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The Ubyssey Jan 31, 1967

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Array Strike vote on, ANkS su^prt off
By KRIS EMMOTT
Student council still plans to hold a strike
referendum Feb. 8, but Monday night withdrew
its support and now urges students to vote "no".
The referendum, which was to be held Feb. 15,
asks students whether they support a week of
concern, including a strike, if the B.C. government
does not allocate $66 million to higher education.
Students are further asked whether they will
serve on a picket line.
Council moved to keep the referendum, then
to rescind last week's motion of support, and
finally moved to ask students to vote no.
An attempt was made to kill the referendum
completely, but this was defeated.
Debate began when Charlie Boylan attacked
the referendum.
"I made a mistake in asking for this referendum and in voting for it in its present wording,"
Boylan said.
"I could not in all conscience); Sti|)port itJ |t; is
vague and illogical. There is no chance that this
wording will be passed by the students-''
Boylan said the question of serving oh a picket
line would alienate students, that a boycott instead of a close-out strike would better serve
council's purpose, and that supporting a boycott
and serving on a picket line were two separate
questions.
Ad Hoc Boycott—See Page 3
Treasurer Lome Hudson argued that the question had been raised and must now be decided by
the students.
"The public will say we are backing down because president Macdonald said we were irresponsible. Students have the right to vote on any
question."
Boylan suggested an alternate referendum to
i_Hf>.qk approval for a one-day boycott.
First ^icj--president Carolyn Tate suggested
council^ireccmsider the wording making it clear
the'main'issue was a possible fee hike.
First council voted to hold the referendum,
then to rescind the motion urging students to vote
yes.
Boylan then moved that council urge students
to vote "no".
The motion passed 11-11-1, with chairman
Peter  Braund   casting the  deciding vote.
Miss Tate moved to rescind the whole referendum question.
"We are in an impossible position," she said.
"After drawing up the referendum, how can
we urge students to vote against it?"
"The public knows we've made a strike
threat," replied Hudson.
"We must now bring the issue before the
students to rectify our public image."
— powell hargrave photo
BEATING DOWN student demands, Peterson was roundly booed by mature students for speaking his mind. More
thoughtful marchers threw flowers to
brighten up legislative steps, offset Les's
smile.
UBC debaters
back cup
UBC debaters won the McGoun
cup for the third time in a row Friday.
The cup is symbolic of debating
superiority among western Canadian
universities.
Law student Brian Wallace, and
Richard Watts, arts 3, defeated University of Alberta in a two to one
decision.
Law student Mike Coleman, and
David Quinn, third year pharmacy,
won a unanimous decision over the
University of Saskatchewan team.
The fourth conteding university,
the University of Manitoba was already knocked out of the running by
a unanimous decision in Winnipeg for
Saskatchewan.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 42       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 31,  1967 _dRS3S*>« 224-3916
Les tells marchers
go home, behave'
Shouting, dripping and singing
in the rain more than 1,800 B.C.
students swarmed to the legislature steps in Victoria Friday to
ask for help.
The students marched on the
final day of the B.C. Assembly
of Students' Education Action
Week.
Students were from the universities of Victoria and B.C., Simon
Fraser, B.C. Institute of Technology, provincial nursing schools
and smaller colleges.
Education minister Leslie Peterson, after refusing to meet the
march, received the students with
a blunt defence of the Social
Credit government's education
policy.
"I don't approve of this type
of demonstration. Go back to your
lectures and behave responsibly,"
he told the roaring mob.
Earlier in the day a four-member student delegation visited the
minister and presented their demands — equalization grants for
students from isolated areas, gradual elimination of tuition fees, an
independent   grants   commission,
and student represenation on the
board of governors and senate.
BCAS president Frank Flynn
said Peterson claimed he could
not reveal government policy until the budget was brought down.
"He hadn't even read the brief
we sent him two weeks ago," said
Flynn.
"We failed in some cases and
gained in others. He said he was
personally in favor of equalization
grants but thought UBC president
John Macdonald's independent
grants commission was out of
date."
"Tuition fees will stay," Peterson told the bellowing crowd.
He insisted that the parental
means test for student bursaries
will remain in effect. Student
leaders claimed this was undignified and irrelevant.
"If parents can afford to give
their children a Cadillac to drive
to campus, I think that should be
taken into consideration," Peterson shouted.
"You all have a tendency to
consider what you want in an
isolated fashion  and you ignore
the needs of society as a whole,"
said Peterson.
"It is easy for you who have no
responsibilities to demonstrate
here and for others to promise
you the world," Peterson said in
reference to NDP leader Robert
Strachan and Liberal boss Ray
Perrault who spoke to the students earlier.
Finally in frustration Peterson
asked if the students wanted him
to appease them. He was met with
continued yelling.
"I hope that when the amount
of this year's education budget is
announced you will go back to
your lectures and apply the same
vigor you have shown here today."
During his whole speech, Peterson was continually dodging red
and white carnations thrown by
excited and frustrated students. It
was suggested the carnations were
symbols of the march's triviality.
Before the demonstration a
clash   between   radical   students
To Page 3
See: REBELS
— powell hargrave photo
SOGGY  STUDENTS,  escorted   by well-wrapped   police,  pleaded  for  help in  financing  an  education
to education  minister Leslie Peterson in Victoria  Friday.   Peterson   told   irresponsible   youths   to   go
back   to class. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 31,  1967
TEACHERS, NOT BUILDINGS'
CYCers critize schools
DEEP RIVER, Ont. (UNS) — Two high
school dropouts have arrived in this community to study the dropout problem.
John Earnshaw and Margaret Whyte,
two of 66 Company of Young Canadians
Volunteers, have been living at the Staff
Hotel for the past six months and have become part of the teen-age scene.
Both volunteers are in their late teens
and left high school with one year to complete.
"We have been criticized for being dropouts ourselves," said Earnshaw, "but I think
it's a big asset to have dropped out. It's
like setting a thief to catch a thief — you
develop yourself and give completely —
you understand the problem.
They would like to see the education
system reorganized so that children in the
lower grades would have top-flight teachers,
not the lowest-paid beginners.
"To do this," Miss Whyte said, "they'll
have to stop spending education money on
beautiful buildings and spend it on better
pay to attract more and better teachers."
She believes the emphasis on high marks
and diplomas destroys much that is interesting and beautiful in learning, and that
school only prepares a student to make a
living, not to think for himself or use his
life to the fullest.
Both she and Earnshaw have been critical of Deep River as a middle-class town
with middle-class symptoms of apathy, financial  security  and   emotional   insecurity.
And they have been criticized in turn
for the manner in which they are working.
One Grade 13 student said of them:
'My criticism is that they are not in this
world. They're carried away by their ideals
and they really are dedicated. But they
need some public relations because they
have no concrete proposals and that makes
them lose favor with a lot of people.
"They are helping us to get a newspaper
started, one with no teacher editing. It will
make a good safety valve for those who feel
they can never communicate with adults."
The volunteers are to spend two years
in Deep River.
Petition
questions
president
A petition has been circulated among members of the grad
class, to hold a policy meeting about class president A. K.
MacKinnon.
The petition, issued Friday,
is in response to MacKinnon's
"statement on student action"
which denounced the AMS's
Education Action Week program.
The petition requests a questioning of the authority of the
president to issue such statements, and demands a special
general meeting be called for
discussion.
Results of the petition have
not  yet been  announced.
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Your SKI MYSTERY Entry
n
presented by
CYVR RADIO-ubc radio society
duMAURIER   international
AT MT. ORFARD
CA5A
I 967
in Quebec
EVENTS    ORGANIZED    BV    THE    CANADIAN    AMATKUR    SKI    ASSOCIATION
The Clues to date:—
1. Birds of a feather flock together.
2. Person, Place or Thing are clues of which you
need remember two.
3. From Sea to Sea Canadians love to ski.
4. Mt. Orford and Whistler are a part — bring them
together and you have a start.
5. There's Gold in Them Thar Hill*.
6. One of the seasons is a part of the whole
The correct choice determines your goal
7. We have the facilities but we must prove our capabilities
LISTEN TO    CYVR    FOR DAILY CLUES
AMS ENTRY BOXES ARE PROVIDED
Prizes
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YOUR OFFICIAL ENTRY
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All entries become sole property
of CYVR. Judges decisions final.
First 3 correct answers win respective  prizes  upon  receipt of entry.
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PROTEST
Demonstration
A demonstration in protest against the
increasing backlog of reading assignments.
WHERE: University Hill
Secondary School Auditorium
WHEN: Wednesday & Thursday
at 8 p.m.
READING DYNAMICS
OF B.C. LTD.
Main Office 549 Howe St., Vancouver
Suite 210 685-2374 Tuesday,  January 31,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— powell hargrave photo
WHILE THE MARCHERS marched and the speakers spoke, the rain rained on Victoria and
on uncovered students. Cold, wet stuff plastered down hair, crept under collars and
dripped from soaking chin and brow.
Arts festival sets sail
with films, poets, tour
The Sixth Annual Festival of Contemporary Arts comes to UBC tonight at 8 p.m.
at the Fine Arts Gallery.
The Festival, which annually provides
an opportunity to see and hear what's farthest out in the arts, will bring to the campus an all-Canadian contingent of painters,
sculptors, composers poets, film makers, and
dancers.
The first full day of events is Wednesday:
Leonard Cohen, author of the novel
"Beautiful Losers", and several volumes of
poetry reads some of his recent work in the
Ed. 100 at noon.
Also at noon, a tour of the Fine Arts
Gallery  is  conducted  by   Michael   Morris,
>«v;xr«§ .'>'
one of the  exhibitors   in  the  avant  garde
show.
At 3:30 p.m. in Angus 104, a program of
experimental films by local film makers will
be shown including Dan Singer's da Vita.
Da Vita, shot with borrowed equipment
and borrowed money in a borrowed garage,
during the Festival, it is not entertainment
in the usual sense.
"In da Vita," says Dan Singer, its director-producer, "I have used the device of
an elderly film-maker piecing together the
'great documentary'."
In Buchanan 100, also at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Margaret Atwood author of The
Circle Game will read her own work.
The Festival continues until Feb. 10.
.<!<
* V.     .     -.uS-VS/^
THEN, ER, I SAID...'
Great events in the affairs of man
usually provide a few verbal pearls for
posterity. Friday's march on the Victoria legislature was no exception. For
the convenience of Bartlett, some of
the deathless examples follow:
B.C. Assembly of Students president
Frank Flynn, a UBC science student,
after meeting education minister Les
Peterson: "He hadn't even read the
brief — I was really pissed off."
AMS president Peter Braund, at Victoria College student union building:
"I don't care if I have to eat shit for
the rest of the year — I'm against the
strike and I'll fight any candidate who
supports it. I must have been asleep
last Monday."
Peterson after he was booed by
2,000 students: "I guess I didn't please
them."
Braund at the left-right debate at
Victoria University: "Last time Bennett
came to UBC we lunch-bagged him
out and next time he comes, we'll throw
the bugger out again."
Flynn before the march: "I hope
Boylan doesn't come; I don't want him
speaking. He's a communist and it looks
bad to the public. Of course, I don't
mind myself ..."
'^<^%i^m^mssummmmmmm^^^m^:^^^^ -vs
^TiVs.fist.
REBELS DEMAND SIT-IN
'Wasted winds
can blow good'
By MARGARET LADBURY
The poet of technology Thursday lamented the waste of
one of the world's greatest sources of energy — wind.
"When technology harnesses the wind we will have an inexhaustible source of energy," Buckminster Fuller told an
audience of more than 500 in Totem Park lounge. Fuller was
giving the second Dal Grauer memorial lecture.
"The wanton use of fuels today because they are cheaper
is wrong — they will not foe cheaper for our grandchildren,"
Fuller said.
Fuller likened his views of
the world to Einstein's revolutionary conception of the
universe.
Before Einstein formulated
his theory of relativity people
thought that the universe was
losing energy. They saw energy losses and could not find
them reappearing. They
thought the universe was running  down.
'CONSTANT CHANGE'
Scientists accepted Newton's theory of a universe at
rest without change until Einstein's concept of a universe
of constant change was proven. The energy losses were
tracked down and it was found
that the universe was merely
transforming, not "running
down."
Fuller finds this picture of
a finite, ordered universe indicative of a workable, ordered world.
As a scientist Fuller said he
was very familiar with cases
where the behavior of a system is unpredicted by the behavior of  its  parts.
"The chemistry of a toenail
does not predict the human
being," he said as an example.
Thus, despite the increasingly disorderly actions of the
parts the total is one of order.
'FROM THE MIND'
"Metaphysics     comes    from
the mind. Its concepts are centralized   and   orderly,"   Fuller
said,   "unlike   physics   which
comes  from  the brain and  is
decentralized   and  disorderly."
"In   the  past   the   few  who
used the other three quarters
: of the world, the sea and thus
\ integrated the resources of the
|  world acquired   great   wealth.
The   great   pirates   who   first
circled the globe were limited
only by physical laws."
"Unfortunately     there     are
no designs of these ships left
as they were all destroyed by
the owners."
Fuller described the airplane  as   a technological   ad-
BUCKMINSTER FULLER
. .  . 'like Einstein'
vancement over the ship by
doing more under many more
restrictions.
"How many of you know
how much Totem Park
weighs?" he asked his audience. "People think of ships
and planes in terms of weight
but not unfortunately of buildings."
Giving  Greeks
pick  king, queen
Jim Berry, Beta Theta Pi,
and Lorna Watson, Alpha
Phi, are this year's king and
queen of Mardi Gras.
The couple were crowned at the Mardi Gras week
at UBC.
The hectic activities were
too much for king Berry.
He is now in bed with "fatigue and flu" according to
fraternity brother Ken Irwin.
This is the second year in
a row that an Alpha Phi
girl has been crowned
queen.
Mardi Gras activities raised $15,000 for the Vancouver Association for Retarded Children.
From Page 1
and march organizers occurred
at U Vic.
The rebels, including former
UBC chancellor candidate
Randy Enomoto, demanded a
student sit-in on the legislature
floor.
"There are certain communication channels that established groups like to use to
direct protest so they can preserve their positions," Enomoto
claimed.
"A sit-in would bypass them
and give students an effective
means of showing their determination."
He ran into strong opposition
from Flynn, AMS president at
UBC Peter Braund, and AMS
president of U Vic Stephen
Bigsby.
Flynn conducted a vote on
the question in which one-third
of the students present supported Enomoto's suggestion.
At one point after Peterson's
speech it looked as if the whole
body   would  march  into   the
legislature buildings and burst
into the session in progress.
But the buildings were braced
for assault. Plain clothed
RCMP officers walked the corridors. One side of all double
doors leading to the legislative
chamber was barred and even
an elaborate gate in the main
rotunda was secured.
Students finally headed towards their buses when Braund
told them if they wanted to go
home that night they would
have to move on.
Ad hoc boycott committee
seeks 500-name petition
An ad hoc committee of students Monday circulated a petition on campus to change the strike referendum to a boycott
vote.
Mrs. Barbara Shumiatcher, speaking for the committee,
said her group could not support a strike of the university;
nor could it support the wording of the AMS referendum.
She said the petition, which has been signed by more than
500 students, urges this question: "Are you in favor of a one-
day boycott of classes on Feb. 22, 1967, to indicate student
opposition to any fee increases?"
She said the petition would come before council Feb. 6
for inclusion with second slate elections Feb.  15.
Mrs. Shumiatcher said the committee of 25 students was
formed Saturday. Its members include AMS executives Charlie
Boylan and Carolyn Tate, third-year law student Bob Cruise,
Words co-editor Gabor Mate and special events chairman Brian
Plummer. THtUmSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday,  loc.  24; features,  sports, loc.  23; advertising,  loc.  26.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
JANUARY  31,   1967
Our boy, Les
Education minister Les Peterson sure is a card.
He's useful too — Friday, he showed 1,800 students
the utter futility of trying to reason with a Social
Credit government.
Just think, those 1,800 (150 came from UBC)
thought old Les was not a fatuous and insular man
until he made his patronizing and ill-informed speech
atop the legislative steps.
But Les didn't disappoint us. A week before the
march, he received all the student briefs and made
appointments to see delegations. Somehow, he met the
delegation and talked to them about their briefs, without ever 'reading those submissions.
That didn't stop Les. He stood there like a fine
little man and made policy pronouncements about education. They were not based on information or rational
thought.
He topped it all off by pretending the province isn't
getting nearly as much as the federal government is
kicking back to education next year — and that means
either he and Bennett are liars, or prime minister Pearson and John Macdonald are liars.
Then he had the audacity to suggest marches were
not necessary to catch the collective Socred ear, always
responsive to the will of the people. Funny thing — this
was just after the amassed students learned the whole
fiasco had not moved Les to read our briefs. Marches
are necessary — hell, they're not enough.
But old Les sure is a card, the way he manages
to live on in ignorance and get securely re-elected
every time. Sometimes, though, we wonder who the Socreds do listen to. It's certainly not the people.
What issues?
UBC's student leaders came home all smug and
warm Friday, after a nice unsuccessful march through
the Victoria raindrops. They're convinced they've done
their bit for education and now everybody can sit still
again. It won't wash.
This time money marches are not enough be
cause money is not the central issue; it's merely the
easiest to grasp and the least difficult to attack.
Universal accessibility to higher education is meaningless unless students are worried about the kind of
education UBC provides. Imagine a wildly successful
money march, $66 million fairly evenly divided among
three universities and no fee hike. UBC would remain
an ever-expanding degree mill, punching out graduates5
like plastic cups and stuffing them into the convenient
corporate pigeon holes.
Education is more than a degree attained after
attending the requisite number of lectures and sitting the
prescribed series of mnemenie trials called examinations. Reading a textbook to 600 people.in a monstrous
lecture theatre is not teaching, and one who has become
able to feed back the correct facts when professorial
stimulus is applied has not learned anything.
Nor is this the case in all UBC courses. But all
UBC professors are bound to measure learning progress
in armory-type exams.
All students are confined to narrow studies they
must pursue, stifling the urge to investigate areas just
off the course or to correlate learning among several
disciplines.
Tuum est, sure. But the university as it is erects
barriers to individual creativity, rather than aiding and
abetting scholarship.
All the money marches and fee jazz mean nothing
until academic action parallels them. Student government
still spends all its time worrying about the money, and
never worries about  content.
Small wonder student government is generally considered irrelevant; and even though campaigning for
AMS first slate elections opens this week, nobody but the
usual student government clowns seem very interested.
Candidates for AMS offices should offer concrete
academic programs, and hear student views on the
university itself. To hell with frustrating marches to
Victoria and much sweat about fees — it's time student
government got out of that bag and opened the other.
These elections could be a good start.
^Air^-^/c
Perhaps instead of a strike we should have a cultural revolution
ON SUNDAY
BY AL BIRNIE
Heads up. Wallace
Canadian politicians, despite themselves, are occasionally guilty of uttering undeniable truths.
An excellent example of
this occurred Sunday as the
Conservative financial expert,
Senator Wallace McCutcheon,
was interviewed by a CBC
'Sunday' gremlin on Walter
Gordon's economic thought.
Gordon feels that Canada's
people would be better off,
and more grateful to the Liberal party, if the industries
operating among us were
owned by Canadians rather
than Americans.
McCutcheon was asked to
comment on a statement by
former American secretary of
state John Foster Dulles:
"there are two ways to control a country — to occupy
it militarily, or to take control of its economy."
Said Sen. McCutcheon:
"JFD was a very wise man,
and I would agree with the
first part of his statement,
but concerning the second,
such control of the economy
can only come if the government of the country is corrupt and supine and the
people are lazy and not concerned with how their government operates."
You hit the nail on the
head, Senator.
I would like to carry this
statement one step further.
If these powers control the
country toy military force,
they very likely do not have
the support of the populace.
But if these powers control
the economy as well as the
political and social organizations of a country they completely control the people, for
where will the people find
the resources to secure freedom, and how are they going
to organize their struggle?
Let me disgress for a moment. Say you have signed
a  contract which  binds you
to make payments over several years for a new car.
On your first time out, a
rock shot out by a passing
vehicle puts a hole through
your door. You are angry, because your old reliable car
would shrug off such attacks
with hardly a dint.
Your dealer only sells the
cars, he doesn't know why
the doors are so thin.
The engineers at the factory design such thin doors
because top management has
told them to.
Top management says they
are hired to maximize profits,
and are cutting corners
wherever they can, and built-
in obsolescence increases
turnover and helps profits.
You, who own three shares
stock in that company, hire
the management. It is you
who are responsible for creating such thin doors, yet
you can't tell them to stop
making thin doors.
Meanwhile, back in Ottawa politicians argue as to
"Whether Canadian or American names should sit on the
board of directors of said
corporations.
Meanwhile, in Victoria,
middle-class university students, directed by police,
march to protest the fact
their parents are not directing enough money into training  them   to   be   corporation
-^-^^^-^^_-^-^^§_$
EDITOR: John Kelsey
News - -   .      _       Carol Wilson
City _ -   . .       Danny Stoffman
Photo   ...      Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    .     Claudia Gwinn
Focus    .     —T Kris Emmott
Sports        Sue Gransby
Ass't News Al Birnl*
Ass't City     Tom Morris
CUP Bert Hill
technicians, because it now
tckes five years of expensive
schooling to train corporation technicians to the level
of affluence that their parents have.
Meanwhile, a 21-year-old
boy named Stephen Truscott
has been ?n jail for 7 years
because be allegedly offended people's morals and ethics
by raping .and killing a 14-
year-old girl.
Meanwhile, at UBC's moot
court, Supreme Court Justice
J. A. Macdonald decides that
for one company to electronically bug another to obtain
valuable information "offends
the morals and ethics of most
people . . . but I am unable
to find . . . (the company) . . .
has been guilty of conduct
unlawful under our civil
law."
In North America there
lies a country in which the
government is corrupt and
supine, in which leaders of
government mouth nationalistic slogans which cloud
what is actually happening in
their  country.
In this country people are
lazy and not concerned with
how their government operates, because they cannot see
past the point of how their
government affects the price
of their tomatoes, which have
been planted, grown, and
eaten without ever having
felt fresh air or seen sunlight.
Win some, lose some, tie some,
cheat some — Mike Jessen, Jim
Maddin, Ross Evans, Pio Uran,
and Tony Hodge coolly watched
sports. Fotogs Kurt Hilger, Al
Harvey, Derrek Webb, and Don
Kydd went to the pep meet which
wasn't on because it was Thursday. But they went anyway. They
are stupid," said the charming but
uniquely  putrid  Wang  Ming.
Helen Manning, Margaret Lad-
bury, Manager Murray, Val Zuker,
Peter Shapiro, Bo Hansen, Val
Thom, Charlotte Haire, the correspondent, the mildly perverse
Irving Fetish, and Don Stanley
with analytical fervor strove for
truth.
Staff meeting Wednesday noon,
not today. Tuesday,  January 31,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
ANALYSIS
BY KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Bert's brief blasted
Bert MacKinnon's statement on student action (he's
against it) isn't pure crap.
That's the pity of it. If it
were really crap, he wouldn't
believe in it, as he so obviously does.
That statement, of course,
is not the opinion of the 1967
grad class. It is the opinion of
Bert  MacKinnon.
All of the undergrad society presidents voted for the
b o yc o 11 referendum, except
one who didn't agree with the
wording of an amendment.
Almost all of these presidents are grad class members.
MacKinnon obviously can't
speak for them.
Still, MacKinnon's manifesto
is a worthless argument even
from one person. His ideas
aren't worthless, but his
method of putting them is.
MacKinnon's analysis of "radical ideas" is supported by
many UBC students and he has
the right to state it. He should
not, however, use such vacuous arguments.
The strike idea is "irresponsible". This is a meaningless
word. Criticizing anything is
irresponsible to those who resent criticism.
Patrick Henry was irresponsible. Say what you mean,
Bert. When you say "irresponsible", you are trying to say
:*the general community will
disapprove" or maybe "it is
childish" or even "nothing will
come of it".
Well, it's not childish. Labor officials have ibeen having
strikes for a century.
Will nothing come of it?
Maybe not. Maybe the government will still raise fees
again next year.
Now then, will the community disapprove? This is irrelevant. It is the provincial
government whom we wish to
impress. If it takes something
stronger than briefs, what
shall we do? A strike has been
suggested. Vote it down if you
like, but you must suggest
something else.
"The supporters of the pro
posed march and strike . . . ''
Not everyone supports both.
Many support one and are violently opposed  to  the  other.
"... if they propose a
course of action, it must be
well-thought out and purposeful ..." And so it is. What
purposeful course of action has
MacKinnon  supported?
"Change for cha n g e' s
sake ..." A strike may not
even change anything, it may
only serve as the start of a
student movement to direct
the course of their own university, but if it does change government policy, is this not
"constructive"? Is it "change
for  change's sake"?
"... radical element  on
campus who demand much and
offer little . . . offer no constructive suggestions to the
Senate and Board of Governors as to how the university
could be served ..." This is
nonsense.
They offer plenty of suggestions, and have for years. You
dare not speak for these
people, MacKinnon, since you
have never listened to them.
Those who propose a strike
do not agree with this analysis. Students who do may vote
against a strike, but let them
beware of 'being swayed by
violent opinions of one man
who offers no alternatives himself.
U.B.C. MUSICAL SOCIETY
PRESENTS
How To Succeed
In Business
Without Really Trying
Feb. 6-11 - 8:30
Tickets $1.50, $240, $2.50
Call 228-3176
j
Special Student- Previews
Feb. 6 ft 7 -. 8:30 - 75c
Feb. 9-12:30-75c
Hutwrman
Educational
Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
University Subject*
Morris Huberman,
Educational Consultant
Knowledge Mid Succesa
through Learning Power
215« W. 12Hi Avt., Vancouver
For Appointment, Phono
732-5535       263-4808
WHEN THE NIGHT BEGINS
AND THE VANCOUVER LIGHTS
SHINE
ITALIAN   PARADISE  SWINGS.
Take an Angel to
the Paradise
Enjoy the best Italian Dish
Open   every   night   except   Sunday
5:00 p.m. — 2:00 a.m.
LIVE BAND
NO COVER CHARGE
SPECIAL
U.B.C.  STUDENT DISCOUNT
10% to  15% on weekdays
ITALIAN PARADISE
CABARET
1047 Granville      685-9412
*••*:
.-—? **_*»•
What it means to work where things are happening
It's having ability—and using it. It's a feeling of personal pride. It's doing something
really meaningful. It's challenging and
changing the world. It's living. And doing.
And professional growth. It's excitement.
It's nowT
What's happening at IBM?
Just about everything under the sun—and
beyond. Twenty years ago, the electronic
computer was just getting off the ground.
In this short time, it has come to be called
the most beneficial invention in history.
The pace of new applications is literally
fantastic. Business, goverment, law education, medicine, science and the humanities. All are affected by IBM's information
and control systems. Positively affected.
Chances are there's a place for you in the
growing world of information and control
applications.
Whatever your educational background,
whatever your discipline, you could be a
part of what's happening at IBM.
Make it a point to investigate the advantages of this growth company with the
IBM representative who will be visiting
the campus February 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10.
Your Placement Officer can arrange an
appointment for you. If you cannot attend
the interviews, please write or visit the
IBM office in Vancouver at 1445 West
Georgia Street.
IBM
Internationa. Business Machines Company Limited Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 31,  1967
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
The election of the Executive of the Students' Council 1967-68 will be held as follows:
First Slate: for President, Secretary, Second Vice-
President. Nominations open January 25 and
continue to February 2, 1967. Election will be
held on February 8, 1967.
Second Slate: for First Vice-President, Treasurer, Coordinator. Nominations open February 1 and
continue to February 9, 1967. Election will be
held on February 15, 1967.
PLAY
BY
Samuel Beckett
AUTHOR OF
WAITING   FOR   GODOT
Directed by Judi Freiman
Thur. 12:30 Fri.
Feb. 2 25c Feb. 3
FREDERIC   WOOD   THEATRE
PLAY
BY
Samuel Beckett
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
where the fun is
^ all year round
The Harrison Hotel
GALA WEEKENDS
ONLY ?35 per person complete*
Calypso Carnival - February 3-5
Holiday in Venice - March 10-12
*Double occupancy; includes accommodation
Friday and Saturday night, five gourmet meals,
welcome party, taxes.
HONEYMOONS
it
&
The Harrison's the perfect spot for being as
quiet as you like or as gay as you feel.
Luxurious resort atmosphere, dancing
nightly in the elegant Copper Room. Special
3-day honeymoon holiday only $85 per
couple off-season (Sept. 11 to May 11).
Send for "Honeymoon" folder.
/■
rH
MID-WEEK
SPECIAL
HOLIDAY
i Monday night - Thursday noon
ONLY $38 per person, double occupancy
Includes: 3 nights' room, 5 delicious meals,
dancing and entertainment nightly, swimming in 3 heated pools, a health treatment,
18 holes of golf or a curling lesson.
MAIL COUPON NOW
The Manager,
THE HARRISON Hotel
Harrison Hot Springs, B.C.
Please send the following folders:
□ HONEYMOON   □ MIDWEEK HOLIDAY
□ RATES & ACTIVITIES   Q WEEKENDS
NAME	
ADDRESS	
CITY_
UBC fleet-footed
UBC athletes' gave a good account of themselves at the
indoor-outdoor track and field meet Saturday.
In the men's 660 yards Barry Cunningham and Don Bertoia
held Ron Haddad of UBC to a third place while in the women's
660 yards Joanne Hetherington came second to R. Hoist of VOC.
In the men's shot put Ron Parker won an easy first with a
put of 46 feet 3% inches. Leona Sparrow won the women's shot
put at 39 feet 5 inches.
Sam Vandermeulem and Parker placed first and second
in the men's high jump with jumps of 6 feet. Vandermeulen
edged Parker on attempts succeeded. Pat Pinsent, at 4 feet 8
inches, was beaten by Langley's Maxine Harris, at 5 feet, in the
women's high jump.
Parker, with 19 feet 4V& inches, and Ray Stevenson,
with 19 feet 3% inches, rated first and second in the men's
long jump.
The men's 60 yard dash meant a one-two-three finish for
UBC with Chip Barrett finishing in 6.7 seconds and Bob Browns-
word and Bob Morgan in 6.9 seconds.
UBC won tooth the men's and the women's Zehnerlaufs.
The men ran just over 4 miles in their 15 minutes while the
women ended their 10 minutes with just over IVt miles.
Hindmarch holding hopes
within a brittle bubble
That familiar tune hummed across the wire from Saskatoon Saturday night — the Birds had lost another double-
header.
The TJ of S Huskies stung the squad 2-1 in Friday's game
and 4-3 on Saturday. The weekend action left the Huskies
in second place, two points behind the Alberta Golden Bears.
The Thunderbirds, skating on thin ice, deadlocked in
last place with the TJ of A at Calgary. Birds are winless.
On Friday evening, Glen Richards gave the squad an
early lead, bagging a goal at the 3:46 mark, but the Huskies
bounced back in the second frame, Wally Kozak and Wilf
Chiasson each scoring one to clinch the win.
The Birds pulled their goalie in the last minute of play
in a desperate effort ta tie it up, but were foiled on several
opportunities.
In Saturday's game, the Birds staged a. comeback in
the third period, Kevin McGladery and Al McClean scoring
to narrow Huskies' lead to 4-3. Once again Russ Kirk was
pulled in favor of a sixth attacker, and once again they were
robbed of a tie.
In the final seconds, Tom Koretchuk netted UBC's
othel- goal, and Chiasson, Hill, Riel, and Kellough each
dented the twine once for TJ of S.
Coach Hindmarch, in his imperishable optimism, related
that the team outplayed the Huskies in both matches, but
failure to capitalize on clear-cut scoring chances spelled
defeat.
UBC plays host to Calgary this weekend. Game times
are 8:30 p.m. on Friday, and 2:30 p.m. Saturday afternoon.
The coach's outlook? 'We'll bring back a gold medal
from Quebec." That, sportsfans, is optimism.
AMASSED MOVEMENT
OTTAWA (CUP) — The undefeated teams now number two
in college hockey and basketball.
The latest giant to fall is Canada's top-rated basketball
team, Windsor Lancers, who were upset 117-115, in overtime
by eighth-ranked Toronto.
Windsor's demise leaves basketball's unranked Dalhousie
Tigers and hockey's Sir George Williams Georgians as the only
undefeated college teams.
Sir George ran their unbeaten string to 13 games Friday
by trouncing Bishop's 9-3 in Montreal. Once beaten St. Mary's
trounced winless Mount Allison 74-55 Saturday.
In Ottawa-St. Lawrence basketball, the unranked Bishop's
Gaiters jumped six points ahead of second place Carleton by
winning a mid-week game against Sherbrooke, and then saw
the margin hold up as Carleton lost 72-71 to Loyola, and 88-75
to Macdonald College. The losses snapped the tenth-ranked
Raven's winning streak at six games and dropped them into a
second place tie with Ottawa, who defeated Royal Military
College 76-69.
Acadia's surprisingly fourth-ranked Axemen won their
second game of the season Friday, 51-45 over Mount Allison.
In hockey, top-rated Toronto remained four points ahead
of Waterloo in the OQAA at the weekend by defeating Montreal
11-2, and Queen's 4-3.
Waterloo kept pace with the Blues during the week by
defeating Guelph 6-3 Wednesday and third place, fourth-ranked
Western Ontario 7-6.
The defending western champions, Alberta Golden Bears
maintained their slim league lead by beating winless Calgary
5-2 and 4-1 in Edmonton. The games assured the Golden Bear's
participation in the Quebec Winter Games.
Seventh-ranked Saskatchewan stayed within two points
of the second-ranked Bears by taking two games from B.C.,
2-1 and 4-3.
Fifth-ranked St. Frances Xavier defeated the Acadia Axemen 6-3 in Wolfville, Saturday. Tuesday, January 31,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
— powell hargrave photo
HIGH  SCORING   Neil  Murray   leads  the
Birds to a double victory over Saskatchewan  Huskies. Aided  here by Ian  Dixon,
Murray nimbly dodges 6'8" Bill  Harris.
Dazzling display
Selected members of the UBC Thunderbird swim team shone in Seattle's Pacific
Northwest Association Swim Meet last weekend.
Teams competing came from Washington
and Oregon as well as from B.C.
The meet was not one where team scores
are important but rather was a test of individual performances. UBC's results:
firsts      Bill Gillespie  100 yd. backstroke
seconds Jim [Maddin    200 yd. backstroke
thirds    Jim Maddin    100 yd. backstroke
fourths Bill Gillespie 100 yd. freestyle
Phil Winch 100 yd. breaststroke
fifths Phil Winch 200 yd. breaststroke
sixths    Gary Baker     200 yd. backstroke
With a trophy for each finalist the Birds
brought back a lot of silverware.
Bill Storey and divers Don Panton and
Norm Deeleenheer showed very well.
The medlay relay team of Gillespie,
Winch, Maddin and McLaren placed fifth
in a very fast final.
INTRAMURAL SKIING M0
Information for those competing in the
intramural ski meet to be held at Mt. Seymour, Sunday, Feb. 5.
The racing starts at 11:30 a.m. at the
bottom of Unicorn. Racers must register on
the hill by 11:00 a.m.
Faculties, frats, clubs' and individuals
may register preferably before 11:00 a.m.
There is registration at the intramural office.
An organization may enter any number of
competitors.
Only the four fastest times will be recorded for any organization.
Hoopsters
handle
Huskies
By MIKE JESSEN
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds played, as forward Bob Molinski put it, "two easy
games" on the weekend against the University of Saskatchewan Huskies.
They beat the Huskies 92-63 on Friday
and 104-60 on Saturday.
In the first game UBC let the opposition
take a very early 5-3 lead and then took
command. But by half-time they led the
plodding Huskies 43-20. The Birds' coach
Peter Mullins said that the Huskies had
some good shooters but that they were having a bad night.
Top scorers were Neil Murray with 23
points and Dave Rice and Ken Kern with
12 each. Bill Harris and Ralph Schoenfeld
topped the Huskies with 13 each.
On Saturday night the Birds reached the
100 point mark for the first time this season.
Mullins said the team played its best basketball this year in the first half. In the last
four minutes of that period they outscored
the Huskies 24-2.
The second string played over half of the
second period.
Ian Dixon led the Birds with 21 points.
Murray scored 20 and Phil Langley 16.
Harris was the best of the Huskies with 18
points.
The hustling Birds are alone in second
place in the WCIAA standings and are only
two points behind Calgary, the conference
leader.
30 for JVs
The UBC basketball JV's won their 30th
game in a row over Jr. Men's competition on
Thursday, 71-60.
It was the first of the best of three semifinals against YMCA.
Derek Sankey topped the JV's with 24
points. Sam Vandermeulen and Rick Inrig
scored ten apiece. Next game in the series
goes at John Oliver gym.this Thursday.
The JV's lost an excellently played game
to the Simon Fraser Varsity hoopsters on
Friday, 63-56.
They emerged from the first half with a
37-27 lead over their older and taller opponents, but SFA took over in the second.
With one minute left in the game the
JV's were behind 60-56 when John Drew
sank three straight foul shots to put the game
on ice. Inrig was the best of the UBC scorers
with 22 points. Sankey had 13 and Gordy
Hogg, who played a great game, 12 points.
Drew had 18 for SFA.
///
Hi
Seattle squashers
Seattle Pacific College came out the top
dog at the four-way wrestling tourney hosted
by UBC Saturday.
The Seattle team defeated Alberta 30-10,
UBC 31-13, and Pacific University 32-8.
TJBC, hindered by injuries, was unable
to dress a full team. The Birds therefore
had to give up 15 points to each opponent.
UBC lost to Alberta 38-8 and to Pacific U.
23-20.
Winners for UBC were Wayne Cave,
Dennis Boulton and Ron Turner each with
one win and two losses, Dirk Heiss with two
wins and one loss, and heavyweight Chris
Nemeth with three wins.
Nemeth, at 205 lbs., downed Alberta's
Chuck Alson 4-1. Olson stands at 6'5" and
weighs-in at 282 lbs.
The Thunderbirds suffered further injuries
during the tournament to Jim Fornelli and
Greg Greiner.
THE 1967 GRAD CLASS
PRESENTS
'A LANDLOCKED BOOZE CRUISE'
JOHANN STRAUSS CABARET
Feb.  15,  1967
TICKETS $1.50 CPL. ALUMNAE OFFICE
CONFEDERATION  LIFE ASSOCIATION
SALES    -    SALES     MANAGEMENT
Does your future lie in sales work? Perhaps you haven't
considered it. We would welcome the opportunity to discuss with
you   a   career   with   Confederation   Life   Association.
Wo offer sales work leading to management or the establishment of a professional career in Estate Planning and other areas
of  advanced   Life   Underwriting.
Continuous on-the-job training is a feature of our development
program. Careful selection and excellent salary arrangement will
enable   you   to   embark   on   a   challenging  and   exciting   career.
We will be interviewing on campus February 7, 8 and 9.
Do come and see us and let us show you the actual steps to a
career   in   Professional   Wales   or   Sales   Management.
mil-not
drink for
mrs-lf?
MARTIN  N.  HEAFER
Christian Science Lecturer
The ability to think for yourself, and to think correctly when making
decisions  determines  your  future.
Come to this lecture that will examine the true nature of thinking and its
spiritual  basis.
It will be given by MARTIN N. HEAFER, C.S. of HOUSTON TEXAS, an
experienced practitioner of CHRISTIAN SCIENCE healing . . . and a
member of THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE BOARD OF LECTURESHIP.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1
12:30
BUCHANAN 203
Sponsored  by
Christian Science Organization
SPECIAL I   I EVENTS
presents
JOHN HARRIS
John Harris, a former SNCC worker and now organizer for the Progressive Labor Party in Watts, Los
Angeles, was arrested on charges
of Criminal Syndicalism on September 20th.
SPEAKING  ON   THE
WATTS
REBELLION
Uncle Sam wants YOU
— nigger
Become a member of the world's highest paid black mercenary army!
Fight for Freedom . . . (in Viet Nam)
(Die Nigger Die—you can't die fast enough in the ghettos.)
Support White Power—travel to Viet Nam, you might get
a medal! '
Receive valuable training in the skills of killing off other
oppressed people!
So run to your nearest recruiting chamber!
TODAY - JAN. 31
AUDITORIUM-12:30-
35c Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 31,   1967
7WEEN CLASSES
Watts riots discussed
SPECIAL EVENTS
Former SNCC worker John
Harris speaks on the Watts rebellion,   today,   noon, auditorium.  Admission  35  cents.
ECONOMICS  SOC
Meeting  today,   noon,   Ang.
213 to discuss this term's speakers and social events.
SCM
Jack   Shaver   discusses   the
Death of God thology, today,
noon, Bu. 2206.
UN CLUB
Film  Bethune will be presented  today,  noon,  Bu.   100.
Non-member    admission    ten
cents.
KOERNER LECTURER
Professor   R.   T.   McKenzie
discusses British Political Parties Reconsidered, today, noon,
Bu. 106.
EL CIRCULO
H.   Oostendorp presents Es-
Reds pelt
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Thousands of rebellious bald
red 'blorgs overran the legislative buildings in this island
capital Monday, pelting the
leader of the grey dwarf blorg
faction to death with flowers.
A spokesman for the bald
red blorgs said the action was
a protest against the cancellation, due to political unrest, of
the annual tulip and cabbage
festival.
pana en busca de si misma, tonight, 8:30, Bu. penthouse.
SEAFORTHS
Parade   tonight,   8   p.m.  at
seaforth   armory.    Dress   and
bush.
HENRI'S CAMPAIGN
Expanded Henri's Own Chi-
coutimi Kazoo Band practices
tonight, 6:30, Robson 325.
CONTEMPORARY
ARTS  FESTIVAL
Wednesday's events:
— Poet Leonard Cohen
reads his own work, noon, Ed.
100. Admission 35 cents.
— Michael Morris conducts
a tour of the fine arts gallery,
noon.
— Experimental films by Al
Sens, Sam Perry and Dan
Singer, 3:30 p.m., Ang. 104.
Admission 35 cents.
— Poet Margaret Atwood
reads her own work, 3:30 p.m.
Bu. 100.
BRIDGE CHESS CLUB
Meeting   Wednesday,    7:30,
Brock lounge.
PRE  LIBRARIANSHIP
Meeting with surprise speaker    Wednesday,    noon,    Bu.
225.
ARCHITECTS US
Automobile  films  The   Rise
and  Rally  de   Neige  will  be
shown Wednesday, noon, Lass.
102.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Martin H e a f e r discusses
Why Not Think for Yourself,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 203.
C.LM E-RAJHIA
sweeps YOU into
a drama of speed and spectacle!
A JOHN FRANKENHEIMER FILM
Grand/Prix
STARRING
:UU-ffifr
Orner SOSt Mm™ Wkm
Mmm Wtom Ji\BT<»   irvlftiv
A DOUGLAS - LEWIS PRODUCTION. screen story and screenplay by ROBERT ALAN AURTHUR
directed by JOHN FRANKENHEIMER. produced by EDWARD LEWIS ■ music by MAURICE JARRE
IN SUPER PANAVISIONANO METROCOLOR 	
MGM
Starts
Wednesday Evening
Feb. 1st, 8:00 p.m.
CAPITOL
THEATRE
820 Granville St.
Schedule of
Reserved  Seat Performance-  and
Prices
EVES.  8:00 p.m.         Orch. Loge.
SUN.  thru  THURS.     $2.00 $2.50
FRI.,   SAT.,   HOLS.      $2.50 $3.00
MATINEES  2:00  P.M.
WEDNESDAY                $1.50 $2.00
SATURDAY                     $1.75 $2.25
SUN.   &   HOLS.           $2.00 $2.50
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Professor   Willmott   lectures
on From Dienbien Phu to Ngo
Dinh Diem, Wednesday, noon,
Bu. 100.
WWC
The Weight Watchets club
for those who want to lose
weight. Organizational meeting Thursday, noon, Ang. 214.
GRAD THEATRE
Play toy Samuel Beckett will
be presented Thursday and
Friday, noon, Freddy Wood.
Admission 25 cents.
METROPOLIS (UNS) —
Further sightings of a mysterious flying red, yellow and blue
object have been reported here
recently. Officials said the object appeared to be magnetic.
STAR CITY (UNS) — Civic
officials in this chief city of
the fertile Carrot River Valley
fear a recent power failure will
mean a reduction in the potential record banana harvest.
^
68 OLYMPICS?'
We  have  the  information
including schedule o-
$j£&$.events.   Register   now  tc
**&£?avoid disappointment.
Open 9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday
Hagen'i Travel Service ltd.
HAGEN'S
73*S___JL___
am
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
TAKEN! CHEM 311 NOTES FROM
Mall bench, Tues., noon, ph. 732-
5444.  Reward!
HORNY? THEY'RE MINE. TWO
devils hats lost at Mardi Gras.
Friday   night.    Phone   FA   1-6366.
LOST: EARRING, PLOWER-SHAP-
ed. For pierced ears, near Brock
Library or Grad Centre. Reward.
224-34S6.
LOST: ENGLISH 393 NOTEBOOK,
Buchanan, Monday. Important.
Finder   Please   Phone   731-3074.
LADIES WATCH FOUND JAN. 20
in Buchanan Building — claim at
Dean  Gage's Office,   Bu.  207.    „
LOST: GIRL'S NAVY BLUE JAC-
ket - type cardigan with collar.
Phone  325-8648.
CHEMISTRY SHOT WITHOUT
Black Book left in front Aggie
Building. Last Week. Reward.
Mike   736-4081.	
TAKEN BY MISTAKE AT MARDI
Gras Sat. night. Girls navy blue
coat with white fur trim. Return
of this coat would be greatly appreciated. Phone Ann 224-6887
after  5:00.
LOST LEATHER ZIPPER CASE
Friday. Essential papers. Phone
Rick   926-3850.
Coming Dances
12A
ARTS MEETS SCIENCE MIXER.
Tues., Jan. 31. Brock Lounge at
noon. Guys 25c. Gals 10c.
4%!
hours of continuous big-beat entertainment this Sat. nite at CAM-
P U S A GO-GO - REVISITED.
Three — That's right—three great
bands:
THE SHANTELLES!
THE   SHOCKERS!  and
THE   PAINTED   SHIP!
And  please  note:   Each  band will
be playing in half-hour segments.
That   means    if    you    attend   the
dance for only 1%  hours anytime
between   8:30-1:00   A.M.,   you   will
be  able  to   see,   hear,   and  dance
to   all   three    groups.   Remember,
this Sat.  nite in  the Armouries—
entertainment value at its best!
SEMI - FORMAL BLUE CHIPS
Commerce Dance at Commodore
Feb 3 8:30 p.m.	
BRAVE
NEW
WORLD
MIXER
Tuesday
12:30
in
Brock
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.	
GEOLOGY MUSEUM OPEN MON.-
Frl. 12:30-1:30 F.&G. 116 — come
and see our minerals and fossils.
ALL ARTSMEN — ENTER THE
Arts Poetry Contest now. Cash
prizes. Deadline Feb. 24. For further information contact Arts
Office  Brock  359.
HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS
Without Really Trying. Student
Performances Feb. 6th, 7th, 8:30,
9th,  12:30. 75c.	
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's —
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.76.
SCIENTIFIC TRANSLATIONS Russian, German. Bernard Portier,
Department of Metallurgy 228-
2676.
GIRLS: ESCORTS UNLIMITED
can provide you with an escort
for any occasion . . . Reasonable
rates. All inquiries handled personally and confidentially. Reply
1157   Steveston   Highway.
Transportation
14
RIDE FOR 2 NEEDED FROM
2nd Ave. and Arbutus. MWF 8:30
TTHS'9:30.   Phone   733-3898   Eves.
RIDE NEEDED FROM BROAD-
way at Boundary. M,W,&F at 8:00
a.m.  Please phone  224-6850.
Wanted
15
WANTED:   ROLL   BAR  FOR   TR-4
Call  Bob  at 228-8343.       	
WANTED: "RADIO AND WIRE-
less 30" Vocational Correspondence   course   call   435-5767.
Travel Opportunities
16
ONE AMS RETURN CHARTER
ticket from London, $195.00. Phone
321-9775  after  10 p.m.
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE AC-
commod. for tour in Russia.
Phone   Don  at   228-8825.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
USED   CAR   VALUES
'59   Hillman   Sedan  —  $350.00.
'57    Chev.    Sedan    Automatic
$550.00.
■61  Lark  2-door — $550.00.
Hammond's Garage
Seymour  &   Pacific
MU 3-8451
DATSUN    DEALER
1954 OLDS' GOOD CONDITION.
Deluxe radio. Excellent motor
$150.00 or best offer. Phone Ross
224-9846.
1955 CHEV. BEL AIRE 4 DOOR
Sedan. Automatic — R & H, 4
new tires. Excellent mechanical
condition.   Phone  261-9023.
1963 BMW SPORTS COUPE AND
1961 Valiant with floor shift. Call
321-9393.
SACRIFICE '58 PONTIAC SEDAN.
6 cyl. auto. $400. New tires
(w.w.s) radio, etc. Excellent
shape.   Mike.   731-6295.	
'52 DESOTO—352 HEMI. P. STEER-
ing and brakes. New transmission. Phone 433-6370—Bruce after
6 p.m. 	
VAUXHALL CRESTA '62 std. trans.
31,000 miles, snow tires. $950.00 or
best   offer.   FA   5-3035.
Automobile Parts
21A
'61 FIAT SPYDER PARTS. NEW
top, clutch, tires trans., body
parts.   CY  9-4874.
Bodywork, Glass
23
GLASS FILLING AND BODY
work at Commerce Blue Chips
dance Feb.  3.  Commodore.  8:30.
Automobiles Wanted
25
WANTED SPORTS CAR IN GOOD
running order. Reasonably priced.
Phone 581-7525 Evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. — "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.	
ARTS CHALLENGES AGGIES EN-
gineers and Foresters to a Tug-
of-War. At noon Feb. 1st on Li-
brary  lawn.	
IF YOU DON'T LIKE BLEEDING
ears, hire the Jabberwok. They
play vaudeville, too. Phone John,
CA  4-9073 or  Lindy,   CA  4-4555.
FACTORY TRAINED VOLKS-
wagen mechanics. For the ultimate in tune-ups and repairs see
us soon. Auto Henneken. 263-8121.
Oak  &   Marine  Dr.
8:30 P.M. — B.Y.O.B. — 1:00 A.M.
BLUE CHIPS. Commerce Dance
at  Commodore Feb.   3.
Sewing & Alterations
40
CLOTHES ALTERATION — NEW
— old — repairs — reasonable
charge. Phone 224 - 7141 afternoons.
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST, ACCURATE EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4530
FAST EXPERIENCED TYPIST IN
Acadia Camp. Phone 224-1441
Special student rates.
ELECTRIC TYPING, THESIS AND
essay. Call Joan 228-8384.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640.
EXPERT    TYPING
876-5959.
MY   HOME.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Music
63
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
SKIS: KNEISSL COMBI.W, POLES
and BOOTS. (10), all used one
season.   228-8652   (evenings).
GUITAR AND AMP. FOR SALE.
$75.00. Call 224-9068. Ask for John
in  Room   No.   10.
METAL SKIS COMPLETE WITH
Harness. 215 cm., Remington Electric   Shaver.   Phone   685-2170.
RENTALS  8c  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room 8c Board
62
TRAFFIC PROBLEMS? MOVE ON
campus and forget them! Room
and board Feb. 1. 2280 Wesbrook
224-9986.
ROOM, BREAKFAST, DINNER
for Female student, $70, with congenial   family.   Phone   224-6035.
EXCELLENT VIEW, GOOD FOOD,
and enjoyable atmosphere at the
Delta Upsilon Frat. House. Call
Ron   or   Scott   at   224-9841.
FOR CONVENIENCE, COMFORT,
and congeniality, stay at Zeta PSI
Fraternity, 2250 Wesbrook Cres.
Phone 224-9662 between 5:00 p.m.
and  7:00 p.m.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
GIRL WANTS QUIET ROOMMATE
to share basement house — keeping rooms. Corner Broadway and
Alma.   224-6864.
Real Estate
86
HOUSE FOR SALE NEAR UBC
gates; large modernized kitchen
& bathroom; double lot; revenue
from basement suites pays completely for all expenses; opportunity for married students to
live free. Down payment $3500
minimum.   No   agents.   224-6857.

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