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The Ubyssey Mar 12, 1985

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Array Fees may discourage students
By VICTOR WONG
The board of governors' decision
to hike UBC tuition 10 per cent, for
a 43 per cent increase over two
years, means fewer students from
outside Vancouver will come to
UBC, the Alma Mater Society ex
ternal affairs coordinator said Monday.
"We're going to lose a lot of
students, especially people from the
Interior," Duncan Stewart said.
Stewart, who made a presentation to the board of governors op
posing higher fees, said aside from
the AMS bursary fund and the tuition fee lottery, the AMS can do little to help students cope with the increase. He added there is nothing
the AMS can do to protest the increase now that the board has pass-
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Vol. LXVII, No. 43
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 12,1985
228-2301
ed it.
"We've protested every time
there's been an increase (last year
and this year). One gets the feeling
the board isn't listening," Stewart
said.
Bronwin Specht, a Port Moody
Secondary School guidance
counsellor, said students interested
in UBC will think twice after learning of ihe increase.
"We have maybe six or seven
kids who said they wanted to go to
UBC, but I think some of them may
make a decision not to go because
of the increase," she said.
Lach Farrell, principal of Stanley
Humphrey Secondary School in
Castlegar, said students interested
in go;ng to university from
Castlegar are more likely to go to a
university in Alberta, because it is
cheaper.
"We're pretty much equidistant
from  Victoria or  Vancouver  and
from Edmonton or Calgary," he
said. "I suspect that of our students
quite a number have opted to go to
one of the eastern universities, and
one of the reasons for that is the tuition increase."
But Darrell Lee, commerce 1,
said he did not oppose the tuition
increase. "I think it (UBC's tuition)
is rather cheap compared to the
schools down in the States," he
said.
Steve Pollack, arts 2, said he is
opposed to the increase and will
consider going to another university
next year. "I'll have to-see if I can
return next year; too many programs have been cut," he said.
Simon Fraser University's board
of governors is considering a 10.26
per cent tuition increase. But SFU
did not have as high a tuition hike
last year. The University of Victoria
has not set its new tuition fees.
Students form
PONDERING, PROSPECTLESS GRADUATE realizes he just pissed away four (five) years.
Stall's graffitti bids Pedersen farewell
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
An ad hoc committee called
Students for UBC, recently formed
under the auspices of the Alma
Mater Society, distributed leaflets
yesterday in its initial efforts to
fight cutbacks at UBC.
The next stage planned for today
has ten booths located strategically
at major intersections of the university, said Drew Rose, architecture 3,
Monday.
He said booths will be staffed by
people asking for signatures on
petitions which ask for "support on
an open and equitable discussion by
the un:versity community of how
cutbacks are to be implemented."
He said the ad hoc committee is
also drafting a letter to be
distributed to all senate members
asking them "to address the
method of cutbacks implementation" and "to review budgetary
policy affecting program termination".
Marg.o Paris, architecture 3, said
the Coalition of Students for UBC
is the next phase of defending pro-
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
"Good-bye Pedersen, hello trouble," reads the graffitti in the second floor north side women's
washroom in SUB - middle stall.
Reaction to  former UBC presi
dent George Pedersen's resignation
and his temporary replacement by
former vice president academic
Robert Smith varies from bitterness
to understanding among university
community members.
Federal applications scarce
OTTAWA (CUP) — Application
forms are only now becoming
available in most parts of the country for Challenge '85 student summer job creation program, announced by the Conservative
government more than a month
ago.
The government wants to give
out $205 million, mainly to
employers as a subsidy or grant to
hire students for summer jobs, but
has been slow in organizing the program partly because of an attempt
to "harmonize" job-creation with
the provinces.
Federal bureaucrats in Ottawa
said because the program is new, it
has taken much more time to set up,
and will not be organized by the
time students get out of school.
"It seems unlikely things will be
in place by mid-April," said Allan
Lennon, national co-ordinator of
the employment and immigration
union's campaign against cutbacks
in the ministry.
Under the program, employers
have to obtain applications through
their local employment development branch and the federal
government to give them money to
hire students for the summer.
Lennon said most application
forms are not ready because the
federal and provincial governments
are having problems agreeing on the
forms' content. To make up for the
delay, Flora MacDonald, employment and immigration minister, announced new deadlines for applications: March 29 in B.C., Manitoba,
the Northwest Territories and Ontario and March 22 in all other provinces.
NDP MP Howard McCurdy said
the new deadlines mean the
distribution of money will be
hopelessly delayed.
"The minister has sounded the
death-knell by moving the application deadline back to the end of
March, just three weeks before
thousands of students become actively unemployed," McCurdy told
the House of Commons March 6.
Brian MacDonald, a project officer in the employment ministry,
admitted in an interview that
"human beings being what they
are, they will wait until the last
possible date to send in their applications."
"Ninety or 95 per cent of the applications will come in the last few
See page 2: MINISTRY
David McLean, chair of UBC's
board of governors, said Monday
he stands by his previous critical
comments on Pedersen's departure.
"When he made his political statement last Thursday, Pedersen was
not acting in the best interests of the
university and that is where we part
company."
Pedersen quit his job saying the
Social Credit government made it
impossible for him to continue as
head of UBC. McLean later denounced Pedersen, saying his "timing was terrible" and "not in the
best interest of the university."
UBC's fiscal year begins April 1
and major program cuts for 1985-86
are likely.
Pedersen has accepted the position of president of the University
of Western Ontario. "From a personal point of view I understand
(Pedersen's) decision, those offers
don't hang around" said McLean.
But McLean said he warned
Pedersen that his resignation would
be valid immediately since he would
be criticizing the government, "the
people who pay the bills of the
university." Pedersen is free to
make any comment but not as a
representative of the university, he
added.
McLean said earlier the university possibly needs a different type of
president.
Teaching Assistants Union president Horacio de la Cueva said
Pedersen's departure was a well
calculated risk taken to publicise
the plight of education in B.C.
He said UBC's board effectively
silenced Pedersen as an outspoken
critic of government and board of
See page 2: SMITH
grams against cuts. The architecture
school contacted other programs
asked to show justification for continuance: landscape architecture,
community and regional planning,
rehabilitation medicine, and
religious studies, and met for the
first time last Sunday.
"The coalition is intended to
consolidate positions and as a coalition we'll be more effective in lobbying senate," said Paris.
She said the rally held downtown
last Thursday collected 5,000 petition signatures in less than eight
hours. "And also 300 letters of support and the count is rising," she
added.
Paris said rehab medicine and architecture perceived the threatened
cuts much earlier than other programs. "Now it's the coalition's
aim to get the word out, because if
our programs are threatened so are
the rest."
She added acting president
Robert Smith is replying to all letters of support sent to his office
with the stock phrase: "No final
decisions have been made nor will
they be made without full consultation." But Paris said this is a
hollow assurance.
"It is a hollow assurance because
the senate budget committee was
the organizer of the list" of programs which received letters asking
for justification, said Paris. She added the criteria used in choosing the
list had nothing to do with
academic merit.
Senate budget committee chair
Geoffrey Scudder said the committee was not beind the formulation
of the letters, but were informed of
them. He said the letters came from
the office of the vice president
academic.
Scudder said senate budget committee recommended last year "no
across the board cuts because it
would lead to a general enfeeble-
ment of the university and across
the board mediocrity".
Scudder said UBC is still a top
class university.
Socreds to announce new round of excitement
The provincial budget is being announced Thursday, two weeks before UBC's next fiscal year begins. And
at a time when B.C. unemployment is as high as ever.
Finance minister Hugh Curtis will unveil the secretive document in Victoria sometime March 14, a date
considerably later than UBC's former president George Pedersen would have liked.
UBC's administration was told earlier by government officials to expect a five per cent cut in funds,
although Pedersen said in his resignation speech he did not honestly know how the university would respond
to such a cut. UBC's budget was cut five per cent last, year and UBC received no increase for 1983-84.
the budget will include a "general purpose operating grant" to be later divided among B.C.'s three
universities by the Universities Council of B.C.
Universities ministry comptroller Dorothy Cook said Monday there is no way to predict funding levels
before Thursday.
UCBC interim chair Lee Southern said the council will announce the university allocations no later than
March 25.
The government is also schedule to announce its contribution to student and youth job creation programs.
^ Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 12, 1985
Smith perceived as 'administrator without foresight'
From page 1
governors policies by forcing him
out.
But by quitting Pedersen could
possibly "turn the opinion of the
public towards the universities,"
said de la Cueva.
The person coming after
Pedersen will have the "toughest
job of any president in a long time"
because the next president is going
"to pick up the carcasses," said de
la Cueva.
De la Cueva said in between outgoing and in-coming presidents is
an obedient administrator, referr-
Ministry questioned
From page 1
days," MacDonald said.
Lennon said the employment
ministry claims it can turn around
an application — assess it and grant
or refuse money — in 48 hours.
"But two years ago (the ministry)
also said 48 hours and it took eight
weeks to four months," Lennon
said.
ing to acting president Robert
Smith. "Smith is perceived as
nothing more than an administrator
without much foresight," he said.
Pharmacology head Dr. Morley
Sutter said: "In a sense I applaud
Pedersen's resignation. The government was interfering directly (in
university affairs)."
Jane Burnes, policy coordinator
for   universities   minister   Pat
McGeer, denied the government is
meddling in university affairs.
Pedersen cited threats to the university autonomy in his resignation
speech.
David McMillan, vice-president
development and community relations, said Smith will be issuing a
message in a special UBC Reports
Wednesday. "It is nothing
dramatic, a basic new coach rah-rah
speech."
Smith said the special report is an
attempt to tell the campus we
should all pull together. He said
Pedersen's resignation is a real loss
to the university, adding it is now
his job to hold the fort.
A 24 member committee including four students and chaired
by UBC chancellor Robert Wyman,
will be formed by March 22 and will
submit a presidential candidates list
to the board's academic committee
by May 24.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
AMS calls s
i  i
en referendum
By PATTI FLATHER
The Alma Mater Society council
is calling a snap referendum.
It will ask students to allow
UBC's administration to set athletic
fees in exchange for a management
structure in which students have an
equal say in spending the fees.
A majority of 2,500 students
needed for quorum must vote yes in
the March 27, 28 and 29 referendum concerning the unprecedented
$32 fee the board of governors just
imposed.
Otherwise the AMS will sue the
university. "We'll be forced to,"
said AMS president Glenna
Chestnutt Monday.
"But that's not going to benefit
anybody," she said, because it will
cost the AMS money. She added
students might then lose any say in
how the fee is spent but still have to
pay it.
Chestnutt said a management
structure with 50 per cent student
representation is the best hope now,
adding the AMS is also seeking an
administration commitment to funding.
She said she wants to ensure that
the fee funds intramurals and
recreation, areas a large number of
students participate in. And she
wants the money to benefit men and
women equally, she said, unlike the
current athletic fee.
The AMS opposed the fee which
the board imposed last Thursday,
saying it broke a 1968 agreement
between the board and the AMS
whereby athletics fees had to be
passed by student referenda. The
fee was formerly $13.50.
The  board  cut  the  university's
contribution to athletics by 10 per
cent last year.
Chestnutt said the board's approval of the fee is contingent on
student board member Don
Holubitsky and Neil Risebrough,
associate vice president student services, working out a management
structure. Holubitsky is also on the
AMS committee planning the
referendum.
Asked if more student money for
athletics is justified when UBC programs will soon be cut, Chestnutt
said: ' 'We believe going to university is more than academics."
Women's athletics director
Marilyn Pomfret said she supports
a management structure such as the
AMS is asking for.
She added she is glad athletics
will receive more funding. "My opinion is that referendums are a
suitable way (to raise money) but
the cost is man-hours in order to get
one passed is great."
It would be "unfortunate" for
everyone if the vote fails and the
AMS sues, she said.
Pomfret said she assumes the administration will maintain its current funding levels for athletics.
B.C. needs study
before cutting UBC
By ROBERT BEYNON
If B.C.'s government is going to
cut universities' funding they
should commission a study or at
least look at other studies on
universities, the Canadian Association of University Teachers said Friday.
Sarah Shorten told 80 people in
IRC 2 recent polls conducted show
"the public is prepared to maintain
current levels of education, even if
that means tax increases."
She told the Critical Function of
the University conference that when
the recent Ontario Bovey commission surveyed industry and commerce "it found incredible support
for universities there."
"The commission took the view
that the university system is the
engine for the future," Shorten
said. And she said when the Bovey
commission did an extra study on
select industries it found "the overwhelming view of industry is that
universities had a vital role to play
(in the future.)"
Considering these and other
studies she said she cannot understand why the provincial government
is even discussing cutting the
budgets of B.C.'s three universities.
She added the universities in the
states of California, Texas and the
Carolinas all received hefty increases after studies there.
Despite these examples, Shorten
said universities are also being attacked in Britain, the U.S. and
across Canada. "The quality of student experience is clearly
deteriorating" as a result of cuts,
Shorten said.
Many attacks on universities are
based on false presuppositions, she
added, pointing out that universities are not businesses, do more
than just train professionals and
cannot be analyzed on "the crudest
interpretations."
And she said because the future is
unforseeable universities must be
allowed to spend money on projects
that are not obviously cost efficient.
"Universities have a responsibility
to take risks," Shorten said.
FORMER PRESIDENT PEDERSEN quells tuition fee hike protest rally last year. No rally came this year
Petition challenges UBC withdrawal policy
By PATTI FLATHER
The Students for a Democratic
University want help distributing a
petition opposing the "F" grade
students dropping a course after an
early deadline receive.
SUB a little late
By MURRAY JOHNSON
Better late than never — Monday
March 18 is the tentative opening
for the SUB expansion project.
People should be able to move
through the complex and some food
services will be available by then,
said Michael Kingsmill, the architecture student involved with the
project since his drawings for the
expansion were chosen by the
Capital Projects Acquisition Committee.
This date is more than two months
over the second deadline of January
and well past the initial October
completion date.
The project, costing $1.9 million,
is one of several being funded by
the Alma Mater Society out of a
special CPAC fund. Students voted
in the fall of 1982 to pay an additional $20 student fee for student
capital projects. Some other projects the fund has contributed to are
Whistler cabin and housing.
Kingsmill said there were several
reasons for the delays. He said
footings for the existing building
were not on the right spot, and
more-, debris had to be removed
around the excavation site. He added a whole foundation wall needed
to be underpinned.
And there were water leakage
problems that were both costly and
time consuming, said Kingsmill.
The old concrete on the plaza was
ripped up, a new sealant was applied, and the surface recovered at a
cost of $100,000, he said.
Kingsmill said the committee
considered trying to recover these
costs from the original SUB contractor.
However UBC's physical plant
inspected the work and approved it
so legal action would be directed
against them, said Kingsmill, adding this would mean one part of
UBC suing another.
There will be jobs for at least 30
students in the expansion, said
AMS food and beverage manager
Patrick Chapman. He said he has
interviewed 60 applicants over the
past week, since advertising jobs in
The Ubyssey, and will hire 30 people mainly for food services.
Chapman said additional people
will be hired as needed, with
postings located at the UBC
employment centre in Brock hall.
The expansion contains a
restaurant, a snack bar, a word processing centre, the new intramurals
office, and brand new space for
some clubs including the Photo
Society and the Varsity Outdoor
Club. There will be two bookable
rooms, said AMS vice president
Jonathan Mercer.
Since mid-January SDU gathered
600 signatures asking the senate and
board of governors to return to giving "N" grades for late course
withdrawals, said SDU member
Cathy Falle, arts 2.
The petition also asks that the
deadline for dropping courses be
doubled to six weeks for two-term
courses and to four weeks for one-
term courses, and that no numerical
marks be used in overall averages
for courses dropped late.
The new failing grade took effect
this year in the arts faculty after a
March 1984 senate decision which
says students not completing a
course they are registered in receive
a fail "where circumstances do not
warrant deffered standing."
"Medical or compassionate
reasons" are the only justified circumstances.
The stricter rules will take effect
in all faculties this September. Falle
said SDU will present the signatures
it has to the March 20 senate
meeting but will keep the petition
drive going after that.
Falle said the rules were bad
enough before the changes because
an "N" grade does look bad on a
transcript. "You also have a financial penalty," she said, because a
student's course fees are lost when
the course is dropped.
"It (the former policy) was not
supporting   the   slackers.   People
drop out of a course for a lot of
reasons." Falle said her group sets
up in SUB every Tuesday and Friday between 11:30 a.m. and 2:30
p.m.
Student senate caucus voted in
January to try to lengthen drop-add
deadlines, but rejected SDU's other
proposals. Student agriculture
senator Joe Rutherford, who after
April 1 will sit on the senate committee which handles such issues,
said he supports SDU's proposals.
But he said it is very difficult to
have senate change a motion once it
is passed. "Senate is notorious for
not rescinding motions, especially if
a student brings it up."
SUBway worker wipes grime with a smile
By ROBBY ROBERTSON
A clean sheen follows Leung Wai
as he wipes his way around the Sub-
WAI . . . works hard
way cafeteria, fighting an endless
battle against Subway scum.
For the last 13 years, Wai (his
first name — pronounced "way")
has made it his personal responsibility that crumbs, sugar, and
sticky goobers don't gook your
sweaters elbows.
He is a man who deals in shine.
But to the untold droves of
students who have known him over
the years, Wai's grin is what makes
him unforgettable. Often seen dully
reflected in the stained grain of a
wooden table, as he polishes the
table his image becomes clearer. If
you chance to look up, he says "hi"
and beams.
Wai has a "hi, how are you?"
relationship with countless
thousands of students. "That
friendly Chinese guy" is a typical
description of Wai; a worker
behind the counter who knows him
better says, "He's always proposing
to me."
Whether you're in the Subway to
nibble and feine away the last few
hours before a big-headed exam, or
just to hash away a lunch hour with
a classmate, being friendly with you
is Wai's cup of tea.
"The students are very nice, very
nice," says Wai, drawling out the
"nice" slowly. He talks of his coworkers, the new students in the
fall, the summer, and the fall of the
next year. All of them, says Wai,
are nice, very nice."
When asked if he would like to be
interviewed, Wai waves his arms,
saying modestly, "nah, I'm only a
worker. I'm not important." As I
persist, Wai burries me in a pile of
depreciatory thank yous, shakes my
hand, and continues to hold it as we
talk.
The Subway is place most people
avoid like kitty giblets, but Wai
loves it. It's his enjoyment of simply being with people that makes him
a positive influence. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 12, 1985
Go for it
A few weeks ago, former UBC president George Pedersen said to student senate caucus that when the program cuts came due, following
budget forecasts, there would be a big "fooferah" from people trying to
save their programs. An understandable one, nevertheless, he said.
UBC still doesn't know its budget for next year and the fooferah has
begun. Former vice president academic Robert Smith, now acting president, sent letters to all faculties asking various questions, the most severe
demanding why this or that program should not be axed. He will not make
the letter public, and many of the deans won't either.
Rumors of programs already cut, of government interference, and so on
are abundant. Students, particularly uninformed in many cases are catching on fast in threatened areas.
The methodology of program slashing is an abomination to the university community. An abomination which helps rumors and fears grow rather
than abate.
The program cuts are handled by a select few in secret with virtually no
mutually agreed upon principles guiding them. Foremost among these
people is former vice president academic Robert Smith. Along with him in
a little committee are a few powerful deans. They get together, "gather information", and assure everyone nothing has been decided on for sure.
But the letters sent out are quite specific — Smith may not be certain but
has a good idea what is going to go. When asked how the decision will be
made, he and others always regurgitate the ludicrous "cherry document"
approved by senate last fall.
The cherry-colored document says UBC should cut "core" courses last,
and "non-core" courses first, without even explaining how these are different. This document is a smokescreen shielding the very real lack of information behind it.
The decisions Smith and Co. reach after gathering information will go
through senate budget committee before being rubber-stamped by senate.
Student input? Forget it. When the cuts come before senate, in April or
May perhaps, most of the 17 student members on the 87-member body will
be newly elected, inexperienced, and possibly out of town. This is the only
student representation.
We need student representation elsewhere than on the senate. Go for it.
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Well-dressed board disregards students
By PATTI FLATHER
Six o'clock Thursday, March 7,
1985. It had not been a nice day.
George Pedersen resigned at two
o'clock, and between four and six
UBC's board of governors raised
tuition fees 10 per cent, imposed
higher    fees    for    international
( freestyle)
students, a new unprecedented
athletic fee, and a levy on graduate
students.
All this was against everything
students were saying.
As the board, dressed impeccably
as always, gathered around the
television set in the Information
Services office after the board
meeting, there was no question they
care about the university and how it
is portrayed to the public.
Of course they wanted to see how
the media handled Pedersen's
resignation, and they were clearly
worried. They shook their heads at
BCTV's mention of a UBC hit list,
referring to the letters sent to all
faculties requesting program
justifications. Then they ambled
over to the faculty club for dinner,
passing cars parked outside — including a Mercedes, a Jaguar, a
Lincoln Continental, a Cadillac.
The problem with the board is
that they do not care about
students. University, yes. Students,
no. Shouldn't the two be
synonomous? Yes. There is no way
they can't be the same, except in the
board's eyes, (I am speaking here in
generalities — there are exceptions
such as staff board member Victor
Doray).
No one disputes the fact UBC is
in crisis, a financial crisis caused by
the provincial government which is
attacking our very reason for existence. However, students, and all
the young people who do not make
it to UBC but would like to, are also
in a crisis that goes virtually
unrecognized by the board.
Twenty per cent of B.C. students
were unemployed last summer, and
the figure was higher for ex-
students trying to find permanent
work. B.C. unemployment overall
was and is the second highest in the
country. B.C. is the only province
to have no student grants.
Yet UBC's administration talks
of giving faculty a salary increase
while making students pay more for
tuition and athletics. This is not to
say we don't need good professors
and that we don't want to keep
them here.
Mclean and pedersen
But it seems the administration
and the board do not care whether
or not good students from a variety
of backgrounds come here. How
many   professors   are   under   the
in better times
poverty line, compared to students?
1 am under the poverty line, yet I
must pay more tuition and get less,
and fund athletics, which I do not
participate in. And I am luckier
See page 5: BOARD
Letters
Nutritional science has to tell world how good it is
We would like to take this opportunity to inform you that the Family and Nutritional Sciences
Undergraduate Society is now officially the new name for the former
Home Economics Undergraduate
Society. This change is in keeping
with the name change of our school
which occurred last year.
The school of family and nutri
tional sciences has a two-fold function: to educate for professional
competence and to encourage a
spirit of intellectual inquiry.
There   are   five   undergraduate
Ubyssey quotes entirely out of context
Mykle Thompson expressed a
personal opinion and was quoted
out of context in The Ubyssey
(Washrooms being surveyed,
March 5, 1985). The impression was
given that he and the Gays and Lesbians of UBC support efforts to
crack down on washroom sex.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC has
the stated purpose of representing
all sexual minorities, and actively
working for gay liberation on campus. People who engage in
washroom sex are a sexual minority.
A number of them, perhaps most
of them, hold themselves out as
heterosexual, would never dream of
calling themselves gay, and limit
their homosexual contacts to these
Dear, dear, dear departed George
Dear, departed George:
I sure am glad that you decided to
resign as president of this university. I mean, you're following the
time-honored tradition of the captain jumping first from the sinking
ship.
It's easy to make a principled
statement when you have nothing at
stake. Oh, let me guess, you didn't
know of the offer from the University of Western Ontario until after
you resigned, right?
Do you really think resigning will
help?   If so,   you're  only  kidding
yourself.
Face it, George, the provincial
government is glad to be rid of
anyone with principles. But, hey we
might be lucky and get Pat McGeer
to replace you.
Holy smokes, speaking of Mr.
McGeer, what am I doing taking
time out from my studies to write a
letter? Silly me, I've got studying to
do!
Dave Davies
law 1
brief   anonymous    trips    to   the
washroom.
As long as gays are oppressed,
and homosexuality is stigmatized,
people will be reluctant to express
their sexuality in a more open way.
If people are offended by
washroom sex, the solution does
not lie in photographing those involved, humiliating them or throwing them in jail: the solution lies in
breaking down the stereotypes and
eradicating the sexism that keep
people in the closet.
Kevin Robb Law 2
Mykle Thompson Nursing 3
Damaris Sargent Arts 3
Terry Fairclough Graduate Studies
Sean T. Bickerton Arts 3
Dana Perlman Arts 4
Megan Crowhurst Arts 4
Ian Fairclough Graduate Studies
Richard Kramer Arts 4
David McLaren Graduate Studies
members of Gays and Lesbians
of UBC
programs through which these
functions are accomplished:
dietetics, family studies, home
economics (general), human nutrition and human nutrition honors.
Graduates of these programs are
prepared for work in a variety of
settings. Graduates of dietetics
complete a dietetic internship to
prepare for positions in hospitals,
commercial food service operations, industry, and government
and community agencies.
Graduates from other programs
work in home economics extension,
business, and government and com
munity agencies. Graduates of the
home economics (general) program
are eligible to enter training to
become teachers.
Some students go on to graduate
studies in family studies and on
human nutrition, which are also offered at the school.
The school draws upon the
physical and social sciences to give
students a multidiseiplinary
perspective. This background is used as a base for all of the components in the school: clothing/tex-
tile/design,    dietetics,    family
See page 7: MALE
THE UBYSSEY
March 12, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Patti smirked across the pressroom with wild abandon. "Come here Victor and Murray," she
cooed, "1 have sweet advice on your dear stones " Robert and Charlie looked ayhast at this tyrannical
power Dave Magowan qualked before her might. Robby Robertson avoided her by staying home.
Sarah Million won browny points with her female collaborator by typing out innocuous tweens. And
Monte Stewart tried to hide his photos, to no avail. Tuesday, March 12, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Board often frustrating
From page 4
than many — I don't go hungry, I
have no student loan (yet) and I'm
still here, though if I was in second
year I'd get the hell out.
The board decided that the extra
money gained from the higher tuition fee was more important than
the increased possibility of "no-
shows" who are accepted to UBC
but do not register. Eight hundred
students were "no-shows" last
year, a sharp increase, and a third
of them cited financial reasons. The
board basically said: "We want the
money. Fuck the low-income
students."
The student board members,
Don Holubitsky and Nancy Bradshaw, said after the meeting they
didn't notice any other board
members opposing the fees. Bradshaw was visibly depressed. Both
Bradshaw and Holubitsky worked
hard in the board's backrooms lobbying against the fees. Board
members would listen, say nice
things, say they understand.
Holubitsky said in the hall with a
cynical smile that he had just spent
two hours getting shot down.
Their frustration is understandable. After the meeting Bradshaw
and Holubitsky talked to board
chair David McLean and member
Robert Lee about the need for increased student aid in light of the
increase, particularly for students
from outside the lower mainland.
Lee, a leader in B.C. real estate and
the only member to come from a
visible minority, seemed to agree.
(The board did agree to reexamine
UBC's student aid and market it
better).
But all McLean could talk about
was the need to stop all those bad
students who buy a car with their
student loan. McLean, a well-fed
wealthy lawyer and realtor who
happens to also be very condescending, would not even acknowledge
to Bradshaw that there is a need for
student aid.
He went on to talk about his law
firm and how he as the model
citizen always tells his employees
not to collect U.I. illegally. What is
needed, according to McLean, is
not student aid, but some way to instill a moral sense into people so
they don't abuse the system.
What system, McLean? The
system that gives wealthy people a
head start? The system that
presumes a student receiving a loan,
or a person on U.I., is guilty until
proven innocent? That system
should be abused, and fought, and
changed.
I have a friend who sums up the
attitude of the chair of UBC's
board very well. "Students want to
talk? I'll talk to them all they
want."
It is too bad more students do not
take the board seriously. I can
understand people feeling the
meetings are fait accompli. They
are. But it is fascinating to watch a
large part of B.C.'s economic,
political and social ruling class
gather together and joke as they
kick students in the teeth.
You have here Robert Wyman
from Pemberton, Houston,
Willoughby, who according to
wealth-glorifying Vancouver
magazine has already "made it."
There's former Social Credit education minister from the 1950's Leslie
Peterson who rumor has it almost
succeeded Wacky as Party leader.
Or Peter Brown, an investor and
chair of Expo's finance committee.
Or Robert Lee. Or Joy McCuster,
who some say got appointed by the
government because she and her
husband played tennis doubles with
universities   minister   Pat   McGeer
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Atmitjrapli
Phone   now   for   your   complimentary sitting, choose from
18 previews (proofs)
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADWA Y
Resume photos as low as 75c in
colour.
and his wife. All the board needs is
Jimmy Pattison to round out its
narrow business orientation.
It's all really very fascinating. If I
return to UBC next year I can look
forward to virtually the highest fees
in Canada, and a little entertainment at 2 p.m., first Thursday,
every month. That's in the Old Admin. Check it out.
CENTRE
Copy Card
Available Now!!
$10.00 Value
No More Coins
Needed.
Student Union
Building
228-4388
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AMS concerts presents
THE VILLIANS
Friday, March 22
SUB Ballroom
Tix: AMS Box Office
PUNCHLINES
Wednesday, Mar. 13
SUB Auditorium
12:30 p.m.
FREE!
r^tTiTimii m tiiHTTTTtnttwwmtll
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"MARKETING FOR A
CHANGING POPULATION"
Dr. Gerald Gorn
Commerce Dept., UBC
Tuesday, March 12th, 1985
12:30 p.m.
ANNUAL MEETING
Free Dinner
Wednesday, March 13th, 1985
5:00-7:00 p.m.
HILLEL HOUSE
(Behind Brock Hall) 224-4748
Patti blather is a poor but
righteous Ubysseyer. Freestyle is a
forum open to Ubyssey staffers.
' >.:>.>*:«! "T.c&a
YOU CAN TAKE IT WITH
YOU!
WE   HAVE  A   SHIPMENT  GOING   TO   VOUR
COUNTRY. CALL NOW!
Tippet - Richardson Limited
''the friendly movers''
324-5015
120—455 East Kent Street, Vane.
OTTAWA • TRENTON • PETAWAWA • NORTH BAY
• HAMILTON • KITCHENER • STRATFORD • LONDON • MISSISSAUGA • EDMONTON • CALGARY •
VANCOUVER• SAN JOSE
•a
Schniing
v
-^
0 v,
0
^Vpies^c
After you've gone down the slopes for the last time in the day, remember
the sensation of the snow-filled wind in your face with Hiram Walker Schnapps.
Its cool, minty flavour is as refreshing as a spray of snow.
HIRAM WALKER SCHNAPPS.
WHAT A DIFFERENCE A NAME MAKES. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Vtfg0ti
TODAY
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Student reading: poetry, prose, drama, 7 p.m.,
Museum of Anthropology, theatre gallery room.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Professor Aronson speaks on two origins of the
Cold War in comparative perspective: Canada,
U.S., UK relations, noon, Buch. B 221.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Prorated registration, noon, SUB 216 E, 3:30 and
5:30 classes moved to SUB 207/209.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Recovery program for compulsive overeating, no
fees, noon, conference room, Lutheran Campus
centre.
GRADUATE CENTRE
Modern dance classes emphasizing back care,
stretch, $6 per class, 5:30 p.m -7:30 p.m., large
cafeteria. Graduate centre.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CENTRE
Weekly   testimony   and   bible   readings,   noon,
SUB 211.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Lunch speaker, Dr. Gerald Gorn, "Marketing for
a   Changing   Population",   noon,   Hillel   House
(behind Brock Hall).
AMS ART GALLERY
Art education — painting, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., AMS
Art Gallery, SUB.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture:  pediatric surgery,  Dr.  R.  H.  Marshall,
noon. Wood 1.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,   everyone welcome,  7  p.m.,  Aquatic
centre.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Video   presentation,    'Raising   Capital',    noon,
Angus 226.
WEDNESDAY
ETHNIC STUDIES COMMITTEE
Paul Wynn from CBC's "The Canadians" speaks
on "Images and  Reality: Who are "the Canadians"?", noon, Buch A102.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night,  newcomers meet in SUB 237A,
4:30 p.m., Gallery lounge, lower area.
UBC SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Staff meeting, noon, SUB 241K.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Badminton, 4:30 p.m.-6 p.m., Osborne Gym A.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Annual   general   meeting,   dinner,   5   p.m.-7:30
p.m., Hillel House.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Guest  speaker  Ted   Black   on   "The   Poetry  of
Life", noon, Buch B317.
UBC-JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Sushi sales: raw fish and other good eats, noon,
SUB Lower concourse.
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE AND
TRAVEL CLUB UBC
Egypt:   Land of the  Pharoahs,   presentation  by
Russell   Jennings,   Westcan   treks   and   travel,
noon, SUB 205.
UBC SPORTSCAR CLUB
Executive elections, and pre-Wesiwood seminar,
7 p.m., SUB 205.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Business discussions, 4:30 p.m., Angus 226.
THURSDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Annual general meeting and executive elections,
newcomers welcome, noon, SUB 215.
Ten booths are dotted about
campus today and are worked by
Students for UBC, an ad hoc group
of students concerned about the
possible elimination of their programs.
These students are asking
students, faculty and staff to sign a
petition asking the senate and the
administration to allow "an open
and equitable discussion by the
university community of how cutbacks are to be implemented."
The    request    is    essential.
Stop, talk, sign the petitions.
You owe it to other students. You
owe it to yourself.
Special
Offer
20°/c
O Off
Any Hair Service
With Student
AMS Card
1071 Denman St.
688-7808
2178 W. Broadway
731-4138
BIG BLOCK BANQUET
University honors its most outstanding women
athletes, 5:30 p.m., UBC Faculty Club.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Annual general meeting, noon, SUB 205.
UBC AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY
General meeting, open to all, noon. Brock Extension 358.
UBC CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Poetry reading, noon, Buchanan Penthouse.
CUSO-UBC
Development   education   series,   Land   Reform
7:30 p.m., International House, Upper Lounge.
SOUTHERN AFRICA WORKING GROUP
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 260.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
General election, Bible study after, noon, Scarfe
206.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Meeting for executive election, final planning for
Whistler trip, noon, Hennings 302.
PRE-DENTAL CLUB
Dr.  Williamson on the future of dentistry and
talks by executive nominees, noon, Woodward
5.
ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP
General   meeting,    possible   speaker,    noon,
Geography 212.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Have your name translated into Chinese, part of
Asian Week '85, 1:15 p.m.-2:15 p.m., SUB Concourse.
AMS ART GALLERY
Art education —painting,  10 a.m.-4 p.m., AMS
Art Gallery.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Nominations for executive elections,  1:30 p.m.,
International House.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Prime  time,   everyone  welcome,   noon,   Brock
302.
UBC MARXIST LENINIST
STUDY GROUP
Forum —oppose   Reagan's   "visit"   to   Canada,
noon, BUCH B216.
UBC SHITO-RYO KARATE CLUB
Karate demonstration, part of Asian Week '85,
noon, SUB Concourse.
FRIDAY
AMS WOMEN'S CENTRE
Andrea     Dworkin    speaks
Women," 8 p.m., IRC 2.
on     "Right    Wing
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Mad March Mania dance, tickets $4 on sale at
Little Sisters and SUB 237A, 8:30 p.m., SUB
Partyroom.
SOCIAL WORK 415 CLASS
Panel discussion of social work opportunities in
the '80s with 3 guest speakers, 1 p.m.-3 p.m.,
School of Social Work, lecture hall A.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Panel discussion: 'The Media and the Arms
Race", noon, SUB 205.
AIESEC
Introduction to AIESEC meeting, noon, Angus
221.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Nominations for executive elections, noon, International House.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Film, 'Chan is Missing', part of Asian Week '85,
noon, SUB Auditorium.
ANDREA
DWORKIN
Feminist Author
speaks on
RIGHT WING
WOMEN
Fri., Mar. 15
8 p.m.
IRC 2 UBC
Tix: Students $5
Others $7
AMS Box Office
Overflow Tickets
at the Door
UBC RUGBY DANCE
featuring
SECRET SERVICE
Saturday, March 16
8 p.m.
Come before 9:30 p.m. and get
one refreshment FREE!
SUB Ballroom
Tix: $4.00 AMS Box Office
and from Players
TRAVELCUT5 GoingYourWay!
STUDENT WORK ABROAD PROGRAMME
MAKE YOUR HOLIDAY WORK!
CFS has a way to help you
cut travel costs and earn
valuable work experience in
Britain. Ireland, Belgium or
New Zealand. You owe it to
yourself to find out about:
SWAP
1-800-972-4004
N.ime      _
Address
Mail completed coupon to:
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
604 224-2344
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
Granville Island   1516 Duranleau St
604 687-6033
The travel company of CFS
S^CO-OP OUTDOOR
*-' GEAR SWAP
Want to sell those hiking boots that
never really were your size? Buy the
gear you need to travel to Europe or
go summer backpacking without
spending a bundle?
The Co-op's 3rd Annual
Outdoor Gear Swap is the
answer Call 872-7858 for more
details. P.S. you don't have to be
a Co-op member to participate.
Win a
Pentax
Sharpshooter II
When you come to the Gear
Swap be sure to enter to win a new
Pentax Sharpshooter II camera to
be given away at 3 PM the day of
the Gear Swap. No purchase
necessary to win. Camera is
courtesy of Pentax Canada Inc.
AM MOUNTAIN
M^m EQUIPMENT
aWWA co-op
Gear Swap
Sunday, March 17, 10am_3pm
428 W. 8th Ave., Vancouver
Tuesday, March 12, 1985
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS^
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
C.i.r.silinl .n/s .irt' payabl' in ativani r   Dr.Hllmr  s 10:30 a. rv.  the
(lav lit'fnrc ;mh!n   t'u >i >
Publications Room 26'i. SUB.. UBC,  Van.. B.C   V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
Paintings by
ELIZA HAWKINS
March 18th & 19th
Poetry Reading at
7:30 p.m.
Everyone welcome
FREE
11 - FOR SALE - Private
ALMOST GIVING AWAY!! Much loved and
very well cared for, complete Canon camera
outfit, incl. Canon AE1, 50mm lens, zoom
lens and flash. Free cases &■ filters, nights
685-1130.
15 — Found
FOUND:  Tennis raquet in front of Regent
College. Phone Lori, 224-7295.
A BLUE UMBRELLA found in Brock Hall,
to claim call Shirley at 255-0291.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
OCTOBER 5, 1985 LSAT
on September 13, 14, 15/1985
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT Preparation Courses,
112-800-387-3742.
30 - JOBS
MALE FEMALE MODELS wanted for
haircuts, etc. Call SOPHISTICUTS at
668-7808 or 731-4138.
CHILDCARE NEEDED for 6 mth. old, 4
p.m.-8 p.m. Mon.-Fri. commencing May 6.
References &■ exp. essential. Shirley
253-8332 asap.
35 - Lost
LADIES' black cross pen w/pouch, lost in
biology building. Reward offered. Call: Jenny, 261-0559.
LADIES' GLASSES, clear plastic frames, in
SUB Ballroom, Feb. 21. Please call Linda at
228-4507.
40 — Messages
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB Concourse
(Phone 228-3777)
50 - RENTALS
MINI STORAGE
Summer Storage Special
261-5315, 680-5277
A-Western Storage Co.
540 Beatty St.
3 FOR 4 MONTHS
RENT COUPON
70 - SERVICES
THE WRITER ... the typist. Term papers.
Assignments. Research. Reports. Professional Resumes. Ghost Writing. Memoirs.
Speeches. Business Proposals. 733-1383.
YOUR DEADLINE approaches but draft
No. 47 is still not quite right? Don't despair!
Experienced editor will polish term papers,
theses, etc. Other services also available.
Contact Footnotes Information & Research
Services, 430-5751.
JOB INTERVIEWS
In today's fiercely competitive job market
there is one tragic and inescapable fact:
The Interview is all that matters. If you
win the interview, you win the job. "How
To Successfully Win Job Interviews" is
available at the Bookstore or write: Fleetwood Press, 246B - 8155 Park Road,
Richmond, B.C. V6Y 3C9 for free details.
85 - TYPING
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reasonable rates for students for term papers,
essays &■ masters. 273-6008 eves.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U &del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (MICOM). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail. Fast
professional service. Jeeva, 876-5333.
WORDPOWER - Editing & word processing professionals. Thesis, term paper,
resume £t form letter specialists. Student
rates. 3737 W   10th (at Alma). 222-2661.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we type,  theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs/wkends. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, mscpts., resumes, theses.
IBM Selec. II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9857.
YOUR WORDS professionally typed - to
go. Judith Filtness, 3206 W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351 (24 hrs. I Fast and reliable.
MINIMUM NOTICE: Essays & resumes.
224-1342 (24 hours).
WORD WEAVERS - Word processing,
stud, rates, fast turnaround, Bilingual.
5670 Yew & 41st. 266-6814.
TYPING: Professional presentations for
proposals, resumes, etc. Competitive rates.
734-0650 124 hrs.).
WORD   PROCESSING  SERVICES.   Spell
ing,    grammar    expertise.    Days,    nights,
weekends. Call Nancy 266-1768.
TYPING: W/P AND TYPING: term papers,
theses, mscpt., essays, incl. reports, letters, resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. 25 yrs. experience. Reasonable, accurate, fast. Phone
Richmond, 271-6755.
LET JANE TYPE last minute essays for you.
Reas. rates. Fast, quality service. 879-3250
aft. 3 p.m. wkdays. Anytime wkends.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING WITH
A DIFFERENCE. 24 hr., 7 day, accurate,
fast dependable. AES 7300 Et AES Plus
equip. Call Yvette, 879-2027.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: $1.00/pg.
double spaced. Essays, term papers, etc.
from legible work. Call Kim 876-7630.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for students on North Shore.
Days, eves., weekends. 985-8890.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Math, sciences,
languages, fine arts, literature. Will correct
grammar £r spelling. 872-7934.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING professionally
finished with daisy-wheel typewriter. Call
Glenna, eves, or wkends at 734-8561.
TYPING: Essays, theses, term papers,
mscps. $1/page. Call 228-8827 after 4 p.m.
YEAR AROUND EXPERT essay, theses
typing from legible wk. Spelling/gram, corrected. 738-6829. 10-9 p.m. K. Ed bus rte.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
Essays, term papers, theses
Student rates. 261-6102
PDQ WORD processing. Essays, theses,
reports, letters, resumes. Days,
eves/wknds. Quick turnaround. Stud,
rates. 731-1252.
90 - WANTED
IDENTICAL
TWINS
Required for Innovative
Research in
Bio-Psychological
Research
For information contact
Dr. H. Klonoff
No. 7-2255 Wesbrook Mall
Psych Unit
228-7301 Tuesday, March 12, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Letters
Students destroyed hose
The irresponsible behavior of a
few childish, immature members of
the student body at UBC has cost
our company $500 to replace 20 feet
of 12" suction hose that was in
place at the Student Union
building.
While unattended this special
hose was stood on and deliberately
flattened beyond repair by three to
six students.
I know this lack of respect for
other people's property is not practiced by all the students, but the few
who do show this lack of respect,
brand the rest equally in the eyes of
the victim.
Those that witness this wanton
damage are as guilty (as those committing the act) for aiding and abet-
Males increasing
From page 4
resource management/consumer
studies, family studies, foods,
human development, housing
design, nutrition.
Although the study of foods and
of clothing are one part of home
economics, neither secondary
school home economics nor that offered at the univesity level fit the
"cooking and sewing" image.
At the secondary school level, the
focus is on practical and personal
education, while at the university
level, the focus is on application of
academic knowledge.
The field of home economics has
wide appeal and attracts men and
women of diverse academic
backgrounds. Although the majority of the faculty and students in the
school are female, one-third of the
faculty are male.
Furthermore, since courses offered in the school are relevant to
many other majors, male enrolment in our classes has increased.
To find out more about the
school's programs and courses, enquire at our new building (beside
the new bookstore), at 2205 East
Mall.
Yuki Omoto
family and nutritional sciences
undergraduate society treasurer
ting the vandals by letting them go
scot-free and not reporting such a
destructive inconsiderate act.
An apology will not replace the
costs of damage and in light of the
above, the whole student body
should be responsible for the costs,
unless those vandals be brought forward to face their responsibility.
Your reply would be appreciated.
Frank Hurson
president, Power Suction
Service Company Ltd.
THINK KINKO'S
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5706 University Blvd.
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WHERE    YOU     FIND    A
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TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE
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Open daily 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
O. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS GUARANTEED TO
CHANGE YOUR WA Y OF THINKING?
1. Studying at King's College in London
2. Studying at Royal Holloway College in London
3. Studying at The British Studies Centre in
Canterbury.
A. ANY OF THE ABOVE
The Institute for American Universities now offers 3 study-
abroad options in Great Britain: King's College of the University of London, The Institute's British Studies Centre in
Canterbury, and Royal Holloway College (also of the University of London.) Each combines a first-rate academic programme with the opportunity to live and travel in Europe.
For details concerning the Institute's programmes, write to us
at 73 Castle Street, Canterbury CT1 2QD, England, or see
your campus study-abroad advisor.
NOMINATIONS NOW
OPEN
FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES ON THE
FOLLOWING PRESIDENTIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEES
Concerns of the Handicapped
Food Services
International House Board
of Directors
Land Use Committee
Men's Athletics
Sherwood Lett Memorial
Student Union Building
Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre
Traffic & Parking
War Memorial Gym Fund
Women's Athletics
Youth Employment Program
Nominations Close
4 p.m., Wednesday
March 20
1 position
4 positions
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
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Community Rep
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3 positions
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Forms Available
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 12, 1985
Thunderbirds impress at Elk Lake
3$r
UBC ROWERS LACKED preparation time for Elk Lake Regatta, held last weekend on Vancouver Island. Thunderbirds will host a regatta at Burnaby Lake on March 23.
The UBC rowing teams thawed
out last weekend, faring very well at
a tri-meet regatta at Elk Lake, just
outside Victoria.
and the University of Oregon.
"Our crews went to Victoria after
only two weeks of rowing", said
UBC men's coach Boris Klavora.
recording a time of 8:06.0 while
finishing second behind University
of Victoria in the varsity eight. The
Vikings have five members of the
SPORTS
After a long winter lay-off, the "Burnaby Lake (where the 'Birds Canadian Olympic team which won
'Birds displayed marked improve- train and  host  competitions) was a gold medal at Los Angeles,
ment in the competition which also frozen until two weeks ago". "Rowing techniques need to be
featured the University of Victoria UBC won the cox four event, improved," said Klavora, who was
Names abound as Big Blocks loom
a member of the Canadian rowing
entourage at L.A.
The UBC women's team recorded a major upset over the UVic varsity eight. The Thunderbirds came
from behind to shade the Vikettes
by a time of 7:16.6 compared to
7:18.6.
The UVic squad boasted three
Olympic team members while Tricia
Smith, a silver medalist at L.A.,
was UBC's only Olympian.
The reverse came true in the
junior varsity eights with UVic
beating UBC by nearly a minute.
The UBC novice eights also finished
second behind UVic.
"Our depth is really beginning to
show through in the jayvee and
novic boats," said UBC women's
coach Drew Harrison, also a
member of the Canadian coaching
group at the 1984 Olympics. "I'm
really pleased with all performances."
UBC will host a regatta at Burnaby Lake on Saturday March 23.
CITR goes on air
CITR FM 102 (cable 100) has announced that it will broadcast the
final game of the B.C. boys' high
school basketball championships
from the PNE Agrodome Saturday
night. The final contest begins at
8:45 with CITR going on the air at
8:30.
By MONTE STEWART
As ihe UBC varsity season winds
down, speculation has come to
highlight the sports page.
The annual Big Block dinners will
be held over the next two weeks.
The women's awards ceremony will
be held this Thursday at the UBC
faculty club while the men's dinner
will be held the following Thursday
at the same locale.
As far as the women are concerned, there should be few surprises in
terms of award selections. The
swim team, the only women's team
to record a national title, is the clear
favorite as UBC Team of the Year.
Accordingly, Jack Kelso, winner
of Canadian Interuniversity
Athletic Union women's swim
coach of the year for two years running, is the obvious choice for UBC
Women's Coach of the Year.
Individually, there might be a few
surprises. Several members of the
national champion swim team
could be considered, including
Rhonda Thommasson, Barb McBain, and Fiona Waddell. Joannie
Cockroft, holder of the CIAU high
jump record, also has a strong
chance of winning the whole
shabang.
However, considering that this
was an Olympic year, rower Tricia
Smith should be one of the top contenders for the top women's award.
The men's awards also seem fairly predictable.
The UBC soccer team, as the
university's only men's national
champion this year, should easily
win UBC Team of the Year honors.
However, coach Joe Johnson,
primarily because of his low profile,
is not necessarily a clear choice for
the Coach of the Year Trophy.
That honor could go to hockey
mentor Fred Masuch, who guided
the Thunderbirds to their best
showing in eight seasons — despite
finishing out of the playoffs.
The Bobby Gaul Trophy, named
after a varsity rugby player who lost
his life to cancer in his fourth year
at   UBC,   will   definitely   change
teams this year. Paul Thiessen, a
former member of the men's
volleyball team, won the award last
season. However, the volleybirds'
poor showing this year excludes any
members from consideration.
Again, the UBC hockey team
should dominate this department
because of its success and because it
is one of the darlings of the UBC
athletic department. Both men's
athletic directors, Bob Hindmarch
and Rick Noonan are actively involved in the Canadian Olympic
hockey team.
Bill Holowaty, as the Canada
West hockey league's leading scorer
and the conference's nomination
for CIAU Player of the Year, is the
most likely choice to win the highly
respected award.
Nevertheless, Olympic rowers
Pat Turner and Paul Steele, will
receive some consideration as a
result of their roles on the eights
team which won a gold medal a*
Los Angeles.
The City of Vancouver has
awarded both Turner, Steele, and
Tricia Smith with civic merit
awards. A lack of recognition from
UBC could be viewed as a slight
considering the Olympians' civic
and national achievement.
Glenn Steele, an outstanding running back with the UBC football
team for the past four seasons, will
probably receive consideration.
However, the Burnaby native did
not have an outstanding season as
the 'Birds missed the playoffs for
the first time in five seasons.
The men's and women's athletic
committees will make the respective
selections. No choices are expected
to be announced before the awards
ceremonies.
Ski 'Birds fall out
Idaho, usually a friendly state,
turned on the Thunderbird ski
teams last weekend.
The UBC men's team failed to
defend its National Collegiate
Ski Associatin title at McCall.
Several T-Birds, including
slalom ace Stu Gairns, delivered
sub-par performances because
of unexpected spills.
Gairns, winner of he
skimeister award at every meet
except one this season, did not
finish in the top 10 in either the
slalom or giant slalom events.
Sean Jaegli was the 'Birds' top
slalom finisher, coming in fifth.
No other Thunderbird cracked
the top 10.
Ken Stevens was seventh in the
giant slalom event.
Although the T-Birds did not
win a second consecutive
American national title (UBC
and SFU are the only Canadian
schools in the NCSA), both
Stevens and Jaegli were named
to the All America teams.
Jaegli was a first team choice
while Stevens was selected as a
second team member.
Wendy Morrison was UBC's
only female All-American. She
was named to the women's first
All-America team as a result of
her fourth place showing in the
women's slalom.
The UBC men's team came
fifth in the alpine combined portion of the competition.
College of Idaho won both the
men's and women's overall coin-
petitions.
Two 'Bird pucksters win awards
The Thunderbird hockey team
did not make the playoffs this year
but two 'Birds have proved their
ability to cope with finals.
Forward Bill Holowaty and
defender Rick Amann dominated
the    Canada    West    Universities
Athletic Union awards selections.
Both players were named to the
first all-star team with Holowaty
receiving two individual awards and
Amann taking one.
Jeannie moves up
UBC did not win a national track
and field- championship last
weekend in Windsor, Ontario.
That's the bad news; now, here's
the good news.
Jeannie Cockroft reached a new
state of euphoria, winning the
women's high jump competition.
Cockroft raised herself to a Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union
record of 1.86 metres.
The new mark surpassed the
previous record of 1.79 metres, set
by Allison Armstrong in 1981.
Alberta and Saskatchewan tied for
first place in the women's division.
The Thunderbirds, with only four
CIAU   qualifiers,   finished   eighth
overall.
As expected, Simon Hoogewerf
streaked to victory in the 1,000m
event. The Abbotsford native
recorded a time of 2:20.
Dave Wilkinson provided UBC's
next best showing, a third place
finish in the 60m hurdles.
Hoogewerf and Wilkinson, along
with Warren Lee and Bob Dalton,
staked the T-Bird 4x400 relay team
to a second place standing.
The University of Toronto won
the men's crown while UBC wound
up fifth in the nation. Consequently, the 'Birds finished two rungs
lower than their third place CIAU
ranking.
The veteran centre, who returned
to UBC after two seasons in Japan,
won the Dave "Sweeney" Shriner
Trophy as the league's leading
scorer with 19 goals and 28 assists.
He also won the UBC Alumni
Award for displaying high levels of
sportsmanship and ability.
Amann, a New Westminster
Bruin during the Ernie McLean era,
received the Mervy "Red" Dutton
Trophy as the league's top
defender.
Holowaty was also named as the
Canada West candidate for CIAU
Player of the Year.
Meanwhile, three Alberta players
were named to the first team:
goaltender Ken Hodge, defender
Tim Krug, and forward Breen
Neeser.
Golden Bear mentor Clare Drake
was selected as Canada West Coach
of the Year.
The Golden Bears, ranked
number one in Canada all season
long, have qualified as one of the
top four contenders for the CIAU
finals.
Cheerleaders draw crowd
The UBC cheerleaders held a training camp last weekend, attracting
more than 100 potential recruits. The four member squad is trying to gain
team status. "We won't receive scholarships," said Susan Jang. The
cheerleaders are hoping to become a team as a means of increasing
membership.
They began the season with 16 members — including four males.
However, most team members quit because of a lack of organization.
There are now just four official moral supporters: Jang, Karla Grandahl,
Rebecca Richards and Eileen Albany.

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