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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 25, 1990

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Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, September 25,1990
Vol 73, No 7
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"We have spent too many nights at home
scared to go out and angry about our fear,     -j
On this night we unite to take back our :
space—to express our rage at our imprison- -.7
ment and fear and danger and pain. On this   |*|'
night we unite to walk in the street free of |
fear, free of harassment and attack, and !
free of male'protection'." j
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-Women of the 10th annual Vancouver Take Back the Night Classifieds 228-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holders ■ 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines 60 cents, commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional
lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on 25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4:00 p.m.,
two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7, 228-3977.
r
05 - COMING EVENTS
ECUMENICAL EUCHARIST 27th
September. "Movements Towards Unity:
Anglican and Lutheran Relations". All
welcome to this UBC Anglican community
event at 12:30 p.m. Bring bag lunch to
Lutheran Campus Centre.
10 - FOR SALE -
 COMMERCIAL	
WARNING
Calling this number could help you lose
10-29 lbs. per month. Diet Disc Program
as seen on TV. 299-2190 UBC.
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
1981 SUZUKI GS400T Motorbike for sale.
16,000 km, very good shape, new rear tire
6 battery. Asking $650 or best offer.
Contact Al at 873-0958.
1977 AUDI FOX, $500.00. Must sell. Red
wine colour, sunroof, 93,800 km. Call 251-
1521.
1981 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA, 5 sp.,
sunroof, stereo, $3000 o.b.o. 228-9760.
ELECTRIC PIANO - FENDER RHODES
"SEVENTY-THREE" with Road case. Real
Action - Weighted keys - Excellent Cond.
$500 OBO. Call Dave after 7:00 p.m. at
874-2043.
TWO TICKETS FOR ZZ TOP (REDS).
Taking offers. Oct. 1st. 222-8251.
79 PLYMOUTH HORIZON, 8,000 km on
rebuilt engine, new carb, exhaust, clutch.
$1,000 OBO. 738-7879 after 5.
1975 VW BEETLE, easter egg blue, stereo,
fuel injected, exc. cond. Runs well, $2,049.
Leave msg. 731-8147.
DOUBLE FUTON & FRAME $90; also
single futon frame $70. Andrea.  734-
0912.
RX7 TURBO MAG WHEELS
4-16x7 wheels, retail $2,200; near new
condition; $800. Ph. 736-1603.
20 - HOUSING
SHARED HOUSE $240/mo. Nice clean
room on upper floor. Own bath, laundry,
cable. For N/S, 41st/Oak in Kerrisdale.
261-6944. Tom.
BERTHA'S SMALL MOVES. Sml. 1
bdrms, bach. & studio. Graham 733-0427.
Between
TUESDAY, SEPT. 25
World University Service of Canada.
Presentation by UBC students who
went to Morocco for the 1990 seminar. 12:30pm, Buch A204.
United Church Campus Ministry.
Informal worship & communion
service. All welcome. 12:30pm, Lutheran Campus Centre.
Drug & Alcohol Awareness Cmte.
(DRAAC). Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Program: Rob Dunfield will
discuss his accident & how life has
changed. 12:30pm, Conversation
Pit, SUB.
Jewish Students' Assoc/Hillel.
Famous Hot Lunch. 12:30, Hillel
House.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 26
Japanese Legal Studies, Faculty
of Law. Lecture: "Abortion and the
Law in Japan". Speaker: Prof.
Kinjo. 2:30pm, Law 176.
UBC Student Counselling & Resources Centre. Film - "Everything
to Live For"(suicide). 12:30pm,
Brock 200.
Lay Catholics. Video presentation
on the apparitions of the Blessed
Virgin Mary at Fatima, Portugal
in 1917. 7pm, SUB 205.
25 - INSTRUCTION
ENGLISH CONVERSATION SERVICES. Small group or private lessons.
A. Bissett 736-2360.
70 - SERVICES
GAME PLAN. Your complete guide to
hockey pool tactics. How to deal with
pool rules, make lists, compile a draft
strategy, and avoid common mistakes.
Lots of statistics (defencemen, goalies,
team trends). Send $17.95 + $1.00
(postage and handling), certified cheque
or money order to: W.I.N. Enterprises,
#156 - 9632 Cameron Street, Burnaby,
B.C. V3S 7N3
30 - JOBS
WORK STUDY POSITIONS. Social
Psychiatry Research Unit. We need
research assistants on three major
research projects: - The Course of
Schizophrenia. - The Native Indian
School Project - Mental Health Among
Southeast Asian Refugees. Applicants
must be eligible for the work study
program, and be available for 6-10 hours
per week. Wages $10.25 - $11.25 per
hour. Contact Dr. Morton Beiser, 228-
7327.
EXPERIENCED RESEARCH TECHNICIAN immediately required for parttime.
Person should have experience in animal
surgery and basic computer. Time and
hours negotiable. $ good. Call Dr. Tsang
524-9623 betw. 7-10 p.m.
CONTRACT DRIVERS $7/hr. cash & tips
paid nightly. Must have own car. Apply
in person at Domino's Pizza. 5736
University Blvd. or 11700 Cambie Rd.,
Richmond.
P/T SALES
Student required to sell educational
microscopes on commission basis. Ideal
for self starter, medical student, or
marketing. Do you have spare time?
Call Scott Weir, 943-5159.
AVON SALES DEALERS REQUIRED.
Earn money for all those extras!  Work
independently, enjoy flexible hrs. For
information call 582-1507.
BROKE? DONT BE! We have p. time
work available. Ifyou want to be your
own boss make serious money call Mr.
Cameron for an appt. 731-3312.
Drug & Alcohol Awareness Cmte
(DRAAC). P.A.R.T.Y. is a graphic
theatre presentation medical professionals on the aftereffects of an
accident related to drinking.
12:30pm, SUB Aud.
UBC Film Soc. Cinema-16 presents "Entre nous". 7 & 9:30pm,
SUB Theatre.
Jewish Students' Assoc/Hillel.
Torah Study with Rabbi Ronnie
Cahana. 12:30pm, Hillel House.
Varsity Outdoor Club. Gen. mtg.
Slideshow on backcountry skiing,
hiking, rock climbing, mountaineering. All welcome. 12:30pm,
Chem 150.
United Church Campus Ministry.
Start lip dinner & fellowship. Everyone welcome. 5pm, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
Dance Horizons. Stretch &
Strength class taught by Cindy.
12:30pm,SUB Partyrm.
Dance Horizons. Musical Theatre
class taught by Laura. 3:30-5pm,
SUB Partyrm.
Students for Forestry Awareness.
Ben Parfitt of The Vancouver Sun:
The Role of Media in Presenting
Environmental Issues. 12:30pm
McMillan 166.
Campus Pro-Life 1st gen. election
mtg. 12:30pm Buchanan Dl21.
"HAPPY 75" UBC,
and welcome first year students from
"SECONDO", your KITSILANO music
store for all your musical needs:  texts,
sheet music, metronomes, manuscript. We
buy/sell/trade 2nd hand music. "Come for
a browse."
2744 W. 4th Ave. (at MacDonald).
Mon-Fri 10:30 - 6. Sat. 10:30 - 5.
734-2339.
75 - WANTED
ARTIST WANTED PART-TIME, work in
own home. Must be able to do fantasy and
animals from imagination. Contact Frank
or Helen at 322-5137.
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
TYPING TAPE TRANSCRIPTION A
SPECIALTY. Also papers, essays, editing
service as well. Very fast service. 224-
2310.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch? ... have it
done for you - you can even book ahead.
$27/hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal
text per hour, laser printer. SUB lower
level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant;
228-5640.
Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship. Grad student discussion.
5:30pm SUB 211.
EXPERT WORD PROCESSING, desk top,
spread sheets. Exp. with typing papers
and thesis. Call Bev at 590-9390.
WORD-PROCESSING. 2.50/db. sp. page.
Computorsmiths, 3726 W. Broadway at
Alma. New Grammar check. 224-5242.
NEED IT YESTERDAY?
Speedy Dee Typing Services
South Delta, Richmond area.
Call 946-7402.
JB WORD PROCESSING ... 224-2678.
Fast, accurate, reliable, also featuring do-
it-yourself W/P on PCs.
BIND YOUR THESIS
Library quality hard cover books
$15 plus gold stamping,
anything in soft covers $1.99 + up
Call 683-2463 today.
ON CAMPUS 7 AM - 10 PM. Quick,
quality word processing.  English, French,
Spanish tapes, Desktop. 224-3675.
Amnesty Int'l. Annual Gen. Mtg.
12:30. SUB 205.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 27
AMS BUDGET CMTE cancelled.
UBC Student Counselling & Resources Centre. Workshop - Skills
for Academic Success. 12:30pm,
Brock 200.
Pre-Dental Soc. 1st gen. mtg Sept.
27, 12:30pm, Wood G66.
UBC Student Counselling & Re-
: sources Centre. Workshop: Self
Esteem Enhancement.l2:30pm,
Brock 200.
Horticultural Club. 1st mtg of the
new school year. Surprise speaker
with slides. Bring your lunch.
12:30, Plant Science Greenhouse,
West Mall at Stores Rd.
Int'l Student's Program Cmte,
German Club & Berlin Exchange
Students. "German Reunification:
Perspectives" (in English). Speakers, slides, discussion. Bar open.
All welcome. 7pm, Int'l House.
Drug & Alcohol Awareness Cmte.
(DRAAC). Mike Buckingham, will
discuss the effects of drinking &
driving. 12:30pm SUB Aud.
Ambassadors for Jesus.Wkly mtg.
Darwin Dewar on 1:1 evangelism.
12:30pm Scarfe 1024.
Int'l Socialists Club. Mtg topic:
Operation Solidarity '83. 7:30pm
SUB 211.
THE
CAPTAIN
Buys/Sells
Good»Used»Inexpensive
• Antiques   • Electronics
• Furniture   • TV's  • Stereos
• Musical Instruments
(CLOSE TO CAMPUS)
17th & Dunbar    222-2775
mm&*&
A new totally automated 24 hour Video Store
at
4453 West 10th Ave., Vancouver, B.C.
(604) 222-8333
Video Cube offerc
a over 3000 Videos A Nintendo to lelect from
a over 300 tides el INTERNATIONAL
NEWSPAPERS & MAGAZINES for sale.
Rent 2 movies - get 1 FREE with this ad
The #1 Fear
is Public Speaking
Conquer it...
TOASTMASTERS
Annual Open House
Wed., September 26
7:00 — 9:00 pm
SUB Rm 209
Pacific Rim Club General mtg.
12:30, Asian Centre.
AMS Butokukan Karate. Regular
workout. 6:30-8:30pm, SUB Ballrm.
Jewish Students' Assoc/Hillel.
Faculty/Staff Lunch. 12:30pm, Hillel House.
Dance Horizons. Jazz 2 class taught
by Jackie. 5-6:30pmSUB Partyrm.
Dance Horizons. Beginner Jazz
class taught by Val for the enthusiasts. 3:30-5pm SUB Partyrm.
Dance Horizons. Chinese Dancing
class taught by Edna. A new class!
2-3:30pm SUB Partyrm.
Dance Horizons. Jazz 1&2 class
taught by Val, for those with some
dancing background. 12:30-2pm
SUB Partyrm.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 28
Drug & Alcohol Awareness Cmte
(DRAAC). Bzzr Garden with an
emphasis on de-alcoholized and
non-alcoholic products. RCMP,
Univ. Detach, will have a breath -
alizer on hand. 4-7pm SUB 207/
209.
Drug & Alcohol Awareness Cmte
(DRAAC). PA.R.T.Y.: a presentation by health care professionals.
12:30pm. Conversation Pit, SUB.
Rehabilitation Medicine. Dance
featuring Wallstreet Bend. Tickets
$8. 7:30pm-12:30am, SUB Ballrm.
"RAISING
AWARENESS OF
SEXUAL ABUSE:
STRATEGIES FOR
COMMUNITIES
with Meg Hickling, R.N.
Monday, October 1,
12:30 P.M., SUB 215
sponsored by:
United Church
Campus Ministry
information:
224-3722
JEFFS LOWCOST
TYPEWRITERS
ALL TYPEWRITER RENTALS
• Electrics
• Select rics
• Memory
Everyday Low Prices, To:
■ Students ■ Business • Individuals
• Daily • Weekly • Monthly
 We Deliver
298-4600
2201 ROSSER AVENUE, BURNABY
UBC DANCE
HORIZONS
OFFERS
FREE CLASS
with this coupon for
Sept. 24-28/1990
JAZZ, BALLET, Contempory,
Chinese Dance
&More
SUB 208 or
PHONE 222-3567
Pacific Rim Club. Indonesian
Food-Nite.7pm Grace Restaurant,
2141 Kingsway, [RSVP 228-6401
by Sept. 25].
Friends of Trotskyist League of
AMS. Forum: U.S. Out of Persian
Gulf. 7:30pm SUB 211.
Grad Student Society. Eugene
Ripper's Fast Folk Underground
featuring Dead Head Cool. 8pm
No cover charge. Fireside, Grad
Student Centre.
Foreign Service Exam Counselling Inc. 2-day Prep Seminar.
12:30- 6:30pm Angus Room 421.
Dance Horizons. Stretch &
Strength class taught by Cindy.
12:30pm SUB Partyrm.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 29
Open Auditions for lead roles in
Film Department's student films.
10:00am-2 pm Call 228-6154 for
an appointment & info.
I
HOT
FLASHES
Wanted: students to transform
the AMS into a grassroots
organization, or to abolish it and
work towards majority student
representation on the Board of
Governors instead.
Wanted: volunteers to bring
about environmental change
within the AMS. Must be
politcally adept. Please contact
John Lipscomb, SUB 258, 228-
3973, or home 222-4476.
2/THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1990 NEWS
Protestors
office in
•  •■ •■
ill
ipy Minister of Justice's
t of Mohawks
by Mark Nielsen
Vancouver city police moved in on six
protestors supporting the Mohawks in Oka,
Quebec on Monday, ending a three hour sit-
in at the constituency office of minister of
justice Kim Campbell.
The sit-in was timed to coincide with the re-convening of parliament in Ottawa where
Campbell, member of parliament
for Vancouver Centre, joined other
MPs in returning to work.
A group spokesperson, who
refused to reveal his name, said
that they planned a peaceful protest, but intended to stay until
their demands were met.
"The peaceful demonstrations
at the (Vancouver) Art Gallery
haven't had much of an effect," he
said. "We want to go a step further."
The protestors, three of whom
wore kerchief masks similar to
those worn by the Mohawk Warriors, sat in a small circle on the
floor ofthe office while Campbell's
staff worked around them.
The three hour sit-in ended
at about 3 pm when police arrived
and took the protestors away to
police headquarters in a van. The
protestors offered no resistance.
Headingtheir list of demands,
the protestors wanted Campbell
to retract "inflammatory statements" she has made, specifically
that Mohawks would get no special legal treatment.
Instead, as minister of justice,
Campbell should guarantee the
Mohawks amnesty from any
charges that police may lay
against them as a result of the
ten-week-old blockade, the protestors said.
Furthermore, they want
Campbell to use her influence as a
cabinet member to push the government to "deal with the political roots of the problem."
The group also presented
Cambpbell's staff with a statement which was faxed to Campbell
in Ottawa. Campbell had not
called the office back, by the time
police arrived.
"She has probably been sitting all day, and has just been too
busy to call," staff member and
ex-AMS president Mike Lee said.
The statement said in part
that the protestors believe that
the Canadian government refuses
to work towards a just and
peaceful settlement to the conflict
and that the conflict should be
decided before a neutral body such
as the International Court at the
Hague.
The statement also said that
historically, Mohawk claims to
sovereignty are as valid as those
of Lithuania, Kuwait and other
small nationsstrugglingtoregain
their independence.
Protestors occupy Minister of Justice Kim Campell's office
MARK NIELSEN PHOTO
Asked if this may be an extreme position, the spokesperson
replied that the treaties between
the Mohawks and the British government were signed on a nation-
to-nation basis.
"Part ofthe stipulations that
cae with (Canadian) independence
was that Canada would honor all
treaties," he said. "By not doing
so, Canada is denying they have
any sovereignty."
As a result, he said the
Mohawks must act as a nation to
regain that sovereignty.
CiTR accused of
promoting Public
Enemy and racism
A warm and inviting doorway? A ticket off campus?
MIKE COURY PHOTO
By Joanne Neilson and Lydia
Cheng
The BC Organization to Fight
Racism has accused CiTR of promoting hatred and intolerance.
BCOFR secretary Allan
Dutton said in a letter to the
campus radio station that "CiTR
has demonstrated a flagrant disregard for Canadian broadcast
policy by airing and sponsoring
the work of Public Enemy—a group
well known for promoting racism
and religious intolerance."
BCOFR spokesperson Randi-
Lee Taylor, said "there is evidence
enough to revoke CiTR's license"
and has requested the Canadian
Radio-Television Commission to do
so.
Public Enemy has been
banned by TV stations in Canada
and the U.S. for lines such as "Told
the rab, get off the rag/Crucifixion.
Ain't no fiction ./So-called chosen,
frozen ./Apologies made to whoever
pleases/Still they got me, just like
Jesus" from Welcome to the Terror
Dome.
An information officer at
CRTC said they cannot revoke a
license when it is in term unless
they call a hearing or prosecute in
court. The complaint has to be very
serious to merit such action, and
this is their first record of com-
plaintregarding CiTR airing Public
Enemy.
"The responsibility rests with
the broadcaster," the CRTC officer
said. "The licensee has to respond
to public concern." The CRTC is
not a censorship body; it is there to
see if there isa blatant violation of
the regulations.
The regulation in question
states that a licensee shall not
broadcast any abusive comment
that, when taken in context is likely
to expose a group to hatred or
contempt on the basis of religion,
as outlined in section 3(a) of the
broadcasting regulations of the
CRTC.
CiTR station manager Linda
Scholton said "CiTR feels and believes the song is not against our
music policy. It doesn't apply to
any ofthe clauses.
"The songis not implicitly anti-
Semitic. To interpret the song you
need tobringin other information;
the song alone will not give you
that. Interpretation depends on
how the song is described—some
people interpret the song differently."
Scholton stands behind the
radio station's decision to promote
the concert. "We play the band so it
made sense to promote the concert,"
she said. "If we didn't, we wouldbe
hypocritical. At the concert, the
band spoke out against racism;
nothing in the show was anti-
Semitic besides the interpretation
of the one song."
Scholton invites concerned
individuals to discuss the matter
on the air. "We're concerned—it's
not something we're tossing aside.
We firmly believe in the stand we
took and are willing to defend it."
Wendy Narod-Maon, a student
at Emily Carr College of Art and
design, read about the issue in a
community-newspaper and helped
bring the issue to the attention of
the UBC administration.
Narod-Maon said "the things
the Public Enemy say are classic
anti-Semitism, the kind that has
provoked violence against Jews for
millennia.
"It is debatable whether it is
CiTR's duty to air racism. Publicly
promoting it is beyond freedom of
speech. Artists are not special or
above other people's rights or
freedoms," she said.
Taylor said that now that CiTR
has promoted the concert itis "not
an issue of freedom of speech" because they have promoted racism
and religious intolerance.
"Any [repentant] action of
CiTR would have to be in conjunction with the minority groups
affected" Taylor said since it is
"almost too late for a public apology."
AMS Student's Council voted
to support CiTR's music policy at
last Wednesday's council meeting.
September 25,1990
THE UBYSSEY/3 NiWS
Students question Canadian unity
by Michael Booth
English 100 students who
were asked to write essays on Canadian unity and the future of
Quebec reached some surprising
conclusions.
Deb Blenkhorn, a teaching
assistant for English 100, asked
the 28 students in her class to
write a diagnostic (not for marks)
essay on a range of topics including the questions "is there any
such thing as Canadian Unity?"
and "what do you see as the future
of Quebec?" Blenkhorn found the
results disturbing.
"I guess what I found disturbing is that an overwhelming majority of my students did not believe there was any such thing as
Canadian unity," Blenkhorn said.
"The reason for that is that we
tolerate so many cultures and beliefs.
"The feeling I got was that
there is a generation of students
now that believe there is no such
thing as unity in diversity and
that in order to have unity we
would all have to be the same,"
she said.
Political Science professor
Paul Tennant found Blenkhorn's
conclusions interesting but not too
surprising.
"Each year I ask my students
what their ethnic identity is,"
Tennant said. "This year 18 per
cent said they were Canadian
without qualifying it. This number has gone down from roughly
"If the French are
wise, they will not
separate from
Canada."
50 per cent 20 years ago."
Tennant pointed out that the
results may be a reflection ofthe
students limited exposure to the
issues facing Canada.
"This last decade has been
characterized by demands by cultures, regions, provinces and every variety of interest group," he
said. "It certainly is a time of accelerated demands and disagree-
"Many people hope
that their province
will become a part of
the United States."
ments.
"The students coming into
UBC now have only been paying
attention to the whole scene for a
couple of years. They have a quick
snapshot as opposed to a wider
view."
The question of Quebec's future also evoked an interesting
response from the students.
"The general concensus was
that Quebec would separate and
that there would be very negative
consequences for Quebec if that
happened," Blenkhorn said. "It
would be Quebec's loss, not
Canada's."
Political Science professor
Phil Resnick agreed with the conclusion, but said it did not go far
enough.
"I can partly concur, but I
believe that there would be serious losses for English Canada,"
"After the failure of
the Meech Lake
accord, Canada is on
the brink of
disintegration."
Resnick said, adding "it's clear
that an agreement must be
reached between English Canada
and Quebec."
Resnick said that the current federal system will probably
evolve into a looser Canada/
Quebec union with the two sides
sharing common structures but
only in specific areas like defense and currency. The big loser
in such an agreement would be
bilingualism.
Blenkhorn decided to ask
the questions in her class after
last spring's engineering
nEUSlettre published material
offensive to Natives.
"If the university wants a
campus wide campaign against
discrimination, they should do it
through English 100 because it
is mandatory for all first year
students," Blenkhorn said.
"Engineers aren't the only
ones who have discriminatory
attitudes," she said. "Perhaps it's
because they are more vocal than
other groups on campus. It may
be a case of them saying what
others are thinking."
Gala Great Trekker
Dinner/Dance
Honoring Pierre
Berton,
Thursday, Sept. ^*
27, 6:30 pm,
Hotel
Vancouver.
Welcome Ceremony
for students,
Sept. 27, 2:30 pm
Ola Auditorium
Blue & Gold Classic
Football Game,
Saturday, Sept. 29,
BBQ at 1 pm, game
at 2 pm, T-Bird
Stadium.
Homecoming
Dance,
Saturday,
Sept. 29, 8 pm,
SUB, Ballroom.
Homecoming
Parade, Thursday
Sept. 27, 12:30 pm
Campus
Arts '20 Relay Race,
Sunday, Sept. 30,
9:30 am,
VGH to UBC.
Meet the Brass
(Members of UBC
Administration),
Monday Oct. 1,
12:30 pm, SUB,
Party Room.
Gardens...Museums...Galleries
Sports...Reunions
JOIN THE CELEBRATIONS
SEPT. 27 - OCT 3
For more information call 222-8999
S__t|
m
\NM\ I KS \R>
THE    UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
SILKSCREENING
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OYE SPORTSWEAR & DESIGN
J   C
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PRICE INCLUDES: 1 colour print, garments, set
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mg (.33 extra^ . . solid coloured fabrics may vary
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Call: (Ask for Kenneth) 875-6879
Monday    Saturday     10 am - 6 pm
Open Sjturdsys Sundays Evenings by appointment
r ^
cThe -pen may
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sword, but
pagemaker
has them both
ticked.
<Dont believe
us?join us on
our quest for.
the mightiest
medium..
The
Ubyssey,
sub 241k
4/THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1990 r
L
NIWS
Post Office moves into bookstore
by Nadene Rehnby
Postal Station "U", Canada
Fost's last remaining outlet in the
UBC area, is just one of 14,000
Canadian postal outlets that will
be shut down in the crown
corporation's move toward
privatization.
Canada Post spokesperson
Etoug McClelland said postal services were taken over by the UBC
Bookstore on August 2, and have
been operating smoothly.
"When we are certain customers' needs are being met, we
will start the procedures to close
(Station "U") down," he said. "We
haven't announced a decision to
c lose postal station "If just yet."
McClelland said that the union
and employees must first be notified and the lease with the university allowed to expire.
The changeover will not affect
students adversely, McClelland
said. He added that the UBC
Bookstore will provide all services
formerly offered by Station "If,
and cited increased hours and the
availability of post boxes as advantages the Bookstore holds over
Station "U".
He said that polls conducted
during other changeovers showed
that "ninety per cent of customers
tell us the service is the same or
better than it was before."
But Brian Charleton, spokesperson for the Vancouver Local of
the Canadian Union of Postal
Workers, is upset with the
changeover. "We are diametrically
opposed to Canada Post's policy
and strategy of contracting out
and privatization," he said.
Charleton said Station "tf is
a perfect example. "They cite improved service—this is false. We
have offered to expand hours."
Charleton is also outraged at
the loss of workers' pay. While the
post office pays their counter employees fifteen dollars per hour,
the UBC Bookstore employees will
receive ten.
"At least the bookstore is
CUPE (Canadian Union of Public
Employees)," said Charleton.
However, he is concerned with
other post offices affected by
privatization. "At 7-11 it's minimum wage."
But McLelland said. "No one
will lose their job. They will receive
a preferred assignment, not the
midnight shift at the plant."
Charleton said job security is
far from the only issue.
"The money made by Station
"If, instead of going to improve
the postal system, is going into the
pockets of somebody else—most of
the time to corporations like 7-11
and Pharmasave," he said.
Charleton said the changes
will hit especially hard in rural
areas. "Wicket employees cover
4,200 jobs across the country.
Postmasters (who are unionized
separately from CUPW) covers
twice that, at least," he said. "And
eighty per cent of rural post office
employees are women."
AMS programs without direction
by Martin Chester
Six months after assuming a
full-time position as AMS programs director, Laura Myers has
decided itis time to leave her post.
Myers said on Monday that
she had verbally tol d AMS general
manager Charles Redden of her
intention to quit, but her letter of
resignation is still in process.
"There are a lot of problems
with my position and the AMS,"
Myers said, adding that her resignation was sparked by a letter to
the editor of The Ubyssey by AMS
director of finance, John Lipscomb.
The letter, describing a day in
Lipscomb's life, said "our overworked programs coordinator
yelled at me until I signed the
payment for our Frosh Week
Ocean Outdoor Video Dance Party
which was partially coming out of
the wrong account."
Myers said "The staff people
who work here hold this place together. If you don't respect your
staff members then your whole
organization falls apart."
"If Mr. Lipscomb has a prob-
Bud Kanke, CA: President, Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd.
The restaurant business for many is an expensive
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In 1971, with a $900 savings balance, Bud and several
partners gave Vancouver diners the city's first upmarket
seafood experience. The Cannery.
Mulvaney's followed in 1975. Seafood with a dash
of Southern spice. Viva in 1979. A classic supper club. In
1984, The Ninth Ave. Fishmarket. Then Joe Fortes, in
1985. Seafood downtown style.
The menu grows. And now Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd., with some 300 employees, reels in annual
sales of nearly $10 million. m-   -y  <
Along the way, Bud Kanke has earned ^V ^
the deserved reputation of a man with the skills   L.     _•
to transform the most modest opportunities into
prize catches.
He credits his CA for providing him the base to
develop his entrepreneurial strengths. "It gives me discipline ... going by instinct is one thing, but there's merit
in managing with good, sound numbers'.'
Bud Kanke. CA with a string of seafood restaurant
successes.
Ifyou think a future in chartered accountancy
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Bud Kanke's CA
helped him acquire
his taste in seafood.
lem with what I did he should
have come to me personally," she
said. "Taking pot shots at your
staff in a forum like The Ubyssey
is inexcusable."
Lipscomb said he wanted to
apologize for the letter.
"The reference to Laura in
my letter was supposed to be completely non-accusatory and innocuous," he said. "And Fm really
sorry that it hurt her."
Myers said the letter was just
the last in a series of setbacks
involving the AMS council.
"I'm trying to create a cohesive and tight university, so we
can act as a united 30,000 person
body. It is not a priority with
council," Myers said.
"Why would students support
Students' Council, their pathetic,"
she said. Everyone on council has
their own personal agenda and
social activities do not fit into
them, Myers said.
AMS vice president Johanna
Wickie said she was disappointed
Myers was leaving and agreed
with Myers' opinion of council.
"We're losing a really quality
staff member," Wickie said, "students council has to be aware that
we have to have a mandate larger
than just a political one."
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THE UBYSSEY/5 Four hostile newspapers
arc more to be feared
than a thousand
bayonets.
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Sharpen your fountain
pens!
Join the revolt!
Come by SUB 241k for
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spreadsheets, databases, programming,
telecommunications, desktop publishing,
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(somehow even these applications seem fun
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are avilable to students until November 9,
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Abolish the AMS
by James Dolan
The Alma Mater Society has
outlived its purpose at UBC, said
AMS director of finance John
Lipscomb.
The AMS is no longer representative of the student body,
Lipscomb said.
"The AMS doesn'thave enough
accountability because the apathy
on campus is so high," Lipscomb
said. "People who get voted in are
those able to secure block voting—
such as engineering votes. These
people are not really representing
a sufficient amount of people on
campus."
"I'm tired of having these few
people dictate policy for 26,000,"
he said.
Only 2,433
of UBC's more     	
than 27,000
students voted
in the AMS executive elections last year.
Lipscomb also said the frequent corruption in the AMS is a
result ofthe current structure.
"The reason why people steal
flats of beer from the AMS is because ofthe lack of accountability,"
he said.
Two flats of beer, paid for with
AMS funds, were given to pirate
ship volunteers at the AMS barbecue earlier this month, he said.
As a solution, Lipscomb wants
either the abolishment or a complete restructuring ofthe AMS.
"You can't solve the apathy on
campus, so maybe we should
change the organization. I'd like to
see a grass root student union—a
pure democracy," Lipscomb said.
Lipscomb said that one idea is
a confederation of service organizations which could replace the
current AMS structure.
Upon registering, a student
would allocate his/her $32.50 AMS
fee to service organizations such as
CITR radio and The Ubyssey. The
amount allotted to each organization would be entirely up to the
student.
Profile
This idea embodies the idea of
a true democracy, he said.
"It's really the student's money
anyway. It should be spent in a
way more reflective of their wishes.
This idea embodies the idea of a
true democracy," Lipscomb said.
If an organization cannot secure a share of the student fees,
they would receive no funding, he
said.
"If not enough students support the organization, keeping it
going would be a waste of time,"
Lipscomb said.
Current AMS businesses such
as The Pit Pub, Blue Chip Cookies,
and Tortellini's restaurant would
either be run on a 'break even'
basis or allocate their profit to service organizations in accordance
with  student
      allocations.
Under
Lipscomb's
system,    the
Board of Governors would
replace the AMS executive in overseeing the management of AMS
businesses.
With the elimination of AMS
bureaucracy, more money would
be available to student service organizations, Lipscomb said. "Basically, every organization could
have twice as much money as it
has now, or student fees could be
lowered."
Another alternative Lipscomb
suggested was to keep the AMS
intact, but leave decision making
entirely to the students, with policy
being made by referendum.
In this type of organization, a
majority would have to be won on
two separate votes, to prevent special interest groups from flooding
meetings with their members on a
given day.
However, Lipscomb said recent problems with reaching quorum would seem to render this
plan unfeasible.
If enough student support is
shown, a referendum could be held
to decide the future of the AMS,
Lipscomb said.
STUDENT AT LARGE
Positions Available
on the
Committee for Equality & Unity
Formed to promote awareness, discussion
and understanding of discrimination issues, the
Committee needs students to further these goals.
The first meeting is on Tuesday, September 25 at
5:30 in SUB 224.
Further information can be obtained at the
AMS Ombudsoffice
in SUB 100A.
Ihe Ubyssey needs you
The Ubyssey student newspaper is Cooking for an
om6uddy.
must be a staffer, preferably experienced Pigood
knowledge
of the system is important.
Apply to SUB 241k
Wednesday, noon at staff meetings
6/THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1990 THI ARTS
]
lives and breathes
ily Dave Kootnikoff
THE first production of the
new Frederic Wood season,
Arthur Miller's A View From The
Bridge, is a powerful and
arilliantly acted modern tragedy.
THEATRE
A View From the Bridge
Frederic Wood Theatre
Until September 29
All the elements that make
A View From The Bridge a great
play are at work—a harmonious
synchrony is achieved enabling
the play to live and breathe on
its own. This production is as
natural as its characters and
invites the audience to participate in an intimate heart to
heart.
We are transported to
Brooklyn, into a livingroom, and
into the heart of a man. Boundaries are transcended and the
production shifts from an ancient
amphitheatre, with its columns
and themes of human tragedy, to
modern day anywhere.
Miller's vision is realized
and enforced by the individual
performances, especially those of
Troy Skog in the lead role as
Eddie Carbone, Kerry Davidson
as his wife Beatrice, and Roger
Haskett as the effeminately
charming, and at times hilarious,
Rodolpho.
Under the direction of John
Juliani, Miller's exploration into
the nature of justice and its
possible indifference, is skillfully
controlled and revealed on the
personal, societal, and divine
levels.
Juliani also displays an
artist's sensitivity as he delicately balances the two contrasting elements of humour and
drama. The dark and shadowy
texture ofthe play's theme is
effectively captured in the
production's lighting and choice
of colours. As is usual for
Frederic Wood productions, the
set design is a kind of subliminal
star, adding to the play and to
the actors' performances without
diverting the audience away
from the central action.
At first I was skeptical,
thinking that it would be
impossible to replicate the
accents and mannerisms of
Brooklyn Italians on the Frederic
Wood stage, and at the beginning
ofthe performance it is awkward. However, these qualms are
quickly reduced to redundancies
as the universality ofthe play is
embraced.
Perhaps this is why the
production is effective and why
you should go see it; its weaknesses (and there are some,
believe it or not—like Alfieri's
stiffness and the slight deviation
from the text at the end ofthe
first scene) are overshadowed by
the production's triumphant
strengths.
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Elvis look-alike performs outside SUB Friis the King dead?
MATTHEW JOHNSON PHOTO
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APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
ACCEPTED FOR POSITIONS ON
THE STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION.
Applications forms are available in SUB room
238 and must be handled in by 4 pm on Friday,
October 12,1990.
For more information, contact the Director of
Administration, RomaGopaul-Singh (Room 254)
or the SAC Secretary, Martin Ertl (Room 252).
Are you literate? Could you fool
people? Join the hordes of revolutionary news maggots. We meet
regularly at noon on Wednesdays
in SUB 241K, also known as hell.
September 25,1990
THE UBYSSEY/7 You Can Become A
DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTIC
Find Out How...
Pan Pacific Hotel
Wed., October 3* 7:30 PM
999 Canada PL, Gazebo Rm. 1 • Vancouver
A Palmer College of Chiropractic West
Admissions Representative will discuss:
Careers in Chiropractic
Palmer West's Program and Facilities
Admissions Procedures & Financial Aid Opportunities
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For further information on this Palmer West
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SPORTS
The University of British Columbia
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1990 AUTUMN LECTURES
JOHN LANDER HARPER
One of the outstanding ecologists of the century, Dr. John Harper, Emeritus Professor of the School of Plant Biology,
University of North Wales has revolutionized the science of plant ecology. Recently awarded the Darwin Medal for his
research on the population biology and evolution of plants which has greatly improved the understanding the adaption
of plants to their environment, he is preparing a 2nd edition of The Population Biology of Plants (1977) which remains
a standard reference text.
SPECIAL EVENTS        September 24-26, 1990       Coast Plara Hotel,
Conference on Global Environment Change: The Implications for B.C.
Vancouver
Sponsored by The University of British Columbia and The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorships in celebration of the
75th Anniversary of UBC, the Conference is intended for policy makers in business, industry, all levels of governemnt, academic
communities, members of labour, professional communities, environmental groups and concerned citizens. Dr. Harper, a
dynamic lecturer, is Keynote Speaker at the Conference, presenting CHANGE IN THE GLOBAL BIOLOGICAL SYSTEM
on Monday, September 24 at 2:00 PM on the Conference Level of the Coast Plaza Hotel.
To Register for the Conference: Telephone Kim Cu_ of Venue West 681-5226
ON BEING A MODULAR ORGANISM:
Thursday, September 27 Room 2000, UBC Biological Science Bldg., at 4:30 PM (Seminar)
Friday, September 28 Room 2000, UBC Biological Science Bldg., at 12:30 PM (Lecture)
GLOBAL WARMING: An Ecologist's Response (Vancouver Institue Lecture)
Saturday, September 29 Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 PM
Thunderbird and Dinosaur players race for the ball     john MANIS PHOTO
in women's soccer action Saturday
Thunderbirds seek third
straight Diachem title
The Diachem Bowl, the second jewel in the triple crown of
athletic competition between UBC
and Simon Fraser University, will
take place this Wednesday at
Thunderbird stadium.
The first jewel, football's
Shrum Bowl, was won by SFU
earlier in the month. The third,
basketball's Buchanan Classic,
willbe heldat War Memorial Gym
on November 5.
Sponsored by Diachem Industries, the Diachem Bowl is an
annual contest between the
Clansmen and the Thunderbird
men's soccer teams.
Historically, UBC has dominated the competition with a 2-1-
1 record, including victories in
each ofthe last two years.
This, however, is not necessarily indicative ofthe nature of
the match. The Diachem Bowl is
always a spirited, competitive
game.
The UBC women's soccer
team will also see action when
they square off against the University of Victoria in the preliminary match.
Kick-off for the women is at
5:30 p.m. and the men hit the turf
at 7:30 p.m.
UBC BOOKSTORE
RETURN POLICY
COURSE BOOKS
Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by the
original receipt) for fuU refund any time up to the following
session deadlines:
Fall September 28.1990
Winter January 25, 1991
Spring May 17.1991
Summer Julyl2.1991
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition. After
the respective deadlines all course books will be non-returnable.
NON-COURSE BOOKS,
MERCHANDISE & SUPPLIES
Returns will normally be accepted up to 10 days from
date of purshase, when accompanied by sales receipt.
No returns or exchanges on sale items, special orders,
electronic and computer goods, protective eyewear,
lined shorts, bathing suits and swimming accessories.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT • NO REFUND • NO EXCHANGE • NO EXCEPTIONS
Refunds for purchases by cheque will be made
after 10 business days from the date of purchase.
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boukvard • 2284741
Vancouver Rowing Club player reaches the end of the line
in rugby action versus UBC Saturday
JOHN MANIS PHOTO
3/THE UBYSSEY
Septemoer 25,1990 Weekend wins have empty Ring
by Warren Whyte
While the UBC women's soccer team won both of their games
over the weekend, they suffered a
serious loss in the process.
After a 9-0 win over Lethbridge on Friday, the T-Birds lost
their star player Mitch Ring when
she went down with an ankle injury the second half of Saturday's
3-0 victory over Calgary.
Although the exact diagnosis
of the injury is as yet unknown,
the most likely scenario is a partial ligament tear requiring up to
four weeks in a cast.
Despite this distressingnews,
twelve unanswered goals in two
days left coach Brian Thomson
hopeful about the rest of this young
season.
"We're scoring goals—that's
a real positive thing for us this
year," said Thomson.
A big part of the increased
goal productivity is the play of
Jenny Hafting, who completed a
hat-trick against Lethbridge and
added two more goals against
Calgary.
Also stockpiled in the newfound scoring arsenal are Andrea
Neil (2), Ring (2), Carmie Vairo,
Sophie Spilborghs and Cory Hare.
If the T-Birds continue to
shine around the net and play the
defensive game to which they are
accustomed, the loss of Mitch Ring
should not keep the T-Birds from
winning soccer games.
Tne T-Birds next game comes
this Wednesday when they meet
the University of Victoria in the
Diachem Bowl's preliminary
game. Kickoff at Thunderbird
Stadium is scheduled for 5:30.
The team then goes on the
road for weekend games against
Lethbridge and Calgary.
.*wsAI*t
Lethbridge goalkeeper seeks to grip elusive soccer ball
in Thunderbirds 6-0 win Friday
JOHN MANIS PHOTO
Pronghorns and Dinosaurs provide
fresh meat for Thunderbirds
by Warren Whyte
The CIAU needs two soccer
leagues: one for UBC and one for
everyone else.
Two shutout victories over the
Universities of Lethbridge and
Calgary, 6-0 and 4-0 respectively,
set the stage for a season that
could see UBC remain undefeated
for a second consecutive season.
Despite injuries to seven of
twenty-two players, the T-Birds
were able to field teams that completely dominated and outplayed
their opposition.
UBC veteran midfielder Ron
Village said "this year we've got
more depth than last year. This is
probably the strongest team we've
ever had."
In Friday's game against
Lethbridge, UBC turned the
Pronghorns into pylons as the T-
Birds controlled the ball at will.
Passing it freely in all thirds of
the field, the T-Birds looked relaxed, confident and, most importantly, like they were having fun.
Strikers Rob Reed and Billy
Conner probably enjoyed themselves most, scoring two goals
apiece. Village and Wee' Willie
Cromack rounded out the scoring.
Cromack's goal was singularly outstanding as he brilliantly
bent a free kick over the wall and
into the near side ofthe net.
Saturday's game against
Calgary was a little tougher, but
it still had the same sense of T-
Bird domination.
"We finished them off in the
first half," said midfielder Mike
Mosher, who netted two goals, one
on a penalty shot. Other goal scorers were Rob Reed and Colin
Pettingale.
Coach Dick Mosher said he
was "quite pleased in general.
Anytime you beat a team like
Calgary 4-0, it is a good win."
Both shutouts were credited
to the starting keeper Ray Lohr,
while the injured Pat Onstad
(hamstring pull) saw second half
action Friday, and Enrique
Domingo shared the duty Saturday.
Mike Mosher summed up the
team's overall feeling after
Saturday's victory: "We've got to
go out and do the business earl}'
and no one should touch us."
UBC's next business is in the
Diachem Bowl vs. Simon Fraser
University on Wednesday, Sept.
26. Kickoff is at 7:30 at
Thunderbird Stadium.
The T-Birds hit the road this
weekend when they swing through
Alberta for rematches of last
weekend's games against
Lethbridge and Calgary.
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• Monographic card & Mono monitor      $129
■ ATI VGA E.jge & TVM supersync
2A monitor 800X600 colour display    $635
• XT-10. XT-12. 286-12, 286-20,
386-25, 386-33C and486-25 computers
are available at special price
» Peripherals: Modems, printers. Hard drive,
Mouse etc are available at a special price
Bring this ad to us £ receive
an adalHonal $20 cBscount
Tel: (604) 266-1113
Fax: (604) 736-9071
Unit 104 - 950 W. Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
/ JB'"f
Jea
teachers are
willing to share their knowledge
- and their credit union.
Everyone is welcome
to enjoy the friendly atmosphere
and personal service that
JCUprovides.
Visit or call a branch soon
and see the difference
foryourseff.
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t_i_„k—__■,„ „*__ t„.„-i...____. „„,„       Telephone 224-2364 Telephone 294 -S106 Telephone Wi-SI 51
Teiephon e 324-6655      Telephone 581-9828
TCU INSURANCE AGENCIES LTD.
5594 (ambie Street
Vancouver, B.C. Y5Z3Y5
Telephone 324-6655
— THE THIRD ANNUAL —
UBC ALCOHOL AND DRUG
AWARENESS WEEK
September 24-28,1990
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
THURSDAY,  September 27/90,
AUDITORIUM
12:30  pm   to   1:20  pm,   SUB
Back by popular demand, Mike Buckingham, a former
Washington State police officer will discuss the effects of
drinking/driving accidents. Mike speaks from personal
experience — he was hit by a drunk driver.
FRIDAY, September 28/90,12:30 pm to 1:20 pm, CONVERSATION
PIT, SUB
PARTY: a presentation by health care professionals. What is it like
for them to care for victims of drinking related accidents?
Warning:slide show may contain violent and disturbingpictures.
FRIDAY, September28/90,4:00 pm to 7:00 pm, ROOM 207/209 SUB
This Beer Garden wraps up the week with de-alcoholized anti nonalcoholic drinks (as well as alcoholic beverages — after all we are
promoting RESPONSIBLE DRINKING). The ICBC designated
driver program, Tall Cool One, will be in effect. As well, the RCMP,
University Detachment will have a breathalyzer on hand.
DAILY DISPLAYS will be in the main concourse from 11:00 am to
2:00 pm. Participants will include: Student Services, ICBC, RCMP,
BC Lung Association, AA, NA, Al-Anon, and students from the
Health Sciences, eg. Pharmacy, Nursing, Family & Nutritional
Sciences.
September 25, 1990
THE UBYSSEY/9 The, Cfrea t Oeia te:
An (ny-it at ion
Saturday, September 29
The Dean of Arts cordially invites instructors and
students to the Great Debate.
Topic for Debate:
The 21st Century Does Not Need the Liberal Arts
Participants:
Chair:    Dean Patricia Marchak
Faculty Debaters:    Phillip Harding (Classic)
J.A. Lavin (English)
James Powell (Anthropology)
Iain Taylor (Botany)
Time:    2:00 P.M.
Place:    Buchanan A104
Refreshments Will Be Served Following The Debate.
SPORTS
Danielson shines amid the
rubble of Thunderbird collapse
WANTED
Student Loan Researcher: Work Study Position
#740, $11.25/hr. To research problems associated with the current form of student aid, and to
make recommendations on how to improve it.
Transportation Co-Ordinator: Work Study Position #739, $11.25/hr. Primary duty: to establish
and maintain a computerized car-pool network.
Secondary duties include investigating and
reporting on other forms of "clean" transportation.
Please contact Jason Brett, AMS Co-Ordinator of
External Affairs, at 228-2050 or SUB 250 by
October 2 for more information.
by Wayne King
Early leads and UBC football
team wins go together like cheese
cake and the Nutra-Slim diet plan;
they don't.
The T-Birds led 22-9
at half-time over the University of Saskatchewan
Huskies and increased
their lead to 25-9 midway
through the third quarter
before the Huskies
stormed back with 27 unanswered second half
points en route to a 36-25
victory.
The Huskies' defense
effectively shut down the
T-Bird running attack.
The defending Canada
Westcham pions held 1989
Hee Creighton nominee
Jim Stewart to only 46
yards on 17 carries and
the T-Birds to only 82
yards along the ground.
The T-Birds appeared
to be in control through
the first 40 minutes. The
turning point in the game
occurred when Saskatchewan recovered a third quarter fumble and on the next play,
Husky quarterback David Earl
threw a 54 yard touchdown pass
to wide receiver Mark Olson.
"That was a real momentum
shift," said UBChead coach Prank
Smith. "It really took the wind out
of our sails."
UBC quarterback Vince
Danielson turned in a sparkling
performance, leading the T-Birds
to 438 yards in total offense.
Danielson set this season's single
game Canada West conference
T-Bird quarterback Vince Danielson
highs in completions and total
yards, connecting on 22 of 33
passes for 362 yards. For his
efforts, Danielson was voted the
Canada West player ofthe week.
Danielson's favourite target
was wide receiver Rob Neid, who
pulled in 11 passes for 207 yards
and two touchdowns. Neid tied a
UBC record for receptions in a
single game (11), shared by Craig
Keller and current T-Bird assistant coach Mike Bellefontaine.
The Huskies' Earl completed
5 of 12 passes for 100 yards and
one TD but was most effective scrambling for 91
yards rushing and two
TD's. Earl's second score
came on a 70 yard scamper in the dying moments
ofthe game. Running back
Duane Dmytryshyn
rushed for 150 yards on
18 carries and scored two
TD's to grab a share ofthe
lead in the conference
scoring race.
The loss drops UBC's
conference record to 1-2
and places them in a three
way tie with Alberta and
Manitoba for third spot,
two points behind second
place Calgary. The T-
Birds will host the
Manitoba Bisons in UBC's
homecoming game this
Saturday and need a victory to remain in the hunt
for a play-off berth.
"If the kids play well well be
able to get right back into the
thick of things," Smith said.
UBC's 75th Anniversary
homecoming festivities (beer garden, banner contest, etc) will begin at 1pm with the kick-off of the
T-Bird/Bison match-up slated for
2pm.
MELANIE GRIFFITH       ^      MATTHEW M0DINE
mey were
the jjerfeet couple,
buying the
perfect hduse,
until o perfect stranger
moved into their lives.
uric h
If ■ ■■     siiai^ a;;- ;
STARTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 AT A SILECT THEATRE NEAR YOU.
Serving Canadians
at Home and Abroad
The people who work for External Affairs and
International Trade Canada enjoy careers with
constant challenges and broad frontiers. By
working on a wide variety of assignments at home
and abroad, they gain experience that enhances their
professional development and opens national and
international doors. We encourage applications from
women, aboriginal peoples, members of visible
minority groups and persons with disabilities.
If you are a Canadian citizen and have completed a
university degree in any discipline, or will have
completed one by the end of June, 1991, why not
submit an application form and take the tests for the
Foreign Service? The application deadline is
October 12. 1990. and the tests will be held on
October 20. 1990 in every Canadian city which has a
university campus. To obtain an application form or
more information on the tests and a career as a
Foreign Service Officer, call the office of the Public
Service Commission of Canada nearest you or your
campus employment centre.
A Foreign Service Officer will be on campus during
the 1st week of October to talk about a career in the
Department. For details, contact your campus
employment centre.
The Department is interested in recruiting from a
wide variety of academic disciplines, so students
from all faculties are invited and encouraged to
attend.
Come and find out more about the possibilities that
await you!
Ces renseignements sont aussi disponibles en
frangais.
Canada.
MSmSwSi
l+l
External Attar* and A ft ares extftrieurec et
InternabonaJ Trade Canada        Commerce sxtor ieur Canada
10/THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1990 $1*081$
Cyclist takes a comer in the Logan Cycle.
JOHN MANIS PHOTO
SCOREBOARD
: Canada West
STANDINGS
Won*—'« Soccer
Football
Men'« Soccer
UBC       9
Lethbridge
0
w
L
T
F
A
P
w
L
T
F
A
P
Alberta  3
Saskatchewan
0
Saskatchewan
3
1
0
86
53
6
UBC
2
0
a
10
0
4
UBC       3
Calgary
0
Calgary
2
1
0
95
59
4
victoria
1
0
i
6
3
3
UBC
1
2
0
63
89
2
Alberta
1
0
0
3
0
2
Iten'■ Soccer
Alberta
1
2
0
47
52
2
Calgary
0
1
i
1
5
1
UBC       6
Lethbridge
0
Manitoba
1
2
0
44
82
2
Saskatchewan
0
1
0
0
3
C
Calgary  1
Victoria
1
Lethbridge
0
2
3
2
11
0
Victoria  5
Lethbridge
2
UBC       4
Calgary
0
Wo_e_'a Field
Hockey
Woaen' m  Soccer
w
L
T
F
A
P
w
L
T
F
A
P
Football
victoria
4
0
1
16
1
9
UBC
2
0
0
12
0
i
UBC       25
Saskatchewan
36
UBC
2
1
1
5
3
5
Alberta
1
0
3
3
0
2
Calgary  51
Manitoba
16
Manitoba
1
1
2
7
7
4
Calgary
0
1
*
0
3
0
Alberta
1
3
0
4
10
2
Saskatchewan
0
1
3
0
3
0
Calgary
0
3
1
1
12
1
Lethbridge
0
1
3
0
9
0
Help us Bring tlie
"World Together
Northern Telecom and Bell-Northern Research (BNR) have a
global vision - to be the world's leading supplier of
telecommunications equipment by the year 2000.
At BNR, we're researching and applying the technologies for
the design and development of products, systems and services
that set the standards around the world.
At Morthern Telecom we are a partner with BNR in the design
of the technologies. We have prime responsibility for
manufacturing, sales, marketing and customer service of a
wide range of telecommunications products.
To help us achieve our goal, we are seeking graduates at the
Bachelor, Master and Ph.D levels primarily in the fields of
Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Mathematics,
Physics and Business Administration. We are looking for team
oriented individuals with ideas and enthusiasm who share our
vision and want to be a part of our success.
If you would like an exciting career shaping the future of
telecommunications, submit your application to your campus
placement office, indicating to whom you are applying - BNR
or Northern Telecom, no later than October 9, for BNR
and October 15 for Northern Telecom.
We will be on campus November 6 & 7.
Help us turn our vision into reality.
ret
northern
telecom
BNR If
Now you an have all the versatility of an easy-to-use Macintosh Plus* for
the low price of $999. This special offer from Apple Canada Inc. is available to UBC
students, staff and faculty only between August 27th andMe^Wj|h, 1990.
UBC Computer Shop«228-4748
Quantities are limited. Provincial Sales Tax not included in above price.
6 Macintosh Plus is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc
September 25,1990
THE UBYSSEY/11 WANTED
Student-at-large reps for the AMS External Affairs
Committee. Get involved and make your voice heard
on issues such as financial aid, housing, and all sorts
of student related issues.
First meeting, Tuesday, October 2, at 5:30 pm in SUB
260.
Please contact Jason Brett, AMS Co-Ordinator of
External Affairs, at 228-2050 or SUB 250 for more
information.
CLOSEST BICYCLE SHOP TO UBC
BICYCLE STORES
PROUD
SPONSORS
OFTHE
UBC-
TRIATHLON
DON'T USE
YOUR HEAD,
USE A
HELMET
4387 West 10th Avenue
12 Locations to Serve You.
222-8200
We Also Have A Fully Stocked Service Department
/MORSE-TECH
COMPUTER     INC
1237 WEST BROADWAY
VANCOUVER. B.C.
Tel: 738-3886
Fax: 738-2881
Campus Special
80286-12 MHz SYSTEM $ T095
80386SX-16 MHz SYSTEM $ 1465
80386DX-25 MHz SYSTEM, Intel 386-25 cpu   $ 1895
The above systems have the following configuration:
-1 MB memory (80ns RAM)
-Teac 1.2 MB floppy drive
-40 MB (28ms) hard disk
-1 parallel, 1 serial, & 1 game
-101-keys enhanced keyboard
-monochrome card
-12" TTL Amber monitor
-small  footprint AT case
-200W (CSA)   power
supply
All systems include a two-year labour & a one-year parts warranty.
Upgrades: (add to above system price)
12" VGA paper white monitor & VGA card (640x480) $ 100.00
14" VGA color monitor & VGA card 256K (640x480) $ 365.00
14" VGA color monitor & VGA card 512K (1024x768) $ 560.00
Mitsubishi 60MB (28ms) hard drive w/ 1:1 interleave RLL $ 120.00
Seagate 80 MB (19 ms) hard drive w/ 1:1 controller $ 165.00
Accessories:
3.5" OR 5.25" high density floppy drive $ 99.00
Logitech Hi-res serial mouse $ 99.00
MS Mouse w/ Windows 3.0 $ 165.00
MS DOS 4.01 * 79.00
Microsoft Windows V3.0 w/ Toolbook $ 105.00
Cardinal 2400 bps int. modem w/ MNP5 s/w $ 119.00
Mon.- Fri. 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM
Sat. 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
2% discount for post secondary students
w/ ID for cash and carry orders
LETfERSZT 1.1L..I   ...
What happens when trees die...
Page B-l of Monday's Globe
and Mail has a picture of an Oregon
license plate with a bumper sticker
that reads, "I love spotted
owls...Pried." Surrounding it is an
"article" discussing public debate
(the timber industry's viewpoint)
regarding Oregon's old-growth forest.
Being from Oregon — a state
where, like B.C., logging is a BIG
influence in the economy, and politics — I was upset to see the Canadian press doing whatthe U.S. press
has been doing all along: misrepresenting the Old-growth issue with
unconcealed bias.
Oregon contains part of one of
the last old-growth forests in the
United States, and there is a raging
debate going on as to whether or
not parts of it should or can be cut
down.
Politicians, the media, and
the timber industry are making
the whole issue out as a "saving
owls/trees vs. saving jobs" thing.
Bullshit! Timber companies are
only too happy to sell rawlumber to
foreign markets, thereby eliminating business for local mills. The
U.S. government allows timber
companies to cut PUBLICLY-
owned national forests, and doesn't
re-invest the money back for the
public. And entire families' livelihoods are threatened by the decisions of a few politicians. It is a
matter of looking at the continued
prosperity ofl umber executives and
conglomerates not only at the expense of the forests, the endangered species, or the foresters, but
at the expense of the taxpayers as
well.
What was done, in the case of
Oregon's old-growth forest, for example, is thatthepartiesmostlikely
to benefit from old-growth logging
tried to find a single, relatively
uncrucial element on which to focus the public's attention. Through
the efforts of certain environmental groups, this became the Spotted
Owl issue.
True, saving a threatened spe
cies is important. However, what is
traditionally neglected here is the
fact that logging industries have
been continually raping the land;
and, when the supply of fresh, un-
defiled timber stands wear thin,
they cry "We'll go broke unless we
can cut it down!"
To explain: The U.S. government has declared the spotted owl a
threatened species, and has recommended a reduction in logging of
federally owned forests in Oregon
from 3.85 BILLION board feet to 3"
BILLION board feet beginning October 1. This is a compromise from
an original proposal limiting cutting to 2.6 billion board feet. It must
be noted that 4.5 billion board feet
was harvested in Oregon alone last
FREESTYLE
year.
The timber industry claims
that these reductions will cripple it,
resulting in the loss of thousands of
jobs.
It seems to me that if lumber
industries want to "manage" this
"renewable resource", want to save
jobs, and really want to stay a
healthy industry, they would have
kept a constant, well-planned rate
of de-forestation, rather than going
hell's bells trying to keep up a supply
for the demand. If it takes awhile to
restock your product, andyou want
to keep steady business, you don't
fire up the ol' chainsaw and actively
TRY to run out of product.
In the Globe's article, John
Hampton ofthe North west Forestry
Association claimed that "the forest service estimates that, cutting
at current levels, the old-growth
will last 50 years." What he, and
most of those in the timber industry
neglect to mention is that while we
have awhile until the forests are
wiped out, THE Y WILL BE WIPED
OUT! It takes a long time to re-
supply trees (and those are made
into tree farms), and a few THOU
SAND years to replace old-growth,
provided that during that entire
time there is no human intervention.
Everyone has heard that if logging isn't maintained, the workers
will be out of jobs. But the executives of Weyerhauser, Georgia Pacific andother logging corporations
(and the "founding fathers" of
Oregon's economy) will still be quite
well off, thank you very much.
Most of this isn't thought about
much. The lumber industry may
not directly involve most people —
except for the fact that trees are the
Earth's lungs — but this isn't
proven.
Then again trees are renewable — except when you try and
compare a tree farm to a temperate rainforest, or when you just
take a look at a clear-cut and
think that maybe trees will grow
there in a few decades.
But trees are being planted
every day. True, but fallen logs that
make up watersheds — which
greatly affect water quality — are
being harvested, so that my home
town, once touted for its natural,
drinkable tap water, now has a
flourishing bottled water business.
If public logging debate was
more centered on the logging
industry's historical and continu-
ingirresponsibilityandunaccount-
ability, or even the long-term effects cutting down trees has on the
world's natural legacy, and less on
the short term monetary or even
ecological benefits, maybe there can
be a workable solution where we
still have trees, still can breathe,
still have drinkable water, and yes,
still have a logging industry.
There are those who will say
that this is being done right now.
Try asking them who REALLY
benefits. And at whose expense?
See if the trees have something to
say.
Oh yeah, silly me, trees can't
talk. They're too busy being cut
down.
Matthew Johnson
John wanted cheap
computers?
I would like to bring your attention to a couple of interesting
statements that appeared in the
September 21 Ubyssey. On page
three, John Lipscomb, D of F, is
quoted as saying "Lower end
models coul d have been purchased"
with regard to AMS computer expenditures. John was one of the
three exec to support the
Macintosh bid, and currently has
the largest, most expensive machine sittinginhisoffice. While he
now seems to feel that executive
are paid too much in the summer,
he did not feel that way in late July
when he asked for another $2,000
for himself.
Just thought you'd like to
know.
Jason Brett
Co-Ordinator of External
_r\_TT31 T'S
John denies conflict
of interest
There is no conflict of interest
in this Student Court business. A
conflict of interest would include a
payback to myself, and in this case
there is none. There is no conflict
between voting for what one believes in (e.g. increased development education through the Global
Development Centre becoming a
service organization) and volunteering one's time on the same. All
Student Council members do this,
e.g. DRAAC, External Affairs,
Homecoming, Programs, First
Year Student Program, Student
Leadership Retreat, constituencies
(EUS members voted on their AMS
financial status, GSS members
voted for CPAC to fund their
Graduate Student Centre). Thatl
am being scapegoatedfor a "crime"
that is so common and ordinary
among Student Council members
shows that this whole issue is simply a personal attack on me and a
political attack on what I stand
for. What is remarkable and appalling is that only a few council
members realized this and argued/
voted against sending me to Student Court; this sort of removal
from reality reinforces in my mind
the need to replace the AMS political system with somethingmore
representative of students and
common sense.
I believe that the AMS should
provide students with more development education. Now is the
time to examine our behaviour and
assumptions; our consumption,
coercion, competition, self-interest,
inequity, prejudice, discrimination,
and nationalism have serious
consequences for our children and
our planet. I vote based on what I
feel is important. I ran and I will
run again to be your representa-
tivebasedonwhatlbelieve. Ihave
no conflict of interest.
(Now, why didn't someone
bring up "conflict of interest" when
most of the execs voted to get
themselves computers? God, this
world is perverse!)
John Lipscomb
AMS Finance Coordinator
Once upon a time ...
An interesting piece of literature was recently publishedinThe
Province written by our own Kurt
Preinsperg. On September 6,1990,
Preinsperg made his way into the
Literary Hall of Fame with his
article "How Can I Get A Date
With A Woman?"
In his modesty, Preinsperg
states that he "...doesn't pretend to
knowit all..."in regard to relationships, but then proceeds to offer
"33 Tips for Success" on how to
meet women at one of the "best
hunting grounds in the world", our
own university and college campuses.
In an age when violence
against women and rape continue
to surge, Preinsperg's quaint
summary of ways to stalk women
seems sorely out of step. Maybe
it's time for him to spend a few
years in the real world.
His macho 70's attitude concerning the pursuit of women is
outdated and bordering on the
absurd. With the attitude he expresses it i s difficult to fathom how
he is able to qualify himself as
speaking for the women and men
of UBC in his role as student president.
Preinsperg may be surprised
to learn that women are actual
coherent, thinkingbeings and that
sexual conquest is not the single
goal of all men on the UBC campus.
Maybe the next article he
should write should be entitled "33
Ways to Finish Your Ph.D."
Lori Keller Arts 4
Mark MacLean  Grad Studies
Daffyd Roderick Arts 4
12/THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1990 OP-ED
G.S.T. ain't for me
The March 20th issue of The
Ubyssey carried a three quarter
page Federal advertisement paid
for by YOU AND ME THE TAXPAYER telling us that the students will be better off if the
General Services Tax becomes
law next year. Nothing could be
further from the truth!!!
The advertisement points
out less than a half dozen items
that WILL NOT be taxed under
G.S.T. Each item below will cost
ALL STUDENTS 7% more if we
allow this tax to proceed.
Watches and repairs
Suntan lotions and all non-prescription drugs
Computers, software and rentals
House insulation
Lumber, brick, glass
Pizza deliveries
Chinese Food
Bus and taxi fares
Carpet cleaning and furniture
Dishes, cutlery and cookware
Telegrams and stamps
Sports equipment
Airplane, bus, train tickets
Vacuum cleaners
PERSPECTIVE
All food in restaurants, cafeterias, vending machines
All clothing including baby and
maternity wear
Books, newspapers, magazines,
bibles (nothing is sacred under
G.S.T.)
Admissions to movies, theatres,
plays, zoos, parks
All parking fees nationwide—
including student parking
All gasoline, diesel, natural gas,
coal, wood
Cablevision, hydro, telephone,
FAX lines
Automobiles, new and used
Dry Cleaning
Hair care products
Hair cuts and cosmetics
Men's toiletries
All non food items in retail stores
Bicycles, parts, repairs
Every soft drink and cup of coffee
Pet food
Feminine hygiene products
Hotel, Motel, Campground fees
Eyeglasses, contacts and dentures
Spa and health club memberships
Lessons in everything and anything imaginable
Birth Control devices
Baby strollers
Burglar alarms
Student supplies
Ski lifts and rentals
Ferry trips
All arcade games
Cookies
Memberships and dues
Legal and accounting services
Customs duties
Long distance calls
Farm produce at source
Funerals
Wedding dresses
Play schools
Typing Services
Motorcycles
Hair blowers and dryers
Nail polish
Greeting cards
Flowers
P.S.—Beer will go up 24.5% in
the year 1991"!
If the items on this list do not
apply to you...then perhaps the
government is right and YOU
will be better off. What do you
think???
Malcolm Watson
UBC Staff
Your Campus Neighbourhood Pub
Presents... those crazy rock n' roll guitar guys
Todd
BUTLER
&
Laurence
KNIGHT
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Every Friday
and Saturday Night „.. S:30 PM
Thursday Night - Darts Nightly 8 PM
Now Open Daily at 3:30 PM (Except Sunday 6 PM)
Located in the heart of Fairview/ Acadia just off Wesbrook Mall
Sunday Night - Jazz & Classical Night
featuring Live Music ...„.._ :30PM
♦♦*»♦♦♦♦♦♦->♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦♦-»■»
AMS
DAYCARE
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
THURSDAY, SEPT 24TH
5:30 - 8:30 PM
SUB 206
In order to inform the committee on the current Daycare situation at UBC and to make
suggestions for its improvement, written and
oral presentations are welcomed.
For further information, please contact the
AMS Ombudsperson at SUB 100A 228-4846.
Join  The Ubyssey...
The world is waiting to be sabotaged,
written about, photographed, satired,
drawn, and ridiculed.
Document chaos.
Come  to  SUB  24IK
THIS PARTY
COULD CHANGE
YOUR LIFE
Ifyou are in third or fourth year and you're looking for a career
in the business world, come see us. We're Chartered Accountants
from firms downtown and in the Lower Mainland and we'll be on
campus September 26 to talk about career possibilities in one of
the most stable professions - chartered accountancy.
There are jobs available in chatered accountancy for non-
Commerce grads from all disciplines. Chartered Accountants come
from all backgrounds, bringing new skills and diversity to this
growing, dynamic profession.
Chartered Accountants set the standard for accounting and
auditing in Canada and, because of their education and training,
are in demand by business around the world.
Here is an opportunity to talk to CAs on an informal basis and
explore opportunities. You may be an ideal candidate for Canada's
fastest-growing profession.
You're invited to a:
Wine, Beer & Cheese Event
UBC Faculty Club
Ballroom
Wednesday, September 26
5:00-7:00 p.m.
For more information call Ken Ruffelle at the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of British Columbia at 681-3264.
[<
?i!
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia.
Wp* U^&jnneateu^
September 25,1990
THE UBYSSEY/13 Still trying to take
back the night
When you are afraid to walk alone down a dark street,
When the choice not to go out at night is based on
whether you have an escort,
When you can't trust your uncle,
When you realize you have been taught to be afraid,
anger becomes a part of your reality.
Women's reality is often one of fear—a kind of fear that
most men do not share and cannot understand. The anger
that stem s from this fear is probably the strongest motivator
for women who march to Take Back the Night.
Women march because they refuse to accept that they
should stay at home. They march together because in unity
they have strength, in strength women have power, and
with that power women will take back the night.
Through repetition the statistics lose their impact: a
woman is raped every 17 minutes in Canada—one woman
in four will be raped sometime in her life. But remember
that these people are not statistics on a printed page, not
women distanced by the media nor victims of isolated
incidents of violence. They are our sisters and mothers, our
neighbours and friends.
Last year eleven cases of sexual assault were reported
on this campus. Around Totem Park. Between SUB and
Gage Tower. In Buchannan Tower. And the other places
never reported.
An assault is not limited to sexual violence with penetration. Assault is the man who sits beside you on the bus
and touches your leg. Assault is verbal as well as physical.
Assault is the assumption that women's bodies are available to all men. Assault is the assumption that familiarity
equals consent— ie. date rapes.
Violence against women is the transgression of personal
and moral boundaries, with no respect for the dignity of
women as individuals or as a collective. It is an example of
the persistently unequal power relations that exist between
women and men. These relationships are perpetuated by a
system of enforced silence.
The attempt to destroy the silence, to demonstrate
strength and unity, is met with fear and aggression—when
women taking the streets of Vancouver for one night out of
three hundred and sixty-five are harassed by male onlookers,
the need for such a march becomes undeniably apparent.
Until women can walk alone at night without the fear
that most men do not know, and that many do not even
acknowledge as valid, women will use their anger to work
for change.
MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMINATION
PHIL. 5oo
theUbyssey
September 25, 1990
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University ot British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staffand not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud
support ofthe Alumni Association. The editorial office is
Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial
Department, phone 228-2301; advertising, 228-3977;
FAX# 228-6093
In the land of happy penguins, Yggy King, the court
jester, juggled while Andrew Epstein waxed prosaic. Jennifer Milligan spewed out immaculate sonnets in perfect
rhyme scheme, Nadene Rehnby checked. "What wondrous
words!" exclaimed Ernie Steltzer who was immediately
bowled over by Matthew "Tigger" Johnson. "Tigger" bounced
higher and higher into the air, until he flew away! "Good
riddance," thought Effie Pow, Colin Maycock, and Wayne
King. Michael Booth thought a funeral was in order. Paul
Dayson thought a party was in order. After very brief
debate in the collective Elaine Griffith convinced everyone
that a party was the way to go, and Paul eventually won out
in the end.
What a party it was! Martin Chester played the accordion, accompanied by Rebecca Bishop on the tuba, and
Roderick McFarland on the xylophone. Mark Nielsen had
never heard such beautiful music. All was merry and gay,
except that Don Mah, Steve Chan, and James Dolan all
brought lemon merengue quiche in hollandaise. Luckily it
was Warren White's favorite food. Hao Li taught Mike
Coury how to Lambada. Even Laurie Newell, John Manis,
and Dave Kootnikoff had fun as they talked, ate, and
danced the night away.
The party would have been perfect, but unfortunately
Lydia Cheng was the first to spot it. Joanne Neilsen yelled
"Duck!" but it was too late. "Tigger" landed smack on the
beer keg, rendering it useless. Yukie Kurahashi could only
shake her head. "What a waste," she sighed. And they all
lived happily ever after.
PHOTO FRONT BY DON MAH
Editors
Rebecca Bishop  •  Michael Booth  •  Martin Chester •  Paul Dayson
1 Identify:
C~
Letters
Kurt's a good boy
I am writing in response
to the recent fury that has
been stirred up due to the
actions of the AMS President, Kurt Preinsperg. I
cannot stress enough how
sad and angered I am over
Kurt's predicament due to
the irony ofthe situation.
Quite simply, I feel that
Kurt is being accused of
something he did not actually do or in fact ever intend
to do.
In early August of 1990,
I was approached by Kurt
about this matter. Kurt
handed me a piece of writing entitled "33 Rules for
Relationships" and asked me
to give him my honest opinion on its contents. Kurt's
main concern was that it
would be pleasing and inoffensive to women and that it
would be seen the way Kurt
wanted it to be, namely, as a
positive way of improving
communication between
men and women. Kurt told
me at the time that he intended to one day get the
piece published but was
waiting until more women
had given him input on the
article and how it could be
improved. I did not find anything offensive with the
contents ofthe piece and was
very touched that Kurt
would take the time to think
about how interpersonal relationships could be improved between men and
women.
Obviously then, it came
as a great surprise to me to
pick up the September 7 issue of The Ubyssey and read
the hurtful editorial written
by The Ubyssey staff. While
I understand that an editorial is merely an expression
of an opinion, I question the
fairness and overall integrity of your work. Subsequent articles have admitted that there were grave
errors in the choice of words
included in your piece. In
addition, your decision to not
reprint the piece you were
referring to (i.e. to allow students the privilege of judging for themselves the full
meaning of Kurt's article)
was also questionable.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
What has disheartened
me most about this situation isn't so much the injustice that has been shown to
Kurt Preinsperg as it is the
injustice shown to the students of UBC. In one broad
swoop of journalistic grandstanding The Ubyssey has
seriously affected the political life of a fine, dedicated
student leader, brought embarrassment to the university due to the poor editing
and malicious nature of its
newspaper staff and stifled
the creative juices of many
budding writers who will be
intimidated by the damage
that may be done if their
works are similarly slashed
and misrepresented.
There is no doubt in my
mind that Kurt will eventually emerge from this situation unscathed. Kurt is a
kind, gentle and respectful
man and I still have enough
faith in humanity to believe
that good people in this world
will succeed.
However, I have serious
reservations about the competence and conduct of The
Ubyssey editorial staff. Such
talented minds should be put
to better use than being advocates of the devil who
scrounge for or fabricate dirt
in order to malign others.
Instead of hacking another
person's work looking for
sinister undertones that may
or may not be present, you
should try writing about
positive matters that may
possibly help others and
serve to make the world we
live in a better and more
loving place.
Antonia Rozario
Science 5
Fleming
perpetuates
NDP myth
Finally someone has exposed the true nature ofthe
New Democratic Party in
B.C. I think that Niko
Fleming hits the nail on the
head when he describes the
NDP as having "no real
platform," and as a group
wanting "to be all things to
all people" (Freestyle, Sept.
14,1990). He goes on to say
that "they [the NDP] don't
seem to feel a need to put out
positions of their own." I
totally agree with these
statements. Ibelieve thatthe
only reason Mr. Harcourt et
al have not presented a
comprehensive platform of
their own is because they do
not have one, or if by chance
they do possess one—are too
worried about possible criticism to publicize it.
What is the NDPs^ position on many ofthe major
issues facingthe government
and the people of this province? Issues like native land
claims, and the environment
(an especially interesting one
considering the support the
Party traditionally receives
from both hard-core environmentalists, as well from
labour [IWA]) have not been
adequately addressed by the
NDP.
I do take exception
however, with Mr. Fleming's
suggestion that we should
"hear something about the
NDPs long and honourable
commitments to education,
health and social programs..." Mr. Fleming is
simply perpetuating the
myth that only socialist
parties Gike the NDP) take
an active interest in the
overall well-being of individuals, and has obviously
overlooked the valuable
contributions of the Social
Credit Party in these areas.
I can only infer from Mr.
Fleming's comment that he
is in favour of paying higher
taxes—which is the only way
that the NDP could possibly
finance an even more extensive network of social
programs than are already
in place.
It is very easy for an
opposition party to criticize
government policies, itis not
however, as easy to govern.
I can only hope that the NDP
will pay for its negativism,
continued hollow criticism,
and lack ofa policy platform
where it counts the most—
at the polls in the next provincial election.
Tricia Stamer
Arts 3
Don't label frats
We at the Sigma Chi
Fraternity are writing this
letter in response to the accusations put forth by Rosemary Taylor on September
14 that fraternity houses are
inhabited by "beer-swilling
pigs."
Negative and inaccurate comments such as this
serve only to further blacken
the reputation of college
fraternities. This leads to
the stereotyping of our organizations as associations
similar to those of the fictional fraternities portrayed
in Hollywood movies. I
would expect more from a
person in education. Rosemary should have further
investigated the situation
she described before mud-
slinging and slandering an
organization she obviously
knows nothing about.
Rosemary stated that
she saw numerous cans and
bottles scattered around the
fraternity houses during a
walk on Sunday morning.
Although Sigma Chi was not
the fraternity in question, it
is our policy that all members of our chapter clean up
the house and yard the day
after any parties or events.
As our parties usually continue until two a.m., the
cleanup does not begin until
after our members wake up,
and/or arrive from homes off
campus, in the afternoon. If
Rosemary had come by the
fraternity houses later in the
day she would not have seen
the mess she described.
We at Sigma Chi recycle
all of our cans and bottles.
After one event last term we
received over one hundred
and thirty dollars in refunds
from our aluminum. Wealso
are involved with the donation of clothing to the mentally handicapped as a further effort to aid in the recycling of materials we no
longer need. We hope that
this letter clears up any misconceptions as to the environmental awareness ofthe
Sigma Chi Fraternity.
Brian Erb on behalf of
The Brothers of
Sigma Chi
14/THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1990 LEnERS
The beauty of
spectator sports
"Get off that couch!" "Wakeup!" "Read,walk,run...do something!" Although the activities
suggested are fun and generally
quite healthy, the person who is
receiving this common verbal assault IS doing something. To the
uninvolved person, most spectator
sports represent a mindless experience populated by beer drinking
louts. From my perspective I say
this is a popular misconception and
the time has come to explain the
complexities of being a sports fan.
In order to logically proceed I will
deal only with three spectator
sports, baseball, hockey and football. These spectator sports provide society with both an emotional
and aesthetic experience which
satisfies a basic human need.
In order to begin, the definition
of a spectator and a fan must be
explained. A spectator is a mere
viewer, an unattached bystander.
A spectator usually is the one who
delivers the uneducated verbal
assault described above. The
spectator doesn't care about the
sport and has only one concern,
"How much time left?" A fan is
someone who is emotionally involved with a team and/or player.
The fan usually begins as a spectator, innocently watching the
sport unaware of what is developing within him or her. As the fan
develops, he or she is no longer
concerned with how much time is
left but now yearns for overtime!
Over the months, or years, the
emotional bond tightens between
the individual and a team and
eventually becomes so strong that
he or she steps into the realm of
being a fan.
As the fan's emotional commitment to the team and the sport
increases he or she begins to see
the plays develop, studies the game
and dissects the sport into it's essential elements: Baseball—coordination and patience; Hockey—
endurance and intensity; Football—power and speed. The football fan sees the game as a constant
battle for ball control and sustained
drives from one end ofthe field to
the other. The baseball fan studies
the many intricate strategies and
of course the classic batter/pitcher
matchups. The hockey fan sees the
plays unfold behind the net and
appreciates both the beauty and
intensity ofthe game.
The game is merely a game to
those who remain uninvolved by
shutting out the intrinsic values
found in each sport. The beauty of
a homerun swing, the grace of a
Walter Payton run and the finesse
of Gretzky all provide the fan with
exciting and satisfying moments.
The pressure situations, the clutch
hits, the bone-rattling bodychecks
are what the real fan appreciates.
To the fan, watching the season
unfold is like reading a good novel.
The fan becomes involved, the
heart races, the palms moisten and
the toes are tapping as he or she is
put through an emotional
rollercoaster throughout a game.
So the next time you see
someone or a group of people
around a T.V. on the edge of their
seats, think of the fan. Think of
the emotional bond and the sheer
excitement (or pain) he or she is
experiencing. The fan feels a part
ofthe team, the fan will follow the
team through the ups and the
downs. Although sitting on the
couch may put on calories, think of
?? of the Week
In the interests of initiating debate on campus, The
Ubyssey is introducing a new
feature to these pages.
On a trial basis, we will
pose a question and invite your
response. The staff of The
Ubys sey will select five letters
that reflect a cross-section of
the views presented.
Standard Ubyssey letters
policy — type written, under
300 words, no racist, sexist or
homophobic content — will
apply.
Please submit your response to our office (SUB 241K)
by 4:00 pm on Friday, September 28. The selected answers
will be printed in Tuesday's
edition of The Ubyssey.
This week's question is one
that some English 100 students were asked as an essay
topic:
Is there any such
thing as Canadian
Unity?
the cerebral and emotional exercise a fan is receiving. Sports provide both aesthetic beauty and
intense emotional trials for the
person who is willing to become
involved.
NOTE: Remember, if taken
too far a fan can ruin relationships
and potentially end up like Pete
Rose.
Gord Whittaker
MBA 1
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CARTEL
APPROVED
AGENT
September 25,1990
THE UBYSSEY/15 "We're here, we're
queer, and we don't
want your coffee"
by Nadene Rehnby
Aconflict be tween lesbians and
the owner of Joe's Cafe escalated
over the weekend and appears far
from resolution.
The dispute began September
16 when an employee of Joe's Cafe
was offended by two women who
were embracing. According to Jill
Beamish, a lesbian and resident of
Commercial Drive, the waiter "became abusive."
Beamish said the waiter told
the women there were children in
the restaurant, and that they shoul d
act like normal people. She said
that Joe Antumes, the owner ofthe
cafe backed the waiter up.
Many of the outraged members ofthe lesbian community live
in the Commercial Drive area and
are long-time customers of Joe's
Cafe. They have called for a boycott
ofthe restaurant and are distributing leaflets outside the premises.
They have also delivered a list of
demands to Antumes.
Carlos Silveira, a ten-year employee of Joe's Cafe who was distressed about the way the protestors were treated, said the dispute
escalated when Antumes and another employees began dousing the
protesters with a sprinkler system.
"We didn't think it was necessary to turn the hose on these
people," said Silveira. "I thought it
was childish."
The day staff walked out upset
and embarrassed, and, after trying
to talk to Antumes about the situation, Silveira was fired. "I was
trying to talk to him (about the
dispute) and he fired me," Silveira
said.
"I was not taking sides," he
said. "I just don't agree with what
Joe was doing, throwing- them out
after all these years of supporting
him."
Silveira said lesbians make up
"probably fifty per cent, if not more,
of his business. Without them, I
don'tthinkhe wouldhave survived."
Beamish became involved in
the skirmish with Antumes during
a lesbian "kiss in" Sunday night.
She said Antumes "pulled our chairs
outfrom underneath us, and pushed
me off a table."
Beamish was also a participant in the group of protestors
doused by Antumes' sprinklers
while protesting outside the cafe.
The lesbian community is demanding an apology. Erin Graham,
another lesbian involved in the
protest, said "we gave him a letter
outlining our demands. One of them
was a public apology. The others
were about treating lesbians and
other women there with respect."
But Silveira said it is unlikely
Antumes will apologize.
"You try and talk to him and he
just starts screaming and goes on
and on and says "everybody's after
me." He seems to think he's right,
but (the lesbians) have been doing
it all these years, I don't see anything
different. I didn't expect this from
him."
"I think most of them would
come back if they would sit down
and talk about it. But I don't think
Joe would ever do that," Silveira
said.
A spokesperson for Antumes
declined comment to The Ubyssey.
But Beamish said "This isn't
about Joe's—i t's about homophobia.
"I've been verbally abused,
physically assaulted, spit on and
fired from jobs, not for being openly
affectionate, but just for daring to
be a dyke, and not hiding it, not
being ashamed," she said.
Beamish said she will be at the
nightly protests, which are expected
to continue throughout the week.
Graffiti on the side of Joe's Cafe.
REBECCA BISHOP PHOTOS
Increased enrolment causes
overcrowding
Cramming them in to cram rt in.
PAUL THOMSON PHOTO
by Jennifer Milligan
A 4.8 per cent increase in enrolment has resulted in overcrowded classrooms and long
waiting lists for students trying to
get into required courses.
UBC registrar R.A. Spencer
attributes the increase to more
students applying to UBC, the
failure of the registrar's office to
anticipate this demand and an increase in the number of students
continuing their studies.
The result is some students
being taught in overcrowded classrooms and others being turned
away from the classes and time
slots of their choice.
The 4.8 per cent increase is
based on a headcount of every registered student and includes part-
time students taking only one or
two courses.
"In the faculty of Arts alone,
there shouldbe amaximum of 1500
students, but this year the enrolment numbers exceed to 1640,"
Spencer said.
Each year the Office of the
Registrar offers admission to students and then estimates how
many will actually attend. In a
normal year, only about 50 per
cent of applicants accept their offers and in some faculties (such as
Medicine) the registrar continues
to offer admission until every seat
is full. In a faculty as large as Arts,
there is no time to organize such
an activity.
This year the registrar has
more students accept their offers
of admission than they anticipated.
Programs which normally did not
exceed their full capacity went beyond their anticipated number.
Student enrolment has also been
continuous and the return rate is
higher this year than in the past.
There has been a declining
number of classroom spaces for
courses such as English 100, a
compulsory course which cannot
be taught as a lecture. Peter Taylor, the chair of English 100, said
there was no problem with the
population of English 100 in the
past, but this year there was a
surprising increase in enrolment
of undergrad students. Thisin turn
led to students having to be accommodated.
Students not registered before
classrooms exceeded their maximum capacity had to stand in line
for several hours to be slotted into
an English 100 class. Students did
not get as great a choice in choosing their time slots and, in order to
meet the increased demand for
English 100, sections were putinto
every available classroom. Thisled
to overcrowded classrooms.
The Associate Department of
English said there should ideally
be a maximum of 20 students in
each section of English 100. Two
years ago, professors in the English Department voted to allow
no more than 25 students in English 100 classes.
Taylor said the professors decided to extend this limit to a
maximum of 28 students because
English 100 is a mandatory course
for all students.
The professor's main concern
lies with the most effective way to
run the course.
Students are expected to take
English 100 in their first year and
therefore have to be accommodated
with a classroom. Taylor said there
was already 6 new sections of English 100 open at the end of the
first week of school, the maximum
that could be opened due tolimited
classroom space.
Professors must decide between letting a few new students
into their classrooms and exceeding the maximum number of 28, or
teach the course more effectively
with the students already there.
English 100 was not the only
Arts course to turn away students.
In Religion 100, student numbers
are also exceeding classroom space.
There are no new classrooms to
accommodate students and the
professors have declined splitting
classes. Religion is a department
that generally does not limit enrolment and tries to encourage
students to keep coming in.
The current overcrowding
problem is due to an inadequate
data base. The university maintains a record of the maximum
number of seats available to students in each classroom. Spencer
said the list is generally not kept
up to date and sometimes chairs or
desks get broken and don't get repaired. Therefore some rooms may
have a data base less than the
actual number of seats.
16/THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1990

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