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The Ubyssey Sep 25, 1987

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Array the Ubyssey
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Council hikes student honoraria
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AMS hacks snack on surplus
By ROSS McLAREN
Student Council passed the
AMS budget Wednesday night,
increasing the honoraria for AMS
executives, Student Administrative Commission members, and
several AMS service organizations including CITR and The
Ubyssey.
The only organization that
asked for an honorarium and was
turned down was the Gays and
Lesbians of UBC.
Council decided to increase all
honoraria to bring the AMS in line
with other universities in Canada.
UBC, with one of the largest student populations in Canada, has
among the lowest paid student
executives.
AMS executive honoraria
were increased one and one-half
times over a base figure of $1,200
for the president and director of
finance, and one and one-half
times over a base figure of $800 for
the vice-president, director of
administration and co-ordinator
of external affairs.
The president and director of
finance will now receive $2,750
each while the vice-president, director of administration, and coordinator of external affairs will
receive $1,300 each.
The question of honoraria
levels was submitted to a council
ad hoc budget committee at the
September 9 council meeting. After one meeting the committee
decided to fund the honoraria from
a $15,000 AMS budget surplus.
But some people on council
thought the money should have
come from the budget rather than
from a budget surplus.
Graeme Luke, graduate society representative, said "this was
not the way to do it. The level of
honoraria should be set within the
total budget. There are other
choices than honoraria to spend
the surplus on?
Caroline Rigg, co-ordinator of
external affairs, agreed with
Luke. "The money should not have
come from a surplus. The committee had a short time to decide...a
proper assessment should examine what each position entails?
Rigg said.
Some council members were
unhappy with the negotiated figures.
Director of administration
Tim Bird said it is unfair that the
president and director of finance
will be paid so much more than the
other three AMS executives.
"When honoraria were first
decided years ago the duties and
jobs of the president and (director
Socreds reroute welfare
funding from disabled
^l****' ... ... : 1 1„..,   *.!.„   „.•.■,.
By MIKE GORDON
(CUP) - The BC government is
going against a request from the
federal health minister to pass an
increase in federal disability pension benefits on to welfare recipients.
Nearly 150,000 Canadians
whose disability prevents them
from working or seeking work
were supposed to receive an
across-the-board increase of $152
a month in Canada Pension Plan
(CPP) payments starting last
January.
But certain disabled welfare
recipients in BC, part of Canada's
roughly 20,000, have had the extra
money deducted from their
cheques.
Social services and housing
minister, Claude Richmond, has
been deducting the CPP benefits
on the grounds that the Guaranteed Available Income for Need
(GAIN) Act only requires the government pay a minimum income
assistance — independent of out
side income or benefits.
Federal-provincial welfare
cost sharing requires all sources of
income, including disability pensions, be considered in determining welfare payments.
But Richmond's decision goes
against a request by federal health
minister Jake Epp to the provinces
earlier this summer to disregard
the extra monthly $152 as income,
and pass it on to welfare recipients
at no extra cost.
"It's just obscene what he's
doing," said Jean Swanson, coordinator for End Legislated Poverty,
a coalition of anti-poverty and
tenant's rights groups.
"The feds increased benefits
to disabled people and the province reduced accordingly, so
people are no better off," she said.
Swanson sent a letter on behalf of the coalition urging
Richmond to comply with the
federal minister's request.
"In effect," she charges, "a
federal increase which was designed to help disabled people liv
ing below the poverty line, has
been snatched by your government to reduce the deficit."
The maximum amount currently available to a single disabled person under GAIN is $574 a
month.
Robin Loxton, a project
worker for the B.C. Coalition of the
Disabled, says there are roughly
20,000 people in BC receiving CPP
benefits, and about 16,000 on
GAIN for the Handicapped.
Loxton estimates that leaves
about 2,000 people supplementing
their welfare with CPP cheques.
"It is critical that disabled
people are able to receive that
extra income from other sources,"
said Loxton, adding that private
insurance companies have also
been deducting the pension increases in their disability policies.
"If (disabled people) had a
reasonable income in the first
place this wouldn't be an issue.
We're talking about below poverty
line, anyway."
see page 4: welfare
of finance) were worth more. Now
with SUB expansion, club expansion, and the increase in offices,
the (director of administration) job
has become more difficult and
time consuming," said Bird.
"The committee (that came up
with the new figures) did not consider the changein the workload of
the director of administration,"
Bird said.
AMS vice-president Jody
Woodland agreed there should not
be a discrepancy between all executive honoraria.
"I can see putting the president on top because that is the
accepted thing," said Woodland.
"But I don't see any reason for
differential honoraria between the
other four executives."
But AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont disagreed: "There
should definitely be a monetary
difference between the executives?
"There is more time involved
and more responsibility involved"
in the president's and the director
of finance's jobs, said
Nevraumont.
"However, I think the other
three executives should be getting
a slightly higher honorarium —
maybe 20 per cent? she said.
John Liesch, Gays and Lesbians president, was unhappy with
council's decision not to provide
honoraria for GLUBC executives.
"I am somewhat disappointed. The choice seems to be
arbitrary given that executive
members of other service organizations received honoraria? said
Liesch.
AMS vice-president Jody
Woodland was "shocked" that
honoraria were not granted to
GLUBC.
"I can't believe they would
single out the gays and lesbians,"
said Woodland. "It's a big step
backwards."
The decision not to fund the
Gays and Lesbians provided some
of the most intense debate in a
meeting that can only be described
as a chair's nightmare.
The motion on Ubyssey editorial honoraria also elicited lively
argument.
The ad hoc committee recommended that each Ubyssey editor
receive a $500 honoraria with a
$1,500 bursary available to editors demonstrating financial
need. This was amended to provide a straight honorarium of
$2,000 for each editor.
Ubyssey editors have not received honoraria in the past.
Other honoraria increases
include:
Student Administrative
Commission members:
from $300 to $450;
- SAC secretary: $400 to $600;
-Ombudsperson: $300 to $450;
-Speakeasy: $500 to $750;
-Volunteer Connections:
$100 to $150;
-CITR: $1,600 to $2,400.
MARANATHA PERSON WITH a lot to say is interviewed by John "Scoop", CITR reporter at Clubs Days
GIANT DISECTS TINY alien space ship. Little space grubs say "no! no!"
michal *t_mour photo THE CLASSIFIEDS
Rates: AMS Card Holders-3
lines, $3.00, additional lines,
60 cents, Commercial - 3 lines,
$5.00, additional lines, 75
cents. (10% DISCOUNT ON
25 ISSUES OR MORE)
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 4:00 p.m. 2 days before
publication. Publications Room 266,
S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
5-COMING EVENTS
United and Presbyterian.
INVITES YOU TO JOIN US IN
WORSHIP
IN THE CHAPEL OF THE EPIPHANY
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OFTHEOLOGY
6030 CHANCELLOR BLVD
SUNDAYS-10:30 AJW.
MINISTER: REV. ALAN REYNOLDS
CHURCH OFFICE PHONE: 224-7011
UBC STUDENTS WELCOME
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD.
Sunday evening, Sept. 27
7:30 p.m.
EVENSONG
Speaker: Don Grayston
The spiritual Journey of a peacemaker"
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
SEX, SPIES & SECRETS
Dr. Peter North
Oxford University
Saturday, Sept. 26
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Bldg.
8:15 p.m.
10 - FOR SALE -
 COMMERCIAL
69 BEER DRINKING GAMES. The
best way to start a party. Send $3.95
plus name and address to DRAKE-
MARTENS PUBLISHING, 4490
WI Uh. Vancouver. V6R 2M3
11 - SALE-PRIVATE
COMPUTER - IBM compatible, 1987
Tandy SX, 640K 2 floppy drives, modem, printer, monitor. $1500. 261-
2242 days, 737-7999 Eves.
OFFICE STORAGE PIGEON
HOLES, ideal for storing journals,
reprints, lab manuals, etc. Measures
5'x 3' reg. $275 - NOW $50 like new; call
228-2646
PERFECT STUDENT CAR! '76 Toyota Corolla SR5 New Carb. & Brakes,
No rust, exc. Running cond. $1795
OBO Phone 434-1900
HIDE-A-BED, brown & white, very
good condition. $125.
732-0635.
11-SALE - PRIVATE
YAMAHA 360 1976 7000 miles, excellent condition, 2 helmets, rack, case,
$500. Phone 222-1016.
NORCO SASQUATCH MOUNTAIN
BIKE 23". Much too much to list!
Has EVERYTHING CHEAP!  $590.
Leaving country. 873-6753.
71 TOYOTA COROLLA, Good cond.
$250. Phone 224-5942
76 PLYMOUTH VOLARE Slant 6
engine, Mech. Exc. Body great. New
battery, tire, very reliable. $1100. Call
263-6638.
1980 AMC- SPIRIT GT; 4 spd; 6 cyl;
77,000km; wht/blk interior; 2 door;
excell. cond; 1 owner; stereo-cass;
$3450 obo. Call 261^092 (852-3206)
WOOL 4 SALE; beautiful clean quality; 1 grey, 1 dark-brown (4 kg each).
$35 each. Phone 261-4092 (852-3206)
DATSUN F10 1978, good working
condition, must sell. $600 OBO. Phone
224-6389.
72 DATSUN 110,2 door, 4-speed. Good
for student. Running condition, some
rust, blows blue. $200 OBO. 733-1974.
15-FOUND
WALLET FOUND on Main Mall opposite the bookstore. 228-4866 Eveline.
25-INSTRUCTION
THE U.B.C. WOMEN'S CENTRE invites women to sign up for WEN-DO
women's self defense course. An invaluable 6 week course. Call 228-2163.
30 ■ JOBS
P/T NANNY in my home, alternate
week days; near UBC; phone
228-0328 aRer 4:30 p.m.
ACNE? BALDNESS? CELLULITE?
WRINKLES? We have the solution!
Money back guarantee. Helsinki
method. "Images" personal care products. Great growth potential for f/t, p/t
distributor. For products & info, call
929-5053.
GREAT PAT JOB - CONVENIENT LOCATION
THE RICHMOND BOAT HOUSE is just across the
Oak St. Bridge - only 15 minutes from Campus.
Flexible shifts. 2-4 evening shifts per week. A fun
job, you will deal with the public in a pleasant restaurant environment. We require energetic, enthusiastic people with a good work ethic to fill these
positions - Host/esses, cocktail servers, waiter/
esses. Complete training provided. Apply Saturday, Sept. 26 at 2:00 p.m. 8331 River Rd, Richmond
STUDENT WANTED for part-time
sales job. Generous wage plus cash
commission. Those interested may
apply at 736-6711, ask for Rob.
NANNY for Jr. High School student.
$30/day, one week/mo. Dunbar area,
live-in, call Lynn 731-0926.
35 - LOST
LOST COOL SHADES - Rayban May-
fair
Lost on Sept. 8 Tues.
Place: enroute between Angus & Buto.
Contact: Sean 737-0486
Emotionally attached, Cash reward.
70 - SERVICES
FUND RAISER WITH expertise in
Indian Act & Canadian Granting
Agencies etc. Can obtain commissioned freelance Assoc, with a native
group. Call McCoy, 580-3483
75 ■ WANTED
SAMI'S is looking for delivery people
who understand the hospitality business & have their own trans.
Apply at 2200 Cornwall Ave. 737-7777.
HAIR IS HAIR DESIGN requires
models for hairstyling colour, perm
workshops (Hair must be in good
cond.) Pis. call Rebecca 879-5435.
80 - TUTORING
PARISIAN FRENCH
Teacher-Tutor
Program conformed to Individual
Reasonable Rates
Serious Students Only
Jill 684-7479
WANT A 1ST CLASS GRADE?
An articulate & well organized essay,
report, or thesis earns a top mark.
Have your work edited & learn essential writing techniques to meet highest
academic standards. An experienced
Writer - Editor - Tutor, Social Sciences
graduate, will provide expert instruction and counselling. Full range of
academic services available from re
search & proof reading to typing and
creative writing instruction.
CALL A&A TUTORIAL SERVICE
687-5277
85 - TYPING
WORDPROCESSING, essays & thesis
by exp. wordprocessor & spellchecked.
521-8055
TYPEWRITING - MINIMUM NOTICE SERVICE essays & resumes,
scripts, proofreading, writing/research help. 327-0425
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: STUDENT DISCOUNTS. Laser & letter
quality printers. 10th & Discovery
222-2122
JUDITH FILTNESS, 3206 W.38th
AVE. 263-0351 experienced & accurate; student rates available.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 YRS
exp. word proc. & IBM typewriter.
Student rates. Dorothy Martinson
228-8346
ACCURATE REPORTS.
Broadway & Granville. 732-4426
Student rates available.
TYPING? Experienced & reasonable.
Spelling & grammar no problem, APA
a specialty! Discount rates, min. notice. Kits area-June - 738-1378.
ECONOTYPE. Special student rates,
7 days a week 24 hours Kitsilano.
736-1442, 736-1442, 736-1442
99 - MISCELLANEOUS
FIGURE SKATERS - 21 &. over (by 1/
1/88) precision team forming. Tuesdays 7:45-8:45 West End Comm.
Centre. 980-7663 Paige.
BETWEEN
CLASSES
TODAY
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Beer garden, 3:30 - 8.00 pm
SUB215
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
TGIF, 4:30pm, Lutheran Campus
Centre
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST
GROUP
Information enlistment to make
the club more effective than past
years, 10:30am - 4:30pm, SUB
Main Concourse
SHITO-RYU KARATE .
Club Days Sign-up Session,
10:30am - 4:30pm, SUB Main
Concourse
CITR-UBC RADIO
Open House. Join our living,
breathing radio station., 10am-
4pm, SUB 233
MUSIC THEATRE SOCIETY
OF UBC
Sign up for auditions for our
production of "Merrily We Roll
Along", 9am - 4:30pm, SUB
Concourse
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Fall retreat at pioneer Chehailas.
Call the IVCF office on Fraser St.
for more info.
SATURDAY
BMS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP (BAPTIST
STUDENT MINISTRIES)
Fall Festival, "New Image*
performing and talks on building
quality relationships for families
and single students, group
(singing, mime, puppets), Evening
6:30 to 9:30, Acadia Park, Phase II,
Yalta Place Courtyard
MONDAY
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
UBC
First General Meeting of the year,
with video on human rights. All
welcome., 12:30pm, SUB215
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Organizational Meeting, Noon
(12:30pm -1:30pm), UBC NDP
office SUB249F
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN
RESEARCH
Japan Film Series. "Japan—An
Overview" (28min. 1981) and
"Tokyo Family Life" (30min. 1983).
Free noon-hour series.,  12:30pm,
Asian Centre Auditorium
TUESDAY
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
Annual genera] "Welcoming"
Meeting, 12:30pm, Buchanan B230
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
<J
($£ CITR PRESENTS
^        D.O.A.
Plus guests
L KABONG
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 DOORS OPEN
8:30 P.M.
SUB BALLROOM - NO MINORS
Advance Tickets $5;00 UBC Students
AMS Box Office
UBC BOOKSTORE
RETURN POLICY
COURSEBOOKS
Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by the original receipt)
for full refund any time up to the following session deadlines:
FALL SESSION
OCTOBER 2,1987
WINTER SESSION    JANUARY 29,1987
SPRING SESSION     MAS. 14,1987
SUMMER SESSION  JUl_.16,1987
After the respective deadline all course books wiU be non-returnable.
Books roust be unmarked and saleable-as-new condition.
NGN-COURSE BOOKS, MERCHANDISE & SUPPLIES
Returns will normally be accepted up to 10 days from dattofpurchase, when
accompanied t>y SALES RECEIPT
NO RETURNS on sale items, special orders, electronic and computer goods,
lined shorts, bathing suits and swimming accessories.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR RECEIPT
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND
NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1987 Council reps attend conference
Three students off to New Orleans
By ROSS McLAREN
Students' Council
passed a motion Wednesday night
to send three council members to
a student services conference in
New Orleans, Louisiana, at a cost
not to exceed $3,000.
Council passed the motion
even though the exact cost of sending three delegates was unknown,
and detailed information such as
the cost of hotels and plane fares
was not available.
The motion was not part of the
regular agenda but was put forward during 'other business' at the
end of a three and one-half hour
meeting.
The chair of the meeting,
AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont at first refused to
consider the motion, but she later
agreed to let the motion go forward
Jody Woodland,   AMS  vice-
YOUNG MAN TAKES swing at mutant fly
george x photo
Memorial's student union fills piggy
banks for scholarships
ST. JOHN'S (CUP)-Students at
Newfoundland's only university
will be asked to finance their own
scholarships by plunking pennies
into a giant piggy bank.
And Memorial University's
(MUN) student council is challenging post-secondary institutions across the country to follow
suit.
The students will place a
huge piggy bank in a cafeteria
during National Universities
Week, scheduled between October
24 and November 1. The money
raised will be doled out by MUN's
Scholarships and Awards
Committee.
"We hope that because the
students are contributing to themselves, they will give freely of their
funds. We welcome any contributions, be it $1 or $50," said Ann
Marie Vaughn, council president.
Vaughn hopes other universities will pick up the idea, and
compete in a "Generosity per Capita" contest. She co-chairs a Canadian Federation of Students
Commission which is seeking
ways to involve students in the
awareness-raising week.
MUN's theme will relate to
the future, Vaughn said, and she's
looking for a rocketship design for
the bank.
"We thought we should get
involved in the 'investing in our
own future' concept," said
Vaughn.
No other universities have, as
yet, responded to the challenge,
according to Mary Elizabeth
Archer, MUN's co-ordinator for
the National Universities Week
activities.
president and one of the people
elected to go to New Orleans, said
the motion was not on the agenda
because there was not enough information at the time the agenda
was set.
"I got detailed information
about the conference two weeks
ago but I thought no one would
take the idea of sending people
seriously," said Woodland.
"Then I threw the information together and had it ready for
Wednesday. Because of the October 1 deadline for supersaver
rates" it had to be decided on
Wednesday, said Woodland.
Tim Bird, AMS director of
administration, who forwarded
the motion, said it was handled in
a disorganized fashion but defended the decision to send delegates.
"I saw workshops at this conference not offered at Canadian
conferences. I thought these workshops would be a large benefit for
the AMS," said Bird.
"The money spent to send
people to Toronto this summer (for
a conference) was worth it because
we got the idea for the new Inside
UBC and it saved the AMS
$10,000," he said.
AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont also thought the
conference was valid but added
"the way in which it was presented, that was bullshit."
The three people elected were
Board of Governors student representative Simon Seshadri, science
undergraduate president Todd
Ablott, and AMS vice-president
Jody Woodland.
Students miss
their paychecks
By ELYNN RICHTER
Approximately 300 to 400 students did not receive paychecks on
the September 22nd pay period for
work done in various departments
on campus.
"UBC is a sickly machine,"
said a student library assistant,
referring to the inefficiency of the
financial services department.
The delay in paychecks is the
result of the burst of student hiring which takes place each year at
this time, said Elizabeth Berryman of the financial services department. "Between 1600
to 1800 students are hired and
each requires an appointment
notice," she said.
Berryman said notices are the
responsibility of the departments
which do the hiring. The problem
is aggravated because each department waits to see what their
needs are before issuing the notices, she said.
She said she does not see her
department as being inefficient
since they "give full attention to
getting people paid?
About 150 checks were processed as of Thursday and the balance will be taken care of on a daily
basis. Volume is expected to return to normal in October.
Berryman does not see the
delays as a problem but merely
"the nature of the system."
UBC wants $40
million forestry
building on campus
By JEREMY FRASER
UBC has plans to co-operate
more closely with industry in forestry research following the construction of a new forest sciences
building.
The university has asked federal minister Bill McKnight of the
Western Diversification office for
$40 million to build the centre.
The new multidisciplinary
research and education facility
would "house all forestry-related
research on campus? said Peter
Larkin, vice-president of research.
Having all of the forest-related activities in one building
would "encourage interaction between the many specialized fields
that play a part in forest research,"
according to Larkin.
Larkin said the facility will
work closely with industry in
undertaking research on forestry-
related projects.
Forestry companies Papri-
can, FORINTEK, and FERIC will
work with the university in the
new facility and hope to benefit
from a co-ordinated approach to
managing BC's forestry industry.
Larkin hopes research facilities like the new forest sciences
building will develop new technologies and wood products.
Future plans for the building
include the addition of government labs and the involvement of
the BC Forest Service and the
Canadian Forestry Service.
STUDENTS INDULGE IN AMS' latest money-making venture, the SUB
tanning salon. Jennifer lyall photo
September 25, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 Welfare bomb       Student council briefs
hits disabled
from page 1
Lynne Colley, a volunteer
worker at the Vancouver Unemployment Action Centre, is prevented from full-time paying
work because of her epilepsy and
Muscular Distrophy (MD).
Colley says disabled welfare
recipients have problems even
getting their single-source income. She says she lived on the
street for 20 years, and it was 10
years before she was diagnosed
for MD.
"They didn't think I was
handicapped at all," she said,
adding she wasn't accepted as a
disabled welfare applicant even
after being diagnosed.
Colley said welfare recipients, especially the disabled, are
often ignorant of their rights
anyway.
"At the welfare office they
tend to act like it's their money,"
she said. "That's why they are able
to intimidate you."
Though the coalition wants
Richmond to pass the extra $150
on to disabled welfare recipients,
Loxton said the problem raises
larger questions about the federal
government's responsibility for
monitoring its share of provincial-
federal funding under the Canada
Assistance Plan (CAP).
"Ethically the province
should be passing it on because it
was intended for disabled persons," said Loxton. "On the other
hand, the increase itself was
rather ill sought-out — they
should have anticipated this problem."
Loxton said that CAP is presently under review, with a report
due in December.
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September 24 council meeting
COMMITTEE TO SPARK DIALOGUE
Council members voted
Wednesday to approve the formation of a Publications committee.
The committee will help determine student concerns and facilitate communication between the
newspaper and student council. It
will consist of the ombudsperson,
members of The Ubyssey staff,
student-at-large members and a
non-voting AMS Business Manager.
COUNCIL SAYS NO TO GLUBC
"I am shocked. I can't
believe they singled out the gays
and lesbians," said vice president
Jody Woodland following council's
vote to not pass a $300 honorarium
for the executive of the Gays and
Lesbians of UBC. Although some
council members argued in favour
of awarding honoria as a "form of
thanks for taking a lot of heat,"
others felt that GLUBC should be
treated like any other club. "A lot
of other clubs are doing the same
amount (of work)? said science
representative Brian Pataky. "It's
their choice," he said.
AMS TO BEAT PHONE CHEATS
The AMS is being
cheated of hundreds of dollars in
false phone charges,said AMS
business manager Charles Redden following an examination of
the budget last Wednesday. "We
have at least $500 a month in
fraudulent phone charges? said
Redden. But Redden also said
phone frauds will drop dramatically in December with the installation of a new phone system at
UBC.
"I'd like to congratulate
you all on thinking this time," -
AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont, following a lengthy
debate on budget changes.
JOIN THE
UBYSSEY
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all other offices of the firm. Candidates will be graduating in May 1988
and would ideally have most, if not all, 45 credit hours required by the
ICABC and be currently registered in the Commerce Faculty.
Submit an original or photocopy of your UPCA form and a copy of
your most recent transcripts by October 2 to the Canada Employment
Centre on campus, Brock Memorial Hall. All resumes will be
acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 9 regarding campus interviews which will take place during the week of
October 19 and 26th. Additional information is available at the
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2300 -1055 West Hastings Street
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1
Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1987 East versus west
Doug Christie urges western separation
By JOSEPH DAVIS
The only way western Canadians can attain justice, freedom
and prosperity is to separate from
central Canada according to the
founder and self-appointed leader
of the Western Canada Concept
Party.
Douglas Christie spoke at a
public meeting Monday night at
the Sheraton Villa.
"We must escape from the
three-headed monster residing in
eastern Canada? said Christie
about the Liberal, Conservative
and NDP parties.
The monster is created by the
"two-province federal system"
said Christie. One hundred and
seventy seats in the federal House
of Commons are held by Ontario
and Quebec, while the West has
80.
Christie accuses the other
federal parties of pandering to the
whims and needs of the East while
ignoring the needs of the West.
"We (the WCC) are the only
party willing to listen to and work
for the West," said Christie.
Since it was founded in 1975,
the WCC has undergone a number
of changes. Between 1980 and
1983 the party expanded into Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. In 1986 the WCC became a
federal party. The main thrust of
the party has remained the same,
as Christie said, "to withdraw
from a corrupt and bankrupt government based in the east."
"The WCC is growing fast and
must soon expand it's administration and office," said Bill White, a
five year party member and Vancouver region organizer.
The media has often been a
thorn in Christie's side. "Personally, I have only contempt for individuals of the media? he said.
The WCC recommends to all
its members that they increase
their support and awareness of
party issues and collect any news
stories for party files. The Edmonton Sun was once successfully
sued for referring to the WCC as
the Alberta version of the KKK.
The WCC wants to see the day
when the western provinces individually voice their opinion on
separation via referendum. If the
results of the referendum favored
separation the nation created
would consist of those provinces
wanting out of Canada. The prospective provincial candidates
would consist of B.C., Alberta,
Manitoba, the Yukon and the
North West Territories.
Narrowly focussed
education poses
danger, says Marzari
By JENNIFER LYALL
Point Grey's two MLAs, NDP Darlene Marzari and Social Credit Kim
Campbell were both on campus this week to meet students at clubs days. In the first
of two interviews, The Ubyssey talks to Darlene Marzari about the direction and
philosophy ofBC's advanced education system.
Darlene Marzari, the NDP
critic for advanced education,
takes a "traditionalist" view of
education in the eighties.
"I think the value of a university education is to create a flexible and tolerant and creative
mind? she says. She thinks
schools of higher learning should
encourage students to "think, and
read deeply, and write? and to get
a general rather than a sped ali zed
education.
Marzari thinks people who
train themselves to fill certain
specialized positions will pay for it
as society's needs change in the
future. "The year 2000 I think is
But she doesn't see that need
being met by BC's present education system. "I worry about education that takes students along a
single narrow track and by the
"I'm  very  opposed  to   seeing  universities
turned into factories for jobs."
going to ask for people to move
flexibly from job to job. There has
never been a greater need for
thinking generally."
DARLENE MARZARI...supports reading writing & thinking      j. iyaii photo
time they finish grad school they
are good for one thing only. There is
a danger that too many of our students are too focussed."
While Marzari agrees job
training is also important she insists that the focus of a university
must remain learning, not jobs:
"I'm very opposed to seeing universities turned into factories for jobs;
that's the antithesis of a university."
"I think job training is very
much a function of community colleges and that is (one reason) we set
up the community college system?
she said. "It's up to each region and
community to establish the job
training programs it needs."
Marzari thinks this year's new
provincial student aid program,
which reintroduces a partial grant
system, is "a vast improvement
over the old one."
But she says the improvements haven't increased accessibility to higher education: "The aid
may be slightly better but the
spaces aren't there."
For BC to reach 1982 enrolment levels and come on par with
the rest of Canada, 24,000 more
students must be registered in
post-secondary institutions, said
Marzari. "That's a whole university; it's six community colleges.
It's more than bad, it's a crime."
But solving the problem will
not be easy: "It means more money,
new systems of planning, an influx
of younger teachers." She also
hopes to prompt the opening of a
new university in northern BC.
Marzari wants to see more
people participating in BC's advanced education system.
"All we need is the spaces."
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September 25,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 OMBUDSOFFICE
A.M.S. Problems & Complaints
Department
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Applications At The Office
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Gay basher bashed
GLUBC serves useful purpose on campus
By PETER MacDOUGALL
Once again hatred and
bigotry returns to the letters
page of the Ubyssey (September
22). The star of this edition is
noted possessor of truths, Gord
Hohensee.
Mr. Hohensee, in prose that
would cause Joyce to weep, contends that GLUBC "is a specific
social organization that is not a
service."Gord goes on to say that
with the exception of GLUBC,
all other AMS service organizations are "intended either to directly assist students or to promote UBC's good standing
among the students and the
community."
If Gord had turned to page
24 of Inside UBC he would have
read that GLUBC seeks "to provide social, recreational, and
educational services to the gay,
lesbian, and non-gay populations of UBC and Vancouver. As
a service organization, GLUBC
seeks to educate the general
community and provide necessary support for members." Despite Gord's argument to the
contrary it appears that there is
no logical distinction between
GLUBC and other AMS service
organizations such as Speakeasy, Women Student's office or
Joblink that provide support,
assistance and education to students.
The issue of whether or not
GLUBC is a social club or a service organization doesn't appear
to be Gord's real concern. What
he really wants to do is have a go
at gay-lesbian bashing; and he
does it with a vengeance. Quite
obviously a homophobic, Gord
equates homosexuality with
sadism, incest, bestiality and
child molesting. To make such a
blanket statement demonstrates a shocking degree of ignorance and an absence of logic.
If Gord equates homosexuality with these violent acts then
why not equate heterosexuality
with the same things. They are
different forms of sexual preference; just because one of them is
practised by a minority in our so
ciety or because the holy bible declares it a sin, does not make
homosexuals more prone to violent
or sadistic action than heterosexuals.
What is equally disturbing is
the arrogance with which Gord
proclaims that GLUBC is an
"immoral entity." How can he be so
presumptuous as to pass judgement on what is moral or immoral?
It is this kind of absolutist thinking that frightens me, Gord. Howis
it that Gord Hohensee is fit to
decide that homosexuality is immoral and that, by implication,
heterosexuality is moral? Is it be
cause the bible told you so Gord or
have you made a thorough examination of both lifestyles and arrived at your conclusion in this
way? Probably the former.
Persecution is usually the result of absolutist thinking. Gord,
do you really wonder why GLUBC
needs to provide support for it's
members and education to the
general public? Sit back and read
your letter again, Gord. Its bitter
invective is a frightening lesson in
intolerance.
Peter MacDougall is a country boy
who came to Vancouver to write for
The Ubyssey.
Silence surrounds soccer
UBC's "best" play   without recognition
By VICTOR CHEW WONG
A funny thing happened to me last Friday afternoon. It was sunny. Birds were
slicing soft breezes into halves
and quarters. And students
were meandering about like lazy
rivers to some distant ocean.
From midair I caught a rumor
that there was to be played a
soccer game that afternoon. I
folded the rumor neatly and
placed it in my mind.
The university men's soccer
team, the Thunderbirds, were
said to be the best in the land -
the national collegiate champions. A title to hold proud. A title
an entire university population
could wear like a blue ribbon or a
like a new suit.
To my disappointment when
I arrived at the playing field
there weren't throngs of cheering fans. Nor was there a huge
stadium to house the three time
defending national champions.
Two teams played on a
bleacherless field. There were a
few spectators lounging on a
bank of grass at the edge of the
field; parents and girlfriends, I
assumed.
The cold block of dissapoint-
ment I felt over the lack of arena
and crowd soon melted. I looked
around and began to appreciate
this rather unique picture.
The playing canvas was soft,
green, lush. It was banked around
the perimeter. And soccer players
were romping across it like so
many thoroughbred horses. The
entire scene was framed by tall
waltzing evergreens just beyond
sixteenth avenue.
There was silence but for the
muffled sound of cleats moving
over the pitch. There was the infrequent call for the ball.
The crisp passes were like
bold blue strokes over a
green canvas.
"Keeper."
"Up the wing Joe."
Voices were caught by the wind,
carried to the evergreen, and lost
in the cadence. The striking of the
ball with cleats sounded like
marshmallows popping over a
campfire; that sound also was lost
to wind and branches.
The play of the Thunderbirds
had the same precision as games
I'd seen on television. Their crisp
passes were like bold blue strokes
over a green canvas. Their movement was uniform and coordinated.
Ball to the middle. Wingers
break. Pass to the wing. Cross
back to the middle. UBC blue and
gold jerseys surge airborne for the
ball. A head makes contact. The
ball finds a corner, and snaps
twine on the net.
The Thunderbirds win the
game 2 - 0. There is little celebration. The team knows there
should have been more than two
goals. The two teams shake
hands, then the UBC team begins
the clean-up ritual they've followed for years.
Everyone contributes to the
cause. There is no star system
here. Alec Percy, and Colin Pettin-
gale, the two goal scorers, pick up
balls, flags, and nets like everyone
else.
They are the best team in Canada. They putaway theirownnets
at the end of the game just as they
put them up at the begining.
There are no managers. There is
little glory. They play for the
game.
Victor Chew Wong is a jock turned
editor with very clean teeth and a
moving personality.
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
September 25, 1987 CONJURING CARR'S SPIRIT
Play creates layers of illusion & truth as it explores artistic inspiration
By STEVEN CHESS
Song of This Place
Van. East Cultural
Centre
Until Oct.3
Student tickets $12
Currently playing at
The Vancouver East
Cultural Centre is a
beautifully lyrical play
about the nature of artistic inspiration.
Song of This Place is
the story of an actress,
Frieda, who is trying to
Carr. Thus the play
becomes the story of
both the painter and of
the actress on a quest to
plumb the depths of
creativity and artistic
inspiration.
Frieda,an eccentric
prima donna, has come
with a company of ac
tors to the B.C. forest to
rehearse her play about
Emily Carr, hoping to
capture the essence of
Carr that has thus far
eluded her. At the point of
utter frustration, Frieda
is indeed visited by the
spirit of Carr, or Millie as
those closest to her called
her.
Together the two women
embark on a bumpy journey into the painter's fascinating life and into the
nature of the artistic inspiration and creativity
_   1 il Alt.. _/»
Millie's craft.
"People must lose a piece
of themselves in order to
be free," says Millie, exhorting Frieda to venture
deeper than acting, a
false, imitative art in
Carr's opinion, allows.
Scenes from Carr's life
are enacted by marionettes manipulated by
the four actors who had
comprised Frieda's company. The puppets are
charming and effective.
Their use adds to the layering of illusion and
truth, which is suggested
by Millie as key to her
creative philosophy, and
crucial to the success of
Frieda's play.
"It's all very true, but
how true," says Millie,
venomously   mimicking
*L_i1_   _1_ _    •	
about her work and
Frieda's desire to know
the TRUTH about Emily
Carr. Truth, argues Millie, has nothing to do with
anything.
The play's first act is a
finely wrought and delicate piece of work, that
promises an emotionally
exhausting second act.
The delicacy of the first
act, however, is lost in a
jumbled second act that
never soars to the emotional heights that are
earlier suggested.
The second act - a revelation meant to explain
Carr's inability to receive
love and her feeling of
being "a stranger in my
tr»*_v*»*il*iF _**•-_-*_-»_-_*_"_ _-_-/■_••_-»       i *r.        •»-_■*_-•_ t
town" - falls flat. It provides a lame vindication
or explanation of the
complexity of Carr's character.
The music in the second act contributes another problem.    Mostly
innocuous in act one, it
becomes intrusive in
act two with its hackneyed and preachy lyrics like "let go and the
green world will be
yours." This act requires a subtlety that
the music greatly
blunts.
Joy Coghill and
Joan Orenstein give
fine performances.
Orenstein is captivating as the spirit of
Emily Carr and Coghill
quite     convincingly
tistic insight and
wholeness. As difficult
as it must be for an
actress to play an actress, Joy Coghill is
convincing as Frieda.
The puppets by
Frank Rader are alone
worth the price of admission.
"5&m
September 25,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 (SSSB5 AWARDS
IMPORTANT REMINDER
UBC BURSARIES
Students are reminded that applications for general bursaries administered by the
University of British Columbia are now available from the Awards Office. The deadline for submission of completed applications is October 1. 1987. Students must
submit an application if they wish to be considered for UBC bursaries.
Bursaries are assigned on the basis of financial need. Since bursary funding is limited,
awards are normally made only after a student has exhausted other sources of aid,
including government student loans and grants. Recipients of bursaries will be
notified by mail in November and December.
The Awards Office is open on weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
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Too outrai
is too bad
By KATHERINE MONK
MOVIE
Too Outrageous
Starring Craig Russell
at the Bay Theatre
opening tonight
Canadians CAN make good
films. Dick Benner CAN make
good films. Unfortunately, Too
Outrageous, Canadian director
Dick Benner's latest effort, isn't
one of them.
Ten years after the success of
Outrageous, a warm and tender
movie about two outsiders who
find love and strength in each
other's friendship, Dick Benner
decided to haul his teddy bear drag
queen Robin Turner (Craig
Russell), and his schizoid sidekick
Liza Connors (Hollis McLaren)
out of the closet to make Too Outrageous or Outrageous Two (this
witty pun is about the extent of
this film's comic ability).
Too Outrageous picks up ten
years later in the lives of Robin
and Liza. Robin has been playing
the tacky and not-so-tacky gay
clubs in New York, and Liza has
been writing to keep herself sane
during the ten year intermission.
Now Robin is on the brink of getting his Hollywood style big
break... But what is the price?
Selling out, compromising his
morals, the loss of his best friend?
Robin wants to make it big
after all those years doing drag in
the burlesque clubs, and so does
his new and irritatingly over-eager and over-acted agent Betty
Treisman (Lynne Cormack).
Betty decides the best place for
Robin to be after making it on a
small scale in New York is in - are
you   ready?   -   Toronto.      Yes,
Toronto, that 1 and of golden opportunity, and cheap location fees.
As the sun sets over Mississauga, the snow may fall on Bay
Street, but romance is blooming in
the hothouse of Hogtown. Looney
Liza gets a man, complete with
physical scars to match Liza's
mental ones, only his scars come
from the "president of the United
States". Alas, poor Manuel, the
new lover, is the victim of some
generic Central American revolution.
Then there's Bob and Luke,
members of Robin's entourage,
who are madly in love with each
other, but Luke is getting quite a
nasty cold from this frigid Canadian winter. And, lest we forget
Robin, he finally finds a muscle
bound stud who really cares.
Now isn't that special. As the
plot trips along from yawn to semi-
giggle, the dark clouds begin to
gather over all this love-drenched
saccharine celluloid. The love affairs fall apart one by one, culminating with an intensely unmov-
ing speech about, what else, but
AIDS.
I wish I weren't so cynical
about this film, but from beginning to end the plot was predictable and chock-full-o-cliches. At
first I found it difficult to stay
awake, but then realized there
wasn't any reason why I should.
The movie's inadequacies
became particularly glaring when
it's compared with its predecessor,
which Benner wrote and directed
so beautifully in a mere three
months, and on a shoe string to
boot. It took Benner two years to
write Too Outrageous, and it still
seemed stiff and awkward.
The rough honesty of the earlier   low-budget   Outrageous   is
Jazz that makes
the mind travel
By ROLF BOON
VANCOUVER
669-3343
NEW WESTMINSTER
522-7931
LANGLEY
534-7477
VICTORIA
383-1174
PRINCE GEORGE
564-1111
Jazz Concert
Jan Gabarek Group
Robson Square Media Centre
Thursday, September 17
No drugs were required on
Thursday night at the Robson
Square Media Center. All a person
had to do was listen, something
that is very easy to do when the
music is intoxicating and tasteful.
In this case it was presented
by the Jan Garbarek Group to a
sellout crowd of three hundred and
fifty. It was music for the mind —
incredible, effective and well
crafted.
For nearly two and a half
hours the audience was treated to
sounds that made the ears see and
music that made the mind travel.
With what seemed like no effort at
all the Garbarek Group captured
and held the audience in focus.
This was not mainstream jazz
but rather a combination of folk,
minimalism, experimental jazz
and the avant-garde. Subtlety was
the overall picture. Solos were a
cappella instead of the traditional
rhythm section backup. There
were no fancy grooves to help—the
musicians didn't need them.
The overall shape of the concert was well styled and each solo
timed so that the motion continued. The only pause was a well
deserved twenty minute intermission.
This was the first time that
the Norwegian flautist and saxophonist Jan Gabarek has performed with the ensemble of German Eberhard Weber on bass,
Swedish Lars Janson on keys, and
Brazilian Nana Vasconcelos on
latin percussion. An impressive
lineup.
The keys, bass, and sax, when
performing as an ensemble,
played polyrhythmic and lyrical
tonal lines melding together their
personal stylings in a way that
made you feel as if they had been
together for years.
The percussion was strictly
latin; there was no kit. Vasconcelos added spice to the group, but
unfortunately he didn't show the
control and refinement the others
felt naturally. At times the percussion was too loud—even obnoxious—but part of the problem
could have been in the mix.
All four are exceptional musicians performing esceptional
music. They can be found independently on the Black Swan and
Highlife labels.
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1987 Seous
CRAIG RUSSELL AS Mae West
gone, replaced by a high-gloss
veneer that turns Robin and Liza,
who were likeable and human in
the first film, into irritating comic
book characters.
In fact, there is nothing much
believably human in these characters at all. Yes, they want love.
Yes, they are searching for something which seems out of reach.
But then again, so was Lois Lane.
The main strength of Outrageous was its sincerity, and the
interesting symbiotic relationship
between Robin and Liza. Each
character was split in their own
way, only to find integration and
consolidation in each other's company. Yet all this is lost in Too
Outrageous,   and   thanks   to
Benner's directing, not even such
talents as Russell and McLaren
can save it.
But it's not a write-off. Craig
Russell's impersonations and
singing save this movie from the
catalogue of Canadian failures,
which seems to grow larger with
each Telefilm Canada grant.
And even if the film didn't
carry it off, I think Benner had
some good ideas and intentions:
the exploration of new problems
faced by the gay community, and
the painful process of growing old
in a world which seems to care
more about money than it doe?
human feelings and relationships.
But good intentions do not a good
film make.
Doll's House comical
... but was it meant to be?
By CAROLYN SALE
THEATRE
Hendrik    Ibsen's   A   DOLL'S
HOUSE
Directed by Charles McFarland
Frederic Wood Theatre
September 16-26
Freddy Wood is doing Ibsen
with a twist. They're playing A
DOLL'S HOUSE like it's comedy
(unintentionally). And the audiences are laughing - at all the
wrong moments.
The hilarity results from
rather one-dimensional portrayals of Nora (Victoria Maxwell) and
Torvald (Lawrence Kagan). Vicky
Maxwell admirably captures the
girlishness of Torvald's "songbird"
and the franticness of his "little
lark" when she fears Krogstad
(Neil Gallagher) will make his
threats to expose her duplicity to
her husband.
She is, however, over-hysterical. The fever-pitch delivery of her
lines is grating, and leaves her no
intensity to build to.
When she dances the tarantella, intended to be. the bold,
physical expression of Nora's panicked spirit fighting for liberation,
she has the audience giggling
nervously. She cannot bring the
complex Nora to life.
Lawrence Kagan's portrayal
of Torvald veers dangerously close
to parody. He may be amusing,
but the play suffers.
The pace of the final conclusive interchange between Torvald
and Nora is far too fast. Kagan
does not have time to establish the
strength of the feelings for which
Nora condemns him. Without the
intensity, neither her rejection of
him nor his reaction are sufficiently dramatic or believable.
Nora should be at her most
distraught when she discovers
that her husband is a stranger to
her.   Her willingness to play his
doll must suddenly become insupportable for her. Maxwell does not
register any self-doubt.
From the start she gives us no
sense of Nora's potential. Her
radical transformation in the final
act is not only unjustifiable, it is of
the wrong nature. She is too
preachy, too sure of what are
newborn feelings and newfound
During the last few minutes,
however, we are shunted back into
the 19th century to watch a Victorian lady leave her husband. At
the very moment in which the
audience should consider Nora's
decision within a timeless context,
McFarland insists that we recall
how shocking it was for a woman
LAWRENCE KAGAN AS Torvald and Victoria Maxwell as Nora
knowledge. Neither her speech
nor her expression reflect the
trauma of realizing that the last
eight years of her life have been a
farce.
Director Charles McFar-
land's decision to move the clock
up and place the events of A
DOLL'S HOUSE within thel960's
rather than the 1870's could have
worked well. It would have manipulated the audience into moving beyond the surface to consider
Nora's reasons for leaving Torvald
rather than being simply sacked
by the action.
to leave her husband and children
duringthe 19th century. With one
fell swoop, McFarland undercuts
his own engineering.
It's little wonder that there
seems to be no coherent idea
among the cast as to what A
DOLL'S HOUSE is all about.
Mark Weatherley as Dr. Rank, the
calm at the centre of the storm,
making peace with his own impending death, is superb as usual.
Unfortunately, he is the only
member of the cast who seems at
ease with his role.
Dancers disappoint
with season opener
JUDITH MARCUSE...MODERN dance
By TANIS SAWKINS
DANCE
Emotional Rescue—three
evenings of contemporary dance
September 17th, 18th and 19th
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse
' The Judith Marcuse Dance
Company premiered two new
works in their semi-successful
season-opening show.
The last show of the evening
was the expected highlight:
Marcuse's only new show, Playing
Without Fire (or "The Final
Flicker of the Flaming Ferroman-
ganese Performers"). The 45-
minute attempt at contemporary
dance as narrative was disappointing. Playwright iSidney
Sheldon asks, in his dry and often
witty taped text "Why do I feel like
the head lump in a bowl of oatmeal?" As oatmeal often is, Playing Without Fire was lukewarm,
bland and there was too much of it.
The detailed program notes
and clever taped text were
absolutely necessary, as the dancing itself failed at narrative. The
dancers merely served to illustrate the text; they would have
been ineffective on their own.
Tacky plastic flowers, techni-
colour marshmallows and brilliant crushed velour costumes
drew cheap laughs, but were ulti
mately distracting.
The work is about a group of
down-on-their-luck entertainers
who are lost in the Mubwoie Dessert searching for an audience.
They are bound together by a
shared dream, but ultimately go
their separate ways.
The first work presented by
the award-winning Vancouver-
based choreographer, was the often seen favourite—Seascape.
Once the nine dancers shook
off their initial nervousness their
liquid, undulating movement
evoked a lyrical sea. The music of
J.S. Bach and actual sounds of the
ocean transported the almost full-
capacity audience to a peaceful
seaside. Pale violet-blue lighting
and flowing irridescent costumes
enhanced the tranquil tone.
In Innostress, the second
work of the evening, the powerful
electronic sound of Brian Eno and
David Byrne forced the audience
out of its complacent state. This
dramatic ballet was the Canadian
premiere of Ohad Naharin's work.
He was named Israel's "Choreographer of the Year" in 1983.
This piece was created during
the Lebanon crisis, but doesn't
capture the political climate.
Rather, it focusses—rather fuzzily—on the effects of war on individuals and on the sexes. Dressed
in army fatigues and muted earth
tones, the dancers donned a facade
of sexual equality. Women dancers lifted each other and men, and
male dancers embraced.
Unfortunately, contrasting
images were presented in such
rapid-fire succession that
Naharin's vision was obscurred.
At one point, a solitary dancer in a
lone spotlight perfectly captured
the fearful isolation of a soldier.
Then, seconds later, several dancers were on stage interpreting the
unique camaraderie and trust
that the military arouses, through
supportive lifts and uniform,
march-like choreography. The
images themselves were strong,
but their impact was lost in the
staccato juxtaposition.
At times the score better expressed the vision than the dance.
The effective use of sound: amplified heartbeat, marching footsteps, and anxious breathing, created an atmosphere of fear and
feigned bravado.
The strength of the nine-
member dance troupe is that they
are distinctive, recognizable individuals who also work as a unified
whole--almost telepathically.
Their unabashed delight in movement (two of the dancers were
originally gymnasts) was hampered by their affected roles in
Playing Without Fire, but shone
through in the other two pieces.
September 25,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 Ridge Fest
animates
By ALAR OLLJUM
Artistic influences from Walt
Disney to Franz Kafka, from Laurie Anderson to the Sex Pistols are
evident in the 16 films presented
at this year's festival of animation
at the Ridge.
FESTIVAL OF ANIMATION
Fri. Sept.8 thru Thurs. Oct.l
7 & 9:30pm
Matinee Sat. & Sun. 2pm
The Ridge Theatre.
Most of the films originate in
the USA, but several European
films and one film each from Canada, the Soviet Union and Bulgaria are included in the program
The two Italian entries are
definitely the most humorous of
the program. The first traces the
bizarre evolutionary process generated out of the scum in the bottom of a coke bottle. This Darwinian farce moves along, rather incongruously, to the martial
rhythms of Ravel"s Bolero.
The second , "Self Service", is
a weird paranoid fantasy of the
rise and the fall of a grand mosquito conspiracy, which teaches us
that blood-sucking exploiters are
inevitably self-destructive.
Several of the films are more
explicit in their social critism. The
sole Canadian entry, "Oh Dad",
employs the simple technique of
rope animation to relate the anger
of a son at his father's generation's
legacy of creeping ecological crisis
and impending nuclear holocaust.
The British "Hello Dad", I'm in
Jail" is a bitterly funny punk rant
of spite and disgust for bourgeois
sensibility.
The two east bloc entries are
fasinating. The Kafkaesque real-
'YOUR FACE' - ANIMATION
by Bill Plympton
ity of present-day Bulgaria is well
portrayed in the crushed-paper
animation used in "Crushed
World". The Soviet film, "That's
Not the Same at All", very effectively satirizes the endless possibilities of low-tech industrial solutions to pollution. Imagine, a cow
that turns garbage and smog into
gasoline!
Computers and lasers are
used in several US entries to produce a strange kind of new realism
in animation. In one of these,
"Red's Dream", a unicycle takes on
the personality of an aspiring but
neglected entertainer. The animation is so true to life that one
actually feels great empathy for
-Red'.
If this year's animation festival is representative of the state of
the art then technical innovation
and sharp social commentary now
animate the world's animators.
The festival runs to October 1.
Advance purchase of tickets -
available at the AMS box office in
SUB - is well advised.
M0ISEIWITSCH...W0RK IN progress
Art explodes
By JUSTINE BROWN
Carel Moiseiwitsh's Fugitive
... in the Tiger Infested Ravines of
the Jumna River is a 'site specific
work'—in other words, it exists
only for the duration of the show.
Visual Art
Fugitive...in the Tiger Infested
Ravines of the Jumna River
Carel Moiseiwitsch
UBC Fine Arts Gallery
Main Library
Until October 8
Fugitive is a stark, confrontational cycle of charcoal drawings
which challenges and transforms
the conventional museum-going
experience. A somewhat strident
written introduction in the
gallery's anteroom familiarizes
the visitor with Moiseiwitsch's
concept.
Thus prepared, the visitor
sallies forth into the ring, where
his or her senses are assaulted by
explosive civilisation-as-jungle
imagery drawn straight onto the
gallery walls in an uninterrupted,
flowing sequence.
Hectic matriarchal fetishistic
goddesses clash in primal conflict
with phallic militaristic monsters.
There is an illusion of chaotic
movement. This is a cold, comfortless scenario: armour gives way to
machinery or stark bones.
Moiseiwitsch's direct technique transforms the museum
from a mere sterile background
into a piece in itself—form embodies meaning.
The nature of this event precludes the possibility of seeing it
elsewhere at a later date. None of
these drawings will be popping up
at some downtown gallery or in
your parents' living room. After
the 28th of September, Fugitive
will literally cease to exist—instead of finding workmen carting
off carefully wrapped canvasses,
latecomers will be likely to discover the artist on her hands and
knees wiping her work off the wall
with a rag.
Get on down to the UBC Fine
Arts Gallery and take in Fugitive
while it lasts.
GMAT     LSAT      GRE
(Graduate Management
Admission Test)
(Law School Admssion Test)
(Graduate Record Exam)
WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
University of British Columbia
Next courses October 2,3,4
• Includes Sexton text book, lectures and
• One year personalized services.
_ • Instructors hold PhD, MBA or LLB. ——
cOviOO Educational Ccnlcrs {/
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION
>>-'
CALL
222-8272
RED LEAF
Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
SS8-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon.-Fri. 11:30-9:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundavs and Holidays   '
4:X p.m.-9 p.m.
2142 Western Park	
UBC Villaga
Opposite Chevron Station
It's coming....
the great
UBC SHOE FAIR
SOUTH PLAZA STUDENT UNION BUILDING
Wednesday - Friday, September 30 - October 1
10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
(UBC's semi-annual blowout shoe sale)
Guaranteed lowest prices on
ail your favouriie brand names.
adidas^     IFJaaboh
. .. another outdoor adventure
hosted by
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UBC (rfkckmJLa&... fa oood Mrtfi
SUCCESS
It's not easy to be successful in today's competitive business environment.
YOU have to stand out from the crowd.
A C.A. designation can help you to achieve this
SUCCESSFUL FIRM
• We are a National firm of Chartered Accountants
• In the past 5 years, our practice in all areas has grown substantially. Two
of our biggest growth areas are public companies and management
advisory services - high client contact area.
• With DUNWOODY, you are involved with tax and audit planning, not just tax returns and
"ticking and bopping".
SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS
• In 1986, DUNWOODY Vancouver office had a 100% pass rate on the Uniform Final Exam!
• From our National staff intro course through to our UFE prep course in Toronto, we
support your efforts to complete your program as fast as possible.
• DUNWOODY salary, benefits and working conditions let you know that we value you
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AT DUNWOODY THERE IS A DIFFERENCE
If you are interested in a team approach instead of being a "junior" cog in the machine, we
want to interview you! Together we can unlock your door to success.
SIGN UP to interview with DUNWOODY & COMPANY or call 688-5421 and talk to our
recruiting team:   Dennis Cessna, Partner Dale Harper, Manager
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Management Advisors
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a step ahead
ra
Members,
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of British Columbia
Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1987 THAT'LL STOP YOU
N       0
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f    MOASON
( \nadjan:
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1 IN A S      E      R
^^mjj&ui
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CANADIAN?;
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ANADIAN
CANADIAN
*M1
Each bottle gets one step closer to the perfect Canadian. Can you put them in the correct sequence?
September 25,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 DO CONTRACEPTIVES CAUSE
URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS?
The Division of Infectious Diseases at UBC/VGH is
looking forsubjects fora research study, to determine
if there is an association between urinary tract infections and particular methods of contraception.
If you are interested and are just starting (or
restarting) use of the diaphragm, cervical cap, or oral
contraception, we would like to contact you on 5
occasions.
We are offering compensation for your time and
transportation costs.    *
For further information please contact
Carol Cole, RN
Research Nurse for Dr. A.W. Chow
875-4588
The people who brought you
THE COCONUT PARTY would now
like to lead you astray
with
UNDERCUT '87
Sept. 26
8 P.M.
Armouries
No Minors
Tix $5
AMS Box Office
FUS Office
(MCMI 62)
For the Roads
to Higher Education
Attention all post-secondary students! Before
you open a textbook this term, study the benefits
of fast, affordable transit to and from school.
FAST TRAX, the post-secondary student's transit
guide, will be available on campus this fall. Pick
one up for complete information on routes serving
your college or university, how they connect with
the rest of the system, and how you can save time
and money with prepaid fares. Watch for details
on posters and in the September 11 edition of
The Buzzer.
^"g
-n,^_   -X   Vancouver Regional
iranSIt   Transit System
"The Idler"
lacks bite
By STEVEN CHESS
THE IDLER, a new play
by Ian Weir at The Waterfront
Theatre, contains somewhere
within the confines of its limited
vision an important play about
what Weir sees as a new leisure
class of welfare recipients.
THE IDLER runs at The Waterfront Theatre on Granville Island
until October 10. Tickets are $8 for
students from Monday to Thursday and $10 Friday and Saturday.
There is a Wednesday matinee.
For tickets call The Waterfront
Theatre box office at 685-6217.
Glimpses of this other play are
evident in the current production,
yet a strong script and fine acting
do not make up for a story that
could have been,in addition to an
amusing comedy, a powerful and
relevant social commentary.
decides to play the same game by
actually getting a job.
In one of the play's more inspired moments, Wilfred has a
dream in which his friend, the
disenchanted idler, is visited by
the spirits of Career Counselling
and Upward Mobility, who urge
him to "turn his thoughts to materialistic things...and to read the
autobiography of Lee Iacocca."
J.J. decides to enter the rat
race,and realizes after a fruitless
job search that it is the fear of
rejection and of failure that has
prevented him from trying sooner.
In a bar with Wilf, J.J.
realizes how deluded he has been.
Unfortunately, he has not the
character to act upon this self rec-
v JP I  mA
)P*M«>
tftf*
J.J. Davenport, the idler,
lives with his friend and self appointed biographer Wilfred Grim-
shaw, an eloquent old drunk.
Together, on welfare, they share
the deluded dream that they are a
modern day Boswell and Johnson.
What they really foster
in one another are grandiose, and
erroneous, illusions that they are
intellectual men of leisure. "Think
of it not as welfare? says J.J.,
"rather think of it as a pension
from the crown." Their insular
world is shattered by J.J.'s infatuation with an opportunistic university drop-out named Susan.
Though the love story is
weak, Susan is an important catalyst to J.J.'s acquisition of self
knowledge. Once J.J. is challenged for Susan's affection by
Jason, an arrogant rich materialist who lives off of his father,he
..as J*J-
ognition. He ends up as he has
begun, maintaining the illusions
he shares with Wilf. Somehow, one
feels that there should be more of a
fight on the parts of both the playwright and his creation.
Both in the well written
dialogue and the staging of this
play it is clear that workshopping
has honed it to a fine polish. What
though is playwright Weir trying
to say with this production? The
Idler is a social commentary with
no bite. It seems in all the attention paid to detail that the larger
picture has become obscured.
What are the consequences of
J.J.'s fear, of the fears of a generation of people afraid to abandon
the false security of a welfare
cheque? Elements such as the
Boswell/Johnson relationship are
presented then abandonned,
never to achieve any of their possible dramatic effect.
The play is partially
saved from this sense of incom-
NORMA MATHESON...as Susan
pletion by the efforts of a fine cast
highlighted by Duncan Fraser's
portrayal of Wilf, and Ted Cole's
dual performance as the twins
Bobby and Murray.
Fraser provides the right
amounts of pathos and irony for
the character of an obviously intelligent but dissipated man trying to
live vicariously through the
younger J.J.
Cole plays Bobby and Murray as
opposite sides of the same coin.
Murray, a turgid intellectual, and
Bobby, a vapid ne'er do well, both
passively wait for something to
happen, whether it be a socialist
uprising or a successful 'get rich
quick' scheme.
J.J. as played by David
Marr is as sympathetic as such a
deluded character could be. Marr
is affective and endearing despite
his character's silliness.
The technical elements of the
production are all first rate, and
Paul Mears' direction finds just
the right pace to emphasize the
strengths of Weir's script.
The combination of elements,
however, do not fill the void created by the play's lack of teeth.
D-J/VC4N
Ff**SER
as Grin,,
shaw
Symphony entertains
but lacks variety
By MARTIN DAWES
The highlight of the VSO's second concert of the season was
undoubtedly the young pianist
Yefim Bronfman. Playing
Prokofiev's 3rd Piano Concerto,
Bronfman displayed an intense
and concentrated passion which
carried the audience through an
exhausting emotional odyssey.
SYMPHONY
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
with
Yefim Bronfman, Piano
Sept.l9th & 21st,
Orpheum Theatre
The dramatic first movement
was followed by a more introspective   middle   movement,   where
Bronfman led the audience in an
entrancing group meditation. He
then abruptly shot the rapids in an
all-out race to the finish which was
dazzling.
However, conductor Rudolf
Barshai was not always quick
enough to catch Bronfman at the
tempo changes, and the orchestra
could not seem to resist drowning
him out at the climaxes.
Before looking quite at home
with his fellow Russian Prokofiev,
Barshai gave Schubert's 5th Symphony such a dull reading that one
suspected he had his mind on the
homeland.
Barshai walked through this
graceful and melodic symphony as
if he was conducting a military
band. The slow sections plodded,
the quicker movements were devoid of momentum, and the potentially dramatic moments were
played down. Why?
Vancouver composer Fred
Schipizky's Symphonic Sketches
opened the second half of the program. Schipizky, who also plays
string bass, displays an imaginative sense of orchestration here,
which the orchestra evidently enjoyed. However, this early work is
cluttered with ideas and is ultimately incoherent.
Wait! Isn't this - a piece by
acontemporary local boy - a case of
Interesting Programming? Not
really. Schipizky's harmonies are
pleasantly ol d-hat - and yet, just to
make sure of a large audience, the
see page 16:  PENGUINS
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1987 D.O.A:
8 years gone and still
going strong
By STUART DERDEYN
Dave Gregg, the smiling guitar player for D.O.A., is on the
phone from Nanaimo, where the
band is preparing to bring their
no-holds-barred rock n' roll to
town for the first time.
As usual, the group is dealing
with apprehensive management,
antagonistic opening acts, and a
rough and ready crowd.
"After eight years in the business, it's still the same old song
dance. Punk rock was a joke that
nobody got,one that creates bad
vibes, but the band lives to get on
stage and win over new crowds.
The raunchier the better, we work
that much harder to get our message across?
That message, that there can be
a world community of diverse persons with conflicting views cooperating and working to improve
their lives and the world around
them, is what has kept D.O.A.
going; recording, making gruel-a-
thon tours, playing benefits worldwide, and surviving on a shoestring.
"People ask 'Why are you still
doing this? You'll never make any
money'. Well, we refuse to be ignored. We're one of a small number of rock n' roll bands that play
the music the way it should be,
stripped down, without all the
corporate veneer.Peoples' music,
anyone can do it, you don't have to
be some eccentric, drugged out,
holy person to entertain."
Entertaining is on the minds of
the band in a big way these days,
with a new record company (PROFILE/ROCK HOTEL) and a new
disc "True (North),Strong and
Free". D.O.A. is making plans to
tour the U.S. and release a video of
their cover of B.T.Os' "Taking
Care of Business".
"We have a new ideal of touring these days" says Ken Lester,
the band's manager? To be a good
band that puts on a good show is
not enough anymore".
When the Crusade '87 U.S.
tour is over, the band hopes to
realize a longtime dream...The
Intense-a-Thon."What this would
entail is a multimedia extrave-
ganza including
ban ds,poets,artists,politia)s, workshops,
and displays. We would set up in a
community for a couple of days,
and bring people from all walks of
life together to communicate and
participate in the spectacle".
"Hopefully, we can give someone something new, get them inspired to go out and do something
on their own, with others, establish a new grassroots movement
comprised of people who care for
each other. D.O.A. has a place to
sleep and a hot meal every place
they go in Canada, the U.S., and
Europe East and West. The In-
tense-a-Thon hopes to bring these
ties to many."
Somewhere in Nanaimo, a club
manager holds his ears and hopes
his venue will survive the evening
while on stage four peace lovingin-
dividuals are trying to get an
important message across. It
could be an experience worth looking into this Friday at the S.U.B.
"OKAY, THROW THE donut!"
DOA CUTTING A deal with Sam Feldman.
10
Chronicles*
•'VcovjsT*
UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB
WEST COASTS BEST
Driving Range Facility
r
SPECIAL
1/2 price on a
bucket of balls to
\ any UBC students
)      (must show
student card)
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• 10,000 sq. ft. of Bunker
• 100 compression Golf Balls
THE PUBLIC COURSE WITH THE PRIVATE APPEAL!
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Gordon thanked +he S+. Bernard for
his trouble "and sent him on his way.
1/2 PRICE ON ANY SIZE BUCKET OF
BALLS
Present this coupon and your UBC
Students Card. Offer expires
November 1,1987. Limit one coupon
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i T i
September 25, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 13 Give officials
your input on
athletics review
If you've ever thrown a baseball, played
disc golf or even suffered through a sauna at
the pool — this draft's for you.
The draft proposal of the President's
Task Force to Review Athletic and Sport
Services has hit the newstands. As a student, you're paying $41.50 this year in activity fees, so the administration is asking for
your two-bits — they want some student
input.
The story behind the formation of the
University Athletic Committee is complex,
but so is the best fiction. If you can get ahold
of some of the appendices (available from
UAC head, RD. Srivastava), they make for
a fascinating read.
If you want more background get in
touch with your student UAC representatives - Don Isaak and Jody Woodland. They
have a lot more information than is given
through the report, and as AMS executives,
are concerned with the student angle on athletics.
After you've leafed through the four
page copy available in the September 24th
issue of UBC Reports and talked your ideas
over with a few buddies, jot down some of the
ideas that impressed (or depressed) you
about the report, and drop off your comments to Dr. Srivastava's office (in the Old
Administration Building).
Some areas that may whet your appetite include:
1. AMS president Rebecca Nevraumont
said thatbringingall the facilities under one
management board could result in user fees
being paid by students for facilities that
were previously freely available.
2. The AMS may be taking over full administrative and financial control of the
intramurals program, but Nevraumont has
warned that this would be possible only if
ALL the recommendations in the draft are
accepted. Otherwise, she said, "it would be
too much of a strain on AMS time and
resources."
3. Earmarkingapercentageofthe$5.50
athletic fee increase for intramurals could
be one way to ensure adequate funding. The
other side of the coin of course is that earmarking a fee would allow other departments to say "you already have your share."
4. The report also examines the relationship between the school of physical
education and the department of athletics
and sport services. Ex-UAC student representative Martin Cocking has argued in
favour of separating the funding of the
school and the department to guarantee
athletics funding autonomy, while still allowing the school to draw on the resources of
the athletic department.
5. There still exist inequalities in funding between the mens and womens athletic
programs. The task force acknowledges this
as a problem, but has no real concrete suggestions.
Good luck, have fun, and exercise your
rights as students to have input into administrative decisions.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 25, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of Brtish Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration , or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian University Press. The
editorial office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-2301/228-
2305;advertising,228-3977.
Jennifer Lyall agonized as she waited for calls from
prospective dates Jeremy Fraser, Steve Chan, Victor
Wong, Joseph Davis, Martin Dawes, Steven Chess,
Barry Davis, Stuart Derdeyn, Tom Brode and Randy
Shore. The telephone rang. Her heart soared. She
picked it up and panted with expectation. It was only
Ross McLaren. Ross was desperate for a date. He had
already called Laura Busheikin but she was busy filing
Rolf Boon _ toenails. Corinne Bjorge was dreaming of
licorice. Kathy Chung, Carolyn Sale.Justine Brown,
Kinga Kristan, Ann Rogers, Tannis Sawkins and Elynn
Richter were on the telephone to each other, gossiping
about Ross. Lisa Langford was busy being uncreative.
Katherine Monk was in a meeting with Steven Spielberg
negotiati ng her next movie role. Deanne Fisher was busy
writing a dumb masthead. Jennifer's sense of pity
combined with desperation consumed her and she said
yes. She and Ross enjoyed a lovely eveningin the bumper
cars at Playland.
News Item:
wan+s Lo   keep Canada  w\\\\re. .
*?,\_   Clyne
Letters
Institutionalized bigotry
continues to
offend
Why I would not leave
my children alone in a room
with Gord Hohensee and
other ruminations on the
nature of institutionalized
bigotry...
As a first aside, I want
to point out that the very
attitudes expressed in Mr.
Hohensee's letter debunk
the idea that Gays and Lesbians of UBC is not a service
organization. GLUBC does
our community a great service by offering peer counselling for gay and lesbian
students and by providing
educational materials to
combat the homophobic
myths that prevail in an
oppressive, heterosexist
society.
The thing that really
annoys me about institutionalized bigotry is that it
allows individuals to avoid
accepting responsibility for
their own hatefulness. If the
Bible and the church say
that hurtfulness is okay,
then it must be okay, right?
There is a perversity involved in the prolongation of
doctrines and practices in
an age in which they can be
seen as faulty and harmful.
I would hope that my children will grow into aheal thy
respect for the golden rule
"love thy neighbour as thyself and avoid the abundance of intolerance in religious dogmatism.
I would not' leave my
children alone in a room
with Mr. Hohensee because
his mind creates a bizarre
link between homosexuality
and "sadism, incest, beas-
tiality or child molesting."
In fact, the overwhelming
majority of child molesters
are heterosexual males —
many of whom, coincidentally, refuse responsibility
for their own actions and
A gay point of view
I am writing in reply to
Gord Hohensee's letter attacking AMS funding of the
Gays and Lesbians of UBC.
Since (hopefully) someone
else will write in to discuss
your homophobic intolerance, I will only talk about
my viewpoint as a gay person at UBC who has very
little to do with GLUBC.
First of all, the office staffers are definitely
performing a service to
people on campus who are
looking for counselling
about their sexual identity.
At least half of the few times
I have stopped by there,
some nervous person has
come in to talk with someone or to ask for information
about the club or sexuality
in general.
While it's true that
GLUBC holds some social
functions, which are more
well-attended than you
seem to think, this is not
their primary function.
They are on campus to answer questions, and just
because you feel that you
don't have any to ask doesn't
mean that there is not a
need for the service.
GLUBC is not run by a
tiny group of all the gay
people on campus, who
spend all their waking
hours siphoning AMS
money and evilly plotting to
"recruit" new members.
There are a lot of us, in every
faculty, who rarely go there.
I doubt if you would use
only the word "Christian" to
describe yourself. It's only
one aspect of your personality, and that's the same with
my being gay. If you don't
know who we are, it's because we do not hang signs
around our necks telling
you. You are looking for
stereotypical people who do
not exist in real life.
Gord, I am not going to
sign my name because generally you think that I'm an
OK guy and not a "disgusting, evil" person. Someday
maybe I will tell you that I'm
gay but right now you are
just too irrational to deal
with it.
Remember, Christians
used to be thrown to the
lions. Now that you have
freedom to be who you are,
why not be a little less
damning of those of us who
don't quite have that lux-
ur^' anonymous
arts 3
feelings. Hopefully my children will clean out their
mental closets more regularly and with more compassion than the bigots of our
time. Bernice Pelletier
arts 4
GLUBC needs
funding to
fight
vandalism
In response to Mr.
Hohensee's letter in the last
Ubyssey—before protesting, why not inquire how
much of the $12.50 actually
goes to the GLUBC, and
whether this no doubt extravagant sum serves to
cover the damages caused to
their office by vandals with
the same tolerant, charitable attitude to gays and
lesbians as yourself?
But your letter does
serve to demonstrate why
GLUBC is a service organization—because it gives
support and counsel to those
faced by implacable homophobia like yours. Just as
the Women's Centre helps
women confronted by a
male-dominated and often
sexist system. How do vou
feel about funding them, or
CITR, or the Ubsyssey? I'm
sure all of these offend your
Christian sensibilities at
least occasionally.
If you don't like how
AMS spends your money,
then elect a new executive.
But I wonder if your Christian conscience leads you to
protest with equal vehemence how the provincial or
federal government spends
your taxes. Or doesn't your
Bible tell you that racist
immigration, robbing education and health-care to
help corporations, and let's
not forget nuclear weapons
are immoral and disgusting? Or have you forgotten
that Christianity was also
once put in the same category as incest and child
molesting too?
Hope Leith
grad studies
Letter
contravenes
policy
In previous years, the
Ubyssey staff demonstrated
respect for the dignity of all
members of the UBC community by establishing a
policy of non-publication of
sexist, racist or homophobic
material. The September 22
issue contained a letter,
opposing the funding by the
AMS of the Gays and Lesbians of UBC, which clearly
contravened that policy.
The September 22 issue
contained no editorial policy
statement. Does this mean
there has been a change in
the previously stated editorial policy? A clear statement articulating The
Ubyssey's position with respect to letters to the editor
that are sexist, racist, or
homophobic would be appropriate given the contradiction arising between this
papers previous policy and
the publication of Mr.
Hohensee's letter.
Diana Breti, law 3
N.K. Banks, law 3
Page 14
THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1987 Student
suffers for
lack of "family
connections"
I followed with interest
the comments of Jim
Steiger, UBC professor of
psychology and listened
carefully to his defence that
he is, after all, no different
from any other employee
enjoying the benefits of his
contract when his contract
includes tuition rebates for
his children. No different,
for instance tha the car
salesperson who received a
rebate on a new Thunderbird or than the Woodward's
clerk, clothing his/her children at a 25 per cent discount.
After thinking about
this logic for several minues
I decided that as a natural
extension of this logic that,
well, why don't we fust open
the whole can of worms and
let the UBC firefighters,
sanitary engineers and facility caretakers also be allowed tuition rebates for
their children, as a 'perk" in
their contracts? After all,
these are people who also
contribute to the team spirit
of UBC and provide services
that keep this campus clean
and free of danger so that
the mental quest can flourish.
If we must put up with
this system of holding costs
down by offering tuition
waivers to sons and daughters of employees at UBC,
then let's at least extend it to
all employees. That's only
fair, if after all, the profs
don't consider themselves
any more privileged than
any other employed people.
And the rest of us? Well, I
guess well just have to suffer for not having family
connections here.
Marilyn Bowman
arts 5
Steiger
responds for
faculty tuition
rebates
Again, a student-politician writes about the faculty
tuition rebates with an ill-
considered appeal to emotionalism!
Rob Cook's letter to the
editor (September 22) urged
us to consider, as a serious
argument against faculty
tuition rebates, a scenario
where a professor's child,
"unsure" about attending
university, decides to go to
UBC "because it will efec-
tively be free," thus displacing a "more motivated and
deserving" student. Cook
concluded that the current
system might allow the faculty to "fill our university
positions with unmotivated,
uninterested students while
turning back those who
truly wish to be here?
This scenario, and its
implied argument, are as
full of holes as a Swiss
cheese.
First (as Mr. Cook
would have discovered had
he read my column carefully) the tuition is not free.
It is being treated as a taxable benefit, and faculty will
get about half their money
back, provided the child
passes courses.
Second (as students are
only too aware) tuition represents only a fraction of the
cost of attending university.
Characterizing faculty children ass attending UBC
"effectively for free" shows
little regard for established
facts.
Faculty children are
evaluated for admission to
university under the same
criteria as other students. If
faculty children are admitted to UBC, it will be because they are more qualified than those not admitted. Hence, the notion of a
dull faculty child displacing
a highly motivated non-faculty childmakeslittle sense.
Indeed, the far more likely
scenario is that a bright faculty child will displace a
marginal applicant, thus
leading to a higher quality
student body!
James Steiger
professor of psychology
Sovereignty
demands
submarines
I am writing to reply
James Young's article
"Canada's submarine's purpose questioned" in the September 22 Ubyssey. There
are a number of glaring falsities contained within the
story.
Professor Michael Wallace was quoted as saying
"the US can easily track the
handful of subs which pass
by the Canadian coast each
year."
Assuming these subs
are worth tracking, why
should Canada rely on the
US navy to defend our own
waters? By passing off this
responsibility to the US we
are surrendering piece by
piece our sovereignty.
The reason the white
paper on defence proposes
the purchase of the 10 to 12
submarines is to enable
Canada to defend and control her own waters. It was
in fact the uninvited presence of US ships in the
Northwest passage that
prompted to Canadian public to realize the extent to
which our sovereignty is
being threatened.
Currently, Canada's
claim to the Northwest passage is not recognized by the
US because of certain international laws. If the US
were to recognize Canada's
claim they would also have
to recognize Khaddafi's
claim to his "line of death."
Wallace suggests this is
idiotic for the extremely
simplistic reason that you
can't see a sub under water.
He suggests we use surface
vessels. I find it hard to believe that an icebreaker or
even aircraft carrier would
be visible from Washington
or Moscow. In addition subs
are more mobile and practical   under   the   Arctic   ice
Mike Laanela
arts 1
Licorice condoms
taste better
In response to Carol
Pedlar's letter in The Ubyssey, Sept. 18, we have a
suggestion for the condom
machine in the women's
washroom in SUB. Although this theory may at
first appear to be rather
radical, its roots are based
upon scientific, medical fact.
Our proposition is as
follows: licorice flavored
condoms should be added to
the dispensing machine.
This is due to the medicinal
properties of licorice.
It is well known that
licorice is a traditional folk
medicine for the treatment
of sore throats and just recently, it has been discov-
ered that licorice is usefulin
treating various herpes infections (CPS 1987, p. 155).
Our rationale behind licorice flavored condoms is
that they would:
1. promote safe sex.
2. prevent unwanted
pregnancy.
3. treat various herpes
infections.
4. taste better that
lubed condoms.
5. make it possible "to
commit fellatio over one"
without getting that nagging post-fellatio sore
throat.
As for the other complaints, we will give these
further consideration.
F&T
 pharmacy and arts
Please return
crane plaque
Someone removed a
commemorative plaque
from Crane library, and we
would like it back.
The 3x4 foot wood and
bronze plaque was removed
sometime during the
Labour Day weekend from
beside the entrance to
Crane library, Brock hall
north. The plaque commemorates the opening of
Crane   library   almost   20
years ago, and lists individuals and organizations
which contributed to the
estabishment of this unique
library and resource centre.
This item is of little
practical value to anyone
but the students and visitors of Crane library. If you
have information about its
whereabouts, plese phone
Crane library, 228-6111. If
you have it, please arrange
to have it brought back. No
questions asked.
Paul Thiele
librarian and head
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters,
should be as short as possible and may be edited for brevity
as well as for sexism, racism and homophobia. Bring them
in person with your ID to the Ubyssey Office, SUB 241k.
e are looking for energy.
Yours!
Consider a career or summer job with
Esso Resources Canada Limited. We are
part of one of Canada's largest integrated
petroleum companies. We take pride in
our people, integrity and technical
excellence. This is our formula for
success. This fall we will be on campus
looking for energetic students in the
following disciplines:
Engineering
Commerce/MBA
All positions are based in Western
Canada, primarily Alberta.
If you are searching for a challenging
summer position or career with a
company that strives for excellence, we
welcome your application. Visit your
Campus C.E.I.C. office today for further
details on our positions. The
application closing deadline is
October 14th.
Ssso
A DAY WITH SCOTT PECK, MD
psychiatrist, peacemaker,
author of The Road Less Travelled
Sat, Oct. 3, 9:30 - 4:45
McPherson convention Centre,
7325 McPherson, Burnaby
special student rate $35 (includes lunch)
more information and tickets:
The Shalom Institute - 433-2599
THE BEST
THINGS
IN LIFE
ARE FREE
Staplers, paper cutters, hole
punches, tape, white-out, glue
sticks, paper clips and a large,
well-organized workspace.
kinkcs
Great copies. Great people.
"06 I imcrsiu  Bl\ J.
_2_-l68<S
M TH 8-9 F 8 6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
UBC AQUATIC CENTRE WEIGHT TRAINING
PROGRAMS
UNIVERSITY FITNESS - Monday thru Friday 2:45-4:15pm
Do you like to exercise without the crowds? Then try the
UNIVERSITY FITNESS session at the UBC Aquatic Centre. A
supervised weight room, sauna and steam room are available.
Open to Public Adults, UBC STAFF STUDENTS AND FACULTY.
COST IS $1 PER VISIT OR BUY A FITCARD at $12 for 15 visits.
(Main pool and whirlpool not available)
INTRODUCTION TO WEIGHT TRAINING
Topics in practical and theoretical sessions include: weight
training myths, strength vs. endurance, terminology, use of equipment, proper technique, injury prevention, program design,
muscles and their actions, and physiological differences between
sexes.
INTERMEDIATE WEIGHT TRAINING
Topics include a review of basic weight training principles
and use of equipment, introduction to advanced weight training
principles and exercises, discussion of the different training
programs, designing programs for specific sports, isolation
exercises and how to get the most from a workout.
Introduction/Intermediate Weight Training
$20 for 2, 2 hour sessions on consecutive Monday evenings
5:30 - 7:30pm
Sept. 28 - Dec. 2/87 and Jan. 11 - Mar. 30/88
CAMPUS
CUTS
Haircutting for men & women
5736 University Blvd.
(In The Village)
228-1471
The issues.
The scandals.
The beer.
The Ubyssey.
Its a way of life.
SUB 241k.
September 25,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 15 Sludgeabilly to drink to
Voodoos voodooize Railway with
trashy but lovable originals like
fI was raised by Robocop1
By ANN ROGERS
The inimitable sound
of Deja Voodoo has
been luring ostensibly
well-adjusted people out
of their lairs all week, as
they play a set of dates
here on their current
cross-Canada tour. It's
true that if you've heard
one Deja Voodoo song,
you've probably heard
them all, but thia doesn't
prevent them from being
one of the most engaging
bands around.
As the pioneers of a
musical   style   called
'sludgeabilly' this eccentric Montreal-based duo has built up a
dedicated cult following since its
inception in 1981. But don't let the
words 'cult band' scare you off- the
offbeat but always on target humour of the band has sustained
them through four albums and
innumerable tours, and they continue to Voodooize audiences
wherever they play.
Scavenging material from the
scrap heap of pop history, Voodoo-
style si udgeabilly is a m ishmash of
forgotten garage band tunes, fifties b-sides and trashy-but-lovable originals reduced to frenetic,
ultra-distorted and ludicrously
short 2-chord aural barrages that
make you want to get obscenely
loud,
drunk and run into a wall.
Songs are repetitive,
and unabashadly silly, designed to
poke holes in the often too pretentious side of underground music.
A typical Voodoo set includes
such songs as *If Mashed Potatoes
Were Security Guards*, "I Wanna
Do Things With You", and, this
Deja Voodoo
The Railway Club
Sept. 22nd
being a $3-movie Tuesday, an
impromptu rave-up called "I Was
Raised by Robocop'.
Singer-guitarist Gerard Van
Herk looks like a fugitive from the
Munsters' basement. On drums,
Tony Deward's sole prop is his
face, which seems to be in imminent danger of exploding as he
punctuates Van Herk's deadpan
delivery with screams of
"AARRGHI"
The Tuesday gig was rather
subdued by sludgeabilly standards (when I saw the band last
spring, Deward dispensed with his
drum kit altogether for a song and
provided the beat by slamming his
head into the mike). Both the
Railway crowd and the band were
enjoying themselves, but the energy level was disappointingly
low.
Also sufferi ng from the lack of
energy was self-proclaimed hate
filled man Chris Houston who
opened the gig. Houston is an
uneven performer - sometimes
he's fabulous, sometimes he'«
demented - hut jf you're lookingfor
some scabrous nihilism, he's the
man to see.
His songs are full of
bad drugs, lousy bosses,
Elvis, eight-track tapes
and scummy donut shops.
With characteristic misanthropy he introduced
"Surfin on Heroin" as an
anti-drug song, explaining
that he wasn't against
drugs per se, but against
drugs that make people
throw up on his carpet.
"That's an unfun drug? he
said.
Deja Voodoo are winding up their stay in Vancouver at the Arts Club
this weekend, a venue that
is probably ideally suited
to the sludgeabilly sound.
Presumably the fact that
it's a weekend, not a lacklustre Tuesday night will
pick up the energy level,
and a lot of fun will result.
Penguins
play
deadman's
tune
from page 12
administration proved itself a
coward by leaving his less than
famous name out of the concert
ads.
The evening concluded with
Glazunov's 5th Symphony.
Barshai, the low brass players, the
middle-aged string players, the
audience, and Glazunov's ghost all
enjoyed this grand piece of architecture which, written around the
turn of the century, sounds today
like a touching homage to the
dying romantic tradition.
Barshai appeared confident
with the work, and the orchestra
was aroused and conveyed a communal energy that sent the audience out into the world smiling.
Yes, a guaranteed moneymaker alright: a brilliant young
piano-wizard, good old Schubert,
some Russian romance, and even a
bit of Canadiana to touch the nationalistic spirit. Musicians do
have to drink and eat, though,
even if it means sacrificing adven-
turousness and variety.
All the same, I think the VSO
still qualifies as "alternative" entertainment for the young and the
restless. It's quite a wierd sort of
ritual, really: a stick-waving penguin stands in front of man \ <>vher
penguins who blow, hit, ;;
horsehair,   twisted   meta.
>).; trees, stretched sk. :   ■*;-.,
-■-■■■_;ng to the instruc :.-rs of
who is usually dead
■'•..' wonder someone <?■ . ■ re-
ea that "symphony concerts
:e mostcivilizedeventsin the
history of the human race".
ub
iO-
ye.
all
ma
are
"We are a huge corporation. We pass a $4.5 million budget in 20 minutes,
so what is $2,300?'
Simon Seshadri, speakingfor
the motion to send delegates
to New Orleans, Louisiana.
FEATURING:
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ENTER TO WIN A MACINTOSH PLUS!
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No purchase necessary. Draw will take
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SEE APPLE SOLUTIONS FOR:
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FOR ALL YOUR APPLE NEEDS COME TO
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FREE POPCORN!
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FREE DEMONSTRATIONS!     <
HAVE YOUR PICTURE TAKEN BY
MACVISION!
Apple Sales Representatives and
UBC Bookstore Computer Shop Staff
will be on hand to answer any questions
about Apple products.
Macintosh is a trademark of Apple Computer Inc.
Apple and the Apple Logo are registered trademarks of
Apple Computer Inc.
_____
mm BOOKSTORE
6200 UNIVERSITY BLVD. 228-4741
Page 16
THE UBYSSEY
September 25,1987

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