey and university president Lord
Taylor — the university couldn't hold them all
anyway. All 5,000 students habitually slosh
through the muck surrounding new construction
and park next to dump trucks.
Everyboby's waiting for the opening of the
new dining hall to ease the crunch, and for
Taylor's by-now-mythical master plan to materialize.
The plan is expected — Taylor drops hints —
to outline the new campus and concretely detail the stages of the foundation program and
Memorial's planned growth to 10,000 students
in ten years.
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CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC Thursday, November 23,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Daily dispute creates havoc
Sit-ins,  sleep-ins,  violence  and  arrests  resulted   in   total  academic  upheaval
By D. JOHN LYNN
Canadian University Press
MONTREAL (CUP) — Two weeks ago the McGill
Daily reprinted an article from the satirical Realist
magazine which Principal H. Rocke Robertson judged
to be obscene libel.
Three students — Daily Editor-in-Chief Peter Allnutt, Supplement Editor Pierre Fournier, and Supplement columnist John Fekete, under whose column
the article appeared — were asked to appear before
the senate discipline committee, facing possible expulsion.
The issues in the controversy are unclear, mainly
because different campus groups either place one
issue above the other, or interpret issues in contrary
ways, or mix issues together. The result is intellectual
chaos.
The original administration charge of publishing an obscene libel was dropped after considerable
pressure by campus intellectuals.
Yes, dear reader, Swift wrote of children being
eaten. Isn't it disgusting? Is it literature? Is the Realist literature?
MOT APHRODISAIC
The passage from the Realist, professors and students agree, cannot be considered an aphrodisiac.
It is undoubtedly this kind of argument, applied
to the principal publicly through newspaper and pamphlets, and, one can assume, privately, which led to
the change in the wording of the charge, avoiding
he obscene libel question entirely.
The second issue which cropped up was freedom
jf the press. At the first level one had to determine
if the Daily editors were to have newspaper policy
iictated by either student council or the administra-
;ion.
On this subject Principal H. Rocke Robertson told
;he student council Nov. 6: "Editorial freedom does
lot mean the right to be unware of consequences."
vith the administration. This is contrary to the
Charter of the Student press in Canada, which
itates;
"Whereas freedom of the student has been abridged in the following ways:
"By suspension, expulsion, or threat of similar
KRASSNER
council meeting
action .  .  . the Canadian student press affirms its
belief that it must be free from abuses these ..."
U of T student president Tom Faulkner, in a
letter to university acting president J. H. Sword
concerning a simliar reprinting in the U of T Varsity
said:
"The matter with which we are here concerned
is the charge of obscenity, not an academic infraction." He thereby told the university disciplinary
committee to keep hands off the
paper, that it was the responsibility
of the student council, as publishers of the Varsity, to deal with
it as it sees fit.
While maintaining final editorial policy should rest with the
editor only, Daily editor Peter All-
nut has retraced the article and
apologized for what he said was
a mistake in printing it in the first
place. But council, at a Wednesday
agreed to have the judicial committee determine if the Daily acted in bad faith in
printing the article. A new issue, bad faith, had been
created, to be drawn in true red herring fashion
across the whole affair.
The next issue to emerge was the whole question
of student discipline.
McGill student council, discussing this very issue
after Robertson's speech Monday, could not agree on
an answer. They turned down an invitation to place
two students on the senate discipline committee, but
could not muster a majority vote to disassociate
themselves completely from the committee's actions
in judging a student for a non-academic offense.
RETRACTION AND APOLOGY
But the Students for a Democratic University had
no such difficulty in coming to a decision on the matter. Tuesday they sat in in front of the room in which
the committee was to hold court. Their sit-in produced the desired result — the trial was postponed
for a week, and students began to mobilize against
the administration.
At some point Monday night after the council
meeting had adjourned, the issue grew from a matter
of discipline to a question of total university govern
ment, particularly the student role in that government.
SLEEP-IN
The students started sleeping in at the administration building. It is not exactly clear, even now, what
they wanted. But in a Tuesday pamphlet announcing
a noon-hour rally in support of the three students
who were to be tried that afternoon the SDU called
for a revision of the structure of university government by a commission of students, faculty and administration.
Tuesday night and Wednesday were sit-in days,
led by SDU chairman Slan Gray, a lecturer in political science.
Gray called off the sleep-in Wednesday night,
content that their point had been made.
It was. The academic senate Wednesday released
a statement admitting the need for a greater student
role in university government.
HIERARCHY CONCERNED
While the report does not indicate that students
will get full membership on senate seats, it does reveal concern by the hierarchy that the student voice
is not being heard at all.
But the stalwart protestors — about 60 of them —
not content with mere promises, remained in the
administration building until police carried them out
late Thursday night.
Stan Gray and Paul Joseph, a student, were arrested and charged with common assault as police
tried to clear crowd back from the front of the building.
The final issue — what is it? The faculty tried
to answer this question in a huge open forum Friday.
Professor Charles Taylor vaguely suggested two distinct issues: The Daily affair, and student autonomy
in their own affairs. But few others were able to
face issues even this squarely.
The issues will continue this week and next, with
little end in sight. The total effect on the McGill
campus has been to thoroughly confuse most people
at all levels of the university with varying interpretations of the various events.
It is not possible to conclude at this point that
any order at all will emerge, from the McGill chaos
— just new issues, or new interpretations of old ones.
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December 4 and 5 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 23,   1967
GRADUATE   STUDENT   CENTRE
Expansion means:
V TREBLED DINING FACILITIES
V BIGGER BEERGARDENS
V ALPINE-VIEW LOUNGE AND BALCONY
V GAMES ROOM
V BALLROOM FACILITIES
V QUIET AREAS
Also
expanded library
catering dining room
conference rooms
periodicals room
space to expand
WHY DO WE NEED
EXPANSION ?
EXPANSION
„JM*V*
^'5
SZH&'M
The proposed new wing, designed by architect   Zoltan   Kiss  who   worked  on   the  original
Centre, maintains the beauty of the setting and takes full advantage of the unique view.
Present Centre Facilities Obsolete
The Thea Koerner House was created as a meeting place for graduate students, a centre for exchange
within the most dispersed and intellectually diversified
student group on campus. We are in immediate
danger, however, of seeing our Centre die out as an
effective unifying force because so few of us can get
into the building at one time. Not only are we
cramped for space but also we are restricted to a
very narrow range of activities. We cannot accommodate a visiting lecturer, we have no place to stage
a concert, we can't show a film to more than 30
people, and we can't hold an economical dance with
live music because we can't get enough people into
the lower lounge.
Scope Of Activities Can Be Increased
The proposed $750,000 addition to the Grad.
Centre will solve both major problems of space and
scope. The Ground Floor will contain a 225 seat, split
level dining room that will function all day, thus not
just tripling space but also increasing serving hours
and meal variety. At the entrance Plaza Level, a
large multi-purpose room with outdoor patio will serve
as a dance-floor and meeting hall capable of handling
an economic group. On the Third Floor is a games
area that will provide billiards, table tennis, cards,
and TV for relaxation, and a small party room for
catering. A quiet fourth floor will have a spacious
reading and study library, a committee room, and a
conference room available for bookings or for study and
discussions when free. The Fifth Floor will remain
unfinished to allow for future expansion and to lower
the cost to present graduate students. Private conversation will be possible in a lounge and balcony
on the Sixth Floor with an unparalleled view of
mountains and sea. Departmental parties, conferences, and seminars can be held simultaneously in at
least seven different rooms while the general services
are undisturbed. A decentralized service plan and
the freeing of the present small cafe, will allow several
areas of both buildings to be licensed when required.
The Time To Act Is Now
We are constrained to think in terms of the future,
to apply foresight to a problem easily recognized. We
must initiate the expansion of the Centre before the
rising cost of buildings makes our plans economically
unfeasible. "Tuum Est" at this university has, for
generations of students, meant the willing assumption
of responsibility and it is only ourselves who can act
to keep viable the functions and philosophy of a meeting place for graduate students.
Board Ot Governors Agrees In Principle
A brief outlining our expansion plans was presented by the G.S.A. to the Board of Governors at
their November Meeting. The Board is aware of the
needs of the Centre and has said to us through Acting
President Walter H. Gage "that the Board of Governors is sympathetic to the expansion plans, subject
to suitable financing arrangements being made." The
basis of a sound financing scheme can only be our
willingness to act on our own 'behalf through a building fee.
The Cost Is $14 Per Year Per Student
building cost that would answer the need for expansion. No money is being asked for increase in
bureaucracy or office space—the entire amount represents an investment in the building itself.
Proposal Is Culmination Ot
Three Years Planning
The Executive has made numerous efforts to poll
the membership since the need for expansion became
obvious. The problem has been discussed at the last
four general meetings over a period of two years
and accumulated information has been dispersed to
the membership in newsletters and in the G.S.A.
minutes posted on noticeboards in each department.
A survey was made during the last winter session
which elicited a 27% response from the membership.
Of those 27%, 77% of replies indicated that they
would use the Centre more if it was less crowded;
82% of replies preferred expansion of the Centre
to splitting the membership between the Centre and
backed areas in S.U.'B.; and 72% expressed willingness
to support a fee increase to finance expansion. We
accepted this as an indication of support for further
studies which are now completed. The facilities list,
the financing and enrollment projections, the provisions for further expansion, the drawings, the architect's model, and the brief to the Board of Governors
have been carefully prepared and represent a reasonable, balanced plan for maintaining the integrity oi
of the Graduate Student Centre. The plan is designed
to accommodate the full growth of the graduate school
within the present plans of the university administra
tion. We must act now to provide for ourselves anc
the future. When the referendum is in your hands-
support expansion.
The Executive
Graduate Student Association fhursday, November 23,  1967
THE     U B Y S S E Y
Page 9
Each student designs his own personalized study area.
— biO loissUe photo
Ideal study situation created
By PAUL KNOX
A small brown dog runs in and out between
airs of legs and piles of wood.
Purple cloth hangs from the ceilings and
ssorted vines climb assorted poles.
A student who identifies himself as Lyndon
ohnson peers myopically from a red-walled
nclosure in the center of the room.
And there's the occasional student, wedged
i at a customized study desk.
It's all part of the scene as UBC's architec-
ire students do their thing on the third floor
f the Lasserre building.
In search of the ideal study situation, archi-
icture students four years ago ripped out the
raight rows of desks in their study hall.
Then they started over again, using the
riginal desks but adding their own ideas on
ccessories.
Most architecture students have their own
lace to study in the room, which also serves
3 a place for individual consultation with inductors. There are about 50 first-year and 40
;cond-year stuxients Using the third floor.
The 20 third-year and graduate students use
aother room in the Lasserre basement.
"This place is designed to enable students to
study privately without being completely shut
off from the rest of the school," school president
Jim Goodwin, architecture 2, said Wednesday.
"If someone doesn't like something in here,
they get rid of it."
Such innovations might be useful in normal
classrooms or lecture halls, Goodwin said.
"I think there should be some feature in
an ordinary classroom to enable students to let
their attention wander for a minute without
having to fall asleep.
''Glass floors might be a good idea if we
can't have windows in lecture halls."
Warren Scott, architecture 2, disagreed.
"The change has to come from the courses
first," he said. "Classrooms are built to suit
the courses, and if the courses are sterile, then
it's inevitable that th classrooms will be also."
Peter Lattey, architecture 1, said classrooms
are fine in the context of mass instruction.
"Nothing suits a lecture better than a lec-
ure hall," he said.
"But what we're doing here is a different
thing. We're trying to express ourselves in
making a place to meet and work."
IDEAS AT LARGE
By STUART GRAY
, Ubyssey City Editor
If anything became clear at Tuesday's council meeting, it
was that a large cavity of misunderstanding has formed between some members of council and The Ubyssey.
Indicative of this isolation is the growth of a very abrasive
form of discontent among councillors at the newspaper's coverage of campus activities.
What is amazing about this unhappiness is that it mushroomed to such an extent as to culminate in an attempt to sub-
pend the editor, without the knowledge of any editorial board
members until they learned about the special meeting.
This treatise is an attempt to breach the rift in understanding by examining criticism levelled at the newspaper and
by explaining its problems, most of which spring from purely
practical reasons.
To understand the handicaps editors face, it is essential
to understand the mechanical process of a newspaper. All news
stories originate from what is called city desk, comprised of
the city editor and his assistant.
City desk compiles a list of assignments each publishing
afternoon and disperses them relative to the quality and quantity
of news staff available.
We are fortunate this year that our staff is larger than in
previous years, and that it includes some exceptionally astute
and consciencious workers.
A result is the success of a beat system, inovated in September. Such areas as housing, academic activities and senate, are
being covered more extensively this year because a reporter
for each provides continuity of association.
However, our staff and its time are still limited. Even with
a few stalwart reporters coming down each day, often at a
sacrifice of their lecture and studying time, and certainly of
their leisure, we cannot spare reporters whose sole function is
to wander around campus in case something is happening.
One of the criticisms echoed at Tuesday's meeting was that
arts has been getting a disproportionate share of news space.
To those councillors who grumble about limited news
coverage, we ask this: How many times have you come down
to the editorial room, and told use what is going on in your
faculty? Most of you have never seen the office.
AS journalists, we are obligated to give fair and reasonable
coverage to all areas of news interest on campus. More important, we want to.
But if we are to effect an widening of reporting scope,
we must have help.
First, we would ask that faculty executives inform city
desk in good time what events or aspects of interest are occurring in their realm.
Second, we need at least one student from each faculty
who would be willing to cover such happenings in a regular
basis.
Last month, an engineering student was appointed by the
engineering undergraduate society to write about redcoat events.
The result was immediately evident: more coverage of engineering activities.
Any student who indicates an interest in writing for The
Ubyssey, after being welcomed, will be given careful guidance
on points of newspaper style and rules.
In the meantime, an invitation is issued to any councillor
who is unhappy with our news coverage to come down to the
office and discuss the issues with some degree of amicability
and rationality.
This, we suggest, would be better than hasty words in the
inflammable atmosphere of a late-night council meeting.
-'."ii*
fh\A &tt 2>A»cte»
IWte;   Mac ?Abb^
PAULA ROSS
DANCERS
UBC Aud. - Noon, Dec, 7
WORKS  RANGE   FROM
JAZZ DANCE THEATRE TO
CONTEMPORARY INTERPRETIVE
FORMS
A STAGE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF
A CONCEPT OF DANCE FOR
CANADA
A TRULY VIBRANT,
VERY YOUTHFUL,
EXCITING PRESENTATION
SPECIAL EVENTS Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 23,  196>
— kurt hilger photo
WHAT IS A CAR but an expression of one's individualism ? This car found parked outside the
administration   building   is  as   personalized   and individualistic as an owner could want it.
DAMSHUR DAMSEL
Lotta prudery per kin around
An editorial by Ma Murray
from the Bridge River- Lillooet News
If the News and Ye Ed published such a
filthy rag as The Ubyssey of Nov. 3, the decent
people of this town would suspend us and have
a perfect right for damshur!
The UBC Alma Mater Society publishes
three issues per week of this college news sheet
and we take this space this week to say that the
publication should be suspended.
Any other weekly in B.C. would be suspended for a similar edition and this one isn't the
first. There have been other issues equally
vulnerable.
The mast head says the views editorially
are not those of the Alma Mater Society but
of the editor of Ubyssey. Any other editor or
publisher of any newspaper, any place, is liable
for the contents of its columns as indeed libel
suits throughout the years have  shown.
Student
wants block vote
B.C. students should make the government
realize the power of student voting, says Arthur
Weeks, student president of Simon Fraser University.
"Everyone who reaches the age of 19 is entitled to vote in provincial elections," Weeks
said in an interview.
"If we block vote with regard to educational
matters, the government will be forced to act
or it will be defeated."
Hydro electric power and highways consume
capital funds which might otherwise be available for capital expenditures on the campuses,
he said.
Weeks predicted a fee increase by next fall
or as early as this spring.
Successful student government, while composed of different viewpoints, must be united
for the good of the academic community, Weeks
added.
The AMS if it can foe proud of its editor
ought to be no better than any other publisher,
even the Hippie Georgia Straight's.
I repeat The Ubyssey should be suspended
forthwith and taken out of circulation or cleaned up.
There's plenty of grief perkin' all around
the youth. The Ubyssey isn't serving a purpose
or a need.
The taxpayers of this province dig up millions of dollars yearly to enlarge, improve and
provide a seat of learning for the youth at a
university. The Ubyssey has been publishing
for many years and every year it gets lower
to the ground, raising higher the weaknesses
of homo sap. And this one, Nov. 3, is the straw
that breaks the camel's back.
If there were any points to be gained by
displaying Playboy's rejected pages, it might
be different. But if it's unlawful for Playboy
to let its pages go through the mails and over
the counters, what right or dispensation has
Ubyssey to be any different.
Newsprint, ink, plus manpower to make and
spread the word is too good to waste on such
unwholesome and pointless craperoni. From
page one to 20 the editor of Ubyssey had not
one constructive idea or lead on an idea. It
either crepe-hangs or knocks.
Two pages are given to Dick Needham, a
burnt out old journalist who shot his bolt in
riotous dissipation, according to the lead on
Dick's story. Dick chokes himself on an interview that any freshman on the campus would
be ashamed to write.
Dick's tumtum is that the establishment is
looking for responsible slaves but we will tell
Dick he is driving his ducks to a damn poor
market when he goes to a brain-washed readership like that of this pointless, filthy Ubyssey.
We'd like to write a criticism of this issue,
but the narrow-minded, pigeon-minded editor
wouldn't print it. We don't know where we
can go to to get action on suspending this
Ubyssey rag for damshur, or lettin' the student
body have a rest, but we sure as hell will forward a copy of this protest to the AMS forthwith.
BIRD CALLS
THE UBC STUDENT
TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
Is The Handiest Book On Campus
- ESPECIALLY AT CHRISTMAS TIME
BUY  YOUR  COPY  TODAY
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE
BROCK HALL
UBC BOOKSTORE
COLLEGE SHOP
BROCK HALL
Pre-sale ticket holders must claim their books at publications office before Dec. 29.
ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA LTD.
will conduct
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
on
FRIDAY, MONDAY and TUESDAY
DECEMBER 1, 4 and 5, 1967
for
Chemists
Engineers
Biologists
Metallurgists
Mathematicians
Physicists
Continuing staff appointments  available at
* CHALK RIVER NUCLEAR LABORATORIES
Chalk River, Ontario
* COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS
Ottawa, Ontario
ir  POWER PROJECTS
Sheridan Park, Ontario
* WHITESHELL NUCLEAR RESEARCH ESTABLISHMENT
Pinawa, Manitoba
For job descriptions and interview appointment
please visit your University Placement Office.
LABA1T breweres
OF CANADA LTD.
offers
Challenging Career Opportunities
for
Science Graduates
Mr. J. Compton, Technical Director of Labatt Breweries
of Canada will be on campus to interview interested
Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Food Science
graduates.
Date: NOVEMBER 24, 1967
Time: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
For appointments please contact
The Placement Office
BACK-TO-THE-
BOOKS
EYEWEAR
Don't let poor
eyesight hinder
your progress.
If You need
new glasses,
bring your
eye physician's
prescription to
us.
SPECIAL
STUDENT DISCOUNT
Ho^OptmlLl
seven
locations
Greater
Vancouver
1701   W.   Broadway
731-3021
Hycroft Med. Bldg.
3195 Granville
733-8772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENSES
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE" Thursday, November 23,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
'-; liX: •,' .+**% *!?"■'''' ij.';"
McMaster vs Alberta in Bowl
Although UBC football Thunderbirds are
not in it, the Canadian College Bowl is an interesting development in the history of Canadian intercollegiate athletics.
This year the third national finals for the
Vanier Cup will be held and if the pattern
follows, it should prove a mixture of excitement and, something that hasn't been seen
around here for a while, plain old good football.
The scheduling is simple enough. The winner
of the Maritime Intercollegiate Athletic Association plays the winner of the Central Canada
Conference and the winner of that plays the
Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association winner.
Next year the plan will be more fully developed to include the Senior Football League
of Ontario and Quebec.
This Saturday the McMaster University
Marauders will meet the University of Alberta
Golden Bears in Toronto for the Vanier Cup
in the windup of inter-collegiate football for
this year.
The Marauders earned the berth via a 7-0
upset over the St. Francis Xavier X-Men last
Saturday in Halifax in the first annual Atlantic
Bowl.
A 39-yard punt by Marauder Tom Allan accounted for the winning point of the game but
later quarterback Dick Waring ran around his
right end for the six insurance points.
Coach not laughing
though Jokers lose
"The Birds aren't scoring enough goals," said
Fhunderbird field hockey coach Eric Broom after
lis team's narrow 2-1 victory over Jokers II
Saturday.
Broom had expected the Birds to score more
joals than they did against the team that the
JBC Braves had played to a tie earlier in the
season.
"Birds dominated the play in the game but
■vhen they got into the circle, they didn't take
;nough chances," said Broom.
The Birds, who lost their first league game
n four years on Nov. 11, are now in second
place in the first division behind Hawks A.
In other games played Saturday, the Braves
leld their own against a superior team in a 4-1
osing cause to Jokers I.
Tomahawks beat Jokers III 3-0 and Scalps
ost 4"0 to India B on Saturday but bounced back
;o take a 4-0 victory over Hawks D on Sunday.
'McMaster's win over the powerful X-Men
was surprising due to St. Francis' six-win, no-
loss record in the MIAA. The X-Men had scored
357 points during the season and beat Dalhousie
105-20 in one contest.
The Canadian College Bowl annually turns
over all net proceeds to the Canadian Save the
Children Fund.
UBC's Luftwaffe
is off and flying
The UBC Luftwaffe is off the ground and
flying.
The Luftwaffe sky-diving club has grown to
40 members and has elected an executive of
president Miles Kingon, vice-president Peter
Grady and Val Pratico secretary.
The club levies a five dollar membership
charge to pay for incidentals and club expenses.
They now have a clubhouse and a uniform,
dark blue coveralls with a yellow stripe (one
can only speculate where the stripe is on the
uniform).
Members are jumping every weekend as the
B.C. inter-club competition is coming on Dec. 2
and 3.
A promotional meeting is coming soon and
new members are more than welcome. Interested people should contact an executive member.
Letter
Sports editor.- The Ubyssey:
In a recent article in The Ubyssey, Dr.
Bob Hindmarch named players that have
failed to return to the hockey Thunderbirds. He neglected to mention one of the
great stalwarts of last year's team, namely,
Ronald Morris.
Morris, a four-year veteran with the
team, Contributed much to the past success
of the Birds. This year, for those who remember the big M, he is playing with the
former world champion Trail Smoke
Eaters.
Hindmarch's oversight is inexcusable
considering Morris' outstanding performance in the past for the hockey Thunderbirds.
RONALD MORRIS  FAN  CLUB
s
AMUEL ANDERSON
c.
G.
— "American Revolutionary"
— "S.N.C.C. International Affairs Dept. Member"
— U.S. Editor of "New African" Magazine
Committee Member of Black Student Congress
— Previously-Black Youth Task Force Advisor in
Newark, N.J.—Black Power Conference
Former Organizational Director of Harlem
Black Panther Party
— Political Essayist and Reviewer, Poet & Writer,
Math Teacher for the State University of New
York in Harlem
SPECIAL EVENTS-THURS. NOON - NOV. 23
BROCK LOUNGE - 35 CENTS
This coach knows
the rugby score
Coach Donn Spence's prediction came true on Sunday when
the UBC rugby Frosh trounced Simon Fraser 11-3.
"I predicted the outcome a long time ago," said Spence
jubilantly.
The Frosh have only lost one game all season, an opening
3-0 loss to BCIT, so Spence is hoping the Frosh win their last
two games of the season and take the league title.
In other rugby action Saturday, the injury-riddled Thunderbirds absorbed their first loss after two straight wins. Ex-
Britannia firsts edged our Birds 9-8.
Dave Austin's try which was converted by Don Crompton
and a penalty kick by Crompton accounted for UBC's points.
Birds' captain Tom Fraine is suffering from mononucleosis,
Morley Lercher has an injured knee and Gordie McKenzie Is
out with a bad back.
Totems whipped Ex-Britannia seconds 6-0 and the Frosh
beat Royal Roads 6-3 in other games Saturday.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 to-2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
•Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 10, 11, 24, 25.
December 1, 2.
January 12, 13, 26, 27.
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or  224-3205
6  T  8  GRADUATES
EATON'S
(The 98 year-old company)
with a big future
OFFERS
employment opportunities to men and women graduates in-
— Commerce — Marketing option.
Arts
Economic, and/or
Psychology,
and
we will welcome graduates of other faculties who have work
experience plus a career interest in retailing.
Successful applicants will be eligible for—
— Participation on a 3 phase
Management Development Program.
— Comprehensive on-the-job training.
— Competitive salary levels.
— Opportunities for advancement
based on individual performance.
Interviews on your campus will be held November 29th and
30th at the STUDENT PLACEMENT CENTRE.
For further information please contact
Mr. W. L. Davis, Personnel Supervisor,
Local  230,   Eaton's  Downtown   Store. Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 23, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
SNCCY Sam speaks out
SPECIAL EVENTS
American revolutionary Sam
Anderson of SNCC, speaks today, noon, Brock lounge. Admission 35 cents.
VCF
Dr. Pat Taylor discusses test-
tube babies and the meaning
of life, Friday, noon, Ang. 110.
ARCHEOLOGY
Prehistoric sequence from
the Fraser delta and canyon
on display every Thursday,
noon to 3:30 p.m., in the
archeology lab, basement of
the math building. Open to all
staff and students.
PRE LAW SOC
Magistrate Marshall of New
Westminster speaks on small
debts court, today, noon, Ang.
415.
LIBERTARIANS
The dictionary has lied — anarchy forum, today, noon, Buchanan first floor.
NISEI VARSITY
General meeting today, noon,
Bu. 205. Party to follow.
COLLEGE LIFE
Bernie Fandrich discusses
Jesus the Revolutionary, tonight, 7:17 p.m., Dene house
lounge, Totem Park.
TOTEM PARK
Exhibition of Jack Wise
paintings in Totem Park common room all this week.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Meeting for all those interested in or working on science
symposium, Friday noon,
Brock ext. 260.
SKYDIVING
Any members interested in
competition on Dec. 2 and 3,
sign list in clubhouse behind
Brock, before Saturday.
SOCRED CLUB
Seminar with MLA Bob
Wenman, tonight, 7:32 p.m.,
parliamentary council office,
Brock extension.
DEBATING UNION
This House Prefers Red
Guards to Apathy — British
national debating team versus
UBC, Friday noon, Brock
lounge.
Folksy music bags
have  guild  outlet
If your music bag is folk
and you want to do something
about it, there is now a society
for you.
Local folk fans have banded
together to form the Vancouver Folk Guild.
Interested persons can attend the weekly meetings at
612 Davie St., held Sunday at
7 p.m.
CIASP
Meeting to discuss area study
day, Friday noon, IH 402-404.
ANGLICANS
Election and report on chaplain hunting, today, noon,
Henn. 302.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Dr. R. Wong discusses grad
studies today, noon, Ang. 308.
General meeting Friday
noon, Bu. penthouse.
BROADCAST COMMITTEE
Meeting to plan first CHQM
program, tonight, 7 p.m., Brock
board room.
VOC
Friday is last day to pay
membership fees. Pay at noon
in the clubroom.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Prof. Stanley Read of the
English department conducts
a gallery tour of the Thomas
Rowlandson exhibition, today,
noon, Gallery.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau discusses human
nature, today, 1:45 p.m., Bu.
202.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Discussion of jobs abroad
with  CUSO,  today,  noon,  IH.
Coffee hour today, 3 p.m.,
upper lounge,. IH.
EL CIRCULO
Conversation   group    today,
noon,   IH   402.   All   executive
members  please  attend.
PLANNING STUDENTS
William Kerr, planning director and industrial development commissioner discusses
hints to success on the city
scene, today, noon, Lass. 104.
FILMSOC
How the West Was Won, today,   12:30  p.m.,   3:15  p.m.,   6
p.m. and 8:30 p.m., auditorium.
In color and wide-screen. Admission 50 cents.
Relax with art evening of
Folk Music
AT
The Village Bistro
From 8 p.m. till 4 a.m.
2081 W. 4th
Tel. 736-9920
STUDENTS  AT   REDUCED   RATES
coittetagpofatyJewepet3f "■"
by wilfy vanypetm ,.,,
by thomak feafcfentn*   ,
Ml» w 1WI, **«ew#tr    tafc MM*!*
COLLEGE
SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
COLLEGE
LIFE
Tonight, 7:17 p.m.
DENE    HOUSE    LOUNGE
TOTEM   PARK
Bernie Fandrich of UBC Thunderbird*
Football    Team    speaks    on
"Jesus The
Revolutionary"
also  entertainment and refreshments-
SEE YOU THERE!
Everyone Welcome
Sponsored by
Campus   Crusade   For   Christ
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Dances
 11
TIRED OF STUDYING? THEN WHY
no come to theC.V.C.-N.V.C. Dance
at Brock Hall this Saturday, November 25. Featured will be Jason
Hoover and the Epics. Time 8:30-
12. Members $1.00. Non-members
$1.50
RELAX—LET YOURSELF GO UN-
der the spell of our strobe at
Retinal Circus, 1024 Davie. Two
bands.   Fun  from   9   till   2.	
13
Lost & Found
LOST: BEIGE, PINK PATTERNED
glasses case containing gold wed-
din band and opal engagement ring,
reward. Phone Verna Pearson, CA
4-3221  during  day.        	
LOST WEEK OF OCT. 9TH BE-
tween Federal Forestry Lab and
MacMillan Building, pearl cross on
chain and pearl pin. Reward. Phone
during day, CA 4-3221, Mrs. Ferguson^	
Travel Opportunities
16
CALIFORNIA: JET FLIGHT TO
San Francisco. Lowest Christma»
fare $83.00. Avoid rush. 261-3831 or
224-4958.	
COMMERCE AND ECONOMICS
Students ! World - Wide Summer
job       opportunities.       watch      for
__AIESEC Recruitment    Meeting.	
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
WANTED — FOR'" NEW-YEAR'S
eve party — Three piece band,
phone    876-9360.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
WOULD WHOEVER "BORROWED"
my metronome please return it to
the music building—It is a family
keepsake — Distraught music student.
FOUND: WATCH NOV. 21, OUT-
side Hebb Theatre. Collect Pub.
office,   Brock   Hall.
LOST ON OR NEAR BIOL. Science lawn: set car keys, contact
Perry   Guloien,   683-9855.	
TOOLED LEATHER WALLET
missing outside Chem. Lab. 372,
Monday, return 683 Kerry Place,
North   Vancouver.
LOST: SILVER CHARM BRACE-
let, Brock T.V. Room, call Dianne,
YU    5-2671
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED TO NEW YORK,
Ontario, points along way X-mas
holidays._Call   228-3204   or   228-8480,,
ONTARIO STUDENT "REQUIRES
ride to Toronto at Xmas. Share
driving, expenses. Rick. 733-8607,
Leave   number.
PENELOPE HAS LEFT US—NEED
driver for Central West Van car-
pool,   phone   922-7489.	
FILM SOC. PRESENTS
HOW THE WEST
WAS WON
TODAY     NOV. 23     AUD.     50c
12:30,3:15,6:00,8:30
COLOR & WIDESCREEN
ANYONE TRAVELLING TO TOR-
onto  at   Xmas  and   looking   for  co-
 driver,   ph.   731-5420,   ask  for  Gord.
CARPOOL DRIVER NEEDED —
Highlands, Upper Lonsdale area,
988-3568 after 6. Driver, will drive
once   a   week.
RIDES AVAILABLE FROM NORTH
Burnaby for 8:30 classes, call Lea
298-6201. 	
GIRL STUDENT, 23, IS LOOKING
for a ride or partner for hitchhiking to Mexico City around Dec.
15th,   681-0439.	
RTDE WANTED FOR 8:30's FROM
RICHMOND, vicinity of No. 1 Rd.
and Blundell. phone 277-4820, after
7,  ask for Steve;	
BE SURE TO GET THERE WITH
this happy car, 1960 Envoy. Mon-
Fri.   After   6.J733-7235.   $450.   or?
'59 PORSCHE, GOOD CONDITION,
must sell, best offer, 224-9662. 2250
Wesbrook    Cres.
57 MORRIS MINOR, GOOD RUN-
ning condition $200. or offer. Phone
evenings   922-5284.	
1946 CHEVROLET GOOD RUNNING
condition, 4 new tires, radio, CA
4-4743,   re-upholstered.
1957     HILLMAN     (1959     RE-CONDI-
tioned   motor,   new   battery),   $125.00
_ or   offer,    ph.    224-6175,   after   6.     _
TR3   TR3    TR3   TR3   TR3    TR3   TR3
TR3    1959   —   $875  —   224-7858   TR3
TR3   TR3   TR3   TR3   TR3   TR3   TR3
LEAVING TOWN—MUST SELL '65
Austin 1100, excellent condition,
best   offer,   call  261-9436.
Automobile Pails
23
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
1966 HONDA 300 — VERY GOOD
cond., 5700 mi., must sell, lost
drivers licence, $450. ph. 224-9933,
Ron.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
 37
FILM SOC. PRESENTS "HOW THE
West Was Won", Nov. 23, 12:30,
3:15, 6:00, 8:30, Cinemascope, Aud.
50c.
Typing (Cont.)
44
GOOD     EXPERIENCED     T Y P I S '
available   for   home   typing,   pleas
phone  277-5640.
COMPOSITIONS, ESSAYS, THESE
typed. Quick service. Reasonabl
rates.   Phone   681-4634.
.STUDENT'S WIFE, EXPER. ESSA"
and thesis typist — electric — pleas
phone 731-2278.
"^       EMPLOYMENT^""
Help Wanted—Female
OPENING FOR TWO CO-EDS
part-time selling. Exclusive lin
cosmetics. Training and top com
mission. Phone 224-6314 or 73!
9804.
Work Wanted 5
Instruction   Wanted
TUTOR      IN      ARABIC      WANTEI
Phone   526-8029,   evenings  only.
Music
 6
YOU    TOO    CAN   LISTEN   TO   TH
"Lite    of     Love".     Phone:    Franl
224-9020.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
Tutoring
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
Russian. Individual, no contract
$3.00 hr. by B.A., M.A., B.L.S. 73i
6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOL]
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hasting
681-4931.
KOFLACH GOLD STAR BUCKLE
$50.   Phone   224-9956. __	
1 BOGEN CHALLENGER PA AM
2 Trayner columns, each contaii
4 12" speakers, mike and cab!
inclu.   985-5775.	
VOX SUPER LYNX GUITAR WIT
case, Fuzz-tone, 12 string electi
guit., copy of Rickenbacker: 22
6460.
Special Notices
 15
OPEN DOObT~ DROP-IN CENTRE.
(Coffee house in Church cellar).
Every Friday night, 9-12 midnight,
corner of 11th and Fir.	
J~ASON HOOVER AND THE EPICS!
Dance to the soul sound of Jason
Hoover and the Epics! Sat., Nov.
25th.   8:30-12:30,   Brock
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   321-6442.
HOW THE WEST WAS WON —
Nov. 23, 12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:30. Aud.
50c.   Cinemascope   color.	
MAKE 'EM LAUGH WITH AN UN-
usual gift this Christmas. Humer-
ous gifts, jokes, cards, bar supplies, toys, lamps, (check our
prices on picture framing). The
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway, 738-
2311, opposite liquor store and Super   Valu  —   Post-office.	
TICKETS FOR COUNTRY JOE ARE
on sale now at the Record Gallery
Tartini's & the Psychedelic Shop.
Country Joe, Papa Bears & the
Loyalists. Dec. 8-9 Now $2.50. At
door  $3.50.                      	
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. 3 barbers. Open weekdays 8:30-6 p.m. Saturdays 'till
5:30.	
"PAINTING IN CANADA—A History — R. J. Harper. The Book-
finder—4444 W. 10th Ave., Vane,
B.C.
SEE COMEDIAN PAUL K. WILLIS
at The New Camelot, originally
The Bunkhouse (corner of Davie
and   Seymour),  Nov.  24th and 25th.
WATCH FOR IMPORTANT MARDI
Gras   announcement   !!!   Soon   !!!
BOOKS — BOOKS — BOOKS —
Now open—a NEW bookstore on
campus, in the Tudor Bldg., 5732
University Blvd. Featuring all
books and study notes. The
VILLAGE BOOKSHOP. Open 10
a.m.   to   9   p.m.
DUNLOP INTERNATIONAL SQUAS
racquet, almost brand new, offei
Robin   —  224-9957.	
FOP. SALE: 36" ROLLAWAY BE
$25.   Phone 224-3139 after  4.
WANTED TO BUY: OLD ELECTR
trains, the older the better. Amei
can Flyer, Lionel, Hornby, Markli
Bing, very old Marx.  Phone 261-18
HAIR TREATMENT AND BODY
perm at reasonable prices U.B.C.
Beauty Salon in the village 228-
8942.
H1ESS WHAT? BRITISH NATION-
al Debating team vs. U.B.C. Friday, Nov. 24. Brock Hall. 12:30 all
welcome.
TO MY SWEETHEART, ON HER
20th birthday, I drink! Happy
birthday,   R.    S.   from   C.   E.
CARIBBEAN NIGHTS DANCE FEA-
turing Moonlighters Steel Band,
Sat., Dec. 2, Brock Lounge, $1.50
per  person,   tickets   at  AMS  office.
ARE  YOU:
Going home  for  Christmas?  Concerned   about   higher   education?   Meet   in
Brock  Ext. 258, 12:30 Friday, Nov. 25.
INDIA'S   CRISIS:   REVOLUTION   OR
national decay. Brock, noon, Dec. 1.
Hear  Brian  Marson.
ROY, HUT 17, RM. 14 HAS A PHONY
tan   and   uses   plastic   barbells.
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-6129.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffith Limited, 8584 Granville
Street   (70th  &  Granville).   263-4530.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced eassay and thesis typist
Reasonable  Rates. TR. 4-9253.
AT LAST! An exclusive typing service for students. 24-hour service,
elec. typewriters, 1 block from campus. All this for only 30 cents a
page! University Typing Services —
Around the corner from World Wide
Travel — next to R.C.M.P. 2109 Allison Rd. at University Blvd. Mon. to
Fri.  9  to 5.  Phone:  228-8414.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms    I
SINGLE ROOM, BATHRM, SMAI
kitch. Avail, immed. 3455 Trafalg
St.  after  6:00  p.m.
ROOMS — MALE — AVAILABI
now and reserve for second ter
2250   Wesbrook,   5:30-6:30,   224-966:
Room & Board
   I
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMP!
for spring term. Applications tak
now. Z.B.T. Fraternity, 5760 T<
onto Road. Phone 224-9660. Aft
six.
SINGLE ROOM AND BOARD DE
1. Near gates. Phone 228-8380, ma
ROOM AND BOARD CLOSE '
classes. Reasonable rates. Phc
224-9665  after  six.	
HOUSEKEEPING SUITE, 2 GIRI
for Jan. 1st. Near campus. Ph. r
307 —   224-9877 after 6.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
2 ROOM SUITE, NEWLY DECO
ated. Suitable 2 girls, near Univi
sity. Transportation available. I
month.    224-4256   after   7.
SENIOR OR GRAD. STUDE>
female, share two bedroom hoi
with two others. West End. 1
5-7595.
FURNISHED BASEMENT BACH
lor apartment with view; separ;
entrance; light housekeeping. Gr
student preferred; available
September 1968. Dunbar & 15
738-4410 after 5:30 p.m.  $65 per r
 single  occupancy.	
FOR RENT, IN WHITE ROCK, T\
bedroom furnished suite. Self-c<
tained. $115 per month. Ph. 596-3
days.

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