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The Ubyssey Jan 29, 1982

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 42
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 29,1982
228-2301
Nuclear Nightmare
Test of atomic blast effect on American army personnel, Aug. 31, 1957, Nevada.
By BRIAN JONES
"If we do not believe in people
power, then we do not have a
democracy. If we are sceptical about
the efficacy of speaking out, of
writing in our mass media, of
organizing, of approaching our
government representatives; if we are
afraid to take to the streets in opposition to militarism and the arms
race, then we have already lost the
human rights and democratic
freedoms which those arms are said
to be preserving for us."
Dr. Donald Bates
in an address delivered at The
Unitarian Church of Montreal
Nov. 8, 1981
Donald Bates can be aptly described as an angry man. He paces
about the room, emitting unrestrained energy as he talks. Bates speaks
with emotion and sincerity, a
characteristic common among
knowledgeable and passionate activists.
His anger is directed towards what
he sees as the world's biggest problem — the nuclear arms race.
"We've got to stop the arms race
because it is a fundamental crime
against humanity, even without a
nuclear war," says Bates. "It is
already causing the ravages of war
without the nuclear button ever being pushed."
Bates, who teaches history of
medicine at McGill University in
Montreal is more aware than most
people about the consequences of the
arms race and the possible consequences of, if and when it ever
comes, nuclear war. His participation in the peace and disarmament
movement took him to Airlie,
Virginia last spring where the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) held
their first conference. Bates was one
of four Canadian delegates who attended the six-day meeting, which
featured 73 physicians from a dozen
countries, including both the U.S.
and the Soviet Union.
Bates says the IPPNW's main
message is that nuclear war, which it
calls "the last epidemic", would be
catastrophic — that individuals may
survive, but society as we know it
would not. In the conference's final
document, the IPPNW states that in
an all-out war between the U.S. and
the Soviet Union it is probable that:
• more than 200 million people
would be killed immediately;
• more than 60 million people
would be injured;
• 80 per cent of physicians would
die;
• 80 per cent of hospital beds
would be destroyed;
• medical resources would be incapable of coping with those injured
by the blast, thermal energy, and
radiation;
• stocks of blood plasma, antibiotics, and drugs would be
destroyed or severely reduced; and
• food and water would be extensively contaminated.
Consequences such as these have
persuaded many physicians to join
with their colleagues and point out to
the public the dangers of nuclear
war, says Bates. "Doctors became
active 20 years ago, when the Physicians for Social Responsibility was
formed at Harvard to alert people of
the effects of nuclear war, and the
impossibility of an adequate medical
response in the post attack period,"
he says.
Bates stops pacing every now and
then to sip some coffee or gaze out
the window at the North Shore
mountains shining against the
backdrop of a clear winter sky.
"There has been a lot of support
in the medical press and within the
medical profession for this movement," Bates explains. "In the
U.S.A., Helen Caldicott has been
enormously successful in arousing
physicians across the country." The
IPPNW has also enjoyed success, he
claims.
"The big success of the IPPNW
has been to bring together physicians
from both sides of the Iron
Curtain," he says. "The point is to
meet and recognize the flesh and
blood people who are supposed to be
our enemies. With these encounters
comes the overwhelming realization
that there cannot possibly be any
issue that divides us which is so important as to warrant nuclear war."
It  was  this  realization  that  led
Bates to undertake a three week
cross-country speaking tour in
December. In Vancouver, Bates was
kept busy with lectures, interviews,
and talk shows. At a seminar in
UBC's Lutheran Campus Centre in
December, Bates' ideas generated
such interest and discussion among
the 20 people in attendance that his
prepared slide show sat unused
through the entire two hours, forgotten in the midst of Bates' infectious
enthusiasm.
Bates says there are two prevailing
popular scenarios concerning nuclear
war. The first sees the world being
virtually destroyed, and posits no
survival of the human race. The second sees nuclear war as a "temporary setback" which survivors
must somehow live through for some
relatively short period of time —
about two weeks — and then
somehow get organized and carry
on.
Both scenarios are unrealistic, says
Bates. The standard scenario of total
annihilation assumes a USA-USSR
war. "This presupposes a North-
South movement of radioactive
fallout to be lethal to all human beings in a few years. East-West
weather patterns would mean wide
destruction in the northern
hemisphere, but not as much as in
the south," says Bates.
"It is just highly unlikely that it
would destroy the human race completely." The so-called "temporary
See page 5: NUCLEAR
Theatre:
Last Call, a local theatre production is a
satirical look at life
after the Holocaust.
See page 5.
Research:
UBC PoliSci prof Mike
Wallace, vice president of the UN
association in Vancouver, spoke Thursday: page 5. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1982
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Starring Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons Friday, January 29, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
1 laoe tie feat, tie kat, tie
feat, tie feat, tic feat a^
By ERICA LEIREN
The Commodore Ballroom was a-buzz
with excitement last Wednesday night. But
suddenly, the hum of conversation and the
klink of glass on glass was interrupted as the
audience made a bee-line for the dance floor
and the front of the stage to welcome . . .
THE KINGBEES.
People were on their feet and dancing as
soon as the first chords of the opening
number She Was A Sweet, Sweet Girl To Me
were struck. The Kingbees transmit the kind
of raw energy that has even the most
recalcitrant non-dancers marking the beat
with hands, feet, head, neighbor's beer,
anything within reach. As for the dance enthusiasts (myself included) . . . well, have
you seen the Commodore floorboards give
six inches on a good night? They had to be
bouncing at least a foot with the trampoline
effect we set up out there.
Dave Raven and the Escorts started the audience off nicely with their boppy brand of
rock. The band was improved a lot since
previous viewings a year or two ago at Gary
Taylor's. Raven is one of the most energetic
front men around — something which the
audience both appreciated and reciprocated.
The Kingbees rockabilly rocked their way
through their set with songs from both their
albums (The Kingbees and The Big Rock), including the unmistakable My Mistake, with
its driving bass line and frenetic vocals.
Shake Bop, Man Made For Love, Ting-a-
Ling, Tear It Up, and She Ain't My Baby
(but she sure looks good to me) were some of
my favorites. Their songs show the influences
of band favorites Eddie Cochran, Buddy
Holly, Gene Vincent, and Little Richard, as
does the band's hillbilly-hepcat dress style
and stage manner.
A couple of songs from an uncoming but
not yet produced third album, Tear It Up and
Stop, provided intimations of great things to
come. By then, a sax and keyboard will likely
be added to the lineup which will add some
depth to the band and widen its range of
possibilities.
The band plays well together, especially
considering that the two new members
(Lloyd Stout on bass and backup vocals and
Jeff Donovan on drum kit and backups) have
only been with the group since last summer.
But they both hail from Ohio arid have been
playing together for 14 years. Frontman
Jaime James on lead guitar and vocals also
writes the songs and has been the constant
since the 1979 formation of the Kingbees in
L.A.
James is from Toronto originally, but he's
been based in Los Angeles for the past seven
years. "It's nice to come back to Canada
after being away and have people enjoy your
music," he says. (Interesting side note: prior
to forming the Kingbees, James played lead
guitar for Steppenwolf on their 1977 tour of
Europe just before they broke up; obviously
the man is born to be wild.)
The first of the Kingbees' two encores was
an audience participation song. At one point
James was playing his guitar, with obvious
enthusiasm, lying on his back on the stage.
By the time the song ended, the band had
everybody shouting their response to James,
who had by now jumped out :nto the audience.
When the second encore, the classic Hey
Bo Didley finished and the lights went up on
the capacity crowd, the diagnosis was confirmed . . . we'd all been stung by the
Kingbees fever.
James is enthusiastic about the music he
and his two cohorts play. "Rockabilly is rock
and roll and hillbilly music with an edge of
pop to it. Musically it (rockabilly) is like the
purest form of rock and roll," he says. "I
love the beat, the beat, the beat, the beat,
THE BEAT.
"When music gets too technical, it loses its
feeling. Three guitar chords and a lot of feeling will get the audience going a lot better
than some of the fancy anaesthetized rock
that's been played. The guitar solos of the
'70s got too boring."
They obviously know a lot more than three
chords, but no one could accuse the Kingbees
of a lack of feeling when they play.
What does he think about some of the
other rockabilly groups around, like the Bop-
cats, The Straycats, and The Shakin'
Pyramids? "They all came after us." Wow
that there are quits a few other groups playing rockabilly, James says he hopes the
Kingbees' music will mold into a style of its
own. "I want to be doing music that is new,
fresh, and innovative."
The Kingbees have played all over the
United States, in Mexico, in Eastern Canada
(this is their first time in Vancouver) and are
getting a lot of airplay in Europe, says James.
They appeared in the movie The Idolmaker
and on Dick Clark's American Bandstand.
"Chuck Berry (one of James' musical
idols) came to see us at the Whisky (A-Go-Go
in L.A.) a year and a half ago and said he loved us. To me, that was like getting an A- plus
on my report card" says James.
Jerry Lee Lewis, another idol, had good
things to say about the Kingbees when they
toured with him.
Lewis and Berry aren't the only musical
heavyweights the band has won over. "The
English guy came up to us at the Whisky one
night and said he really liked our music,"
says James. "He said that we should go to
England — we'd go over big there. He turned
out to be Joe Jackson. We later opened for
him at the L.A. Amphitheatre and he said we
stole the show."
How, you may be wondering, did the band
acquire its unusual name? According to
James, it was pure fate. "When I was 10
years old in Woodstock, Ontario, one Saturday morning 1 heard live music coming from
a neighbor's down the street. I looked in their
basement window and saw a band practising
and the name Kingbees on the bass drum
head. Then I ran home and told my mom I
wanted to be a Kingbee."
For them as likes ta dance (and even them
as don't like ta dance), the Kingbees will be
oack this summer — you won't be able to sit
still — guaranteed!
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i    ■ i       mnr.i Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1982
HOT NEWS THAT FITS
Teaching Assistants,
Board of Governors
Ratify New Contract
The teaching assistants union ratified a proposed contract with the
university Thursday, ending five
months of negotiations.
The motion to accept the memorandum of agreement, signed Jan.
20, easily passed with 69 union
members voting in favor of the one
year contract. There were seven opposed and two abstentions.
"I am happy the contract was
ratified," said union negotiator
Mike Burke. "We got the best contract we could get."
He added he was glad the contract settlement did not create division within the union.
Opposition to the contract's key
issue of union security gained only
minimal support at the meeting.
Political science teaching assistant
Bill Tieleman urged members to reject the contract or abstain from
voting in a one page position paper.
"I'm not surprised in the least (at
the ratification vote result)," said
Tieleman. "I realized in putting my
position forward that it was a principle and the contract didn't have a
hope of being rejected."
Tieleman countered accusations
that the only reason he supported
the strike was political. "It's a load
of garbage. You go on strike for a
principle," he said.
"When you give up without a
strike on a principle you lose your
credibility as a trade union. That is
what the TAU did," Tieleman said.
The board of governors ratified
the proposed contract Tuesday.
Two Out of Three Ont.
Grads Underemployed
Who says a university education
is worthwhile?
In Ontario, almost two out of
every three students will be unable
to Find jobs that require a university
education in the next five years, according to a government report.
The report predicts at least
88,100 graduates will compete for
jobs that could be filled by college
graduates. At the same time, there
will be shortages of about 45,000
highly   skilled   workers,   including
machine   operators, and welders.
The report notes that many
employers think the education
system has failed to produce skilled
workers for industry. It also
predicts shortages of engineers and
computer experts in Ontario.
But Ontario students putting
money into university education
don't need to worry—they'll probably be able to find jobs to pay off
their loans. According to the
report, unemployment in Ontario
will drop to 4.6 per cent by 1986.
tions. Polls close at 4 p.m. today.
NDP education critic Tony
Grande said he suspected the Ontario government was producing information to give credibility to its
education policies.
Referenda, Elections
Into Final Day of Voting
The total number of voters in this
week's Alma Mater Society elections and referenda climbed to
3,410 after Thursday's voting, said
election commissioner Alexis
Cherkezoff.
There is one more day of balloting remaining for five student council executive positions and fee referenda for BCPIRG and SUB renovations. Polls close at 4 p.m. today.
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THE BOTTLED ROMANCE OF MEXICO Friday, January 29, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Nuclear war means feudal life
From page 1
setback" scenario, Bates maintains,
does not take into account the long-
term effects on the environment, or
on social and economic structures.
"We would be back to a subsistence
economy, just trying to feed
people," he says. "The capacity for
an industrial country to be able to
restore itself is highly doubtful."
Bates suggests that an unlimited
nuclear war would result in a society similar to the feudal society
which existed in the early Middle
Ages. "Nuclear war is not sur-
vivable in any meaningful sense —
only prevention can save civilization from destruction," he argues.
When the topic gradually progresses toward the controversial
ideas of civil defense and limited
war, Bates becomes visibly perturbed, and with a sweep of a hand
discards them both as "nonsense".
"An all-out nuclear war would
not be a war of invasion and occupation of another country, but a
war of total annihilation. Victory
would be equivalent to some kind
of marginal survival," he says.
Refusing to be content with bashing
the civil defense myth, Bates lashes
out once more and takes a shot at
the rationale behind it. "What
bothers me is that civil defense is
aimed at protecting the people in
power, and their ability to maintain
their  power  after   the  war.   This
merely encourages them to consider
nuclear war as a viable alternative."
Bates denounces civil defense
because, he points out, it stresses individual survival "for 14 or 15
days", while civilization is
destroyed. "Civil defense is a direct
extension of the military mentality,
because it presumes the possibility
of war and survival. It fosters the
notion of accepting war, and it encourages a military-like protection
of the individual against his/her
fellow citizens after the war."
It is this kind of philosophy that
Bates finds especially repugnant.
"Among the things civil defense
cannot do is take crops into the
bomb shelter. Neither can it take
freedoms and human rights." So
when the survivors finally crawl out
of their holes, he says, they won't
have much to crawl back to.
Bates is dismayed at the aloof attitude of many Canadians. "A lot
of what you hear about civil defense
presumes that Canada would not be
a main target, that all we have to do
is protect ourselves from fallout
from an attack on the United
States," he says. But this ignores
the realities of Canada's foreign
policy, Bates argues. Canada is
allied with the USA in the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization
(NATO), and in North American
Air Defense (Norad), and because
of these international agreements
the USSR sees us as an enemy, he
says.
* ,  :J** *****     ?-- *    * Y* SV*   ^1
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'4    * ,*>«*',
iJR  #i
It may be difficult to imagine
Vancouver, or any other Canadian
city, as being a target of thermonuclear annihilation. But Bates
draws an interesting, and startling,
scenario. He points out that the
USSR has 4,000 inter-continental
ballistic missiles; and that the USA
has 157 cities with populations
greater than 200,000. Assuming
half the ICBM's are aimed at land-
based silos, and the other half at
cities and military installations,
there are 2,000 missiles for 157
cities. "With 2,000 missiles and 157
cities, how far down the list do you
think Vancouver is, with its one
million people?" asks Bates.
As vocal as he is about the arms
race, Bates becomes even more adamant when discussing disarmament. "Disarmament is perfectly
possible," he says with optimistic
conviction. "Disarmament is feasible technically, economically,
politically,    and    diplomatically.
What is lacking is the will to disarm.
And the only place where that will
can be generated is among the people themselves. The will of the people is our only chance and if they
are without hope, then there is
none."
The human race has within its
power to determine its own future,
says Bates. "Nothing is inevitable.
The future is created, it does not
unfold. The future is invented, and
people make the difference." But
convincing people of this is one of
the biggest obstacles Elates has faced. "What people need persuading
of is that they can do something.
There is a need to empower people
with the realization that they can
make a difference," he says.
Most people realize nuclear war
must be avoided, says Bates, and
the problem is convincing them they
can change things. "The militarists
are winning by default rather than
by persuasion," he says. "The cen
tral task of the movement for peace
and disarmament is thus to convince people that they can do
something, and what it is they can
do."
After two hours of discussion
Bates remains talkative and
energetic.
He mentions with approval,
almost with pride, a group of
McGill students who have recently
become quite active in the peace
and disarmament movement. "One
of the great costs of the arms race is
the psychology and way of thinking
it creates. Young people especially
have a sense of hopelessness. A
whole generation lacks belief in its
future. This is what motivated me
to get involved."
Donald Bates won't singlehand-
edly stop the nuclear arms race, but
with a perceptive originality and a
warm charisma, he may at least get
some people to start shouting.
Last Call not a bomb
NUCLEAR war
civilian alike
Everyone will be a victim, soldier and
Bv MARK LEIREN-YOUNG
BOOM. Flash. You're dead all
of you. It finally happened, Armageddon as predicted. Computer
error, "just provocation," someone losing their mind, "limited
nuclear warfare," or a mouse chewing up the wrong wire — what's the
difference? It's all over.
Last Call
Written   and   performed   by   Ken
MacDonald and Morris Panych.
Directed by Susan Astley
At   the   Vancouver  East
Welcome to Last Call. It's the
morning after — actually it's about
three weeks after, but who's bothering v/ith calendars. There are two
men wandering together. Perhaps
they are the last two men on earth
and one of them has a gun. The
other one is blind. They are searching for people, and the one with
the gun has decided to open a
cabaret. His business ought to be
quite good — not too much in the
way of competition.
The blind man doesn't want to be
there. He likes his privacy. He'd
prefer to be hidden from the problems of the world even if it means
his death. The man with the gun
democratically elects himself ruler
of the world. It will be a short reign,
radiation is already eating away at
him. But he will have his cabaret
and he and the blind pianist will
entertain an audience of radioactive
dust that used to be humans.
Last Call could have been
unbearably depressing. After all,
most people don't spend too much
time giggling about the possibility
of being charred to a cinder. But if
it were who could bother with it?
Last Call is an extremely political
play. The messages are blunt
enough to get through to even the
most socially numb viewer. But the
play isn't all heavy drama. Last Call
is a hysterically funny but frightening musical revue. It takes bitter
reality and makes it palatable — no,
it makes it tasty for a general audience.
The songs contain lyrics like
"well man became a social beast
and went to war every other week."
The message is there. The insight into the human condition is clear.
The gunman, Bartholomew Gross,
played by Morris Panych turns to
the piano player who has spent his
life in self-imposed exile and glibly
blames him for the Holocaust. "I
think you're guilty of criminal
negligence . . ." Gross proclaims.
"All the problems of the world and
you just stayed in your room." It's
funny. People laugh.
But while they laugh they are also
thinking about how many times
they have sat by in their comfortable chairs and watched others
carry the picket signs and fight for
their rights and their concerns. It
makes the audience wonder about
spectators who complain but refuse
to act.
Last Call works beautifully. It
delivers a eulogy in a pretty
envelope that people will be willing
to open. Morris Panych and Ken
MacDonald are both a pleasure to
watch. Panych seems similar to Bill
Murray, and MacDonald as piano
player Eddie Morose maintains a
nice deadpan tone throughout. The
lighting, which was designed by
B.J. Clayden was especially good.
There are bright flashes of white
light at some points and a wash of
red at others that help give the play
that just-nuked freshness.
The songs range from incredibly
funny to extremely morose. Often
this range is found within the same
song. In the Song of Eddie Morose
there are moments of intense humor
that suddenly snap into touching
scenes and then whip back into
humor again.
Even though the play takes on a
far more instructive flavor in the second act and serves its metaphors
and meanings up in clearly labelled
containers, especially at the end, it
is incredibly entertaining.
Well, it's almost closing time and
you're left to ponder questions like
whether it's better to be active today than radioactive tomorrow. So
order up, what'll it be, another
Sunrise or a Zombie? And by the
way, what are you drinking now?
Canada's passive acquiescence fuels arms race
By PAT MacLEOD
The Canadian government is pursuing a policy that encourages and
accelerates the arms race, a UBC
arms race specialist said Thursday.
Canada's passive acquiescence to
current American strategic doctrine
and our exports of nuclear
technology both contribute to the
arms race, political science professor Michael Wallace told 50
people in Angus 412.
"Despite Trudeau's rhetoric of
'suffocating' the arms race by
preventing testing of all nuclear
delivery vehicles, which was applauded at the first United Nations
special session on disarmament in
1978, the matter has never been
brought up in Canadian-American
bilateral talks," said Wallace, who
is vice-president of the United Nations Association in Vancouver.
"Furthermore, Canada has
refused to recognize or respond to
the change in U.S. strategic doctrine from Mutual Assured Destruction (MAD) to Presidential Directive 59."
This directive, issued by president
Carter in 1980 after the twin shocks
of Iran and Afghanistan, states that
it is necessary to initiate nuclear war
under some circumstances. Instead
of challenging this dangerous doctrine, the Canadian government has
adopted the traditional national
gesture, described by Peter C.
Newman as 'the cringe,' Wallace
said.
"If Helmut Schmidt, Francois
Mitterand, and the Iron Lady can
raise issues of nuclear strategy with
the United States, why can't we?"
asked Wallace.
In addition to passively encouraging the Americans by "cosy-
ing up to them," Canada has actively participated in the arms race
by contributing to nuclear proliferation, said Wallace. "Canada is
the only country in the world that
has created a nuclear power, namely India. The export of nuclear
technology almost certainly leads to
the creation of nuclear powers, due
to the ease with which atomic
bombs can be built," he said.
Wallace said the sale of CANDU
reactors to "such peace-loving
regimes" as Argentina, Romania
and South Korea provide them with
the necessary plutonium and expertise for making nuclear weapons.
With the sale of German reactors
to Brazil it is conceivable that a
nuclear arms race could develop in
South America between Brazil and
its historical opponent Argentina,
he added.
Agreements to use the reactor
byproducts for peaceful purposes
only are of little relevance, he
claimed. "What are you going to do
when the Indians start building a
reprocessing plant to extract
plutonium — send in the
Mounties?" asked Wallace.
Since it is easier to influence our
own government than the Reagan
and Brezhnev administrations, the
first step in limiting the arms race
should be to 'unlock' the economic
interests and political careers at
stake in the CANDU program. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1982
Second act saves Lion
By WENDY CUMMING
Jane Goldman's The Lion In
Winter, the story of King Henry II
and his queen, Eleanor of Aqui-
taine, exemplifies the English
medieval version of Greek
mythology's Medea and Jason.
Medea, a sorceress who helped
Jason steal the golden fleece from
her father, married Jason, but when
he abandoned her for another
women she slaughtered their
children in a fury of revenge.
The Lion In Winter
The Vancouver Repertory Theatre
Director Claire Brown
Robson Media Centre
Until Feb. 6
Similarly, Eleanor of Aquitaine
betrays her husband the French
King Louis by marrying the King of
England, Henry 11. Although
Henry acquires half of France
through the marriage, he ultimately leaves his wife for a host of young
mistresses. Eleanor, in turn, with
her guise of insensitivity, denies her
maternal    role,    and    emotionally
murders her children. Her sons are
reduced to beasts who grovel for the
English crown.
The Lion In Winter, ironically set
during Christmas 1183 at Henry's
castle in Chinon, France, depicts a
twisted chain of royal family
upheavals, or more accurately,
royal viciousness.
Claire Brown's direction successfully exposes the degenerate
reality of this extraordinary family
whose squabbles grow from, personal politics into a megalomanical
struggle for kingdoms. Henry,
played by Roger Allen, personifies
the fierce, dogmatic ruler who relinquishes love and moral responsibility for power. Mary Anne D.
MacNeill is equally impressive as
Eleanor, the clever, manipulative
queen who plays her land and her
children off against her husband.
The couple's destructive love-
hate relationship illuminates the
mask-like qualities of the play. We
find beneath this arrogant king
there is an aging man obsessed by
the fear of death. Henry's licentious
affairs thus form, not adventures,
ALLEN .  . . and MacNoil, plotting
but an illusion. They are his
'mauvaise foi' as he attempts to
escape old age.
By comparison, Eleanor, with
her cunmng masks her unrelentless
desire for love. By protecting
herself rom rejection, Eleanor
trades the warm, sensitive side of
her character for a calculated
cynicism. But Eleanor also
represents the women who has
never truy felt loved.
While Eleanor and Henry
cautiously contemplate each move
like a <. hess game, the tension
mounts in their attempts to conquer
one another. Henry hopes that
John, his youngest and favorite
son, succeeds him, bjt Eleanor
demanc.s that Richard, her
favorite, bear the crown.
Their selfishness arid lust for
power pulverized love into hate — a
hate which then flourishes within
their children. When Eleanor
remarks. "Henry, I don't much like
our children," she recognizes her
failure as a mother. Yet her dislike
for her ..hildren is justified, for the
sons' actions simply mirror their
parents' vindictiveness, as they plot
against „'ach other and their father.
Because The Lion In Winter's
plot and scenery are uncomplicated,
stage objects are minimized and
dialogue and gestures, Vkhich expose
the motivations behind these multi-
layered characters, constitute the
essence of the play. Unfortunately,
the actors, except for Henry and
Eleanor-, lack the enormous
dynamism required to maintain the
production's credibility in such a
sparse l stting (wooden chairs and a
black curtain) and somewhat
limited physical actions. The three
sons, though all princely handsome,
do not render convincing three-
dimens onal characters.
But the Vancouver Repertory
Theatre must be commended, for
the second act is compelling as
Henry and Eleanor reach a compromise. Richard will be successor
ony if he marries Alais, Henry's
mistress. And Eleanor, in return is
granted her freedom, only if she
renounces the Aquitaine. Ironically, Richard refuses to marry, thus
posing a stalemate. Eleanor must
return lo her prison in England and
the outcome is postponed for a
year. Without conclusion we leave
the chessboard before checkmate is
called, anticipating the joyous
tidings of next year's Christmas.
Neighbours loses all comic vision
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Neighbours, starring John
Belushi and Dan Aykroyd, is a
juvenile movie. In translating
Thomas Berger's dark farce for the
screen, screenwriter Larry Gelbart
and director John Avildsen have
lost nearly all the novel's comic, absurdist vision and turned it into an
ungratifying  romp.
Neighbours
Directed by John Avildsen
Playing at the Coronet
Belushi and Aykroyd have always
been amiable performers, but other
than 1941, the unfairly maligned
Steven Spielberg film, they haven't
had much of a chance to become a
memorable screen duo; John Lan-
dis buried them in his thousand-car-
crash-movie, the Blues Brothers,
and now Avildsen has done the
same, figuratively speaking.
One look at Avildsen's previous
work, (Rocky, Save the Tiger, The
Formula) and you know he hasn't
done a single subtle or original
thing in his life. Avildsen has no
sense of humor or timing, and he
relies heavily on his stars to carry
off the jokes. In Neighbours, he has
instructed the camera to do nothing
innovative. It is something short of
criminal when a director doesn't
back up his actors with a technique
that matches their style — especially
when the film is a comedy.
Avildsen is the wrong director to
do a comedy. The one pleasure of
this film is Cathy Moriarty who, as
in Raging Bull, almost steals the
show. Although her Brooklyn accent is still thick (she is trying to
lose it so she can play a wider range
of role-), she has a playfulness and
a determined drive that suggests a
grown-up Marilyn Monroe. Dan
Aykroyd also has some inventive
moments; he dons a blonde hairdo
that is stunning. But Neighbours is
merely lacklustre. The producers,
as if realizing this for themselves,
have decided to add book review
quotes before the beginning of the
film, presumably to impress the audience. It merely adds insult to injury.
Water is \
By CHARLOTTE OLSEN
The west coast and water: inseparable. A constant fact of life.
Water: it surrounds us, it rains on
us. We swim in it, wade through it,
curse at it, drink it. It's no surprising then, that an artist painting here
should choose water as his theme.
What is surprising, in fact
astonishing, is how Bill Pike has
depicted such a commonplace
thing.
Bill Pike, MFA Graduating
Exhibition
SUB art gallery
Until Jan. 29
Pike's oil paintings are on display
in the SUB gallery as part of the
Master's of fine arts graduating exhibitions. And every one of them is
of water.
But these are not the usual
renderings: Pike's perspective is not
that of a scenic artist. It is much
more intimate. He focuses on the
water's   surface   and   the   images
reflected by that ever changing mirror. Suddenly water has an infinite
number of faces, some troubled and
brooding, some bright and alive,
and still others blessedly peaceful.
■** &t*K°r»
PIKE
Excellent jazz
By ALLEN STEVENS
Jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie
opened Monday evening at a local
hotel in North Vancouver, and
legions of Vancouver's jazz faithful
braved the rains to hear jazz's elder
statesman blow. They weren't
disappointed.
It was all there: the lightning-fast
trumpet   solos   with   every   note
DIZZY
authentic jazz patriarch
—all«n st«v«n> photo Friday, January 29, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Pavlova remembered
-eric eggertson photo
vonderful
The works have a sense of movement and serenity. The painting
which appears to be the favorite of
the majority of viewers is one entitled Memory. In it, Pike has trapped
. a drip
a thunderstorm's first raindrops as
they pierce the water's surface. The
painting moves with the ripples
created by those few drops. Yet al
the same time the water seems calm
and undisturbed by the storm.
Pike hasn't always looked al
water in this way. Il was not until he
travelled by boat through the fjords
in Norway that he began to see
water with a different eye. The
wash behind the boat mesmerized
him with its constantly changing
reflections. And he decided to
preserve those reflections, first in
photographs and finally in his paintings.
These paintings have a hypnotic
effect. They are made to be looked
at for long periods of time. They
will take you away from a frantic
pace to a quieter solitude. Everyone
who views Pike's paintings is alone
with it, drawn into a private and
serene world. It is a wonderful place
to be.
If water has a soul, Pike has
found it and captured it
magnificently on canvas.
By LAWRENCE PANYCH
Last year marked both ths fiftieth anniversary of the death and
the hundredth anniversary of the
birth of Anna Pavlova; the immortal Russian dancer. Her name is
probably the most commonly
associated with ballet and the fact
that she was perhaps the most
outstanding ballerina of all time is
undoubtedly Ihe reason. But she
had an almost missionary spirit that
helped her bring ballet to the
general public and not just the elite.
This also explains her prominence
over the many other remarkable
dancers of her time.
Ballet was virtually unknown in
the earlier part of this century when
she and her company began touring
North America. In 1910 when
Pavlova arrived in New York from
Russia for the first time there had
been almost no classical dance in
the U.S. Since the 1840's, and even
in New York, the press had difficulty describing oallet, alternately using the terms "ocular" and "visual
opera."
A San Francisco newspaper of
the time attempted to describe this
strange new art form as "the
ponderous messages of the great
composers :hrough the most
primitive and yet most potent of
mediums — movement."
She and her small company extensively toured the U.S. and
Canada, travelling great disiances.
On one occasion the company spent
108 hours on the train travelling
from Quebec to Vancouver. From
1915 to 16, in one seven month
period, they played 140 separate
towns and cities.
Pavlova was a perfectionist and
demanded discipline and hard work
from her company. She played the
role of a stern mother or governess
in what she referred to as her family, concerning herself with what the
dancers were reading, eating, and
feeling. What we today might see as
invasion of privacy was ooked
upon then as a genuine concern for
well being. Pavlova's dancers
developed fierce loyalties to her.
patriarch makes em dizzy
perfectly in place, the delightful
bandstand antics that earned him
the nickname Dizzy (his real name
is John Birks Gillespie), the updated versions of the tunes he wrote
30 years ago sounding as exciting
today as they did in 1950. Backed
by a crack rhythm section (drums,
bass, guitar), Gillespie's playing
delighted the audience, who howled, screamed, and clapped their approval at the close of each number.
Gillespie is an unusual man, even
for a jazz musician. At 64 he's an
authentic jazz patriarch. Unlike
most other jazz musicians of his
generation he has handled his career
with intelligence and skill avoiding
the heroin addiction and alcoholism
that are the usual occupational
hazards of his trade. While few
musicians can claim to have
originated a major musical style, in
the late '40s Gillespie and Charlie
Parker developed bebop, a musical
form which since left its mark on
countless jazz musicians.
Gillespie has been an influential
aid widely imitated jazz musician
for more than 40 years. He began
recording in 1937; by 1945 he was
topping international jazz critics'
polls; in 1947 he packed Carnegie
Hall, the first of the modern jazz
musicians to play there. He began
to compose music, and several of
his tunes (Night in Tunisia, Salt
Peanuts, and Woody 'n You) have
become jazz standards.
When the major labels wouldn't
give him a fair contract he started
his own record company. In the
'50s and '60s he recorded with virtually every important jazz musician and continued topping the
critics' polls. His influence was so
great that other musicians and fans
began imitating his style of dress,
sporting the goatee, black beret,
and sunglasses that he habitually
wore. Throughout it all he continued to play tastefully and never
abandoned his commitment to excellence as jazz styles changed.
He's always been a highly
political jazz musician. In the 'W's
and '50s, when it was neither
fashionable nor safe, he denounced
racism and refused to play before
segregated audiences. To make sure
that he got attention he'd show up
at American airports dressed in
African robes and a skullcap claiming to be the king of a non-existent
African nation. Confusion would
reign as airport officials scurried
about trying to line up a State
Department escort.
In 1968 he converted to the
Baha'i faith, making him the first
and only major jazz musician to
become a member of that religion.
He now campaigns vigorously on
behalf of the Baha'i in Iran, who
are   persecuted
Between sets Monday evening he
commented: "In Iran today it's not
against the law for a Moslem to kill
a Baha'i. They won't even persecute
you for that. Many Baha'i today
are trying to leave Iran, but those
who can't get out and stay accept
their martyrdom. And all this in the
name of religion."
If you like exciting jazz in comfortable surroundings it's a cinch
you'll enjoy Dizzy and his crew.
They'll be at the International Plaza
through the 30th.
As a dancer Pavlova is legendary.
Articles of her time talked as
though she was not quite of this
earth. In fact, there were many
mysteries which surrounded her
personal life and even her birth date
is uncertain.
Pavlova was born sometime
around 1881 the daughter of a poor
peasant reserve soldier. But there is
evidence that she was really the il-
fact shows how liberal the regime
really was but more likely it indicates the stature to which Pavlova
had already risen as a renowned
dancer.
Aside from her early revolutionary convictions, Pavlova was
not a revolutionary dancer. If
anything, her tastes were conventional and somewhat conservative.
Above all she believed that dance
PAVLOVA ... as she was in the Dragonfly
legitimate daughter of a wealthy
Jewish banker, Poliakoff. The
Poliakoffs were the decendants of a
dancing sect from Georgia and the
famous dancer Ida Rubinstein came
from another branch of the same
family.
Pavlova entered the Imperial
Ballet School at the age of 10. "To
enter the school of the Imperial
Ballet," she wrote, "is to enter a
convent where frivolity is banned
and where merciless discipline
reigns." It may have been a convent
but it brought her into contact with
the greatest names in ballet; Petipa,
Cecchetti, Fokine, Karsavina, Ni-
jinski and others.
Upon graduation she immediately entered the Imperial Ballet and
within three seasons she already had
a fan club referred to as Pavlovtzi.
As a young dancer she was swept
up in the revolutionary fervor of
prewar Russia. In 1905 she and the
famous choreographer, Fokine,
were leaders of a dancer's strike in
support of the poor and for improved conditions for dancers.
The strike was short-lived as the
company management was able to
intimidate many of the dancers into
submission. One young dancer
committed suicide as a result of his
persecution by the management. At
his funeral the wreath placed by
fellow dancers read "to the first victim at the dawn of the freedom of
the art."
In spite of her role as the strike
leader, Pavlova was promoted to
prima ballerina.  Some claim this
must be graceful and beautiful. She
was opposed to sensationalism in
dance and detested using dancers
for acrobatic feats. "Dancing" she
said, "is pure romance and it is by
the grace of romance that man sees
himself, not as he is, but as he
should like to be."
It is difficult for contemporary
enthusiasts to appreciate Pavlova as
a dancer since there is no adequate
visual record of her work. Physically she had a frail build but by most
accounts had superb technique. She
was noted for her lightness and
Fokine said "she mastered the difference between jumping and soaring, which is something that cannot
be taught."
But primarily the quality which
endeared her to audiences was an
incredible ability to translate
spirituality and emotion into her
movement.
This was most evident in the
work for which she was best
known, the Dying Swan. The intensity she put into her interpretation
was by all accounts almost agonizing to watch. Sir Fredrick Ashton,
himself almost a ballet legend, commenting on the effect Pavlova's Dying Swan had on his life said, "the
immortal swan injected a mere boy
with her potent poison and he has
never been the same since."
Next week at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre David Lui presents a
special Pavlova celebration. Joffrey
Ballet principal, Starr Dania, and a
small company of others will present a nostalgic recreation of some
of Pavlova's best known pieces. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1982
Protest
Canada, despite its self-proclaimed role as a peacemaker and peace-
loving nation, is a participant in terrorism.
No, Canada does not support 'leftist terrorists' in the world's trouble
spots. Our contribution to world terrorism takes a more accepted and 'legitimate' form.
As a member of NATO and Norad, Canada is helping to hold the world
hostage to nuclear annihilation. As a member of these military alliances,
Canada contributes to the threat of subjecting the human race to mass
megaton murder.
Don't be fooled by the lies that emanate from Ottawa, Washington and
Brussels. All their fancy rhetoric and theories are merely intended to scare
the public into accepting the insane accumulation of weapons.
The official explanation is that the West must maintain the 'balance of
power' with the Soviet Union. The fact that NATO already has enough explosive power to destroy all of Eastern Europe many times over is conveniently forgotten by the merchants of death who claim to be our representatives.
How much overkill capacity do they want? The sad and bitter truth of the
matter is that they will take as much as the people will let them get away
with. Our silence only allows them to continue their deranged illusion of
maintaining peace through deterrence.
"If you want peace, prepare for war," they tell us. And the public, thoroughly instilled with a fear of the 'Soviet threat,' stands idle as the arms
manufacturers get rich producing toys of mass destruction for genocidal
generals and power-hungry politicians.
And the Soviets? They just change a few key words in the same argument and warn their citizens that more bombs must be produced to maintain parity and ward off the 'American threat.'
And the people? We are pawns — statistics in the military's battle plans.
In truth, the people of the West and the people of the East are not enemies
— only their governments are.
Protest and survive.
'm$~i>™^^
f!=t
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"7S».   Q'lFi q1' F~it1"' MR' !
CT  f^
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"I wasn't always a conservative either. I used to be a Nazi."
Letters
MW  ^P^ ^Hm ^^tw       ^^^     W^ ****i-^^r-   .
Come rally and help save a true hero
What is a hero? Dictionaries suggest that a hero is a mythological or
legendary figure of great strength or
ability who is admired for his
achievements and qualities. The
criteria for this title is stringent and
its usage is rare and specific.
If a man's personal integrity and
humanitarian actions earn him the
respect of 100,000 people whose
lives he saved, honorary citizenship
by a major world power and the
deep concern of advocates of
freedom worldwide, perhaps he can
be correctly and affectionately
labelled a hero.
Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish
diplomat   who   snatched    100,000
Hungarian Jewish citizens from the
jaws of Eichmann's death machine
in 1944-5, can indeed be considered
heroic. He drew up thousands of
false passports, herded Jews into
protective housing, hoarded food
and medicines for them, and
blustered, bluffed and bribed officials to release Jews already sealed
inside deportation camps.
Himself a non-Jew, his actions
were motivated by testimonies of
the Jewish refugees he heard while
in Haifa on business. Their accounts of the Nazi atrocities inspired a fatalistic turn in
Wallenberg's life. His commitment
was  genuine;  his  selflessness was
awesome; his courage was incredible.
The Wallenberg case was discussed by American and Soviet
authorities at the Madrid Conference and rallies were
simultaneously held in Toronto and
Ottawa on Nov. 20, 1981. At the
Toronto rally, Ontario Attorney-
General Roy McMurtry stated: "It
is not too late for each of us to give
back to this great man a small part
of the concern and effort for fellow
human beings which he gave the
Jews of Budapest."
His humanitarianism, though,
cost him personally. In January
1945,  at  age  32,  he  disappeared
Appeal for amnesty
Next week people on campus will
have a good opportunity to become
familiar with Amnesty International. The campus group, Amnesty
UBC, is sponsoring "a week for the
disappeared" as part of its ongoing
campaign to defend the rights of
human beings throughout the
world. 1 urge all to take note of the
campus radio presentations and
newspaper articles in order not to
miss this occasion to learn about the
work and the effectiveness of Amnesty International.
As a member of Amnesty UBC I
have struggled with the problem of
how to evoke sympathy for the millions of people who find themselves
living in countries fraught with injustice and violence. I cannot adequately explain the apparent low
level of social conscience among
UBC students. Times have changed, but surely the students of this
campus have remained secure
enough in their situation to be able
to adopt a view that encompasses
the global situation.
THE UBYSSEY
January 29, 1982
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
It was a slow, agonizing wake. "What happened?" asked Muriel Draaisma, head cheerleader and
self-confessed preppy. "An H-Bomb, an H-Bomb. It's Hiroshima all over again," said Mark Leiren-
Young as he toted his anti-ballistic missile in his semi-beard. "Did Reagan survive?" asked arch-
Republican Craig Brooks-haig. "Yes, he turned into a cockroach," shouted a stealthy chorus of
syphilis ridden ex-staffers, Nancy Campbell. Eric Eggertson, and Julie Milehouse Wheelwright, now
collectively welded together. "What happened to Leonid, our comrade?" asked the People Friday
Wendy Cumming, Kerry Regier, and Charlotte Olsen, as they detonated SS20 missiles across the campus wasteland. Remnants of beleaguered TAs, headed by Keith Baldrey III, could be seen wandering
near the gates, still committed to some form of action. Lost souls Lawrence Panych, Erica Leiren, and
Pat McLeod followed him, convinced they could find the cause of their sorrow, mad scientist Gary
Brooksfield, whose fermented mind had Initiated the catastrophe. Mike Kernaghan, Allen Stevens,
and Christine X began to get quotes from the survivors, while the vile rag lifted itself from the rubble of
hacks, under the crippled leadership of Brian Jones and Shaffin Shariff. "We'll meet again," could be
heard on the radio.
My appeal in this letter is to students and staff who seek to broaden
their perspective that they might
take advantage of what Amnesty
UBC has to offer during the upcoming week. My hope is that students will not only increase their
awareness, but that they will notice
the avenue Amnesty International
opens to people who feel compelled
to help alleviate the pain and suffering that results when human beings
fail to respect one another.
Ross Wartnow
arts 3
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
If your letter is not published
right away, it may be because it
wasn't typed, triple-spaced, on a 70
space line. Typewriters are available
in The Ubyssey office for this purpose.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included in
the letter for our information only,
and when valid reasons for
anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity, legality and taste.
Neatness counts.
when the Soviet army entered
Budapest.
Thirty-seven years after his arrest, reports suggest he is still alive
in a Soviet prison. Originally the
Russians denied any knowledge of
Wallenberg and for years claimed
that he was killed by the remnants
of the German troops. In 1957,
Soviet foreign minister Andrei
Gromyko told the Swedish government that Wallenberg had died of a
heart attack on July 17, 1947. In
1957 and Jan. 1981, though, reports
from former Soviet prisoners suggest that Wallenberg is still alive in
the vast Soviet prison network. If
so, he would be 69 years old now.
Lack of confirmed evidence of his
death perpetuate the optimism.
In the spring of 1981, United
States president Ronald Reagan
signed a resolution making the
Swedish diplomat an honorary
American citizen as a tribute to the
saving of 100,000 Jewish lives.
Wallenberg and Winston Churchill
are now the only two foreign nationals to have been granted this
status by the United States.
Vancouver will soon have an opportunity to speak out in praise of
Raoul Wallenberg's actions and in
protest of his detainment. On Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 8:00 p.m. at the Beth
Israel Synagogue, 4350 Oak Street,
the North American Jewish
Students' Network is sponsoring a
Raoul Wallenberg Awareness
Night, the goals of which are to persuade the government to elevate
him to the status of Canadian
citizen, spread the knowledge of his
deeds and create world-wide
pressure on the Soviet government
to confirm his detention and release
him.
The program will include a
dramatization on Wallenberg's accomplishments, a visual presentation and the chance to sign a petition to the government requesting
that the Swedish diplomat be made
an honorary Canadian citizen.
Guest speaker for the evening is
Rabbi Abraham Cooper, Assistant
Dean at the Simon Wiesenthal Centre for Holocaust Studies in Los
Angeles.
In the Network tradition, similar
symposiums are taking place in major cities across Canada.
The inevitable sense of mystery
turned into optimism has become
the hallmark of the Wallenberg
story. Here indeed is a most
righteous hero. If he is alive, a
civilized world can no longer
tolerate his abandonment.
Marina Gutman
'Tieleman wrong9
Bill Tieleman in the Perspectives
column of Jan. 14 (Parasites: get
the red out) made a big issue of the
involvement of Marxist-Leninist
students and others in the struggles
of the students. This is wrong and
divisive.
Anyone who is seriously interested in organizing against cutbacks, fee hikes and other attacks
must not make it a requirement that
people have certain political views.
One should propose a fighting program and encourage everyone,
regardless of their political persuasion to participate. To do otherwise
is to subvert and divide the student
movement leaving it in the position
it has been over the years this attitude has prevailed.
Furthermore, it is the worst kind
of anti-intellectualism to encourage
students not to find out about what
is going on just because one happens to disagree with somebody's
ideas. Students are capable of
understanding what is going on
around them and to try to impose
one's particular view of what they
should do if they want to do
something about the issues that
concern them is totally antidemocratic.
These attitudes can only serve to
divide students and weaken them in
the face of fee increases and cutbacks which certainly weren't
brought on by the people who were
under attack. We encourage
students to unite to defend their interests.
Garnet Colly
committee to fight the fee hike Friday, January 29, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
vista
Wondering what to do this
weekend? Ya, well, so am I. Here
are some suggestions. If you're into
Shakespeare, or if you are taking
English 100, Studio 58's production
of A Midsummer Night's Dream is
being held over until Feb. 6. Performances are Tuesday to Saturday at
8 p.m. in the basement of the main
building on the Langara campus,
100 West 49th Avenue.
Tonight, the UBC Musical
Theatre Society presents Rogers
and Hammerstein's musical South
Pacific at 8 p.m. at the Old
Auditorium. Tickets are only $3 for
students.
If you are downtown on the
weekend and you haven't yet visited
the new Vancouver Arts, Sciences,
and Technology Centre, the broken
displays are probably repaired now.
The centre, located at 600 Granville
Street, is worth visiting and deserving of support. It is open from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday and from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Admission is $2 for adults and
$1 for children, students, and
seniors.
Or, if you are in the mood for
something slightly bizarre, you can
involve yourself in the lives of Bartholomew Gross and Eddie Morose,
who meet on a radioactive road to
nowhere after a nuclear bomb explodes above Vancouver City Hall.
Their "last act" is performed by
Tamahnous Theatre in Last Call —
A Post Nuclear Musical Cabaret
which opens tonight at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre. Call
254-9578 for tickets.
At the Hollywood Theatre,
S.O.B., starring Julie Andrews and
William Holden, is playing with
The Mirror Cracked, starring Liz
Taylor and Rock Hudson. At the
Ridge, The Stuntman is playing
with All That Jazz and, at the
Savoy, Only When I Laugh, with
Marsha Mason and Kristie
McNicholl, is playing with Seems
Like Old Times, starring Chevy
Chase and Goldie Hawn.
The Savoy also shows The Rocky
Horror Picture Show at midnight
on Friday and Polyester, starring
Divine, on Saturday at midnight.
Of course, there are other things
happening in Vancouver this
weekend at theatres, night clubs,
and galleries, but I am out of space
and I don't get paid.
UBC Musical Theatre Society Presents . . .
SOUTH
PACIFIC
JANUARY 29-FEBRUARY 6, 1982
UBC Old Auditorium-8:00 D.m.
Tickets Available AMS Box Office
OR 228-2678, 228-6902
STUDENTS $3.00 OTHERS $5.00
SENDING
RESUMES
9
!••> Bradson
«» Word
Processing
H8f> Dunsmuir Street
Suite- HKO    VW INS
688-7791
sub i«in:
Free sex
advice.
That's right. When you
visit PJ. Burger & Sons
we'll advise you of your
sex. Free of charge! Add this
tree advice to our 15 classic
burgers and other great stuff
and you've got one heck
of a crazy little restaurant, sir
or madam. 2966 \X! 4th Ave.
by Bayswater.
Open daily from 11:30a.m.
AMS
TICKET
OFFICE
AMS PRESENTS
UPCOMING EVENTS
CBO
Doc & Merle Watson. Feb. 5. Commodore
Maynard Ferguson, Feb. 6, Commodore
Great   Guitars  (Charlie   Byrd,   Herb   Ellis.
Barney Kessel), Feb. 7, Queen Elizabeth
Playhouse
John Prine & Steve Goodman, Feb. 16
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Bruce Cockburn, Feb. 18
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Marcel Marceau. Feb. 23,
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
_    ^ ^ _ . __ __ „._.„ Andres Segovia, Feb  24, Orpheum
AMS   CONCERTS MacLean & MacLean, Feb. 26 & 27.
«-   „,.,, r,   .. Commodore
Wilclroots, Feb. 5. SUB Ballroom Danie| AmQs & Randy StonahiM
AIIAO   f%.   lino Mar. 5. Vincent Massey Auditorium
AlVlO   l/LUDO Songest'82. March 5.
Cinema 16, German New Wave Series. Italian Directors    Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Series North Van Rec Centre
NUS/NEUS. Gentleman's Invitational Dance. Jan   29.Pete Seeger. Mar  6. Queenie Theatre
SUB Ballroom Odetta, May 17,
Aggiies. Farmer's Frolic. Jan   30. UBC Armory Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Neuman Club, Annual Winter Ball. Feb. 4.
SUB Ballroom
AIESEC,  Valentine's  Luau   Dance,   Feb.   13.   Mclnnes
Lounge, Gage Towers
Mussoc, South Pacific. Jan   29 tt 30. Feb   16.
Old Auditorium
MISCELLANEOUS
Vancouver Chinatown Lions Club, Chinese New Year
Variety Show, Jan. 31, Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Feb. Bus Passes, Jan. 25-29. Feb   1-5
Pictures for Bus Passes, Jan. 28 & 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Western Express, The Provincial &
Super Loto Tickets
Ehotofinishing Service 	
NOW, A NEW
BURGER THAT'S
MORE BURGER
THAN
BUN
Introducing the new hamburger from the DAIRY QUEEN
E1RAZIER store. In a new "six to a pound" size that really
gives you some meal for your money. Instead of a banquet of
bun.
You see, while other burger chains
get as many as ten hamburgers from a
pound of beef, we get only six. And
that gives you "more burger than
bun." A burger that's tender,
deliciously-cooked. Every time. The
new burger from DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER.
Dairy
Queen
brazier
2601 W. Broadway Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1982
[
Tween Classes
TODAY
MUSSOC
South Pacific, nightlv at 8 p.m. in the Old Auditorium until Feb. 6.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Human rights library, every lunch hour in SUB
230.
SKYDIVING CLUB
"Awards party. Gage party room, 7 p.m., tickets
$2, pick up at SUB 216g.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting,  pick up your tickets for the
awards party, noon, SUB 2l6g.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Comical and lyrical dance film shorts, 50 cents
admission for non-members. Noon, SUB auditorium.
MUSLIM STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Friday prayers, noon. International House.
LSM
Worship/Eucharist,    noon,    Lutheran    Campus
Centre
Happy hour with cheap refreshments, 4 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Party and dance, open to all. Our glorious leader
will be present. 7:30 p.m., SUB 207.
BAHA'I CLUB
Coffeehouse, everyone welcome. Informal discussion, cheap refreshments, 4 to 7 p m. in SUB
212
PHYSSOC
Vine, cheese and bzzr party $1 for all you can
consume, 4 to?, Henning 318.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Vs. Saskatchewan Huskies, 8 p.m. m Thunder
bird arena.
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING
Vs. the University of Puget Sound, 7pm,
Aquatic centre.
CITR
Campus capsule, a look at the news, sports and
social festivities at UBC, cable 100 fm.
LE CLUB FRANCAISE
Guest speaker M. Clair from the French consulate, noon, Mann lounge. International House.
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for women's floor hockey
league, 3:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
CCM
Lecture on The need for wisdom, noon,  SUB
207/208.
SATURDAY
CSA
Downhill skiing and sign-up in the CSA office,
7:30 p.m., Mount Seymour.
BRIDGE CLUB
Informal duplicate bridge tournament,  $6 entrance fee and trophy prizes, 6 p.m., SUB 205.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Vs. Saskatchewan Huskies, 8 p.m., Thunderbird
arena.
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING
Vs. Pacific Lutheran University, 1 p.m., Aquatic
centre.
THUNDERBIRD ROWING CREW WALKATHON
Starts at Vancouver Rowing Club, carrying a 200
lb., 55 foot long rowing shell from Stanley Park
to UBC, and back again, 9 a.m., Vancouver
Rowing Club.
CHESS CLUB
Multi-simultaneous  tournament,   9  a.m.,   SUB
206.
SUNDAY
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Touring ride, 9 a.m., meet south side of SUB.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Game vs.  New Westminster,   10 p.m.,  Aquatic
centre.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Concert  by  the  Vancouver  Chamber  Choir  of
works  by James Joyce and Virginia Woolf,  8
p.m.. Recital Hall, Music building,
SAILING CLUB
Broken Centreboard Regatta,   11  a.m.,  Jericho
Beach sailing centre.
CHESS CLUB
Multi-simultaneous    tournament    continues,    9
a.m.. SUB 206,
MUSSOC
South  Pacific,  Honk  if  Bloody Mary's the Girl
You Love, 8 p.m., Old Auditorium.
CITR
Off Beet, trashy news for trashy people, 7 p.m.,
cable 100 fm.
TUESDAY
MUSSOC
South Pacific, In Love With A Wonderful Guy?,
8 p.m.. Old Auditorium.
CCCM
Ukrainian Orthodox Eucharist with George Hermanson, the radical chaplain who can talk to the
young, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Dennis Lee poetry, a well known artist and literary critic, noon, Buch. 106.
HISTORY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Meeting to discuss plans for grad event and plan
for next wine and cheese party, noon, History
lounge.
HSSC
Dr. W. Bowie from VGH will talk on sexually
transmitted diseases, noon, IRC 6.
COMMITTEE AGAINST RACIST
AND FASCIST VIOLENCE
Literature table, noon, SU8 foyer.
FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT
Robert Mills and the creation of an American
style of architecture, noon, Lasserre 102.
CITR
In Sight, a look at the results of the AMS elections and referenda, after 6 p.m. news, cable 100
fm.
INTRAMURALS
Final  registration  for  men's  SUB 6'  basketball
tournament, 3:30 p.m., War Memorial gym.
Also final registration for men's bowling tournament and corec curling bonspiel, 3:30 p.m.. War
Memorial gym.
THURSDAY
MATH CLUB
Dr. David Boyd solves and gives math solutions
to Rubik's cube, noon, Math 229.
INTRAMURALS
Corec volleyball, come by and play, 7:30 p.m..
War Memorial gym.
Also final registration for men's squash tournament. 3:30 p.m., War Memorial gym.
FRIDAY
SPEAKEASY AND STUDENT
HEALTH SERVICES
A public presentation on sexually transmitted
diseases, noon, SUB 111.
|       Hot Flashes       |
War and love
in living color
Mussoc presents a revamped
rendition of Rogers and Hammer-
stein's terminal South Pacific. See
War and Love in living colorl Hear
hearts of glory rave in the old
auditorium, nitely to Feb. 6, 8 p.m.
Patrons are warned not to perform
acts of nostalgia in the washrooms
and lobby.
The southern Pacific during
World War two was an exciting
place for both American death merchants and Japanese Kamakazi
pilots. Peering through binoculars
at one another, these two cultures
soon found something to agree
upon. They acted promptly and
soon brought one another to a
verge of annihilation.
V - Glffcfc - see
O-ton-nom-me. O-ton-nom-mie.
Autonomy! There, I got it right.
Autonomy for the Used-to-be.
Autonomy for the Use-less-ly.
Autonomy for The Ubyssey! Wow,
I got it right again. Boy, werkin,' I
mean working, for this paper sure
improves my spilling, I mean spelling. And helps my phonetics
toooooo, oops too many ooo's.
Well, on with the show.
Autonomy meetings for the finance
committee at 1 p.m. at Trutch
house and for the campaign com
mittee same time but not same
place. It's at Glen "peace, love and
backrubs" Sandface's house. Bring
munchies to both meetings if you
like. Attend or dye, I mean die!
Wfsdoni wonted
Do you need wisdom? Do you
have the wisdom to know? Do you
know what wisdom is? Well, come
get wise, the Co-operative Campus
Ministry is wisely presenting The
need for wisdom.
Nothing personal, but I should let
you know that it's happening noon
Friday, Jan. 29, (today, so hurry) in
Sub 207/209. As you can see,
without the knowledge just given,
you would be none the wiser on
how to know why to be wise.
WRITING
A REPORT?
■!-»•& Bradson
®* Word
Processing
885 Dunsmuir Street
Suite 880    V6C 1NH
688-7791
WINTER LILY PRESS
for your
WEDDING INVITATIONS
255'53&8 or 251'5294
Group
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Alter the game, alter the
exam, alter anything...
the group gropes better
at HJ. Burger & Sons. Home
of 15 classic burgers. And
other great stuff. 2966 \X! 4th
Ave. by Bayswater. Open
daily from 11:30a.m.
Void where prohibited by law.
NISSAN STANZA IS THE
ONE FOR MILEAGE!
Test drive the new Nissan Stanza
and see why we're so excited!
Slanza otters ihe best mileage of any two litre
automobiie soic in Canada  Ana economy is only
one cf the reasons to make it your number one
choice Looks, comfort, room for five people and
sure-footed front wheel drive handling ail ado up to
the top car vatue for your money. Make your best
deal today at
2422 Burrard at Broadway
Phone 736-3771
Ask about
Reduced Rates on
Bank Financing
IS THE ONE
engineering Week *82
ts
MONDAY:
SUB    Plaza,
Redeye    Pancake    Brunch
10:30-2:30
Ingenuity '82 Engineering-Technical Display in
SUB, 12:00-5:00 continued Tuesday
WEDNESDAY:
Events Day —
Teams will compete in all sorts of ways to support
the Variety Club Telethon, SUB Plaza, 12:30.
Door Prize.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $2.00; additional lines, 56c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $3.63; additional lines
55c. Additional days $3.30 and 50c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room241, S.U.B., UBC/Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
PROF. STEPHEN WEISS
U.S. National Institutes
of Health
LIFESTYLE CHANGE AND
HEALTH ENHANCEMENT
Prof. Weiss is chief of the Behavioral
Medicine Branch of the National Heart,
Lung and Blood Institute of the National
Institute of Health.
LECTURE HALL 2,
WOODWARD BUILDING.
Sat., Jan. 30 at 8:15 p.m.
WOTTA DEAL . . . The next GSA
Folk/Night is on Friday Jan 29th at 8:30
p.m. In the Grad Centre Garden Room. It
only makes sense.
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and
hair styling. Student hairstyle, $8.50. Body
wave, $17.00 and up. 601 W. Broadway,
874-0633.
COMPLIMENTARY HAIRCUT. Have your
hair cut and styled by students under expert
supervision. Phone 733-7795.
80 — Tutoring
CUSO
1982 Development
Education Series
Tuesday, February 2 at 7:30 p.m.
and runs every Tuesday until March
9th.
Place: International House,
U.B.C.
A series of discussions accompanied
by audio-visuals, on why after thirty
years of Development the people of
the Third World are still poor.
EVERYONE WELCOME
For more information phone:
228-4886 (a.m.)
85 — Typing
THE PIT is now open Sat. at 4:00. Come in
and watch the game?
COMMUNITY SPORTS: A store full of ski
wear, hockey equipment, sleeping bags,
jogging shoes, soccer boots, racquets of all
kinds, and dozens of other items at very at
tractive prices. 3615 W. Broadway.
11 - For Sale - Private
1974 ALFA ROMEO 2000 GTV. Good cond
Must sell. $6,650 OBO. 738-4236.
TYPING — Special Student Rates. Filtness
& Cameron Public Stenographers, 5670
Yew Street, Phone 226-6814.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING $10,00/hr.
Equation typing available. Pickup and
delivery. Phone Jeeva, 826-5169 (Mission).
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731 9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.).
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
90 - Wanted
15 — Found
20 — Housing
30 — Jobs
GOOD HOUSEKEEPER likes children, look
ing for a live-in housekeeping job. Phone
228-0438.
HELP
WANTED
We'll pay you $40 per hundred
to process and mail advertising
letters and brochures. All
postage paid, no gimmick. Send
name, address, phone and $2
(refundable) for processing to
Textron Inc., Postal Unit 235,
Avon, Illinois, 61415.
35
Lost
99
Miscellaneous
LOST - Pair male's brown wire frame
glasses Friday, Jan. 22/82 between S.U.B.
and Gage Towers. Ph. 876-6667 after 6:00
p.m.
MISSING PERSONS: French Planter,
American Serviceman. Last seen Mary-
Louise Island, South Pacific, 1940's. Please
contact South Pacific, 8 p.m., old aud.
40 — Messages
50
Rentals
65 — Scandals
LONELY COUPLE wish to meet others to
form unique relationships. 224-9015. Teresa
or Herman.
VANCOUVER
REPERTORY THEATRE
General Audition for
James Reaney's
HANDCUFFS
Feb. 6 and 7, 1-3 p.m. at
1150 Homer Street
Spring Acting Workshops
Now Registering
For information and appointment, call
689-5313
WANTED — Christian male companion for
studying and or sports. Phone 224-9726,
Room 402. Friday, January 29, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
AMS CONCERTS PRESENTS
Feb V Fifth
SUB BALLROOM, U.B.C. NO MINORS
DOORS 7:30 P.M./SHOW
8:00 P.M.
GENERAL, $7. AMS $6.   TICKETS:
AMS BOX OFFICE, ALL CBO
OUTLETS
A Srauittutinl Emjliati ffieataurant
4686 Dunbar at 30th 224-2521
3 COURSE LUNCH SPECIAL     3.96
DINNER SPECIALS from 4.96
Pius complete Menu Selection
\ of Salad, Sandwich and
\ House Specialties
i
4 Open: 11:30 - Midnight
Monday thru Saturday
ENJOY ENGLISH PUB-STYLE
FOOD IN AN AUTHENTIC SETTING
Fully Licensed Premises
Make "The Choose" Your Local
1gF=Jr^F.f3r^]rigJiTd^l|=lcJ|=lcjafdB=Jrir^lrFJ;grg
'111 M ^^m. A        .        ■  P^.     ■ a -I
LUV-A-FAIR
Vancouver's #1
New Wave Club
175 Seymour St.
i
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE last delivery!
228-9513
4610 West 10th Ave.
Q'
a
a
%
o
Q
i!
a
a
I
a
'a.
a
a
gtSr^|-iif^>r-Jl-^r=Jr=Jr=i^lripJe.^lr=Jr=iarTp^
RED LEAF     -
RESTAURANT -0
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
' 10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK-UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISE
Mon.-Fri. 11:30-1:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holiday*
4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
2142 Waatam Parkway
!"     U.E.L Vancouver. B.C.   <
lOppoeft* Chevron Station)
has School cpX you down?
^For^nly $20,00
You can have a days stiiry at
GROUSE Am*. plus transportation On
The
UBC Ski Express
Bus leaves SUB 7:15 p.m. on Feb. 6
Ha\f6 a  «?££  rr	
the Pit ok rfour return.
MPT UABLfe FQg L0SS6S 0* Hitter* SiiFffcgUV
LIVE ROCK riFROLL
ROQil^OLL
V
Vfcl^^lOniOLL
LIVE R(^^l'ROLL
Feb.1-6
STRIPES
Opts Mon. - Sat. 7 p.m. - 2 a.m.
932 Granville Mall      687-6418
UEG Gampas
$!■    Pizxa
Steak & Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224 0529
Hum   M:n   Thurs.   1130am   t 00 p m
1130 a m   3 00 p m    S,n   4 00 I   m   3 00 .,
Sii.,    1 00 .) in.  1 00 ., n
2136 Western Parkway
ROTIMAN DELI
CARIBBEAN FOODS
Rati—Curry Chicken—Beef—
Stew—Pouiourri Rice TV Peas
Take Out—Catering—Delivery
Tel: 876-5066
Open Tuesday through
Sunday 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
922 Kingsway — Opp. ICBC
*Ls. I. I. K,
and
THE PIT
The Nabobs of Noise
proudly Present
"THE
HOT
AIR
SHOW"
FEATURING LIVE
BANDS
—The Cheapest Free
Entertainment in Town
Monday, Feb. 1, 1982
9:00 p.m.
NO COVER
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
4«. 5732 y
•*£ UNIVERSITY BLVD/7
f-*T     Eat In and Take Out    $
•f£       OPEN EVERY DAY     ^
4:01) p.m. to 9:30 p.m.     *^*
Phone: 224-1313 A
*
MON. Wet "10" T-shirt
Contest
TUES. Whip Cream
Wrestling
WED. Ladies Night
THURS. Hoser Night
Wear toque, scarf or
earmuffs and  get  in
free.
TOP LIVE BANDS NIGHTLY
FRI. Er SAT.
THIS WEEK:
DEELER
Next Week:
The Wires
First 50 Ladies Friday & Saturday get in FREE.
315 E. Broadway 879-4651 Free Parking
Make a date
to try one of
the fine
restaurants
advertised in
The Ubyssey!
Raggae Concert
Saturday, Jan. 30
LOVE TRAIN
PLUGGY STACHMO
MELONIE WALTERS
THE DUKE
$8.00 Italian Centre
3075 Slocan St.
S. Grandview Highway.
Inf. ph. 430-3337. 980-6628
TWO FOR ONE
TACO SALE
l-or 1.25 and the coupon below, you'll get two of our
delicious tacos . . . two for the price of onel
TACOV)
3396 West Broadway (at Waterloo)
Open 11 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 7 days a week
393 East 12th Avenue (at Kingsway)
Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. 7 days a week
Robson Square Food Fair (Hornby & Robson)
Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 6 days a week
(Closed Sundays)
New Location to open in Feb. at2028 W. 41st
2 TACOS FOR 1.25
This coupon is good for purchase of two tacos for 1.25
Coupon must be presented. One offer per person.
Offer expires Jan. 31, 1982 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1982
^£
T500&9427B
AM/FM cassette deck is designed especially for most
import cars. Features locking fast forward, local/distant
control & power-off eject. Practical, solidly designed
twin flush mount speakers have hemispherical dome
radiator for wider frequency response.
179
COMPLETE
PACKAGE
harman/kardon
M95ED
>J«
Deluxe high trackability cartridge with built-in
snap-down stylus guard and biradial elliptical
stylus. For 3/4 to 1 Vi grams tracking.
|95
i *__.§&? ijLifcp
*      Q    0     v    Q.
hk570i Receiver with 45 watts per channel has
5-level signal strength meters, station lock
beacon, auto FM, tone defeat, tape copy function, monitoring for 2 decks, subsonic filter.
The entire line is priced to
clear. Lowest prices ever!
Limited quantities.
Model 203
Model 203 will provide satisfactory volume
levels for domestic use from an amp output as low as 15 watts per channel to as
high as 100 watts. You get precise stereo
images with low coloration. A computer
designed filter system eliminates disturbing crossover effects.
249
each.
55VX
This two-way system performs
clean and tight bass. The sound
has a very "open" quality.
Recommended Amplifier Power
Range, 10-80 watts.
139
each.
r
S FISHER
RS220
O
Studio Standard AM/FM Receiver with
20 watts per channel has super high-
end features: 5 band graphic equalizer,
5 LED signal strength meter and push
bar controls.
249
REMOTE RADAR DETECTOR BY FOX
This radar detector is totally unobstructive within
the vehicle. Detector is mounted under the hood.
It has exceptional range and reliability on all bands.
199
SIB
S100 CP
IT •=?!
o o
The performance of this cassette is
certified in writing. Features include a Dolby noise reduction system, metal capability, flow meters,
solenoid controls, LED record indicator and full auto-stop.
199
PRICES VALID ONLY WITH THE PRESENTATION OF THIS AD.
WE TAKE
TRADES
PHONE ORDERS
ACCEPTED
^^^    ^      ^^^    WE SHIP ANYWHERE IN CANADA.      m
Q&Osouno
556 SEYMOUR STREET, 687-5837-2696 E. HASTINGS STREET, 254-1601

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